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1.
Rev Neurol ; 73(10): 345-350, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The health pandemic brought about by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has limited access to neurorehabilitation programmes for many patients who have suffered stroke, traumatic brain injury or acquired brain damage due to some other cause. As telerehabilitation allows for the provision of care in situations of social distancing, it may mitigate the negative effects of confinement. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy, adherence and usability of a teleneurorehabilitation intervention for patients with acquired brain injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients included in a face-to-face neurorehabilitation programme at the time of the declaration of the state of alarm in Spain due to COVID-19 and who agreed to participate in the study were included in a teleneurorehabilitation programme. The effectiveness of the programme, understood as an improvement in independence, was quantified with the Barthel index. Adherence to the programme and usability of the tool were explored through questionnaires. RESULTS: Altogether, 46 patients, accounting for 70.6% of the total, participated in the study. Participants significantly improved their independence and showed an improvement in the Barthel index between the start (77.3 ± 28.6) and the end of the programme (82.3 ± 26). Adherence to the intervention was very high (8.1 ± 2.2 out of 10) and the online sessions were the most highly rated content. The tool used showed a high usability (50.1 ± 9.9 out of 60) and could be used without assistance by more than half the participants. CONCLUSION: The teleneurorehabilitation intervention was found to be effective in improving patients' independence, and promoted a high degree of adherence and usability.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/complications , Brain Injuries/rehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Telerehabilitation/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Program Evaluation , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Virtual Reality
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196033

ABSTRACT

Amyloidoses are a group of diseases associated with the formation of pathological protein fibrils with cross-ß structures. Approximately 5-10% of the cases of these diseases are determined by amyloidogenic mutations, as well as by transmission of infectious amyloids (prions) between organisms. The most common group of so-called sporadic amyloidoses is associated with abnormal aggregation of wild-type proteins. Some sporadic amyloidoses are known to be induced only against the background of certain pathologies, but in some cases the cause of amyloidosis is unclear. It is assumed that these diseases often occur by accident. Here we present facts and hypotheses about the association of sporadic amyloidoses with vascular pathologies, trauma, oxidative stress, cancer, metabolic diseases, chronic infections and COVID-19. Generalization of current data shows that all sporadic amyloidoses can be regarded as a secondary event occurring against the background of diseases provoking a cellular stress response. Various factors causing the stress response provoke protein overproduction, a local increase in the concentration or modifications, which contributes to amyloidogenesis. Progress in the treatment of vascular, metabolic and infectious diseases, as well as cancers, should lead to a significant reduction in the risk of sporadic amyloidoses.


Subject(s)
Amyloidosis/etiology , Stress, Physiological , Brain Injuries/complications , Communicable Diseases/complications , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Neoplasms/complications , Oxidative Stress , Vascular Diseases/complications
3.
Brain Inj ; 35(5): 520-529, 2021 04 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080951

ABSTRACT

Purpose: SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause the coronavirus disease (COVID), ranging from flu-like symptoms to interstitial pneumonia. Mortality is high in COVID pneumonia and it is the highest among the frailest. COVID could be particularly serious in patients with severe acquired brain injury (SABI), such as those with a disorder of consciousness. We here describe a cohort of patients with a disorder of consciousness exposed to SARS-CoV-2 early after their SABI.Materials and methods: The full cohort of 11 patients with SABI hospitalized in March 2020 in the IRCCS Fondazione Don Gnocchi rehabilitation (Milan, Italy) was recruited. Participants received SARS-CoV-2 testing and different clinical and laboratory data were collected.Results: Six patients contracted SARS-CoV-2 and four of them developed the COVID. Of these, one patient had ground-glass opacities on the chest CT scan, while the remaining three developed consolidations. No patient died and the overall respiratory involvement was mild, requiring in the worst cases low-flow oxygen.Conclusions: Here we report the clinical course of a cohort of patients with SABI exposed to SARS-CoV-2. The infection spread among patients and caused COVID in some of them. Unexpectedly, COVID was moderate, caused at most mild respiratory distress and did not result in fatalities.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/complications , COVID-19/complications , Consciousness Disorders/complications , Brain Injuries/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Consciousness Disorders/virology , Humans , Italy
4.
Biofactors ; 47(2): 190-197, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-886966

ABSTRACT

Neuroinflammation leads to neurodegeneration, cognitive defects, and neurodegenerative disorders. Neurotrauma/traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause activation of glial cells, neurons, and neuroimmune cells in the brain to release neuroinflammatory mediators. Neurotrauma leads to immediate primary brain damage (direct damage), neuroinflammatory responses, neuroinflammation, and late secondary brain damage (indirect) through neuroinflammatory mechanism. Secondary brain damage leads to chronic inflammation and the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, there are no effective and specific therapeutic options to treat these brain damages or neurodegenerative diseases. Flavone luteolin is an important natural polyphenol present in several plants that show anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, cytoprotective, and macrophage polarization effects. In this short review article, we have reviewed the neuroprotective effects of luteolin in neurotrauma and neurodegenerative disorders and pathways involved in this mechanism. We have collected data for this study from publications in the PubMed using the keywords luteolin and mast cells, neuroinflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and TBI. Recent reports suggest that luteolin suppresses systemic and neuroinflammatory responses in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Studies have shown that luteolin exhibits neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms, including suppressing immune cell activation, such as mast cells, and inflammatory mediators released from these cells. In addition, luteolin can suppress neuroinflammatory response, activation of microglia and astrocytes, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the severity of neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and TBI pathogenesis. In conclusion, luteolin can improve cognitive decline and enhance neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases, TBI, and stroke.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Brain/drug effects , Brain/virology , Brain Injuries/complications , Brain Injuries/drug therapy , Brain Injuries/virology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/complications , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Flavones/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/virology , Neurons/drug effects , Neurons/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
5.
Pan Afr Med J ; 36: 257, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814815

ABSTRACT

Since asymptomatic infections as "covert transmitter", and some patients can progress rapidly in the short term, it is essential to pay attention to the diagnosis and surveillance of asymptomatic patients with SARS-COV2 infection. CT scan has great value in screening and detecting patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, especially in the highly suspected or probable asymptomatic cases with negative RT-PCR for SARS-COV2. This study aimed to detect incidentally COVID-19 pneumonia on medical imaging for patients consulting for other reasons.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Abdominal Pain/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asymptomatic Diseases , Brain Injuries/complications , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Chest Pain/complications , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Incidental Findings , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pleural Effusion/diagnostic imaging , Pleural Effusion/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Tunisia/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 183(1): G9-G15, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647341

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has changed the nature of medical consultations, emphasizing virtual patient counseling, with relevance for patients with diabetes insipidus (DI) or hyponatraemia. The main complication of desmopressin treatment in DI is dilutional hyponatraemia. Since plasma sodium monitoring is not always possible in times of COVID-19, we recommend to delay the desmopressin dose once a week until aquaresis occurs allowing excess retained water to be excreted. Patients should measure their body weight daily. Patients with DI admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 have a high risk for mortality due to volume depletion. Specialists must supervise fluid replacement and dosing of desmopressin. Patients after pituitary surgery should drink to thirst and measure their body weight daily to early recognize the development of the postoperative syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD). They should know hyponatraemia symptoms. The prevalence of hyponatraemia in patients with pneumonia due to COVID-19 is not yet known, but seems to be low. In contrast, hypernatraemia may develop in COVID-19 patients in ICU, from different multifactorial reasons, for example, due to insensible water losses from pyrexia, increased respiration rate and use of diuretics. Hypernatraemic dehydration may contribute to the high risk of acute kidney injury in COVID-19. IV fluid replacement should be administered with caution in severe cases of COVID-19 because of the risk of pulmonary oedema.


Subject(s)
Antidiuretic Agents/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Deamino Arginine Vasopressin/administration & dosage , Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic/therapy , Fluid Therapy/methods , Hypernatremia/therapy , Hyponatremia/therapy , Inappropriate ADH Syndrome/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Brain Injuries/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Dehydration/therapy , Diabetes Insipidus/complications , Diabetes Insipidus/therapy , Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic/complications , Disease Management , Humans , Hyponatremia/etiology , Hyponatremia/prevention & control , Hypotonic Solutions/therapeutic use , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Saline Solution/therapeutic use , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy
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