Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
2.
World Neurosurg ; 147: e272-e274, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009938

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Craniotomies/craniostomies have been categorized as aerosol-generating procedures and are presumed to spread coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the presence of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome coronavirus 2 virus in the generated bone dust has never been proved. Our objective is to evaluate the presence of virus in the bone dust (aerosol) generated during emergency neurosurgical procedures performed on patients with active COVID-19. This would determine the true risk of disease transmission during the surgery. METHODS: Ten patients with active COVID-19 infection admitted to our institute in 1 month required emergency craniotomy/craniostomy. The bone dust and mucosal scrapings form paranasal sinuses (if opened) collected during these procedures were tested for the virus using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The entire surgical team was observed for any symptoms related to COVID-19 for 14 days following surgery. RESULTS: Nine patients had moderate viral load in their nasopharyngeal cavity, as detected on reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. None of the samples of bone dust from these 10 patients tested positive. Mucosal scrapping obtained in 1 patient in which mastoid air cells were inadvertently opened tested negative as well. No health workers from the operating room developed COVID-19-related symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The bone dust generated during craniotomy/stomy of active patients does not contain the virus. The procedure on an active patient is unlikely to spread the disease. However, a study with larger cohort would be confirmatory.


Subject(s)
Bone and Bones/virology , COVID-19/transmission , Craniotomy , Dust , Nasopharynx/virology , Paranasal Sinuses/virology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Brain Neoplasms/secondary , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Decompressive Craniectomy , Female , Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial/surgery , Hematoma, Subdural, Chronic/surgery , Humans , Hydrocephalus/surgery , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Mastoid , Middle Aged , Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt , Viral Load , Young Adult
3.
J Radiat Res ; 62(1): 163-171, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003611

ABSTRACT

The immobilization of patients with a bite block (BB) carries the risk of interpersonal infection, particularly in the context of pandemics such as COVID-19. Here, we compared the intra-fractional patient setup error (intra-SE) with and without a BB during fractionated intracranial stereotactic irradiation (STI). Fifteen patients with brain metastases were immobilized using a BB without a medical mask, while 15 patients were immobilized without using a BB and with a medical mask. The intra-SEs in six directions (anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), left-right (LR), pitch, roll, and yaw) were calculated by using cone-beam computed tomography images acquired before and after the treatments. We analyzed a total of 53 and 67 treatment sessions for the with- and without-BB groups, respectively. A comparable absolute mean translational and rotational intra-SE was observed (P > 0.05) in the AP (0.19 vs 0.23 mm with- and without-BB, respectively), SI (0.30 vs 0.29 mm), LR (0.20 vs 0.29 mm), pitch (0.18 vs 0.27°), roll (0.23 vs 0.23°) and yaw (0.27 vs 22°) directions. The resultant planning target volume (PTV) margin to compensate for intra-SE was <1 mm. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the intra-SE and treatment times. A PTV margin of <1 mm was achieved even when patients were immobilized without a BB during STI dose delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cranial Irradiation , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Immobilization/instrumentation , Masks/adverse effects , Pandemics , Patient Positioning/instrumentation , Radiosurgery , Radiotherapy Setup Errors , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Brain Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Brain Neoplasms/secondary , COVID-19/prevention & control , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted/methods , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(23): 12480-12489, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995004

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 disease is one of the biggest public health challenges in Italy and global healthcare facilities, including radiotherapy departments, faced an unprecedented emergency. Cancer patients are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection because of their immunosuppressive state caused by both tumor itself and anticancer therapy adopted. In this setting, the radiation therapy clinical decision-making process has been partly reconsidered; thus, to reduce treatment duration and minimize infection risk during a pandemic, hypofractionated regimens have been revised. Moreover, telemedicine shows its helpfulness in the radiotherapy field, and patients get the supportive care they need minimizing their access to hospitals. This review aims to point out the importance of hypofractionated RT and telemedicine in cancer patient management in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Radiation Dose Hypofractionation , Radiation Oncology/methods , Radiotherapy/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Bone Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Bone Neoplasms/secondary , Brachytherapy/methods , Brain Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Brain Neoplasms/secondary , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Clinical Decision-Making , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Radiosurgery/methods , Radiotherapy, Conformal/methods , Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(12)2020 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971145

ABSTRACT

A 70-year-old man presented with gradually worsening throat discomfort. He had no prior diagnosis of cancer and no travel history of note. Examination revealed a right-sided painless neck lump. He underwent an MRI of the neck, revealing a gadolinium-enhancing tonsillar mass and two brain lesions. Biopsy of the tonsil lesion was in keeping with an epithelial neoplasm, suggesting metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This was confirmed following a staging CT, which revealed a left renal mass and lung metastases. Due to his brain metastases, the patient has been started on the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib. A brief discussion on the diagnostic evaluation of a tonsil mass as a rare presentation of renal cell cancer follows this report.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/secondary , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Kidney Neoplasms/secondary , Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Palatine Tonsil/pathology , Aged , Anilides/therapeutic use , Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/drug therapy , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Palatine Tonsil/drug effects , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/therapeutic use , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
6.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg ; 98(5): 319-323, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690390

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The WHO declared 2019 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) a public health emergency of international concern. The National and Regional Health System has been reorganized, and many oncological patients died during this period or had to interrupt their therapies. This study summarizes a single-centre experience, during the COVID-19 period in Italy, in the treatment of brain metastases with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS). METHODS: We retrospectively analysed our series of patients with brain metastases who underwent GKRS at the Niguarda Hospital from February 24 to April 24, 2020. RESULTS: We treated 30 patients with 66 brain metastases. A total of 22 patients came from home and 8 patients were admitted to the emergency room for urgent neurological symptoms. Duration of stay was limited to 0-1 day in 17 patients. We chose to treat a cluster of 9 patients, whose greater lesion exceeded 10 cm3, with 2-stage modality GKRS to minimize tumour recurrence and radiation necrosis. CONCLUSION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the whole world is at a critical crossroads about the use of health care resources. During the COVID-19 outbreak, the deferral of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and a work backlog in every medical specialty are the natural consequences of reservation of resources for COVID-19 patients. GKRS improved symptoms and reduced the need for open surgeries, allowing many patients to continue their therapeutic path and sparing beds in ICUs. Neurosurgeons have to take into account the availability of stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce hospital stay, conciliating safety for patients and operators with the request for health care coming from the oncological patients and their families.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiosurgery/methods , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Brain Neoplasms/secondary , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/surgery , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL