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1.
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets ; 21(3): 210-216, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592276

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus, also known as SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus-19), with its rapid rate of transmission, has progressed with a great impact on respiratory function and mortality worldwide. The nasal cavity is the promising gateway of SARS-CoV-2 to reach the brain via systemic circulatory distribution. Recent reports have revealed that the loss of involuntary process of breathing control into the brainstem that results in death is a signal of neurological involvement. Early neurological symptoms, like loss of smell, convulsions, and ataxia, are the clues of the involvement of the central nervous system that makes the entry of SARS-CoV-2 further fatal and life-threatening, requiring artificial respiration and emergency admission in hospitals. Studies performed on patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 has revealed three-stage involvement of the Central Nervous System (CNS) in the progression of SARS-CoV-2 infection: Direct involvement of CNS with headache, ataxia, dizziness, altered or impaired consciousness, acute stroke or seizures as major symptoms, peripheral involvement with impaired taste, smell, vision, and altered nociception, and skeletal muscle impairment that includes skeletal muscle disorders leading to acute paralysis in a particular area of the body. In the previous era, most studied and researched viruses were beta coronavirus and mouse hepatitis virus, which were studied for acute and chronic encephalitis and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Although the early symptoms of SARS-CoV are respiratory pathogenesis, the differential diagnosis should always be considered for neurological perspective to stop the mortalities.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Brain/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23670, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560986

ABSTRACT

Among cases of SARS-CoV-2 infections that result in serious conditions or death, many have pre-existing conditions such as hypertension and are on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme-2 (ACE2), a key protein of the RAAS pathway, also mediates cellular entry of SARS-CoV-2. RAAS inhibitors might affect the expression levels of ace2, which could impact patient susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. However, multi-organ-specific information is currently lacking and no species other than rodents have been examined. To address this knowledge gap, we treated adult zebrafish with the RAAS inhibitors aliskiren, olmesartan, and captopril for 7 consecutive days and performed qRT-PCR analysis of major RAAS pathway genes in the brain, gill, heart, intestine, kidney, and liver. Both olmesartan and captopril significantly increased ace2 expression in the heart, gill, and kidney. Olmesartan also increased ace2 expression in the intestine. Conversely, aliskiren significantly decreased ace2 expression in the heart. Discontinuation of compound treatments for 7 days did not return ace2 expression to baseline levels. While potential risks or benefits of antihypertensive RAAS inhibitors to SARS-CoV-2 infections in humans remain uncertain, this study provides new insights regarding the impact of RAAS inhibitors on organ-specific ace2 expression in another vertebrate model, thereby providing comparative data and laying scientific groundwork for future clinical decisions of RAAS inhibitor use in the context of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Up-Regulation/drug effects , Zebrafish/metabolism , Amides/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Fumarates/pharmacology , Gills/drug effects , Gills/metabolism , Humans , Imidazoles/pharmacology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/metabolism , Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tetrazoles/pharmacology
3.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112291, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxytocin (OXT), a neuropeptide involved in mammal reproductive and prosocial behaviors, has been reported to interact with various stressor-provoked neurobiological changes, including neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter, and inflammatory processes. In view of disturbances in psychosocial relationships due to social isolation and physical distancing measures amid the COVID-19 pandemic, being one of the triggering factors for the recent rise in depression and anxiety, OXT is a potential candidate for a new antidepressant. METHODS: In this present study, we have aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (RE), extracted from distillation residue of rosemary essential oil, on central OXT level in the context of other stress biomarkers and neurotransmitter levels in mice models. Tail suspension test (TST) and elevated plus maze test (EPMT) following LPS injection were employed to assess depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in mice, respectively. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with RE for seven days significantly improved behavior in TST and EPMT. Whole-genome microarray analysis reveals that RE significantly reversed TST stress-induced alterations in gene expressions related to oxytocinergic and neurotransmitter pathways and inflammatory processes. In both models, RE significantly increased central Oxt and Oxtr expressions, as well as OXT protein levels. RE also significantly attenuated stress-induced changes in serum corticosterone, brain and serum BDNF levels, and brain neurotransmitters levels in both models. INTERPRETATION: Altogether, our study is the first to report antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activities of RE through modulating oxytocinergic system in mice brain and thus highlights the prospects of RE in the treatment of depressive disorders of psychosocial nature.


Subject(s)
Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Oxytocin/metabolism , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Receptors, Oxytocin/metabolism , Rosmarinus , Animals , Anti-Anxiety Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-Anxiety Agents/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/isolation & purification , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/metabolism , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Oxytocin/agonists , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Receptors, Oxytocin/agonists
4.
Cell Rep ; 36(10): 109664, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375910

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causes respiratory insufficiency and neurological manifestations, including loss of smell and psychiatric disorders, and can be fatal. Most vaccines are based on the spike antigen alone, and although they have shown efficacy at preventing severe disease and death, they do not always confer sterilizing immunity. Here, we interrogate whether SARS-CoV-2 vaccines could be improved by incorporating nucleocapsid as an antigen. We show that, after 72 h of challenge, a spike-based vaccine confers acute protection in the lung, but not in the brain. However, combining a spike-based vaccine with a nucleocapsid-based vaccine confers acute protection in both the lung and brain. These findings suggest that nucleocapsid-specific immunity can improve the distal control of SARS-CoV-2, warranting the inclusion of nucleocapsid in next-generation COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/virology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Mice , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Viral Load/drug effects
5.
Cell Chem Biol ; 29(2): 239-248.e4, 2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347527

ABSTRACT

Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2) is a cell surface receptor on macrophages and microglia that senses and responds to disease-associated signals to regulate the phenotype of these innate immune cells. The TREM2 signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of diseases ranging from neurodegeneration in the central nervous system to metabolic disease in the periphery. Here, we report that TREM2 is a thyroid hormone-regulated gene and its expression in macrophages and microglia is stimulated by thyroid hormone and synthetic thyroid hormone agonists (thyromimetics). Our findings report the endocrine regulation of TREM2 by thyroid hormone, and provide a unique opportunity to drug the TREM2 signaling pathway with orally active small-molecule therapeutic agents.


Subject(s)
Acetates/pharmacology , Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental/drug therapy , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Microglia/drug effects , Phenols/pharmacology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Retinoid X Receptors/genetics , Thyroid Hormones/pharmacology , Acetates/chemical synthesis , Animals , Binding Sites , Brain/drug effects , Brain/immunology , Brain/pathology , Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental/genetics , Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental/immunology , Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/pathology , Membrane Glycoproteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Glycoproteins/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Microglia/immunology , Microglia/pathology , Models, Molecular , Phenols/chemical synthesis , Phenoxyacetates/pharmacology , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , RNA, Messenger/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , Response Elements , Retinoid X Receptors/chemistry , Retinoid X Receptors/metabolism , Signal Transduction
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 679425, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344264

ABSTRACT

Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults. Despite the fact that they are relatively rare, they cause significant morbidity and mortality. High-grade gliomas or glioblastomas are rapidly progressing tumors with a very poor prognosis. The presence of an intrinsic immune system in the central nervous system is now more accepted. During the last decade, there has been no major progress in glioma therapy. The lack of effective treatment for gliomas can be explained by the strategies that cancer cells use to escape the immune system. This being said, immunotherapy, which involves blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitors, has improved patients' survival in different cancer types. This novel cancer therapy appears to be one of the most promising approaches. In the present study, we will start with a review of the general concept of immune response within the brain and glioma microenvironment. Then, we will try to decipher the role of various immune checkpoint inhibitors within the glioma microenvironment. Finally, we will discuss some promising therapeutic pathways, including immune checkpoint blockade and the body's effective anti-glioma immune response.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy , Brain Neoplasms/pathology , Glioma/drug therapy , Glioma/pathology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Tumor Microenvironment/drug effects , Biomarkers, Tumor , Brain/drug effects , Brain/immunology , Brain/metabolism , Brain/pathology , Brain Neoplasms/etiology , Brain Neoplasms/mortality , Disease Susceptibility , Glioma/etiology , Glioma/mortality , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immune Checkpoint Proteins/genetics , Immune Checkpoint Proteins/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Prognosis , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Microenvironment/genetics , Tumor Microenvironment/immunology
7.
Biochimie ; 179: 281-284, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326920

ABSTRACT

Poxytrins (Pufa Oxygenated Trienes) are dihydroxy derivatives from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with adjacent hydroxyl groups to a conjugated triene having the specific E,Z,E geometry. They are made by the double action of one lipoxygenase or the combined actions of two lipoxygenases, followed by reduction of the resulting hydroperoxides with glutathione peroxidase. Because of their E,Z,E conjugated triene, poxytrins may inhibit inflammation associated with cyclooxygenase (COX) activities, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. In addition of inhibiting COX activities, at least one poxytrin, namely protectin DX (PDX) from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has also been reported as able to inhibit influenza virus replication by targeting its RNA metabolism.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Docosahexaenoic Acids/pharmacology , Fatty Acids, Unsaturated/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Docosahexaenoic Acids/chemistry , Fatty Acids, Unsaturated/chemistry , Humans , Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases/drug effects , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
8.
Neurobiol Dis ; 156: 105422, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267874

ABSTRACT

Synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) such as dexamethasone (DEX), while used to mitigate inflammation and disease progression in premature infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are also associated with significant adverse neurologic effects such as reductions in myelination and abnormalities in neuroanatomical development. Ciclesonide (CIC) is a sGC prodrug approved for asthma treatment that exhibits limited systemic side effects. Carboxylesterases enriched in the lower airways convert CIC to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist des-CIC. We therefore examined whether CIC would likewise activate GR in neonatal lung but have limited adverse extra-pulmonary effects, particularly in the developing brain. Neonatal rats were administered subcutaneous injections of CIC, DEX or vehicle from postnatal days 1-5 (PND1-PND5). Systemic effects linked to DEX exposure, including reduced body and brain weight, were not observed in CIC treated neonates. Furthermore, CIC did not trigger the long-lasting reduction in myelin basic protein expression in the cerebral cortex nor cerebellar size caused by neonatal DEX exposure. Conversely, DEX and CIC were both effective at inducing the expression of select GR target genes in neonatal lung, including those implicated in lung-protective and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, CIC is a promising, novel candidate drug to treat or prevent BPD in neonates given its activation of GR in neonatal lung and limited adverse neurodevelopmental effects. Furthermore, since sGCs such as DEX administered to pregnant women in pre-term labor can adversely affect fetal brain development, the neurological-sparing properties of CIC, make it an attractive alternative for DEX to treat pregnant women severely ill with respiratory illness, such as with asthma exacerbations or COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
Cerebellum/drug effects , Cerebral Cortex/drug effects , Glucocorticoids , Lung/drug effects , Pregnenediones/pharmacology , Prodrugs/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Body Weight/drug effects , Brain/drug effects , Brain/growth & development , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Female , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Myelin Basic Protein/biosynthesis , Organ Size/drug effects , Pregnancy , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/drug effects
9.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 43: 1-8, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240256

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Maternal gestational infection is a well-characterized risk factor for offsprings' development of mental disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and attention deficit disorder. The inflammatory response elicited by the infection is partly directed against the placenta and fetus and is the putative pathogenic mechanism for fetal brain developmental abnormalities. Fetal brain abnormalities are generally irreversible after birth and increase risk for later mental disorders. Maternal immune activation in animals models this pathophysiology. SARS-CoV-2 produces maternal inflammatory responses during pregnancy similar to previously studied common respiratory viruses. METHOD: Choline, folic acid, Vitamin D, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are among the nutrients that have been studied as possible mitigating factors for effects of maternal infection and inflammation on fetal development. Clinical and animal studies relevant to their use in pregnant women who have been infected are reviewed. RESULTS: Higher maternal choline levels have positive effects on the development of brain function for infants of mothers who experienced viral infections in early pregnancy. No other nutrient has been studied in the context of viral inflammation. Vitamin D reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines in some, but not all, studies. Active folic acid metabolites decrease anti-inflammatory cytokines. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have no effect. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D and folic acid are already supplemented in food additives and in prenatal vitamins. Despite recommendations by several public health agencies and medical societies, choline intake is often inadequate in early gestation when the brain is forming. A public health initiative for choline supplements during the pandemic could be helpful for women planning or already pregnant who also become exposed or infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Brain , COVID-19/complications , Choline/therapeutic use , Fetal Development , Mothers , Nutritional Status , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Animals , Brain/drug effects , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Child Development/drug effects , Choline/pharmacology , Developmental Disabilities/etiology , Developmental Disabilities/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/pharmacology , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/therapeutic use , Female , Fetal Development/drug effects , Fetus/drug effects , Folic Acid/pharmacology , Folic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/metabolism , Nutritional Requirements , Pandemics , Placenta/metabolism , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
10.
Brain ; 144(10): 2915-2932, 2021 11 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238183

ABSTRACT

Neurodegenerative proteinopathies are characterized by progressive cell loss that is preceded by the mislocalization and aberrant accumulation of proteins prone to aggregation. Despite their different physiological functions, disease-related proteins like tau, α-synuclein, TAR DNA binding protein-43, fused in sarcoma and mutant huntingtin, all share low complexity regions that can mediate their liquid-liquid phase transitions. The proteins' phase transitions can range from native monomers to soluble oligomers, liquid droplets and further to irreversible, often-mislocalized aggregates that characterize the stages and severity of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent advances into the underlying pathogenic mechanisms have associated mislocalization and aberrant accumulation of disease-related proteins with defective nucleocytoplasmic transport and its mediators called karyopherins. These studies identify karyopherin abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, that range from altered expression levels to the subcellular mislocalization and aggregation of karyopherin α and ß proteins. The reported findings reveal that in addition to their classical function in nuclear import and export, karyopherins can also act as chaperones by shielding aggregation-prone proteins against misfolding, accumulation and irreversible phase-transition into insoluble aggregates. Karyopherin abnormalities can, therefore, be both the cause and consequence of protein mislocalization and aggregate formation in degenerative proteinopathies. The resulting vicious feedback cycle of karyopherin pathology and proteinopathy identifies karyopherin abnormalities as a common denominator of onset and progression of neurodegenerative disease. Pharmacological targeting of karyopherins, already in clinical trials as therapeutic intervention targeting cancers such as glioblastoma and viral infections like COVID-19, may therefore represent a promising new avenue for disease-modifying treatments in neurodegenerative proteinopathies.


Subject(s)
Karyopherins/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/metabolism , Proteostasis Deficiencies/metabolism , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Humans , Karyopherins/genetics , Neurodegenerative Diseases/drug therapy , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Proteostasis Deficiencies/drug therapy
11.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9609, 2021 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217711

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the defining global health emergency of this century. GC-376 is a Mpro inhibitor with antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Using the K18-hACE2 mouse model, the in vivo antiviral efficacy of GC-376 against SARS-CoV-2 was evaluated. GC-376 treatment was not toxic in K18-hACE2 mice. Overall outcome of clinical symptoms and survival upon SARS-CoV-2 challenge were not improved in mice treated with GC-376 compared to controls. The treatment with GC-376 slightly improved survival from 0 to 20% in mice challenged with a high virus dose at 105 TCID50/mouse. Most notably, GC-376 treatment led to milder tissue lesions, reduced viral loads, fewer presence of viral antigen, and reduced inflammation in comparison to vehicle-treated controls in mice challenged with a low virus dose at 103 TCID50/mouse. This was particularly the case in the brain where a 5-log reduction in viral titers was observed in GC-376 treated mice compared to vehicle controls. This study supports the notion that GC-376 represents a promising lead candidate for further development to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection and that the K18-hACE2 mouse model is suitable to study antiviral therapies against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carbonates/pharmacology , Leucine/pharmacology , Sulfonic Acids/pharmacology , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Keratin-18/genetics , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice, Transgenic , Vero Cells , Viral Load
13.
Biofactors ; 47(2): 232-241, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178977

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 leads to severe respiratory problems, but also to long-COVID syndrome associated primarily with cognitive dysfunction and fatigue. Long-COVID syndrome symptoms, especially brain fog, are similar to those experienced by patients undertaking or following chemotherapy for cancer (chemofog or chemobrain), as well in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) or mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). The pathogenesis of brain fog in these illnesses is presently unknown but may involve neuroinflammation via mast cells stimulated by pathogenic and stress stimuli to release mediators that activate microglia and lead to inflammation in the hypothalamus. These processes could be mitigated by phytosomal formulation (in olive pomace oil) of the natural flavonoid luteolin.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cognitive Dysfunction/drug therapy , Fatigue/drug therapy , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Brain/drug effects , Brain/physiopathology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cognitive Dysfunction/complications , Cognitive Dysfunction/physiopathology , Cognitive Dysfunction/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Fatigue/complications , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fatigue/virology , Humans , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
14.
Pharmacol Res ; 168: 105581, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157664

ABSTRACT

In-depth characterization of heart-brain communication in critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory failure is attracting significant interest in the COronaVIrus Disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic era during intensive care unit (ICU) stay and after ICU or hospital discharge. Emerging research has provided new insights into pathogenic role of the deregulation of the heart-brain axis (HBA), a bidirectional flow of information, in leading to severe multiorgan disease syndrome (MODS) in patients with confirmed infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Noteworthy, HBA dysfunction may worsen the outcome of the COVID-19 patients. In this review, we discuss the critical role HBA plays in both promoting and limiting MODS in COVID-19. We also highlight the role of HBA as new target for novel therapeutic strategies in COVID-19 in order to open new translational frontiers of care. This is a translational perspective from the Italian Society of Cardiovascular Researches.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/therapy , Brain/drug effects , COVID-19/therapy , Heart Diseases/therapy , Heart/drug effects , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Brain/immunology , Brain/metabolism , Brain Diseases/immunology , Brain Diseases/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness/therapy , Dietary Supplements , Functional Food , Heart Diseases/immunology , Heart Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Microvessels/drug effects , Microvessels/immunology , Microvessels/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/immunology , Multiple Organ Failure/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
15.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2227, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148855

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of Covid-19 which was classified as a global pandemic in March 2020. The increasing global health and economic burden of SARS-CoV-2 has necessitated urgent investigations into the pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic and vaccination regimens. Human trials of vaccine and antiviral candidates have been undertaken, but basic pathogenetic studies are still required to inform these trials. Gaps in understanding of cellular infection by, and immunity to, SARS-CoV-2 mean additional models are required to assist in improved design of these therapeutics. Human organoids are three-dimensional models that contain multiple cell types and mimic human organs in ex vivo culture conditions. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has been implicated in causing not only respiratory injury but also injury to other organs such as the brain, liver and kidneys. Consequently, a variety of different organoid models have been employed to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of disease due to SARS-CoV-2. Data on these models have not been systematically assembled. In this review, we highlight key findings from studies that have utilised different human organoid types to investigate the expression of SARS-CoV-2 receptors, permissiveness, immune response, dysregulation of cellular functions, and potential antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Models, Biological , Organoids/immunology , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Brain/drug effects , Brain/immunology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Culture Techniques , Colon/drug effects , Colon/immunology , Colon/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Liver/drug effects , Liver/immunology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
16.
Biofactors ; 47(2): 190-197, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-886966

ABSTRACT

Neuroinflammation leads to neurodegeneration, cognitive defects, and neurodegenerative disorders. Neurotrauma/traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause activation of glial cells, neurons, and neuroimmune cells in the brain to release neuroinflammatory mediators. Neurotrauma leads to immediate primary brain damage (direct damage), neuroinflammatory responses, neuroinflammation, and late secondary brain damage (indirect) through neuroinflammatory mechanism. Secondary brain damage leads to chronic inflammation and the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, there are no effective and specific therapeutic options to treat these brain damages or neurodegenerative diseases. Flavone luteolin is an important natural polyphenol present in several plants that show anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, cytoprotective, and macrophage polarization effects. In this short review article, we have reviewed the neuroprotective effects of luteolin in neurotrauma and neurodegenerative disorders and pathways involved in this mechanism. We have collected data for this study from publications in the PubMed using the keywords luteolin and mast cells, neuroinflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and TBI. Recent reports suggest that luteolin suppresses systemic and neuroinflammatory responses in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Studies have shown that luteolin exhibits neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms, including suppressing immune cell activation, such as mast cells, and inflammatory mediators released from these cells. In addition, luteolin can suppress neuroinflammatory response, activation of microglia and astrocytes, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the severity of neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and TBI pathogenesis. In conclusion, luteolin can improve cognitive decline and enhance neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases, TBI, and stroke.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Brain/drug effects , Brain/virology , Brain Injuries/complications , Brain Injuries/drug therapy , Brain Injuries/virology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/complications , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Flavones/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/virology , Neurons/drug effects , Neurons/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
17.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther ; 375(3): 498-509, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842063

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus, is turning out to be one of the most devastating global pandemics in the history of humankind. There is a shortage of effective therapeutic strategies or preventative vaccines for this disease to date. A rigorous investigation is needed for identifying and developing more effective therapeutic strategies for COVID-19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a crucial factor in COVID-19 pathogenesis, has been identified as a potential target for COVID-19 treatment. Smoking and vaping are potential risk factors for COVID-19 that are also shown to upregulate ACE2 expression. In this review, we have discussed the pathobiology of COVID-19 in the lungs and brain and the role of ACE2 in the transmission and pathobiology of this disease. Furthermore, we have shown possible interactions between nicotine/smoking and ACE2 in the lungs and brain, which could aggravate the transmission and pathobiology of COVID-19, resulting in a poor disease outcome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: This review addresses the present global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with respect to its pathobiology in the lungs and brain. It focuses on the potential negative impact of tobacco and nicotine exposure on the outcomes of this disease by interaction with the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor. It adds to the time-sensitive and critically important growing knowledge about the risk factors, transmission, pathobiology, and prognosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Brain/virology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Nicotine/metabolism , Nicotine/toxicity , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Smoking/adverse effects
18.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 322, 2020 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730913

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organization. As of May 18, 2020, there have been more than 4.7 million cases and over 316,000 deaths worldwide. COVID-19 is caused by a highly infectious novel coronavirus known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), leading to an acute infectious disease with mild-to-severe clinical symptoms such as flu-like symptoms, fever, headache, dry cough, muscle pain, loss of smell and taste, increased shortness of breath, bilateral viral pneumonia, conjunctivitis, acute respiratory distress syndromes, respiratory failure, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), sepsis, etc. While physicians and scientists have yet to discover a treatment, it is imperative that we urgently address 2 questions: how to prevent infection in immunologically naive individuals and how to treat severe symptoms such as CRS, acute respiratory failure, and the loss of somatosensation. Previous studies from the 1918 influenza pandemic have suggested vitamin D's non-classical role in reducing lethal pneumonia and case fatality rates. Recent clinical trials also reported that vitamin D supplementation can reduce incidence of acute respiratory infection and the severity of respiratory tract diseases in adults and children. According to our literature search, there are no similar findings of clinical trials that have been published as of July 1st, 2020, in relation to the supplementation of vitamin D in the potential prevention and treatment for COVID-19. In this review, we summarize the potential role of vitamin D extra-renal metabolism in the prevention and treatment of the SARS-CoV-2 infection, helping to bring us slightly closer to fulfilling that goal. We will focus on 3 major topics here: 1. Vitamin D might aid in preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection: Vitamin D: Overview of Renal and Extra-renal metabolism and regulation. Vitamin D: Overview of molecular mechanism and multifaceted functions beyond skeletal homeostasis. Vitamin D: Overview of local immunomodulation in human infectious diseases. Anti-viral infection. Anti-malaria and anti-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). 2. Vitamin D might act as a strong immunosuppressant inhibiting cytokine release syndrome in COVID-19: Vitamin D: Suppression of key pro-inflammatory pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). 3. Vitamin D might prevent loss of neural sensation in COVID-19 by stimulating expression of neurotrophins like Nerve Growth Factor (NGF): Vitamin D: Induction of key neurotrophic factors. .


Subject(s)
Chemoprevention/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Immunomodulation/drug effects , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Brain/drug effects , Brain/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Immune System/physiology , Neuroprotection/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamin D Deficiency/diet therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/virology
19.
Cell Mol Neurobiol ; 42(3): 489-500, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706891

ABSTRACT

The world faces an exceptional new public health concern caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), subsequently termed the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the World Health Organization (WHO). Although the clinical symptoms mostly have been characterized, the scientific community still doesn´t know how SARS-CoV-2 successfully reaches and spreads throughout the central nervous system (CNS) inducing brain damage. The recent detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in frontal lobe sections from postmortem examination has confirmed the presence of the virus in neural tissue. This finding reveals a new direction in the search for a neurotherapeutic strategy in the COVID-19 patients with underlying diseases. Here, we discuss the COVID-19 outbreak in a neuroinvasiveness context and suggest the therapeutic use of high doses of melatonin, which may favorably modulate the immune response and neuroinflammation caused by SARS-CoV-2. However, clinical trials elucidating the efficacy of melatonin in the prevention and clinical management in the COVID-19 patients should be actively encouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Central Nervous System/virology , Melatonin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Central Nervous System/drug effects , Central Nervous System/pathology , Central Nervous System Agents/pharmacology , Central Nervous System Agents/therapeutic use , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/drug therapy , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/pathology , Humans , Melatonin/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use
20.
ACS Chem Neurosci ; 11(15): 2137-2144, 2020 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-636269
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