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2.
Women Birth ; 34(2): 128-135, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454573

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Limited literature is available about women who wish to breastfeed but experience unexpected feelings of aversion in reaction to their infant suckling at the breast while breastfeeding. BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding benefits mothers, infants and society yet breastfeeding rates continue to fall below recommendations in part due to inadequate tailored support after hospital discharge. Influences on breastfeeding are complex and include many physiological, psychosocial and cultural factors. AIM: To better understand the experience of women who have feelings of aversion during breastfeeding by synthesising the existing literature. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched for relevant literature published between 2000 to 2019. Using Covidence software, five qualitative research studies were identified. Studies were then analysed using meta-ethnographic qualitative synthesis. FINDINGS: Feelings of aversion during breastfeeding were described as visceral and overwhelming; leading to feelings of shame and inadequacy. This synthesis identified five findings; a central conceptual category of "it's such a strong feeling of get away from me" with four key metaphors translated from this central conceptual category: "I do it because I feel it is best for my baby", "I can't control those feelings", "I should be able to breastfeed my son and enjoy it", and "I'm glad I did it". This phenomenon may negatively affect a women's sense of self and impact on the mother-infant relationship. CONCLUSION: Some women who want to breastfeed can experience feelings of aversion while breastfeeding. The feelings of 'aversion' while breastfeeding can inhibit women from achieving their personal breastfeeding goals.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Maternal Behavior/ethnology , Mothers/psychology , Adult , Affect , Anthropology, Cultural , Breast Feeding/ethnology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Mother-Child Relations , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Self Concept
3.
J Health Commun ; 26(7): 473-479, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409987

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women are especially vulnerable to COVID-19 while the short- and long-term impact of COVID-19 on maternal and infant health is only partially understood. We assessed the amount of uncertainty and anxiety pregnant women experienced about COVID-19 and whether, and the extent to which, they engaged in information seeking about COVID-19. In total, 320 pregnant women from 38 states took part in this research. The results showed that pregnant women experienced uncertainty and anxiety about pregnancy and breastfeeding and engaged in information seeking from their healthcare providers. Pregnant women's uncertainty influenced information seeking via anxiety, but the effect varied depending on participants' assessments of coping, communication, and target efficacy. While healthcare providers need to discuss ways to avoid COVID-19 infection, participants were assured that their providers had a plan to help them if they became infected with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics , Pregnant Women/psychology , Uncertainty , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Pregnancy/psychology , United States/epidemiology
5.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(2): 194-200, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285651

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected all dimensions of health care, including exclusive breastfeeding assurance and its promotion. The risk of contagion and the consequences of the pandemic have raised concerns among future mothers or in those who are already breastfeeding due to the risk of possible transmission of the virus through breast milk, although active severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has not yet been detected in breast milk. The fear of contagion has favored mother-child isolation policies. So far, there is no evidence of vertical transmission, and the risk of horizontal transmission in the infant is similar to that of the general population. In infants with COVID-19, breastfeeding can even favorably change the clinical course of the disease.


La pandemia de enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) ha afectado a todas las dimensiones de la atención en salud, entre ellas el aseguramiento de la lactancia materna exclusiva y su promoción. El riesgo de contagio y las consecuencias de la pandemia han provocado preocupación entre las futuras madres o las que se ya encuentran lactando debido al riesgo de una posible transmisión del virus a través de la leche materna. Aunque aún no se ha detectado el coronavirus 2 del síndrome respiratorio agudo grave (SARS-CoV-2) activo en la leche materna. El miedo al contagio ha favorecido las políticas de aislamiento madre-hijo. Hasta el momento no existe evidencia de transmisión vertical y el riesgo de transmisión horizontal en el lactante es similar al de la población general. En lactantes con COVID-19 la lactancia materna incluso puede cambiar favorablemente el curso clínico de la enfermedad.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Milk, Human , Pandemics , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Colostrum/chemistry , Colostrum/metabolism , Disease Transmission, Infectious , Female , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Milk, Human/chemistry , Milk, Human/cytology , Milk, Human/metabolism , Milk, Human/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time Factors
7.
Neonatal Netw ; 40(3): 140-145, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259284

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic upon the health care landscape has prompted many organizations to revise policies in response to ever-changing guidelines and recommendations regarding safe breastfeeding practices. The application of these professional guidelines into clinical practice is fraught with barriers, inconsistencies, and often-minimal evidential support. Key concerns for health care providers and patients include antenatal versus postnatal transmission, milk transmission, and separation care versus rooming-in, including the subsequent impacts upon breastfeeding and bonding. While SARS-CoV-2 is a novel virus, the volume of literature to support best practice for couplet care continues to be developed at a rapid pace. The benefits of breastfeeding are steeped in evidence and outweigh the potential risk of transmission of COVID-19 from mother to newborn. Health care organizations must continue to seek guidance for policy revision within the ever-growing body of evidence for best practice and evaluate current practices for feasibility during and after hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/methods , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Promotion/methods , Mothers/psychology , Neonatal Nursing/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256619

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, breastfeeding women have experienced restricted access to support, placing them at increased risk of mental health concerns and limited breastfeeding assistance. This study investigated the effect of the pandemic on feeding choices and maternal wellbeing amongst breastfeeding mothers living in Australian and New Zealand. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey that examined feeding methods, maternal mental wellbeing, worries, challenges, and positive experiences during the pandemic. Most women were exclusively breastfeeding (82%). Partial breastfeeding was associated with perceived low milk supply and longer pregnancy duration during the pandemic. Reduced mental health and wellbeing was associated with lower levels of family functioning, increased perceived stress, and perinatal anxiety. Longer pregnancy duration during the pandemic was associated with lower mental health wellbeing scores, while higher perceived stress scores were reported for regions with higher COVID-19 infection rates and women with perceived low milk supply. Women reported that the pandemic resulted in less pressure and more time for family bonding, while worries about the pandemic, family health, and parenting challenges were also cited. Mental health concerns of breastfeeding women appear to be exacerbated by COVID-19, highlighting a critical need for access to mental health and broader family support during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19 , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Mothers/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Australia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , New Zealand/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
9.
CMAJ Open ; 9(2): E556-E562, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239171

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mental health of postpartum women has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the experiences that underlie this remain unexplored. The purpose of this study was to examine how people in Canada who gave birth during the pandemic were affected by policies aimed at limiting interpersonal contact to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission in hospital and during the early weeks postpartum. METHODS: We took a social constructionist approach and used a qualitative descriptive methodology. Sampling methods were purposive and involved a mix of convenience and snowball sampling via social media and email. Study inclusion was extended to anyone aged 18 years or more who was located in Canada and was pregnant or had given birth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were obtained via semistructured qualitative telephone interviews conducted between June 2020 and January 2021, and were analyzed through thematic analysis. RESULTS: Sixty-five interviews were conducted; data from 57 women who had already delivered were included in our analysis. We identified the following 4 themes: negative postpartum experience in hospital owing to the absence of a support person(s); poor postpartum mental health, especially in women with preexisting mental health conditions and those who had had medically complicated deliveries; asking for help despite public health regulations that prohibited doing so; and problems with breastfeeding owing to limited in-person follow-up care and lack of in-person breastfeeding support. INTERPRETATION: Policies that restrict the presence of support persons in hospital and at home during the postpartum period appear to be causing harm. Measures to mitigate the consequences of these policies could include encouraging pregnant people to plan for additional postpartum support, allowing a support person to remain for the entire hospital stay and offering additional breastfeeding support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Patient Isolation/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Health Policy , Humans , Object Attachment , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Young Adult
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(12): e23273, 2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The benefits of breastfeeding for both infants and mothers have been well recognized. However, the exclusive breastfeeding rate in China is low and decreasing. Mobile technologies have rapidly developed; communication apps such as WeChat (one of the largest social networking platforms in China) are widely used and have the potential to conveniently improve health behaviors. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of using WeChat to improve breastfeeding practices. METHODS: This 2-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted among pregnant women from May 2019 to April 2020 in Huzhu County, Qinghai Province, China. Pregnant women were eligible to participate if they were aged 18 years or older, were 11 to 37 weeks pregnant with a singleton fetus, had no known illness that could limit breastfeeding after childbirth, used WeChat through their smartphone, and had access to the internet. A total of 344 pregnant women were recruited at baseline, with 170 in the intervention group and 174 in the control group. Women in the intervention group received breastfeeding knowledge and promotion information weekly through a WeChat official account from their third month of pregnancy to 6 months postpartum. The primary outcome of exclusive and predominant breastfeeding rate was measured 0-1 month, 2-3 months, and 4-5 months postpartum. RESULTS: At 0-1 month postpartum, the exclusive breastfeeding rate was significantly higher in the intervention group than that in the control group (81.1% vs 63.3%; odds ratio [OR] 2.75, 95% CI 1.58-4.78; P<.001). Similarly, mothers in the intervention group were more likely to provide predominantly breast milk (OR 2.77, 95% CI 1.55-4.96; P<.001) and less likely to give dairy products to their children (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.21-0.75; P=.005). There was no statistically significant difference for exclusive breastfeeding rate 2-3 months (P=.09) and 4-5 months postpartum (P=.27), though more children in the intervention group were exclusively breastfed than those in the control group 2-3 months postpartum (intervention: 111/152, 73.0%; control: 96/152, 63.2%) and 4-5 months postpartum(intervention: 50/108, 46.3%; control: 46/109, 42.2%). CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first effort to promote exclusive breastfeeding through WeChat in China, which proved to be an effective method of promoting exclusive breastfeeding in early life. WeChat health education can be used in addition to local breastfeeding promotion programs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR1800017364; http://www.chictr.org.cn/showproj.aspx?proj=29325. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s12889-019-7676-2.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Health Behavior/physiology , Smartphone/instrumentation , Adult , China , Female , Humans , Pregnancy
11.
Int Breastfeed J ; 16(1): 36, 2021 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has posed several challenges to the provision of newborn nutrition and care interventions including maternal support, breastfeeding and family participatory care. Italy was the first country to be exposed to SARS-CoV-2 in Europe. One of the measures adopted by the Italian government during COVID-19 pandemic was the total lockdown of the cities with complete confinement at home. We aimed to examine the impact of the lockdown caused by COVID-19 pandemic on exclusive breastfeeding in non-infected mothers. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 204 mother-baby dyads during lockdown (9 March to 8 May 2020) that we compared to previously studied 306 mother-baby dyads admitted during the year 2018. To reduce the possible effect of confounding factors on exclusive breastfeeding, a 1:1 matching was performed by using an automatized procedure of stratification that paired 173 mother-baby dyads. Feeding modality was collected at discharge, 30 and 90 days of newborn's life. Exclusive breastfeeding was considered when the infant received only breast milk and no other liquids or solids were given with the exception of vitamins, minerals or medicines. RESULTS: At discharge 69.4% of infants were exclusively breastfed during lockdown versus 97.7% of control group, 54.3% at 30 days vs 76.3 and 31.8% vs 70.5% at 90 days (p < 0.001). The proportion of breastfeeding remaining exclusive from discharge to 30-day was similar between groups (about 80%), but it was lower in lockdown group than in control cohort (58.5% vs 92.4%, p < 0.001) from 30- to 90-days. CONCLUSIONS: Lockdown and home confinement led to a decrease of exclusively breastfeeding in the studied population. Considering the timing to shift from exclusive to non-exclusive breastfeeding, differences between study groups were concentrated during hospital stay and from 30- to 90 days of a newborn's life, confirming that the hospital stay period is crucial in continuing exclusive breastfeeding at least for the first 30 days, but no longer relevant at 90 days of life.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Maternal Behavior , Pandemics , Quarantine , Adult , Family , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
14.
J Perinat Med ; 49(4): 500-505, 2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To find out if the expressed breast milk delivery rate to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for babies who were hospitalized for any reason other than COVID-19, and exclusive breastfeeding (EB) rates between discharge date and 30th day of life of those babies were affected by COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Babies who were hospitalized before the date first coronavirus case was detected in our country were included as control group (CG). The study group was divided into two groups; study group 1 (SG1): the mothers whose babies were hospitalized in the period when mother were asked not to bring breast milk to NICU, study group 2 (SG2): the mothers whose babies were hospitalized after the date we started to use the informed consent form for feeding options. The breast milk delivery rates to NICU during hospitalization and EB rates between discharge and 30th day of life were compared between groups. RESULTS: Among 154 mother-baby dyads (CG, n=50; SG1, n=46; SG2, n=58), the percentage of breast milk delivery to NICU was 100%, 79% for CG, SG2, respectively (p<0.001). The EB rate between discharge and 30th day of life did not change between groups (CG:90%, SG1:89%, SG2:75.9; p=0.075). CONCLUSIONS: If the mothers are informed about the importance of breast milk, the EB rates are not affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in short term, even if the mothers are obligatorily separated from their babies. The breast milk intake rate of the babies was lowest while our NICU protocol was uncertain, and after we prepared a protocol this rate increased.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/trends , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/trends , Intensive Care, Neonatal/trends , Adult , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Protocols , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Promotion , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/standards , Intensive Care, Neonatal/methods , Intensive Care, Neonatal/standards , Male , Pandemics , Professional-Family Relations , Retrospective Studies , Turkey/epidemiology
15.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand ; 100(7): 1219-1229, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039800

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Evidence on perinatal mental health during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its potential determinants is limited. Therefore, this multinational study aimed to assess the mental health status of pregnant and breastfeeding women during the pandemic, and to explore potential associations between depressive symptoms, anxiety, and stress and women's sociodemographic, health, and reproductive characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based study was performed in Ireland, Norway, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the UK between 16 June and 14 July 2020. Pregnant and breastfeeding women up to 3 months postpartum who were older than 18 years of age were eligible. The online, anonymous survey was promoted through social media and hospital websites. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder seven-item scale (GAD-7), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) were used to assess mental health status. Regression model analysis was used to identify factors associated with poor mental health status. RESULTS: In total, 9041 women participated (including 3907 pregnant and 5134 breastfeeding women). The prevalence of major depressive symptoms (EDS ≥ 13) was 15% in the pregnancy cohort and and 13% the breastfeeding cohort. Moderate to severe generalized anxiety symptoms (GAD ≥ 10) were found among 11% and 10% of the pregnant and breastfeeding women. The mean (±SD) PSS scores for pregnant and breastfeeding women were 14.1 ± 6.6 and 13.7 ± 6.6, respectively. Risk factors associated with poor mental health included having a chronic mental illness, a chronic somatic illness in the postpartum period, smoking, having an unplanned pregnancy, professional status, and living in the UK or Ireland. CONCLUSIONS: This multinational study found high levels of depressive symptoms and generalized anxiety among pregnant and breastfeeding women during the COVID-19 outbreak. The study findings underline the importance of monitoring perinatal mental health during pandemics and other societal crises to safeguard maternal and infant mental health.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Depression , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Breast Feeding/methods , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Perinatal Care/methods , Perinatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Peripartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
16.
Breastfeed Med ; 16(1): 39-45, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998251

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Effective social support can have a critical influence on a mother's ability to initiate and continue breastfeeding. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has created unprecedented barriers for breastfeeding mothers to obtain various types of support: emotional, instrumental, informational, and appraisal. However, no research has evaluated the influence the pandemic has had on breastfeeding supports. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of social support among breastfeeding mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional phenomenological approach was taken utilizing semistructured interviews (March-June 2020) with currently breastfeeding mothers (n = 29). Data were analyzed through a process of immersion and crystallization. Results: Mothers are still able to obtain each type of support, however, support has been negatively influenced by the pandemic. Mothers reported experiencing increased stress and isolation and had an immense desire to receive in-person support from peers, family, childcare providers, and lactation specialists. Furthermore, mothers of multiple children felt if they did not already have breastfeeding knowledge from previous experiences they would be unsuccessful in breastfeeding due to their current lack of support. Conversely, a majority of mothers felt the pandemic had positively influenced their breastfeeding journeys due to concerns of formula shortages and extended maternity leaves. Finally, mothers were concerned about safely expressing breast milk on their return to work. Conclusion: Mother's ability to obtain breastfeeding support has been negatively impacted by the pandemic due to the inability to engage with individuals in-person and the lack of access to childcare. First-time mothers may be at higher risk of early breastfeeding cessation due to lack of support. However, breastfeeding journeys have also been positively influenced by allowing mothers more time at home with their child. Resources are needed to support expressing breast milk in the workplace during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Social Support , Workplace/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Nebraska , Postnatal Care , Qualitative Research , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
18.
Early Hum Dev ; 152: 105286, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943049

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Limited information is available regarding barriers to breastfeeding during the COVID-19 lockdown. STUDY DESIGN: This study was designed as a non-concurrent case-control study on breastfeeding initiation practices, defined according to WHO, in women giving birth during lockdown, between March 8 and May 18, 2020, in the COVID-19 'hotspot' in Northeastern Italy (study group), with an antecedent puerperae-matched group (control group). Exclusive, complementary, and formula feeding practices were collected from maternal charts at hospital discharge, on the second day post-partum, when puerperae filled out the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). RESULTS: The COVID-19 study group presented significantly lower exclusive breastfeeding rates than the control group who members gave birth the previous year (-15%, p = 0.003), as a consequence of the significantly higher prevalence of complementary feeding practices in the former (+20%, p = 0.002). Conversely, the COVID-19 study group showed significantly higher EPDS scores (8.03 ± 4.88 vs. 8.03 ± 4.88, p < 0.005) and higher anhedonia (0.56 ± 0.65 vs. 0.18 ± 0.38, p < 0.001) and depression (0.62 ± 0.60 vs. 0.39 ± 0.44, <0.001) subscale scores. In the general linear model analysis, women practicing exclusive breastfeeding showed significantly lower EPDS scores in comparison with those practicing complementary (p = 0.003) and formula feedings (p = 0.001). Furthermore, the highest EPDS scores were observed in women adopting formula feeding, mainly during the COVID-19 quarantine (p = 0.019). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that hospital containment measures adopted during lockdown in the 'hotspot' COVID-19 epidemic area of Northeastern Italy have a detrimental effect on maternal emotions and on breastfeeding exclusivity practices.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Adult , Case-Control Studies , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mothers/psychology , Prevalence
19.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 46(1): 30-35, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-852024

ABSTRACT

For new families giving birth in a hospital setting, the COVID-19 pandemic has presented numerous challenges to their birth, breastfeeding, and postpartum experiences. We present experiences of three first-time, healthy mothers and their babies, as they gave birth in the hospital and were breastfeeding during the start of the pandemic in Philadelphia, PA. Each case is framed in the mother's prenatal goals, infant feeding intentions, birth, breastfeeding, and postpartum experiences. Shared concerns and experiences among the three participants are described in five key areas: 1) Recommendations changing every day, 2) Guilt, concern, and stress, 3) In-person versus telehealth visits, 4) Missing time with family and friends, and 5) Silver linings. Through these mothers' experiences, nurses and other health care providers can learn from their perceptions and events and proactively work to ensure we provide sound anticipatory guidance, enhance our communication, and improve provision of evidence-based lactation care and support.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Postnatal Care/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Labor, Obstetric , Pregnancy , Self Concept
20.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 46(1): 21-29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811164

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to describe how the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic has affected pregnancy, prenatal maternity care practices, and infant feeding plans among pregnant persons in the United States. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study using an app-based survey. METHODS: A link to the survey was sent via email to users of the Ovia Pregnancy app on May 20, 2020 and was open for 1 week. Participants were asked to complete the survey as it applied to their pregnancy, breastfeeding, and maternity care received during the COVID-19 pandemic, beginning approximately February 2020 through the time of the survey. There were 258 respondents who completed the survey. RESULTS: The majority (96.4%; n = 251) of pregnant women felt they received safe prenatal care during this time period. Slightly less 86.3% (n = 215) felt they received adequate prenatal care during this time period. 14.2% (n = 33) reported changing or considering changing the location where they planned to give birth due to COVID-19. Of those who reported they had begun purchasing items for their baby, 52.7% reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected their ability to get items they need for their baby. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Although it is imperative to implement policies that reduce risk of transmission of COVID-19 to pregnant women and health care providers, it is necessary for health care providers and policy makers to listen to the collective voices of women during pregnancy about how COVID-19 has affected their birth and infant feeding plans and their perception of changes in prenatal care.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Prenatal Care/psychology , Adult , Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Patient Education as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data
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