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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(1)2022 Jan 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627521

ABSTRACT

Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to prevent febrile neutropenia post chemotherapy. Usually well tolerated with minimal side effects but aortitis is an extremely rare side effect previously reported. A 64-year-old woman treated with adjuvant chemotherapy including G-CSF for left breast cancer was admitted with fevers, neutropenia and markedly raised inflammatory markers after 7 days of her first cycle. Initially diagnosed with neutropenic sepsis, she did not respond to broad spectrum antibiotics with subsequent CT imaging revealing marked periaortic inflammatory changes consistent with aortitis and periaortitis. Extensive investigations for other causes of large vessel vasculitis were negative and G-CSF was the only causative factor. She rapidly responded to steroids with almost complete resolution of inflammatory changes on repeat imaging within 4 weeks and no recurrence on tapering of steroids. This diagnosis must be considered in patients presenting with fever and raised inflammatory markers post G-CSF treatment.


Subject(s)
Aortitis , Breast Neoplasms , Neutropenia , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Aortitis/chemically induced , Aortitis/diagnostic imaging , Aortitis/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Middle Aged , Neutropenia/drug therapy
2.
Breast Dis ; 41(1): 1-3, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604128

ABSTRACT

During the first hit of SARS-COVID pandemic, an important reorganization of Healthcare Services has been done, and new protocols and pathways to protect frail patients like oncological patients were designed. The second hit of pandemic had stressed these new pathways and suggests to health-workers some improvements for safer management of patents.We reported our experience in organizing the clinical pathway of neoadjuvant therapy candidate patients based on the execution of sentinel lympho-node biopsy and the placement of implantable venous access port in the same access to operating room before neoadjuvant chemotherapy suggesting a possible organizational model. In the period October-December 2020 we have included in this new type of path twelve patients and we have not registered any cases of COVID among the patients included. We think this new path, adopted amid the second hit, will be useful for all Breast Units that are facing the challenge of guaranteeing the highest standards of care in a historical moment where the health emergency occupies the efforts of health workers and the economic resources of health systems.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Catheterization, Central Venous/methods , Infection Control/methods , Patient Safety , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Catheterization, Central Venous/instrumentation , Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Central Venous Catheters , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/standards
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24501, 2021 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592860

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, breast and ovarian cancer survivors experienced more anxiety and depression than before the pandemic. Studies have not investigated the similarities of this trend among BRCA1/2-positive women who are considered high risk for these cancers. The current study examines the impact of COVID-19 experiences on anxiety and depression in a sample of BRCA1/2-positive women in the U.S. 211 BRCA1/2-positive women from medically underserved backgrounds completed an online survey. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression for associations between COVID-19 experiences and self-reported anxiety and depression stratified by demographic factors. Overall, women who reported COVID-19 stigma or discrimination (aOR, 5.14, 95% CI [1.55, 17.0]) experienced significantly more depressive symptoms than women who did not report this experience. Racial/ethnic minority women caring for someone at home during COVID-19 were 3.70 times more likely (95% CI [1.01, 13.5]) to report high anxiety while non-Hispanic white women were less likely (aOR, 0.34, 95% CI [0.09, 1.30], p interaction = 0.011). To date, this is the first study to analyze anxiety and depression considering several COVID-19 predictors among BRCA1/2-positive women. Our findings can be used to inform future research and advise COVID-19-related mental health resources specific to these women.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety , BRCA1 Protein/genetics , BRCA2 Protein/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Self Report , United States/epidemiology
4.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E1205-E1212, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer screening in Ontario, Canada, was deferred during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prioritization framework to resume services according to breast cancer risk was developed. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the pandemic within the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) by comparing total volumes of screening mammographic examinations and volumes of screening mammographic examinations with abnormal results before and during the pandemic, and to assess backlogs on the basis of adherence to the prioritization framework. METHODS: A descriptive study was conducted among women aged 50 to 74 years at average risk and women aged 30 to 69 years at high risk, who participated in the OBSP. Percentage change was calculated by comparing observed monthly volumes of mammographic examinations from March 2020 to March 2021 with 2019 volumes and proportions by risk group. We plotted estimates of backlog volumes of mammographic examinations by risk group, comparing pandemic with prepandemic screening practices. Volumes of mammographic examinations with abnormal results were plotted by risk group. RESULTS: Volumes of mammographic examinations in the OBSP showed the largest declines in April and May 2020 (> 99% decrease) and returned to prepandemic levels as of March 2021, with an accumulated backlog of 340 876 examinations. As of March 2021, prioritization had reduced the backlog volumes of screens for participants at high risk for breast cancer by 96.5% (186 v. 5469 expected) and annual rescreens for participants at average risk for breast cancer by 13.5% (62 432 v. 72 202 expected); there was a minimal decline for initial screens. Conversely, the backlog increased by 7.6% for biennial rescreens (221 674 v. 206 079 expected). More than half (59.4%) of mammographic examinations with abnormal results were for participants in the higher risk groups. INTERPRETATION: Prioritizing screening for those at higher risk for breast cancer may increase diagnostic yield and redirect resources to minimize potential long-term harms caused by the pandemic. This further supports the clinical utility of risk-stratified cancer screening.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Mammography , Aged , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/standards , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Priorities/standards , Health Priorities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mammography/standards , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Risk Factors
5.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1356, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients are severely psychologically affected by breast cancer diagnosis and subsequent therapeutic procedures. The COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions on public life have additionally caused significant psychological distress for much of the population. It is therefore plausible that breast cancer patients might be particularly susceptible to the additional psychological stress caused by the pandemic, increasing suffering. In this study we therefore aimed to assess the level of psychological distress currently experienced by a defined group of breast cancer patients in our breast cancer centre, compared to distress levels pre-COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Female breast cancer patients of all ages receiving either adjuvant, neoadjuvant, or palliative therapies were recruited for the study. All patients were screened for current or previous COVID-19 infection. The participants completed a self-designed COVID-19 pandemic questionnaire, the Stress and Coping Inventory (SCI), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Distress Thermometer (DT), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ C30, and the BR23. RESULTS: Eighty-two breast cancer patients were included. Therapy status and social demographic factors did not have a significant effect on the distress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the DT pre and during COVID-19 pandemic did not differ significantly. Using the self-designed COVID-19 pandemic questionnaire, we detected three distinct subgroups demonstrating different levels of concerns in relation to SARS-CoV-2. The subgroup with the highest levels of concern reported significantly decreased life quality, related parameters and symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This monocentric study demonstrated that the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected psychological health in a subpopulation of breast cancer patients. The application of a self-created "COVID-19 pandemic questionnaire" could potentially be used to help identify breast cancer patients who are susceptible to increased psychological distress due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore may need additional intensive psychological support. TRIAL REGISTRATION: DRKS-ID: DRKS00022507 .


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , Germany , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(1): e21-e31, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586210

ABSTRACT

High-quality randomised clinical trials testing moderately fractionated breast radiotherapy have clearly shown that local control and survival is at least as effective as with 2 Gy daily fractions with similar or reduced normal tissue toxicity. Fewer treatment visits are welcomed by patients and their families, and reduced fractions produce substantial savings for health-care systems. Implementation of hypofractionation, however, has moved at a slow pace. The oncology community have now reached an inflection point created by new evidence from the FAST-Forward five-fraction randomised trial and catalysed by the need for the global radiation oncology community to unite during the COVID-19 pandemic and rapidly rethink hypofractionation implementation. The aim of this paper is to support equity of access for all patients to receive evidence-based breast external beam radiotherapy and to facilitate the translation of new evidence into routine daily practice. The results from this European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology Advisory Committee in Radiation Oncology Practice consensus state that moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy can be offered to any patient for whole breast, chest wall (with or without reconstruction), and nodal volumes. Ultrafractionation (five fractions) can also be offered for non-nodal breast or chest wall (without reconstruction) radiotherapy either as standard of care or within a randomised trial or prospective cohort. The consensus is timely; not only is it a pragmatic framework for radiation oncologists, but it provides a measured proposal for the path forward to influence policy makers and empower patients to ensure equity of access to evidence-based radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees/standards , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Patient Selection , Radiation Oncology/standards , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Europe , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Humans , Radiation Dose Hypofractionation
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25404, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite Saudi Arabia's free and well-established cancer care program, breast cancer incidence and mortality are rising. Husbands' knowledge, and wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening are not well understood in Saudi Arabia. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate husbands' knowledge, and wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected data from 403 husbands in the holy city of Makkah through an online self-reported questionnaire over a period of 2 months, from May 6 to July 7, 2020. Tabulation, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses were the major tools used for data analysis. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the association between husbands' knowledge and wives' behavior regarding breast cancer screening methods. RESULTS: Husbands' knowledge score (a 1-point increase) was significantly associated with the wives' utilization of mammograms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.089, 95% CI 1.024-1.159) and breast self-examination (AOR 1.177, 95% CI 1.105-1.255). Husbands' knowledge also influenced the wives' attitudes toward learning about breast self-examination (AOR 1.138, 95% CI 1.084-1.195). There was no significant association between husbands' knowledge and wives' utilization of clinical breast examination. However, richer husbands showed a socioeconomic gradient concerning their wives' utilization of clinical breast examinations (AOR 2.603, 95% CI 1.269-5.341). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, husbands' knowledge of breast cancer influences wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening methods in Saudi Arabia. Thus, interventions delivered to husbands might increase breast cancer awareness and survival.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Internet Use/trends , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia , Self Report , Spouses , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Sci Immunol ; 5(44)2020 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575907

ABSTRACT

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that acquire the capacity to suppress adaptive immune responses during cancer. It remains elusive how MDSCs differ from their normal myeloid counterparts, which limits our ability to specifically detect and therapeutically target MDSCs during cancer. Here, we sought to determine the molecular features of breast cancer-associated MDSCs using the widely studied mouse model based on the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter-driven expression of the polyomavirus middle T oncoprotein (MMTV-PyMT). To identify MDSCs in an unbiased manner, we used single-cell RNA sequencing to compare MDSC-containing splenic myeloid cells from breast tumor-bearing mice with wild-type controls. Our computational analysis of 14,646 single-cell transcriptomes revealed that MDSCs emerge through an aberrant neutrophil maturation trajectory in the spleen that confers them an immunosuppressive cell state. We establish the MDSC-specific gene signature and identify CD84 as a surface marker for improved detection and enrichment of MDSCs in breast cancers.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/pathology , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome , Animals , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Biomarkers, Tumor/immunology , Breast Neoplasms/immunology , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Female , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred Strains , Mice, Transgenic , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , RNA, Neoplasm/genetics , RNA, Neoplasm/immunology , Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family/genetics , Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family/immunology
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572461

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had critical consequences for cancer care delivery, including altered treatment protocols and delayed services that may affect patients' quality of life and long-term survival. Breast cancer patients from minoritized racial and ethnic groups already experience worse outcomes, which may have been exacerbated by treatment delays and social determinants of health (SDoH). This protocol details a mixed-methods study aimed at comparing cancer care disruption among a diverse sample of women (non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black/African American, and Hispanic/Latina) and assessing how proximal, intermediate, and distal SDoH differentially contribute to care continuity and health-related quality of life. An embedded mixed-methods design will be implemented. Eligible participants will complete an online survey, followed by a semi-structured interview (with a subset of participants) to further understand factors that influence continuity of care, treatment decision-making, and self-reported engagement. The study will identify potentially modifiable factors to inform future models of care delivery and improve care transitions. These data will provide the necessary evidence to inform whether a subsequent, multilevel intervention is warranted to improve quality of care delivery in the COVID-19 aftermath. Additionally, results can be used to identify ways to leverage existing social resources to help manage and support patients' outcomes.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Clin Imaging ; 82: 224-227, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559395

ABSTRACT

Disparities in screening mammography and barriers to accessing breast cancer screening are most prevalent among racial/ethnic minority and low-income women. The significant breast cancer mortality rates experienced in both Hispanic and African American populations are found to be connected to delayed screening. For these women to follow the screening guidelines outlined by the American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging, they must successfully navigate existing barriers to screening. These barriers include differential access to care, language barriers, and lack of medical insurance. The COVID-19 Pandemic has worsened the barriers to breast cancer screening faced by these groups of women. These barriers need to be addressed or they may further exacerbate disparities.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mammography , Mass Screening , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Med Oncol ; 39(1): 5, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504271

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on patients undergoing radiotherapy by comparing the patterns of unplanned radiotherapy interruption before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. We enrolled patients who received their first dose of radiotherapy for breast cancer between January 28 and July 31, 2019 and between January 28, 2020, and July 31, 2020. We compared the radiotherapy interruption patterns in 2019 with those in 2020 to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on treatment interruption. Between January 28 and July 31, 2019, 287 patients with breast cancer received radiotherapy. Among them, 19 patients (6.6%) experienced treatment interruption; the reasons for treatment interruption were radiotherapy-related side effects (10 patients, 52.6%), other medical reasons (three patients, 15.8%), and personal reasons (six patients, 31.6%). Between January 28 and July 31, 2020, 279 patients with breast cancer received radiotherapy. Among them, 23 patients (8.2%) experienced treatment interruption; the reasons for treatment interruption were radiotherapy-related side effects (eight patients, 35%) and COVID-19 screening clinic-related reasons (six patients, 26.1%). Among the six patients with screening clinic-related causes of radiotherapy interruption, five had asymptomatic fever and one had mild cold-like symptoms. The duration of treatment interruption was longer in patients with screening clinic-related interruptions than in those with interruptions because of other causes (p = 0.019). Multivariate analysis showed that cancer stage and radiotherapy volume did not significantly affect treatment interruption. The radiotherapy of certain patients was suspended despite the lack of a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. Precise and systematic criteria for the management of patients with suspected COVID-19 are needed, and the opinion of radiation oncologist in charge of the patient must also be considered.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic
14.
BMC Womens Health ; 21(1): 387, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501998

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the abundance of clinical data available for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), little research on the psychological well-being of breast cancer survivors has been published. We investigate the extent to which self-compassion accounted for the association between psychological well-being (depression, anxiety) and death anxiety in breast cancer survivors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was applied. Participants were recruited from three departments of oncology in Zanjan, Iran. Data were collected from 210 breast cancer patients. Participants completed self-report measures. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship among the study variables. Bootstrapping analyses were used to test the significance of indirect effects. RESULTS: Correlational analyses revealed that depression and anxiety were significantly and positively related to death anxiety (r = 0.77, p < 0.01; r = 0.85, p < 0.01, respectively) and negatively to self-compassion (r = - 0.48, p < 0.01; r = - 0.53, p < 0.01, respectively). Bootstrapping analyses revealed significant indirect effects of depression (ß = 0.065, SE = 0.35, p < 0.03, 95% CI [LL = - 0.0083, UL: - 0.1654]) and anxiety (ß = 0.089, SE = 0.09, p < 0.04, 95% CI [LL = - 0.0247, UL: - 0.1987]) on death anxiety through self-compassion. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study indicate that self-compassion may be considered as one treatment strategy to improve psychological well-being of cancer patients in the new context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Empathy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21526, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500514

ABSTRACT

Earlier in 2020, seven Italian regions, which cover 62% of the Italian population, set up the Mimico-19 network to monitor the side effects of the restrictive measures against Covid-19 on volumes and quality of care. To this aim, we retrospectively analysed hospital discharges data, computing twelve indicators of volume and performance in three clinical areas: cardiology, oncology, and orthopaedics. Weekly indicators for the period January-July 2020 were compared with the corresponding average for 2018-2019; comparisons were performed within 3 sub-periods: pre-lockdown, lockdown, and post-lockdown. The weekly trend of hospitalisations for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) showed a 40% reduction, but the proportion of STEMI patients with a primary PTCA did not significantly change from previous years. Malignant neoplasms surgery volumes differed substantially by site, with a limited reduction for lung cancer (< 20%) and greater declines (30-40%) for breast and prostate cancers. The percentage of timely surgery for femoral neck in the elderly remained constantly higher than the previous 2 years whereas hip and knee replacements fell dramatically. Hospitalisations have generally decreased, but the capacity of a timely and effective response in time-dependent pathways of care was not jeopardized throughout the period. General trends did not show important differences across regions, regardless of the different burden of Covid-19. Preventive and primary care services should adopt a pro-active approach, moving towards the identification of at-risk conditions that were neglected during the pandemic and timely addressing patients to the secondary care system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/statistics & numerical data , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/pathology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
16.
Korean J Radiol ; 22(12): 1938-1945, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497013

ABSTRACT

Breast radiologists are increasingly seeing patients with axillary adenopathy related to COVID-19 vaccination. Vaccination can cause levels I-III axillary as well as cervical lymphadenopathy. Appropriate management of vaccine-related adenopathy may vary depending on clinical context. In patients with current or past history of malignancy, vaccine-related adenopathy can be indistinguishable from nodal metastasis. This article presents imaging findings of oncology patients with adenopathy seen in the axilla or neck on cross-sectional imaging (breast MRI, CT, or PET-CT) after COVID-19 vaccination. Management approach and rationale is discussed, along with consideration on strategies to minimize false positives in vaccinated cancer patients. Time interval between vaccination and adenopathy seen on breast MRI, CT, or PET-CT is also reported.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Vaccines , Axilla , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 189(1): 285-296, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491193

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Advanced breast cancer (BC) at diagnosis is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including among women living with HIV (WLWH). In public hospitals across South Africa (SA), 10-15% of women present with stage IV BC, compared to < 5% in the United States (US); 20% of new BC diagnoses in SA are in WLWH. We evaluated the impact of HIV on overall survival (OS) among women with stage IV BC. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with stage IV BC between February 2, 2015 and September 18, 2019 at six public hospitals in SA. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate the association between HIV status and OS. RESULTS: Among 550 eligible women, 147 (26.7%) were WLWH. Compared to HIV-negative BC patients, WLWH were younger (median age 45 vs. 60 years, p < 0.001), predominantly black (95.9% vs. 77.9%, p < 0.001), and more likely to have hormone receptor-negative (hormone-negative) BC (32.7% vs. 22.6%, p = 0.016). Most women received systemic cancer-directed therapy (80.1%). HIV status was not associated with treatment or OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.13 [95%CI 0.89-1.44]). On exploratory subgroup analysis, WLWH and hormone-negative BC had shorter OS compared to HIV-uninfected women (1-year OS: 27.1% vs. 48.8%, p = 0.003; HR 1.94 [95%CI 1.27-2.94]; p = 0.002), which was not observed for hormone receptor-positive BC. CONCLUSION: HIV status was not associated with worse OS in women with stage IV BC in SA and cannot account for the poor survival in this cohort. Subgroup analysis revealed that WLWH with hormone-negative BC had worse OS, which warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , HIV Infections , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , South Africa/epidemiology , United States
18.
Future Oncol ; 17(34): 4757-4767, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484980

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since breast imaging requires very close contact with patients, a protocol is needed to perform safe daily screening activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methods: Patients were triaged and separated into three different clinical scenarios by performing a telephone questionnaire before each diagnostic exam or a nasopharyngeal swab before every recovery. Specific procedures for each scenario are described. Results: From July to October 2020, 994 exams were performed. A total of 16 cancers and 7 suspected COVID-19 patients were identified. No medical staff were infected. Conclusion: This protocol is an example of the practical use of guidelines applied to a breast unit to assist specialists in preventing COVID-19 infection and optimizing resources for breast cancer diagnosis.


Lay abstract On March 11th, 2020, the WHO officially declared the COVID-19 infection pandemic. Since breast cancer represents the most frequent cancer in women of all ages, and breast imaging examinations require very close contact with patients, a protocol was designed to optimize the management of patients and healthcare workers, performing strict COVID-19 screening and avoiding any impairment of survival of patients with breast cancer. Patients were separated into three different clinical scenarios (non-COVID-19 patients, suspected COVID-19 patients and confirmed COVID-19 patients) by performing a telephone questionnaire before each diagnostic exam or a nasopharyngeal swab before every recovery. Specific procedures for each scenario are described. Confirmed or suspected patients are rescheduled if not urgent. From July to October 2020, 994 exams were performed. A total of 16 cancers and 7 suspected COVID-19 patients were identified. No medical staff were infected. This study demonstrates efficacy in terms of continuity in the provision of an essential level of care in a breast cancer screening and ambulatory setting, providing an example of the practical use of guidelines applied to a breast unit, to assist specialists in preventing COVID-19 infection and optimizing resources for breast cancer diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
19.
Technol Cancer Res Treat ; 20: 15330338211035037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oncotype Dx (ODx) is a genomic assay which estimates the risk of distant recurrence and predicts adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in early stage breast cancer patients. Most ODx data is derived from excisional specimens. AIM: We assess the utility of ODx on core needle biopsies (CNB) and measure its impact on neoadjuvant treatment decisions, particularly in patients with clinically complicated situations. METHODS: Consecutive ODx results on breast CNBs with invasive carcinoma from 2012-2020 at 3 tertiary care hospitals with dedicated Breast Health Centers were reviewed. Clinical indications to perform ODx on CNB were recorded through a review of patients' electronic medical records. Clinicopathologic features, surgical or oncologic modalities and follow-up data were recorded. RESULTS: Three distinct clinical indications for performing ODx on CNB in 85 ER+ invasive breast carcinomas were identified: 1) Excisions with insufficient tissue to perform ODx, 2) adjudicate neoadjuvant therapy versus primary surgical resection, and 3) select neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) versus neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). Primary surgery was selected in patients with low score RS (<18), and NET was preferred in patients with intermediate or high RS (>18). NET was preferred over NAC in patients with low RS (<18). CONCLUSION: This study shows that CNB ODx RS helps guide treatment decisions in a neoadjuvant setting along with other contributing factors such as the presence of pathogenic mutations, node positivity, patient age, and comorbidities. The use of ODx on CNB is furthermore valuable in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic for early breast cancer patients to administer effective therapy in a timely manner.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms, Male/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms, Male/pathology , Carcinoma , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology , Combined Modality Therapy , Electronic Health Records , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genomics , Hormones/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
20.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(5): E57-E62, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468124

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Research indicates that nurse navigators can play key roles in promoting empowerment for patients with cancer through advocacy, educational support, resource navigation, and psychosocial care. OBJECTIVES: This study attempted to elucidate the efficacy of nurse navigation in patient knowledge, care coordination, and well-being before a breast oncology appointment. METHODS: Staff provided a nine-question survey to 50 newly referred patients before their initial appointment. After survey completion, patients had the option to participate in an open-ended interview about their experience. FINDINGS: A greater proportion of patients with initial nurse navigation than those without felt informed before their appointment and thought that their care was effectively coordinated. Although some patients without nurse navigation experienced delays and confusion in scheduling their appointment, no patients with nurse navigators reported such issues.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Patient Navigation , Appointments and Schedules , Female , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
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