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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergency caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic exacerbated psychological distress. Our aim was to investigate the impact of breast cancer on patients' lives during the Italian lockdown. METHODS: Sixty-five female breast cancer patients were studied, assessing the level of psychological distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the impact of the cancer diagnosis (Impact of Event Scale-Revised-IES-R). In addition, we compared these data with a matched group of breast cancer patients enrolled in 2019. RESULTS: Patients enrolled in 2020 had statistically higher levels of anxious symptomatology and higher levels of traumatic symptomatology due to the cancer diagnosis. A mediation analysis was performed to determine how the experience of distress due to COVID-19 negatively impacted the level of anxiety and amplified the impact of the diagnosis with a significant increase in traumatic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the vulnerability of these patients and the serious and novel situation that the healthcare system is currently facing, we would like to point out the importance of structured and organised psychological support for these patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
2.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273576, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevention and treatment of chronic pain problems in breast cancer follow-up care require an adequate response from healthcare providers. Generally, this involves the uptake of evidence-based principles regarding pain management in everyday practice. However, despite the extensive literature on effective pain interventions, systematic and coordinated follow-up care is lacking for breast cancer survivors with pain problems in Flanders, Belgium. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to gather insight into healthcare providers' perceptions of pain prevention and treatment in breast cancer follow-up care, particularly with attention to the multilevel influences on pain follow-up. METHODS: We conducted four online focus groups with twenty-two healthcare providers from different disciplines such as oncologists, pharmacists, nurses, physiotherapists, and psychologists. Data analysis was guided by the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. This guide is inspired by the constant comparison method, based on Grounded Theory. RESULTS: The identified influencing factors were thematically grouped into four levels: at the level of the individual healthcare provider, in interaction with the patient, in interaction with colleagues, and at the context level. At each level, we distinguished factors related to healthcare providers' perceptions such as awareness, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, experiences, and intentions. For example, because of a lack of knowledge and certain beliefs among healthcare providers, referral to other disciplines often does not happen in the context of pain. CONCLUSION: This study points out the need to explore the prevention and treatment of chronic pain after breast cancer from a multidimensional point of view. This involves not only the characteristics of individual healthcare providers but is also inherently interactional and system-like in nature. This analysis provides opportunities for the development of interventions that target the influencing factors of prevention and treatment of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Chronic Pain , Attitude of Health Personnel , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Chronic Pain/prevention & control , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Qualitative Research
3.
Clin Imaging ; 89: 89-91, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906893

ABSTRACT

While ipsilateral lymphadenopathy following COVID-19 vaccination is a relatively common finding on mammography and breast ultrasound transient ipsilateral breast edema is rare with only a few published case reports. Radiologists should be aware of this potential imaging appearance of the breast and axilla following COVID-19 vaccination given the imaging features of edema such as trabecular thickening, skin thickening, and increased echogenicity can overlap with benign and malignant breast conditions such as mastitis and inflammatory breast cancer. We describe a case of transient ipsilateral breast edema after COVID-19 vaccination followed by a discussion summarizing the current understanding and management of transient ipsilateral breast edema following COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
Breast Diseases , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Breast Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Breast Diseases/etiology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Edema/diagnostic imaging , Edema/etiology , Female , Humans , Vaccination/adverse effects
4.
Pan Afr Med J ; 41: 45, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856322

ABSTRACT

Many cases of severe cardiac complications due to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were reported. Cancer and chemotherapy appear to be risk and prognostic factors for COVID-19. A 49-year-old Female, with a history of breast cancer treated by tumorectomy and anthracycline-based chemotherapy was admitted with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) confirmed as COVID-19. She also had elevated troponin I level (up to 43 g/L), and diffuse myocardial hypokinesia along with severe left ventricle dysfunction on echocardiography. Initial treatment included hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, corticosteroids and mechanical ventilation. The evolution was marked by QT interval prolongation (QTc=523 ms) and occurrence of cardiogenic shock. The patient died of hemodynamic instability reluctant to resuscitation measures at the 2ndday of hospitalization. COVID-19 patients may develop severe cardiac complications such as myocarditis and heart failure. Receiving chemotherapy especially anthracyclines may be a precipitating and prognostic factor of cardiac manifestations in COVID-19 cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Heart Diseases , Heart Failure , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Female , Heart Diseases/chemically induced , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Failure/etiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology
5.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(5)2022 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792599

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: This study aimed to analyze the prevalence of mental disorders in patients with breast cancer at Ajou University Hospital. In addition, the patterns and prevalence of mental disorders according to the occurrence of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) were analyzed. Materials and Methods: From 1 January 2008 to 30 June 2021, psychiatric disorders were identified in 5174 female patients diagnosed with breast cancer at Ajou University Hospital. Based on the time when COVID-19 occurred, the pattern of onset of mental disorders in patients with breast cancer was analyzed. In addition, the prevalence of mental disorders according to the time of breast cancer diagnosis and age was evaluated. Results: A year before the diagnosis of breast cancer, 371 patients were diagnosed with a mental disorder. Of these, 201 patients were diagnosed with stress and adjustment disorders, and 97 patients had anxiety disorders. The overall frequency of psychiatric disorders after breast cancer diagnosis peaked two months later. Among psychiatric disorders reported before the COVID-19 pandemic, the proportion of stress/adaptation disorders was 52%, and among psychiatric disorders reported after the pandemic, it was significantly higher at 94.7%. Anxiety was found to be high in the elderly group aged ≥ 60 years, and the prevalence of stress and adjustment disorders tended to increase in the non-elderly group. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients showed different patterns of psychiatric disorders according to age, time of breast cancer diagnosis, and the occurrence of COVID-19. Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, delays in treatment and anxiety about infection have increased the rate of stress and adjustment disorders in cancer patients. Mental health management during the pandemic and after cancer diagnosis can improve the quality of life of patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Tertiary Care Centers
6.
Cancer Med ; 11(17): 3352-3363, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1750320

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Several studies have reported sleep disturbances during the COVID-19 virus pandemic. Little data exist about the impact of the pandemic on sleep and mental health among older women with breast cancer. We sought to examine whether women with and without breast cancer who experienced new sleep problems during the pandemic had worsening depression and anxiety. METHODS: Breast cancer survivors aged ≥60 years with a history of nonmetastatic breast cancer (n = 242) and frequency-matched noncancer controls (n = 158) active in a longitudinal cohort study completed a COVID-19 virus pandemic survey from May to September 2020 (response rate 83%). Incident sleep disturbance was measured using the restless sleep item from the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). CES-D score (minus the sleep item) captured depressive symptoms; the State-Anxiety subscale of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory measured anxiety symptoms. Multivariable linear regression models examined how the development of sleep disturbance affected changes in depressive or anxiety symptoms from the most recent prepandemic survey to the pandemic survey, controlling for covariates. RESULTS: The prevalence of sleep disturbance during the pandemic was 22.3%, with incident sleep disturbance in 10% and 13.5% of survivors and controls, respectively. Depressive and anxiety symptoms significantly increased during the pandemic among women with incident sleep disturbance (vs. no disturbance) (ß = 8.16, p < 0.01 and ß = 6.14, p < 0.01, respectively), but there were no survivor-control differences in the effect. CONCLUSION: Development of sleep disturbances during the COVID-19 virus pandemic may negatively affect older women's mental health, but breast cancer survivors diagnosed with the nonmetastatic disease had similar experiences as women without cancer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
7.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(1)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741646

ABSTRACT

Breast pain has no association with breast cancer yet is a frequent reason for referral from Primary to Secondary Care, often on an urgent (2-week wait) referral. The referral often causes significant patient anxiety, further heightened by screening mammograms and/or ultrasound scans in the absence of an associated red flag symptom or finding by the patient or general practitioner. This paper reports the pilot implementation of a specialist Primary Care Breast Pain Clinic in Mid-Nottinghamshire where patients were seen, examined without any imaging and assessed for their risk of familial breast cancer: numerous studies have reported 15%->30% of patients with breast pain only have a family history of breast cancer.177 patients with breast pain only were seen in this clinic between March, 2020 and April, 2021 with a 6-month interim suspension due to COVID-19. The mean age of patients was 48.4 years (range: 16-86). 172/177 (97.2%) patients required no imaging although there were three (1.7%) inappropriate referrals and two additional abnormalities (1.1%-hamartoma, thickening/tethering) that were referred onward. There were no cancers. 21 (12.4%) patients were identified to have an increased familial risk of breast cancer and were referred to the specialist familial cancer service. 170/177 patients completed an anonymous questionnaire on leaving the clinic. 167/169 (99%) were reassured regarding their breast pain, 155/156 (99%) were reassured of the Familial Risk Assessment, 162/168 (96%) were reassured regarding their personal risk assessment while 169/170 (99%) were 'extremely likely/likely to recommend the service'.This specialist Primary Care Breast Pain Clinic provides service improvement across all levels of care (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary). Patients were successfully managed in the community with high levels of patient satisfaction and together this obviated referral to secondary care. The familial breast cancer risk assessment also helped identify unmet need in the community.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Mastodynia , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Young Adult
10.
Can J Anaesth ; 69(4): 485-493, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has markedly increased delays in oncologic surgeries because of the virus's impact on traditional anesthetic management. Novel protocols, developed to protect patients and medical professionals, have altered the ways and instances in which general anesthesia (GA) can be safely performed. To reduce virus exposure related to aerosol-generating procedures, it is now recommended to avoid GA when feasible and promote regional anesthesia instead. At our institution, we observed faster postoperative recovery in patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery instead of GA. This led us to formally evaluate whether regional anesthesia instead of GA helped improve time to hospital discharge. METHODS: We conducted a historical cohort study to retrospectively analyze two cohorts of patients: prepandemic vs intrapandemic. We obtained approval from our institutional ethics committee to review files of consecutive patients who underwent breast cancer surgery between 30 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 (intrapandemic group; N = 106) and consecutive patients-moving backwards-from 28 February 2020 to 6 December 2019 (prepandemic group; N = 104). The primary outcome was the length of time between the end of surgery to readiness for hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), the need for postoperative analgesia, and the duration of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). RESULTS: The median [interquartile range (IQR)] time to readiness for hospital discharge was significantly lower in patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery compared with GA (intrapandemic group, 119 [99-170] min vs prepandemic group, 191 [164-234] min; P < 0.001) as was the incidence of PONV (3% vs 11%; P = 0.03) and median [IQR] PACU durations of stay (29 [21-39] min vs 46 [37-63] min; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery in the intrapandemic group were ready for hospital discharge earlier, spent less time in the PACU, and experienced less PONV than those who received GA in the prepandemic group. With growing surgical wait times, concerns related to aerosol-generating procedures, and recommendations to avoid GA when feasible, paravertebral blocks as the principal anesthetic modality for breast cancer surgery offered benefits for patients and medical teams.


RéSUMé: CONTEXTE: La pandémie de COVID-19 a considérablement augmenté les retards dans les chirurgies oncologiques en raison de l'impact du virus sur la prise en charge anesthésique traditionnelle. De nouveaux protocoles, mis au point pour protéger les patients et les professionnels de la santé, ont modifié les façons et les cas dans lesquels une anesthésie générale (AG) peut être réalisée en toute sécurité. Afin de réduire l'exposition au virus liée aux interventions génératrices d'aérosols, il est maintenant recommandé d'éviter l'AG lorsque possible et de privilégier l'anesthésie régionale. Dans notre établissement, nous avons observé une récupération postopératoire plus rapide chez les patientes ayant reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein au lieu d'une AG. Cela nous a menés à évaluer de façon formelle si l'anesthésie régionale au lieu de l'AG avait contribué à réduire les délais jusqu'au congé de l'hôpital. MéTHODE: Nous avons réalisé une étude de cohorte historique afin d'analyser rétrospectivement deux cohortes de patientes : prépandémie vs intrapandémie. Nous avons obtenu l'approbation de notre comité d'éthique institutionnel pour examiner les dossiers de patientes consécutives ayant bénéficié d'une chirurgie de cancer du sein entre le 30 mars 2020 et le 30 juin 2020 (groupe intrapandémie; n = 106) et des patientes consécutives ­ en reculant ­ du 28 février 2020 au 6 décembre 2019 (groupe prépandémie; n = 104). Le critère d'évaluation principal était le délai entre la fin de la chirurgie et le moment où les patientes étaient prêtes à recevoir leur congé de l'hôpital. Les critères d'évaluation secondaires comprenaient l'incidence de nausées et vomissements postopératoires (NVPO), la nécessité d'une analgésie postopératoire et la durée de séjour en salle de réveil (SDR). RéSULTATS: Le délai médian [écart interquartile (ÉIQ)] jusqu'à la disposition au congé de l'hôpital était significativement plus court chez les patientes ayant reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein plutôt qu'une AG (groupe intrapandémie, 119 [99-170] min vs groupe prépandémie, 191 [164­234] min; P < 0,001), tout comme l'incidence de NVPO (3 % vs 11 %; P = 0,03) et les durées médianes [ÉIQ] de séjour en salle de réveil (29 [21­39] min vs 46 [37­63] min; P < 0,001). CONCLUSION: Les patientes qui ont reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein dans le groupe intrapandémie étaient prêtes à quitter l'hôpital plus tôt, ont passé moins de temps en salle de réveil et ont ressenti moins de NVPO que celles qui ont reçu une AG dans le groupe prépandémie. Avec des temps d'attente pour accès à la chirurgie de plus en plus longs, des préoccupations liées aux interventions génératrices d'aérosols et les recommandations d'éviter l'AG lorsque possible, les blocs paravertébraux ont offert des avantages aux patientes et aux équipes médicales en tant que principale modalité anesthésique pour la chirurgie de cancer du sein.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Conduction , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Anesthesia, Conduction/adverse effects , Anesthesia, General/methods , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Pain, Postoperative/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
12.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 218(6): 970-976, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593915

ABSTRACT

Ipsilateral axillary lymphadenopathy is a well-documented finding associated with COVID-19 vaccination. Varying guidelines have been published for the management of asymptomatic patients who have a history of recent vaccination and present with incidental lymphadenopathy at screening mammography. Some experts recommend follow-up imaging, and others suggest that clinical management, rather than repeat imaging or biopsy, is appropriate. Symptomatic patients with lymphadenopathy and/or additional abnormal imaging findings should be treated differently depending on risk factors and clinical scenarios. Although ipsilateral lymphadenopathy is well documented, ipsilateral breast edema after COVID-19 vaccination has been rarely reported. The combination of ipsilateral lymphadenopathy and diffuse breast edema after COVID-19 vaccination presents a clinical management challenge because edema can obscure underlying abnormalities at imaging. For symptomatic patients with lymphadenopathy and associated breast parenchymal abnormality, prompt action is appropriate, including diagnostic evaluation and consideration of tissue sampling. This approach may prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment of patients with malignancy masked by symptoms from the vaccination.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Breast Neoplasms/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Early Detection of Cancer , Edema/etiology , Female , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Mammography/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
13.
BMC Womens Health ; 21(1): 387, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501998

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the abundance of clinical data available for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), little research on the psychological well-being of breast cancer survivors has been published. We investigate the extent to which self-compassion accounted for the association between psychological well-being (depression, anxiety) and death anxiety in breast cancer survivors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was applied. Participants were recruited from three departments of oncology in Zanjan, Iran. Data were collected from 210 breast cancer patients. Participants completed self-report measures. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship among the study variables. Bootstrapping analyses were used to test the significance of indirect effects. RESULTS: Correlational analyses revealed that depression and anxiety were significantly and positively related to death anxiety (r = 0.77, p < 0.01; r = 0.85, p < 0.01, respectively) and negatively to self-compassion (r = - 0.48, p < 0.01; r = - 0.53, p < 0.01, respectively). Bootstrapping analyses revealed significant indirect effects of depression (ß = 0.065, SE = 0.35, p < 0.03, 95% CI [LL = - 0.0083, UL: - 0.1654]) and anxiety (ß = 0.089, SE = 0.09, p < 0.04, 95% CI [LL = - 0.0247, UL: - 0.1987]) on death anxiety through self-compassion. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study indicate that self-compassion may be considered as one treatment strategy to improve psychological well-being of cancer patients in the new context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Empathy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Semin Oncol ; 48(4-6): 283-291, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483170

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Lymphadenopathy (LAP) after COVID-19 vaccination in patients with a diagnosis of cancer has been challenging. We analyzed imaging and clinical features from early cases of axillary LAP in six COVID-19 vaccine recipients with a history of breast cancer. METHOD: Among the patients with a history of breast cancer and recent COVID-19 vaccine administration, six patients who showed isolated axillary LAP were gathered. Radiologic features were reviewed from breast ultrasound, chest computed tomography, and breast magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical and pathological information were obtained for analysis. RESULTS: The interval between ultrasound detection of LAP and last COVID-19 vaccine administration ranged from 14 to 28 days (mean 21.67 days). Round shape of the lymph node and irregular cortex were noted in 2 and 0 cases, respectively. Mean maximum cortical thickness, length to width ratio and interval aggravation in maximum cortical thickening were 4.2 mm, 1.34, and 2.81-fold with cut-off value of 3 mm, 1.5, 2.0-fold, respectively. CONCLUSION: We observed axillary LAP ipsilateral to a recent vaccine administration persisting longer than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced. In our patients, COVID-19 vaccine-related LAP tended to show increased cortical thickness without cortical irregularity. Oncologist as well as radiologist should be familiar with the fact that COVID-19 vaccines, regardless of vaccine type or dosage, can frequently cause ipsilateral axillary LAP, showing some suspicious features more often than others, and can persist longer than anticipated so that both over- and underdiagnosis can be avoided. We report our observations in six patients and provide an exhaustive review of the published literature.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , Lymphadenopathy/pathology , Aged , Female , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/complications , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
15.
Home Health Care Serv Q ; 41(1): 1-19, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470035

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to compare the effects of weekly personal feedback, based on objectively measured physical activity, on daily sleep in breast cancer survivors (BCS) with those of an intervention that also included online supervised physical exercise sessions (OSPES). BCS benefiting from both personal feedback and OSPES (n = 24), from pre-lockdown (T0) to the first month (T1) of the national lockdown, experienced an increase in both total (p ≤ 0.001) and restorative (p ≤ 0.001) sleep time, inverting their trend from the first month of lockdown to its end (total sleeping time T1 vs. T2 0.01 ≤ p < .001, T1 vs. T3 p ≤ 0.001; restorative sleeping time T1 vs. T2 0.05 ≤ p < .01, T1 vs. T3 p ≤ 0.001). Supportive technology, together with the reception of weekly tailored advice and OSPES seems to improve both quality and quantity of sleep.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Counseling , Exercise , Female , Fitness Trackers , Humans , Italy , Sleep
16.
Breast Cancer ; 29(2): 242-246, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469776

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Elective operations including surgeries for breast cancer were significantly reduced during the height of the surge of COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts. The safety of performing breast reconstruction during the pandemic was unknown. This study aims to review the safety of performing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction during the first COVID-19 surge in Massachusetts. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients who underwent mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction by Massachusetts General Hospital breast and plastic surgeons immediately preceding and during the COVID-19 pandemic was performed. RESULTS: Thirty patients (34 breasts) underwent mastectomies with immediate breast reconstruction during the COVID-19 restriction period in Massachusetts. Most reconstructions were unilateral. All reconstructions were performed with implants or expanders, and no autologous reconstructions were performed. Two patients (2 breasts) had operative complications. The complication rate during the pandemic was similar to the complication rate pre-pandemic. No patients or surgeons experienced symptoms or positive COVID-19 tests. Over 90% of patients were discharged the same day. CONCLUSION: Prosthetic breast reconstruction was able to be performed safely during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic surge in Massachusetts. Strict screening protocols, proper use of personal protective equipment, and same-day discharge when possible are essential for patient and surgeon safety during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Implants , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Mammaplasty , Breast Implants/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Mammaplasty/adverse effects , Mammaplasty/methods , Mastectomy/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Cancer Res Treat ; 53(3): 650-656, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403959

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread worldwide rapidly and patients with cancer have been considered as a vulnerable group for this infection. This study aimed to examine the expressions of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) in tumor tissues of six common cancer types. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression levels of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in tumors and control samples were obtained from online databases. Survival prognosis and biological functions of these genes were investigated for each tumor type. RESULTS: There was the overexpression of ACE2 in colon and stomach adenocarcinomas compared to controls, meanwhile colon and prostate adenocarcinomas showed a significantly higher expression of TMPRSS2. Additionally, survival prognosis analysis has demonstrated that upregulation of ACE2 in liver hepatocellular carcinoma was associated with higher overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.65; p=0.016) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.66; p=0.007), while overexpression of TMPRSS2 was associated with a 26% reduced risk of death in lung adenocarcinoma (p=0.047) but 50% increased risk of death in breast invasive carcinoma (p=0.015). CONCLUSION: There is a need to take extra precautions for COVID-19 in patients with colorectal cancer, stomach cancer, and lung cancer. Further information on other types of cancer at different stages should be investigated.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Adenocarcinoma/complications , Adenocarcinoma/diagnosis , Adenocarcinoma/epidemiology , Adenocarcinoma/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Databases as Topic , Female , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/complications , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , Male , Mutation , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Analysis
18.
Breast ; 59: 102-109, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is a significant worldwide health crisis. Breast cancer patients with COVID-19 are fragile and require particular clinical care. This study aimed to identify the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with COVID-19 and the risks associated with anti-cancer treatment. METHODS: The medical records of breast cancer patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were collected among 9559 COVID-19 patients from seven designated hospitals from 13th January to 18th March 2020 in Hubei, China. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for COVID-19 severity. RESULTS: Of the 45 breast cancer patients with COVID-19, 33 (73.3%) developed non-severe COVID-19, while 12 (26.7%) developed severe COVID-19, of which 3 (6.7%) patients died. The median age was 62 years, and 3 (6.7%) patients had stage IV breast cancer. Univariate analysis showed that age over 75 and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score were associated with COVID-19 disease severity (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who received chemotherapy within 7 days had a significantly higher risk for severe COVID-19 (logistic regression model: RR = 13.886, 95% CI 1.014-190.243, P = 0.049; Cox proportional hazards model: HR = 13.909, 95% CI 1.086-178.150, P = 0.043), with more pronounced neutropenia and higher LDH, CRP and procalcitonin levels than other patients (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In our breast cancer cohort, the severity of COVID-19 could be associated with baseline factors such as age over 75 and ECOG scores. Chemotherapy within 7 days before symptom onset could be a risk factor for severe COVID-19, reflected by neutropenia and elevated LDH, CRP and procalcitonin levels.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , Neutropenia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/mortality , C-Reactive Protein , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Middle Aged , Neutropenia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Procalcitonin/blood , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
19.
In Vivo ; 35(4): 2253-2260, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285628

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: The anticipation of radiotherapy can cause distress and sleep disorders, which may be aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This study investigated sleep disorders in a large cohort of patients with breast cancer before and during the pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-three characteristics were retrospectively analyzed for associations with pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders in 338 patients. Moreover, 163 patients presenting before and 175 patients presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared for sleep disorders. RESULTS: Sleep disorders were significantly associated with age ≤60 years (p=0.006); high distress score (p<0.0001); more emotional (p<0.0001), physical (p<0.0001) or practical (p<0.0001) problems; psycho-oncological need (p<0.0001); invasive cancer (p=0.003); chemotherapy (p<0.001); and hormonal therapy (p=0.006). Sleep disorders were similarly common in both groups (prior to vs. during the pandemic: 40% vs. 45%, p=0.38). CONCLUSION: Although additional significant risk factors for sleep disorders were identified, the COVID-19 pandemic appeared to have no significant impact on sleep disorders in patients scheduled for irradiation of breast cancer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
20.
Cancer ; 127(19): 3671-3679, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had wide-ranging health effects and increased isolation. Older with cancer patients might be especially vulnerable to loneliness and poor mental health during the pandemic. METHODS: The authors included active participants enrolled in the longitudinal Thinking and Living With Cancer study of nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors aged 60 to 89 years (n = 262) and matched controls (n = 165) from 5 US regions. Participants completed questionnaires at parent study enrollment and then annually, including a web-based or telephone COVID-19 survey, between May 27 and September 11, 2020. Mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in loneliness (a single item on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression [CES-D] scale) from before to during the pandemic in survivors versus controls and to test survivor-control differences in the associations between changes in loneliness and changes in mental health, including depression (CES-D, excluding the loneliness item), anxiety (the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and perceived stress (the Perceived Stress Scale). Models were adjusted for age, race, county COVID-19 death rates, and time between assessments. RESULTS: Loneliness increased from before to during the pandemic (0.211; P = .001), with no survivor-control differences. Increased loneliness was associated with worsening depression (3.958; P < .001) and anxiety (3.242; P < .001) symptoms and higher stress (1.172; P < .001) during the pandemic, also with no survivor-control differences. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer survivors reported changes in loneliness and mental health similar to those reported by women without cancer. However, both groups reported increased loneliness from before to during the pandemic that was related to worsening mental health, suggesting that screening for loneliness during medical care interactions will be important for identifying all older women at risk for adverse mental health effects of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
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