Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 72
Filter
4.
Radiology ; 303(2): 287-294, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861683

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic reduced mammography use, potentially delaying breast cancer diagnoses. Purpose To examine breast biopsy recommendations and breast cancers diagnosed before and during the COVID-19 pandemic by mode of detection (screen detected vs symptomatic) and women's characteristics. Materials and Methods In this secondary analysis of prospectively collected data, monthly breast biopsy recommendations after mammography, US, or both with subsequent biopsy performed were examined from 66 facilities of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium between January 2019 and September 2020. The number of monthly and cumulative biopsies recommended and performed and the number of subsequent cancers diagnosed during the pandemic period (March 2020 to September 2020) were compared with data from the prepandemic period using Wald χ2 tests. Analyses were stratified by mode of detection and race or ethnicity. Results From January 2019 to September 2020, 17 728 biopsies were recommended and performed, with 6009 cancers diagnosed. From March to September 2020, there were substantially fewer breast biopsy recommendations with cancer diagnoses when compared with the same period in 2019 (1650 recommendations in 2020 vs 2171 recommendations in 2019 [24% fewer], P < .001), predominantly due to fewer screen-detected cancers (722 cancers in 2020 vs 1169 cancers in 2019 [38% fewer], P < .001) versus symptomatic cancers (895 cancers in 2020 vs 965 cancers in 2019 [7% fewer], P = .27). The decrease in cancer diagnoses was largest in Asian (67 diagnoses in 2020 vs 142 diagnoses in 2019 [53% fewer], P = .06) and Hispanic (82 diagnoses in 2020 vs 145 diagnoses in 2019 [43% fewer], P = .13) women, followed by Black women (210 diagnoses in 2020 vs 287 diagnoses in 2019 [27% fewer], P = .21). The decrease was smallest in non-Hispanic White women (1128 diagnoses in 2020 vs 1357 diagnoses in 2019 [17% fewer], P = .09). Conclusion There were substantially fewer breast biopsies with cancer diagnoses during the COVID-19 pandemic from March to September 2020 compared with the same period in 2019, with Asian and Hispanic women experiencing the largest declines, followed by Black women. © RSNA, 2022 Online supplemental material is available for this article. See also the editorial by Heller in this issue.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Biopsy , Breast/diagnostic imaging , Breast/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Rev. saúde pública (Online) ; 55: 8, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1818704

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To report the decrease in breast imaging after covid-19 pandemic, obtaining the number of mammograms performed in 2019 and 2020. Additionally, to investigate if there was an increase in the proportion of women undergoing mammography for diagnostic purposes, with palpable lesions. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study, based on the number of mammograms performed by the Brazilian public health services, provided by DATASUS, an open access database. Mammograms from private institutions were not included. This study compares the number of mammograms performed in 2019 and 2020, in women aged 50-69 years, stratified by month, in each federal state, and the presence of palpable lumps (physician-reported). RESULTS: In total, 1,948,471 mammograms were performed in 2019 and 1,126,688 in 2020, for the population studied. These values represent a 42% decline. Monthly, a significant decreased is observed after April 2020. The results varied slightly according to federal state; yet the entire country was affected. Rondônia was the most affected state, with 67% decline. The proportion of women presenting palpable lumps increased from 7.06% on average in 2019 to 7.94% in 2020 (OR = 1.135, 95%CI 1.125-1.145, p = 0,001). DISCUSSION: The number of mammograms performed in 2020 declined considerably. Out of the women who presented for mammogram, the proportion of palpable lumps was significantly higher in 2020. Considering the detection rate of digital mammography, the loss of 800,000 exams means 4,000 undiagnosed breast cancer cases, by the end of 2020.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , Mammography , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Middle Aged
7.
Eur J Radiol ; 152: 110334, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Axillary lymph node characteristics on axillary ultrasound (US), breast MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT are relevant at breast cancer diagnosis. Axillary lymphadenopathy after COVID-19 vaccination has been frequently reported. This may cause a diagnostic dilemma, particularly in the ipsilateral axilla in women who have a either a recent diagnosis of breast cancer or a history of breast cancer. This review provides an overview of the current evidence regarding axillary lymph node characteristics at breast cancer diagnosis versus "post-COVID-19 vaccination". METHODS: A non-systematic narrative review was performed. Studies describing axillary lymph node characteristics per imaging modality (axillary US, breast MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT) in breast cancer patients versus post-COVID-19 vaccination were selected and used for the current study. RESULTS: The morphologic characteristics and distribution of abnormal nodes on US may differ from the appearance of metastatic adenopathy since diffuse cortical thickening of the lymph nodes is the most observed characteristic after vaccination, whereas metastases show as most suspicious characteristics focal cortical thickening and effacement of the fatty hilum. Current evidence on MRI and 18F-FDG on morphologic characteristics of axillary lymphadenopathy is missing, although it was suggested that vaccine related lymphadenopathy is more likely to be present in level 2 and 3 nodes than metastatic nodes. Reported frequencies of lymphadenopathy post-COVID-19 vaccination range from 49% to 85% (US), 29% (breast MRI) and 14.5% to 53.9% (18F-FDG PET/CT). Several factors may impact the presence or extent of lymphadenopathy post-COVID-19 vaccination: injection site, type of vaccine (i.e., mRNA versus vector), time interval (days) between vaccination and imaging, previous history of COVID-19 pneumonia, and first versus second vaccine dose. CONCLUSION: Although lymph node characteristics differ at breast cancer diagnosis versus post-COVID-19 vaccination, clinical information regarding injection site, vaccine type and vaccination date needs to be documented to improve the interpretation and guide treatment towards the next steps of action.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Axilla/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Humans , Lymph Nodes/diagnostic imaging , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Lymphadenopathy/pathology , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Vaccination
8.
Radiology ; 303(2): 295-296, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807539
9.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 218(2): 270-278, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793148

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND. The need for second visits between screening mammography and diagnostic imaging contributes to disparities in the time to breast cancer diagnosis. During the COVID-19 pandemic, an immediate-read screening mammography program was implemented to reduce patient visits and decrease time to diagnostic imaging. OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of an immediate-read screening program with focus on disparities in same-day diagnostic imaging after abnormal findings are made at screening mammography. METHODS. In May 2020, an immediate-read screening program was implemented whereby a dedicated breast imaging radiologist interpreted all screening mammograms in real time; patients received results before discharge; and efforts were made to perform any recommended diagnostic imaging during the visit (performed by different radiologists). Screening mammographic examinations performed from June 1, 2019, through October 31, 2019 (preimplementation period), and from June 1, 2020, through October 31, 2020 (postimplementation period), were retrospectively identified. Patient characteristics were recorded from the electronic medical record. Multivariable logistic regression models incorporating patient age, race and ethnicity, language, and insurance type were estimated to identify factors associated with same-day diagnostic imaging. Screening metrics were compared between periods. RESULTS. A total of 8222 preimplementation and 7235 postimplementation screening examinations were included; 521 patients had abnormal screening findings before implementation, and 359 after implementation. Before implementation, 14.8% of patients underwent same-day diagnostic imaging after abnormal screening mammograms. This percentage increased to 60.7% after implementation. Before implementation, patients who identified their race as other than White had significantly lower odds than patients who identified their race as White of undergoing same-day diagnostic imaging after receiving abnormal screening results (adjusted odds ratio, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.10-0.86; p = .03). After implementation, the odds of same-day diagnostic imaging were not significantly different between patients of other races and White patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.50-1.71; p = .80). After implementation, there was no significant difference in race and ethnicity between patients who underwent and those who did not undergo same-day diagnostic imaging after receiving abnormal results of screening mammography (p > .05). The rate of abnormal interpretation was significantly lower after than it was before implementation (5.0% vs 6.3%; p < .001). Cancer detection rate and PPV1 (PPV based on positive findings at screening examination) were not significantly different before and after implementation (p > .05). CONCLUSION. Implementation of the immediate-read screening mammography program reduced prior racial and ethnic disparities in same-day diagnostic imaging after abnormal screening mammograms. CLINICAL IMPACT. An immediate-read screening program provides a new paradigm for improved screening mammography workflow that allows more rapid diagnostic workup with reduced disparities in care.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delayed Diagnosis/prevention & control , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods , Mammography/methods , /statistics & numerical data , Adult , Breast/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time
10.
Am Surg ; 88(6): 1051-1053, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784958

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted many areas of health care and had a significant impact on care delivery, including breast cancer. METHODS: To better understand the changes to detection and treatment of breast cancer at our institution, we analyzed mammogram rates (screening and diagnostic) and breast cancer operations in 2019-2020. Mammography rates were calculated using county level census data for eligible women (Z-test). For breast cancer staging, a stage severity score was analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U-test (two-tail, P < .05) with proportions derived from WFBH operative volume quarterly reports. Results: Data revealed a relative decline from 2019 to 2020 in breast cancer screening. Screening mammograms decreased by 44% or 1558 fewer screening mammograms (Z = 4.75, P < .00001) and by 21% or 771 fewer for diagnostic mammograms (Z = 2.16, P = .03). With regards to breast cancer operations, we did not identify a statistically significant difference in number of new breast cancer operations at WFBH with 340 cases in 2020 as compared to 384 cases in 2019 (P = .9905). We compared a breast cancer severity score (weighted by stage at time of operation), which did not reveal statistically significant difference in clinical stage of breast cancer at time of operation (P = .71, U = 28). CONCLUSION: Mammography was impacted more than breast surgery cases by the COVID-19 pandemic. More data needs to be collected to evaluate future morbidity and mortality related to breast cancer operations and persistent disparities related to delay in breast cancer care due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mammography , Mass Screening , Pandemics/prevention & control
11.
Eur J Cancer ; 159: 38-51, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719648

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Over 1 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been already administered across the United States, the United Kingdom and the European Union at the time of writing. Furthermore, 1.82 million booster doses have been administered in the US since 13th August, and similar booster programmes are currently planned or under consideration in the UK and the EU beginning in the autumn of 2021. Early reports showed an association between vaccine administration and the development of ipsilateral axillary and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy, which could interfere with the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of breast cancer patients. In this paper, we review the available evidence on vaccine-related lymphadenopathy, and we discuss the clinical implications of the same on breast cancer diagnosis and management. METHODS: A literature search was performed - PubMed, Ovid Medline, Scopus, CINHAL, Springer Nature, ScienceDirect, Academic Search Premier and the Directory of Open Access Journals were searched for articles reporting on regional palpable or image-detected lymphadenopathy following COVID-19 vaccination. Separately, we compiled a series of case studies from the University Hospitals of Derby and Burton, United Kingdom and the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, United States of America, to illustrate the impact that regional lymphadenopathy post-COVID-19 vaccination can have on the diagnosis and management of patients being seen in diagnostic and therapeutic breast clinics. RESULTS: From the literature search, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria (n = 2057 patients, 737 with lymphadenopathy). The incidence of lymphadenopathy ranged between 14.5% and 53% and persisted for >6 weeks in 29% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians managing breast cancer patients should be aware that the COVID-19 vaccination may result in regional lymphadenopathy in a significant number of patients, which can result in unnecessary investigations, treatment and increased patient anxiety. An accurate COVID-19 vaccination history should be collected from all patients where regional lymphadenopathy is a clinical and/or an imaging finding and then combined with clinical judgement when managing individual cases.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Mammography , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Vaccination/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Diagnosis, Differential , Diagnostic Errors , Female , Humans , Incidence , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , Lymphadenopathy/epidemiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
12.
Acad Radiol ; 29(7): 1004-1012, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705736

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: To identify nodal features used to distinguish coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine-Induced benign reactive adenopathy from malignant adenopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This IRB-approved, single-institution, retrospective study compared features of 77 consecutive patients with benign adenopathy secondary to a messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccine with 76 patients with biopsy-proven malignant adenopathy from breast cancer. Patient demographics and nodal features were compared between the two groups using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. A receiver operating characteristic analysis with the maximum value of Youden's index was performed for the cutoff value of cortical thickness for predicting nodal status. RESULTS: The mean cortical thickness was 5.1 mm ± 2.8 mm among benign nodes and 8.9 mm ± 4.5 mm among malignant nodes (p < 0.001). A cortical thickness ≥3.0 mm had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 21% (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52-0.68). When the cutoff for cortical thickness was increased to ≥5.4 mm, the sensitivity decreased to 74%, while the specificity increased to 69% (AUC = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.70-0.84).Cortical thickness correlated with nodal morphology type (r2 = 0.57). An axillary node with generalized lobulated cortical thickening had a 7.5 odds ratio and a node with focal cortical lobulation had a 123.0 odds ratio compared to one with diffuse, uniform cortical thickening only (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Cortical thickness and morphology are predictive of malignancy. Cortical thickness cutoff of ≥5.4 mm demonstrates higher specificity and improved accuracy for detecting malignant adenopathy than a cutoff of ≥3.0 mm.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Axilla/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Lymph Nodes/diagnostic imaging , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
Cancer Radiother ; 26(4): 577-584, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664711

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (Sars-Cov-2) is at the origin of a global pandemic. This pandemic has prompted the current health system to reorganize and rethink the care offered by health establishments. We report the early and late toxicity in patients infected with covid-19 treated at the same time for early-stage breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a monocentric prospective study of patients treated in our hospital between March and June 2020 who were diagnosed with covid-19 infection. The inclusion criteria were to be irradiated for early-stage breast cancer and to have a positive covid diagnosis on a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and/or a lung computed tomography (CT) scan and/or suggestive clinical symptoms. All of them needed 6 months follow-up clinic after the end of the radiotherapy with clinical examination, mammogram, as well as CT scan to evaluate the lung status. Radiotherapy consisted of breast or chest wall irradiation with or without lymph node irradiation, with protocols adapted to pandemic situation. The treatment-related toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.03). RESULTS: All 350 patients treated for early-stage breast cancer were studied. Of them, 16 presented clinical symptoms of covid-19 infection, and of them 12 had clinical, CT scan and PCR confirmation. This entire cohort of 12 patients with median age of 56years (range: 42-72 years) underwent their radiotherapy. During the radiotherapy, nine patients presented radiodermatitis: eight grade 1 (66%) and one grade 2 (8%). Two patients with lymph nodes irradiation presented grade 2 oesophagitis. Late toxicity was evaluated 6 months after the end of the radiotherapy, and there was no radiation or covid lung sequel on the CT scans. One patient presented covid-related dyspnoea, and two had fibrosis. CONCLUSION: The half-year follow-up of prospective covid-19 cohort, treated for early-stage breast cancer demonstrated an acceptable toxicity profile with few low-grade adverse events. It seems that the covid-19 infection does not appear to increase the side effects of radiotherapy. Therefore radiotherapy should not be delayed.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Radiodermatitis , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Radiodermatitis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Breast ; 62 Suppl 1: S17-S24, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611638

ABSTRACT

Neoadjuvant treatment (NAT) has become an option in early stage (stage I-II) breast cancer (EBC). New advances in systemic and targeted therapies have increased rates of pathologic complete response increasing the number of patients undergoing NAT. Clear benefits of NAT are downstaging the tumor and the axillary nodes to de-escalate surgery and to evaluate response to treatment. Selection of patients for NAT in EBC rely in several factors that are related to patient characteristics (i.e, age and comorbidities), to tumor histology, to stage at diagnosis and to the potential changes in surgical or adjuvant treatments when NAT is administered. Imaging and histologic confirmation is performed to assess extent of disease y to confirm diagnosis. Besides mammogram and ultrasound, functional breast imaging MRI has been incorporated to better predict treatment response and residual disease. Contrast enhanced mammogram (CEM), shear wave elastography (SWE), or Dynamic Optical Breast Imaging (DOBI) are emerging techniques under investigation for assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy as well as for predicting response. Surgical plan should be delineated after NAT taking into account baseline characteristics, tumor response and patient desire. In the COVID era, we have witnessed also the increasing use of NAT in patients who may be directed to surgery, unable to have it performed as surgery has been reserved for emergency cases only.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Axilla/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Neoplasm Staging
15.
Einstein (Sao Paulo) ; 19: eAO6721, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599707

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer diagnosis in a breast imaging center. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study that included women submitted to breast exams and procedures in a private hospital in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, as from the period of most strict social isolation measures, in 2020 (separated in first period of social isolation, March 24 to June 21, 2020, and second period, June 22 to December 31, 2020), as compared to the same period in 2019. The number of exams, cancer detection rates, pathologic findings and risk factors were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 32,144 patients were included in the study. Breast imaging exams and procedures decreased by 78.9% in the first period, and 2.7% in the second period, in 2020. By the end of 2020, the number of breast cancer lesions detected was just six cases less than in 2019, although the number of patients submitted to mammograms was 35% lower. CONCLUSION: There was a drop in number of breast exams and cancer diagnoses in the first 90 days of the pandemic. The decrease in diagnosis of cancer was partially compensated in the second period, but the number of patients submitted to mammograms by the end of 2020 was lower, still considering a large number of patients with delayed exams.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 218(6): 997-998, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596422

ABSTRACT

This study describes 94 patients who presented with suspected COVID-19 vaccine-related axillary adenopathy on breast imaging. All biopsies recommended within 12 weeks of the second vaccine dose were benign. Among women not recommended for biopsy, the median interval between the second vaccine dose and ultrasound follow-up was 15.9 weeks. Three biopsies yielding malignant diagnoses were recommended 12.0-13.1 weeks after the second vaccine dose. Lengthening imaging follow-up to 12-16 weeks after the second dose may reduce unnecessary biopsy recommendations.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Vaccines , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Clin Imaging ; 82: 224-227, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559395

ABSTRACT

Disparities in screening mammography and barriers to accessing breast cancer screening are most prevalent among racial/ethnic minority and low-income women. The significant breast cancer mortality rates experienced in both Hispanic and African American populations are found to be connected to delayed screening. For these women to follow the screening guidelines outlined by the American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging, they must successfully navigate existing barriers to screening. These barriers include differential access to care, language barriers, and lack of medical insurance. The COVID-19 Pandemic has worsened the barriers to breast cancer screening faced by these groups of women. These barriers need to be addressed or they may further exacerbate disparities.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mammography , Mass Screening , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Acad Radiol ; 29(4): 501-507, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women who received a COVID-19 vaccination may display subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy on screening mammography, which can appear suspicious for malignancy, leading to additional diagnostic evaluation. PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy (sLAD) on screening mammogram in women who received either the first or second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech (Pfizer) or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines compared to women who have not. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this IRB-approved, HIPAA complaint study from 12/14/2020 to 4/14/2021, 1027 patients presented for screening mammography and met study inclusion criteria. Patients with history of baseline lymphadenopathy or prior cancer diagnosis were excluded. RESULTS: Of the 1027 women, 43 were recalled for unilateral sLAD. 34 women received a COVID-19 vaccination ipsilateral to the sLAD (Pfizer n=19, 44.2%; Moderna n=15, 34.9%), 9 did not (20.9%). Incidence of unilateral axillary sLAD was significantly higher (p-value<0.01) in those who received a COVID-19 vaccination within approximately 7 weeks preceding screening mammogram. 13.2% of patients who received the Pfizer vaccine and 9.5% of patients who received the Moderna vaccine developed sLAD. Moderna's vaccine elicited a more robust reaction in the elderly (Moderna 63.7 years vs. Pfizer 59.7 years). For both vaccines, sLAD resolved on average 46.5 days after the last COVID-19 vaccine (p=0.44). CONCLUSION: Women who have received either mRNA COVID-19 vaccines may benefit from scheduling their screening mammogram before vaccination or consider delaying screening mammography 8 weeks. While Pfizer may have an overall more robust immune response, Moderna may elicit a stronger immune response in elderly women. SUMMARY: Women who received a COVID-19 vaccination before screening mammography were significantly more likely to present with subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy than women who did not receive the vaccine. KEY RESULTS: 13.2% of women who received a Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine exhibited subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy compared to 9.5% of those who received the Moderna vaccine. Only 1.2 % of those who did not receive a vaccine presented with subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy. The average time of resolution of the lymphadenopathy on diagnostic mammogram was 46.5 days overall, with Pfizer-BioNTech taking 50.7 days and Moderna 41.5 days.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/epidemiology , Mammography , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Korean J Radiol ; 22(12): 1938-1945, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497013

ABSTRACT

Breast radiologists are increasingly seeing patients with axillary adenopathy related to COVID-19 vaccination. Vaccination can cause levels I-III axillary as well as cervical lymphadenopathy. Appropriate management of vaccine-related adenopathy may vary depending on clinical context. In patients with current or past history of malignancy, vaccine-related adenopathy can be indistinguishable from nodal metastasis. This article presents imaging findings of oncology patients with adenopathy seen in the axilla or neck on cross-sectional imaging (breast MRI, CT, or PET-CT) after COVID-19 vaccination. Management approach and rationale is discussed, along with consideration on strategies to minimize false positives in vaccinated cancer patients. Time interval between vaccination and adenopathy seen on breast MRI, CT, or PET-CT is also reported.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Vaccines , Axilla , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Future Oncol ; 17(34): 4757-4767, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484980

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since breast imaging requires very close contact with patients, a protocol is needed to perform safe daily screening activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methods: Patients were triaged and separated into three different clinical scenarios by performing a telephone questionnaire before each diagnostic exam or a nasopharyngeal swab before every recovery. Specific procedures for each scenario are described. Results: From July to October 2020, 994 exams were performed. A total of 16 cancers and 7 suspected COVID-19 patients were identified. No medical staff were infected. Conclusion: This protocol is an example of the practical use of guidelines applied to a breast unit to assist specialists in preventing COVID-19 infection and optimizing resources for breast cancer diagnosis.


Lay abstract On March 11th, 2020, the WHO officially declared the COVID-19 infection pandemic. Since breast cancer represents the most frequent cancer in women of all ages, and breast imaging examinations require very close contact with patients, a protocol was designed to optimize the management of patients and healthcare workers, performing strict COVID-19 screening and avoiding any impairment of survival of patients with breast cancer. Patients were separated into three different clinical scenarios (non-COVID-19 patients, suspected COVID-19 patients and confirmed COVID-19 patients) by performing a telephone questionnaire before each diagnostic exam or a nasopharyngeal swab before every recovery. Specific procedures for each scenario are described. Confirmed or suspected patients are rescheduled if not urgent. From July to October 2020, 994 exams were performed. A total of 16 cancers and 7 suspected COVID-19 patients were identified. No medical staff were infected. This study demonstrates efficacy in terms of continuity in the provision of an essential level of care in a breast cancer screening and ambulatory setting, providing an example of the practical use of guidelines applied to a breast unit, to assist specialists in preventing COVID-19 infection and optimizing resources for breast cancer diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL