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1.
Rev. saúde pública (Online) ; 55: 8, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1818704

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To report the decrease in breast imaging after covid-19 pandemic, obtaining the number of mammograms performed in 2019 and 2020. Additionally, to investigate if there was an increase in the proportion of women undergoing mammography for diagnostic purposes, with palpable lesions. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study, based on the number of mammograms performed by the Brazilian public health services, provided by DATASUS, an open access database. Mammograms from private institutions were not included. This study compares the number of mammograms performed in 2019 and 2020, in women aged 50-69 years, stratified by month, in each federal state, and the presence of palpable lumps (physician-reported). RESULTS: In total, 1,948,471 mammograms were performed in 2019 and 1,126,688 in 2020, for the population studied. These values represent a 42% decline. Monthly, a significant decreased is observed after April 2020. The results varied slightly according to federal state; yet the entire country was affected. Rondônia was the most affected state, with 67% decline. The proportion of women presenting palpable lumps increased from 7.06% on average in 2019 to 7.94% in 2020 (OR = 1.135, 95%CI 1.125-1.145, p = 0,001). DISCUSSION: The number of mammograms performed in 2020 declined considerably. Out of the women who presented for mammogram, the proportion of palpable lumps was significantly higher in 2020. Considering the detection rate of digital mammography, the loss of 800,000 exams means 4,000 undiagnosed breast cancer cases, by the end of 2020.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , Mammography , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Middle Aged
2.
Viruses ; 14(3)2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732251

ABSTRACT

Human breast cancer incidence varies by geographic location. More than 20 years ago, we proposed that zoonotic transmission of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) from the western European house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, might account for the regional differences in breast cancer incidence. In the intervening years, several developments provide additional support for this hypothesis, including the limited impact of genetic factors for breast cancer susceptibility revealed by genome-wide association studies and the strong effect of antiretroviral therapy to reduce breast cancer incidence. At the same time, economic globalization has further expanded the distribution of M. m. domesticus to Asia, leading to a significant increase in breast cancer incidence in this region. Here, we revisit this evidence and provide an update to the MMTV zoonotic hypothesis for human breast cancer at a time when the world is recovering from the global COVID-19 zoonotic pandemic. We present evidence that mouse population outbreaks are correlated with spikes in breast cancer incidence in Australia and New Zealand and that globalization has increased the range of M. m. domesticus and MMTV. Given the success of global vaccination campaigns for HPV to eradicate cervical cancer, a similar strategy for MMTV may be warranted. Until breast cancer incidence is reduced by such an approach, zoonotic transmission of MMTV from mice to humans as an etiologic factor for breast cancer will remain controversial.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Animals , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Incidence , Mammary Tumor Virus, Mouse/genetics , Mice
3.
Eur J Cancer ; 159: 38-51, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719648

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Over 1 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been already administered across the United States, the United Kingdom and the European Union at the time of writing. Furthermore, 1.82 million booster doses have been administered in the US since 13th August, and similar booster programmes are currently planned or under consideration in the UK and the EU beginning in the autumn of 2021. Early reports showed an association between vaccine administration and the development of ipsilateral axillary and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy, which could interfere with the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of breast cancer patients. In this paper, we review the available evidence on vaccine-related lymphadenopathy, and we discuss the clinical implications of the same on breast cancer diagnosis and management. METHODS: A literature search was performed - PubMed, Ovid Medline, Scopus, CINHAL, Springer Nature, ScienceDirect, Academic Search Premier and the Directory of Open Access Journals were searched for articles reporting on regional palpable or image-detected lymphadenopathy following COVID-19 vaccination. Separately, we compiled a series of case studies from the University Hospitals of Derby and Burton, United Kingdom and the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, United States of America, to illustrate the impact that regional lymphadenopathy post-COVID-19 vaccination can have on the diagnosis and management of patients being seen in diagnostic and therapeutic breast clinics. RESULTS: From the literature search, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria (n = 2057 patients, 737 with lymphadenopathy). The incidence of lymphadenopathy ranged between 14.5% and 53% and persisted for >6 weeks in 29% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians managing breast cancer patients should be aware that the COVID-19 vaccination may result in regional lymphadenopathy in a significant number of patients, which can result in unnecessary investigations, treatment and increased patient anxiety. An accurate COVID-19 vaccination history should be collected from all patients where regional lymphadenopathy is a clinical and/or an imaging finding and then combined with clinical judgement when managing individual cases.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Mammography , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Vaccination/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Diagnosis, Differential , Diagnostic Errors , Female , Humans , Incidence , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , Lymphadenopathy/epidemiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
4.
Future Oncol ; 18(4): 437-443, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690507

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to explore the hypothesis that the stage of breast cancer at initial diagnosis in 2020 is more advanced compared with 2019. Methods: Tumor, node, metastasis and Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) stages of new breast cancer diagnoses at the Bucks Breast Unit from May 2019 to October 2020 were reviewed. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Average UICC stage increased from 1a in 2019 to 2a in 2020 (p < 0.01). Excluding cancers detected through screening, UICC stage still increased from 1b in 2019 to 2a in 2020 (p = 0.0184). There was a significant increase in the percentage of node-positive patients (p = 0.0063) and patients with metastatic disease (p = 0.0295) on initial presentation. Conclusion: Overall, patients presented with higher UICC stages and more node-positive and metastatic disease on initial diagnosis in 2020 compared with 2019.


Plain language summary During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, breast cancer screening services were halted across the UK. Patients were also encouraged to stay home and to seek medical attention only in an emergency. The authors hypothesized that this might have led to delays in presentation to breast cancer clinics or missed cancer diagnoses. While patients are at home with undiagnosed breast cancer, the cancer can grow and spread. The authors evaluated whether these delays in presentation led to patients presenting with more advanced breast cancers when they finally presented to a breast cancer clinic. The authors collected data on breast cancer stages for a patient group in 2020 (during the height of the pandemic) and compared them with a patient group in 2019. The authors' results did indeed show that patients presented, on average, with more advanced breast cancers in 2020 compared with 2019.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Missed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Metastasis/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
Can J Anaesth ; 69(4): 485-493, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has markedly increased delays in oncologic surgeries because of the virus's impact on traditional anesthetic management. Novel protocols, developed to protect patients and medical professionals, have altered the ways and instances in which general anesthesia (GA) can be safely performed. To reduce virus exposure related to aerosol-generating procedures, it is now recommended to avoid GA when feasible and promote regional anesthesia instead. At our institution, we observed faster postoperative recovery in patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery instead of GA. This led us to formally evaluate whether regional anesthesia instead of GA helped improve time to hospital discharge. METHODS: We conducted a historical cohort study to retrospectively analyze two cohorts of patients: prepandemic vs intrapandemic. We obtained approval from our institutional ethics committee to review files of consecutive patients who underwent breast cancer surgery between 30 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 (intrapandemic group; N = 106) and consecutive patients-moving backwards-from 28 February 2020 to 6 December 2019 (prepandemic group; N = 104). The primary outcome was the length of time between the end of surgery to readiness for hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), the need for postoperative analgesia, and the duration of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). RESULTS: The median [interquartile range (IQR)] time to readiness for hospital discharge was significantly lower in patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery compared with GA (intrapandemic group, 119 [99-170] min vs prepandemic group, 191 [164-234] min; P < 0.001) as was the incidence of PONV (3% vs 11%; P = 0.03) and median [IQR] PACU durations of stay (29 [21-39] min vs 46 [37-63] min; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery in the intrapandemic group were ready for hospital discharge earlier, spent less time in the PACU, and experienced less PONV than those who received GA in the prepandemic group. With growing surgical wait times, concerns related to aerosol-generating procedures, and recommendations to avoid GA when feasible, paravertebral blocks as the principal anesthetic modality for breast cancer surgery offered benefits for patients and medical teams.


RéSUMé: CONTEXTE: La pandémie de COVID-19 a considérablement augmenté les retards dans les chirurgies oncologiques en raison de l'impact du virus sur la prise en charge anesthésique traditionnelle. De nouveaux protocoles, mis au point pour protéger les patients et les professionnels de la santé, ont modifié les façons et les cas dans lesquels une anesthésie générale (AG) peut être réalisée en toute sécurité. Afin de réduire l'exposition au virus liée aux interventions génératrices d'aérosols, il est maintenant recommandé d'éviter l'AG lorsque possible et de privilégier l'anesthésie régionale. Dans notre établissement, nous avons observé une récupération postopératoire plus rapide chez les patientes ayant reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein au lieu d'une AG. Cela nous a menés à évaluer de façon formelle si l'anesthésie régionale au lieu de l'AG avait contribué à réduire les délais jusqu'au congé de l'hôpital. MéTHODE: Nous avons réalisé une étude de cohorte historique afin d'analyser rétrospectivement deux cohortes de patientes : prépandémie vs intrapandémie. Nous avons obtenu l'approbation de notre comité d'éthique institutionnel pour examiner les dossiers de patientes consécutives ayant bénéficié d'une chirurgie de cancer du sein entre le 30 mars 2020 et le 30 juin 2020 (groupe intrapandémie; n = 106) et des patientes consécutives ­ en reculant ­ du 28 février 2020 au 6 décembre 2019 (groupe prépandémie; n = 104). Le critère d'évaluation principal était le délai entre la fin de la chirurgie et le moment où les patientes étaient prêtes à recevoir leur congé de l'hôpital. Les critères d'évaluation secondaires comprenaient l'incidence de nausées et vomissements postopératoires (NVPO), la nécessité d'une analgésie postopératoire et la durée de séjour en salle de réveil (SDR). RéSULTATS: Le délai médian [écart interquartile (ÉIQ)] jusqu'à la disposition au congé de l'hôpital était significativement plus court chez les patientes ayant reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein plutôt qu'une AG (groupe intrapandémie, 119 [99-170] min vs groupe prépandémie, 191 [164­234] min; P < 0,001), tout comme l'incidence de NVPO (3 % vs 11 %; P = 0,03) et les durées médianes [ÉIQ] de séjour en salle de réveil (29 [21­39] min vs 46 [37­63] min; P < 0,001). CONCLUSION: Les patientes qui ont reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein dans le groupe intrapandémie étaient prêtes à quitter l'hôpital plus tôt, ont passé moins de temps en salle de réveil et ont ressenti moins de NVPO que celles qui ont reçu une AG dans le groupe prépandémie. Avec des temps d'attente pour accès à la chirurgie de plus en plus longs, des préoccupations liées aux interventions génératrices d'aérosols et les recommandations d'éviter l'AG lorsque possible, les blocs paravertébraux ont offert des avantages aux patientes et aux équipes médicales en tant que principale modalité anesthésique pour la chirurgie de cancer du sein.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Conduction , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Anesthesia, Conduction/adverse effects , Anesthesia, General/methods , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Pain, Postoperative/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
7.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 191(3): 665-675, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608179

ABSTRACT

PURPOSES: To delineate operational changes in Kaiser Permanente Northern California breast care and evaluate the impact of these changes during the initial COVID-19 Shelter-in-Place period (SiP, 3/17/20-5/17/20). METHODS: By extracting data from institutional databases and reviewing electronic medical charts, we compared clinical and treatment characteristics of breast cancer patients diagnosed 3/17/20-5/17/20 to those diagnosed 3/17/19-5/17/2019. Outcomes included time from biopsy to consultation and treatment. Comparisons were made using Chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. RESULTS: Fewer new breast cancers were diagnosed in 2020 during the SiP period than during a similar period in 2019 (n = 247 vs n = 703). A higher percentage presented with symptomatic disease in 2020 than 2019 (78% vs 37%, p < 0.001). Higher percentages of 2020 patients presented with grade 3 (37% vs 25%, p = 0.004) and triple-negative tumors (16% vs 10%, p = 0.04). A smaller percentage underwent surgery first in 2020 (71% vs 83%, p < 0.001) and a larger percentage had neoadjuvant chemotherapy (16% vs 11%, p < 0.001). Telehealth utilization increased from 0.8% in 2019 to 70.0% in 2020. Times to surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy were shorter in 2020 than 2019 (19 vs 26 days, p < 0.001, and 23 vs 28 days, p = 0.03, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: During SiP, fewer breast cancers were diagnosed than during a similar period in 2019, and a higher proportion presented with symptomatic disease. Early-stage breast cancer diagnoses decreased, while metastatic cancer diagnoses remained similar. Telehealth increased significantly, and times to treatment were shorter in 2020 than 2019. Our system continued to provide timely breast cancer treatment despite significant pandemic-driven disruption.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24501, 2021 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592860

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, breast and ovarian cancer survivors experienced more anxiety and depression than before the pandemic. Studies have not investigated the similarities of this trend among BRCA1/2-positive women who are considered high risk for these cancers. The current study examines the impact of COVID-19 experiences on anxiety and depression in a sample of BRCA1/2-positive women in the U.S. 211 BRCA1/2-positive women from medically underserved backgrounds completed an online survey. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression for associations between COVID-19 experiences and self-reported anxiety and depression stratified by demographic factors. Overall, women who reported COVID-19 stigma or discrimination (aOR, 5.14, 95% CI [1.55, 17.0]) experienced significantly more depressive symptoms than women who did not report this experience. Racial/ethnic minority women caring for someone at home during COVID-19 were 3.70 times more likely (95% CI [1.01, 13.5]) to report high anxiety while non-Hispanic white women were less likely (aOR, 0.34, 95% CI [0.09, 1.30], p interaction = 0.011). To date, this is the first study to analyze anxiety and depression considering several COVID-19 predictors among BRCA1/2-positive women. Our findings can be used to inform future research and advise COVID-19-related mental health resources specific to these women.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety , BRCA1 Protein/genetics , BRCA2 Protein/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Self Report , United States/epidemiology
10.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1356, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients are severely psychologically affected by breast cancer diagnosis and subsequent therapeutic procedures. The COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions on public life have additionally caused significant psychological distress for much of the population. It is therefore plausible that breast cancer patients might be particularly susceptible to the additional psychological stress caused by the pandemic, increasing suffering. In this study we therefore aimed to assess the level of psychological distress currently experienced by a defined group of breast cancer patients in our breast cancer centre, compared to distress levels pre-COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Female breast cancer patients of all ages receiving either adjuvant, neoadjuvant, or palliative therapies were recruited for the study. All patients were screened for current or previous COVID-19 infection. The participants completed a self-designed COVID-19 pandemic questionnaire, the Stress and Coping Inventory (SCI), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Distress Thermometer (DT), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ C30, and the BR23. RESULTS: Eighty-two breast cancer patients were included. Therapy status and social demographic factors did not have a significant effect on the distress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the DT pre and during COVID-19 pandemic did not differ significantly. Using the self-designed COVID-19 pandemic questionnaire, we detected three distinct subgroups demonstrating different levels of concerns in relation to SARS-CoV-2. The subgroup with the highest levels of concern reported significantly decreased life quality, related parameters and symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This monocentric study demonstrated that the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected psychological health in a subpopulation of breast cancer patients. The application of a self-created "COVID-19 pandemic questionnaire" could potentially be used to help identify breast cancer patients who are susceptible to increased psychological distress due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore may need additional intensive psychological support. TRIAL REGISTRATION: DRKS-ID: DRKS00022507 .


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , Germany , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25404, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite Saudi Arabia's free and well-established cancer care program, breast cancer incidence and mortality are rising. Husbands' knowledge, and wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening are not well understood in Saudi Arabia. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate husbands' knowledge, and wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected data from 403 husbands in the holy city of Makkah through an online self-reported questionnaire over a period of 2 months, from May 6 to July 7, 2020. Tabulation, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses were the major tools used for data analysis. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the association between husbands' knowledge and wives' behavior regarding breast cancer screening methods. RESULTS: Husbands' knowledge score (a 1-point increase) was significantly associated with the wives' utilization of mammograms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.089, 95% CI 1.024-1.159) and breast self-examination (AOR 1.177, 95% CI 1.105-1.255). Husbands' knowledge also influenced the wives' attitudes toward learning about breast self-examination (AOR 1.138, 95% CI 1.084-1.195). There was no significant association between husbands' knowledge and wives' utilization of clinical breast examination. However, richer husbands showed a socioeconomic gradient concerning their wives' utilization of clinical breast examinations (AOR 2.603, 95% CI 1.269-5.341). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, husbands' knowledge of breast cancer influences wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening methods in Saudi Arabia. Thus, interventions delivered to husbands might increase breast cancer awareness and survival.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Internet Use/trends , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia , Self Report , Spouses , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572461

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had critical consequences for cancer care delivery, including altered treatment protocols and delayed services that may affect patients' quality of life and long-term survival. Breast cancer patients from minoritized racial and ethnic groups already experience worse outcomes, which may have been exacerbated by treatment delays and social determinants of health (SDoH). This protocol details a mixed-methods study aimed at comparing cancer care disruption among a diverse sample of women (non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black/African American, and Hispanic/Latina) and assessing how proximal, intermediate, and distal SDoH differentially contribute to care continuity and health-related quality of life. An embedded mixed-methods design will be implemented. Eligible participants will complete an online survey, followed by a semi-structured interview (with a subset of participants) to further understand factors that influence continuity of care, treatment decision-making, and self-reported engagement. The study will identify potentially modifiable factors to inform future models of care delivery and improve care transitions. These data will provide the necessary evidence to inform whether a subsequent, multilevel intervention is warranted to improve quality of care delivery in the COVID-19 aftermath. Additionally, results can be used to identify ways to leverage existing social resources to help manage and support patients' outcomes.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Clin Imaging ; 82: 224-227, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559395

ABSTRACT

Disparities in screening mammography and barriers to accessing breast cancer screening are most prevalent among racial/ethnic minority and low-income women. The significant breast cancer mortality rates experienced in both Hispanic and African American populations are found to be connected to delayed screening. For these women to follow the screening guidelines outlined by the American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging, they must successfully navigate existing barriers to screening. These barriers include differential access to care, language barriers, and lack of medical insurance. The COVID-19 Pandemic has worsened the barriers to breast cancer screening faced by these groups of women. These barriers need to be addressed or they may further exacerbate disparities.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mammography , Mass Screening , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 43(11): 840-846, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555815

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to assess the feasibility and patient satisfaction of teleoncology orientation in a vulnerable population of breast cancer patients assessed in a government health system during the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. METHODS: Eligible patients received an invitation to receive remote care to minimize exposure to an environment in which the risk of respiratory infection was present. The means of communication was telephone through an application that allows free conversation with no charge. An anonymous-response questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale was sent through a cell phone application or e-mail directly to each patient or close relative of the patient immediately after teleconsultation. Responses to the questions, which addressed utility, facility, interface quality, interaction quality, reliability, satisfaction, and interest in future evaluation, were compiled and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 176 eligible patients scheduled for consultation were evaluated and 98 were included. Seventy (71.4%) successfully undertook the teleorientation. The questionnaire was submitted by 43 (61.4%) patients. The overall teleoncology orientation was classified as very positive by 41 (95.3%) patients. Specifically, regarding the questionnaire items, 43 (100%) patients scored 4 or 5 (agreed that the teleconsultation was beneficial) concerning the facility, followed by 42 (97.2%) for the interface quality, 41 (95.3%) for both utility and interaction quality, 40 (93%) for satisfaction and interest in future evaluation, and, finally, 39 (90.6%) for reliability. CONCLUSION: Teleoncology orientation of low-income breast cancer patients is most feasible and leads to high patient satisfaction.


OBJETIVO: O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a viabilidade e satisfação em relação à orientação teleoncológica realizada em população vulnerável de pacientes com câncer de mama e provenientes do sistema público de saúde durante a pandemia do coronavírus em 2020. MéTODOS: Pacientes elegíveis foram agendados para atendimento remoto visando minimizar exposição a ambientes com risco de infecção respiratória. O meio de comunicação foi o telefone, pois permite conversa sem custos. Um questionário anônimo com base na escala Likert foi enviado através de aplicativo de telefone celular ou e-mail para paciente ou familiares, logo após a teleconsulta. As respostas, que abordavam utilidade, facilidade, qualidade da interface, qualidade da interação, confiabilidade, satisfação e interesse em avaliações futuras, foram compiladas e analisadas. RESULTADOS: Um total de 176 pacientes elegíveis para teleconsulta foram avaliados e 98 foram incluídos. Setenta (71,4%) realizaram a teleorientação com sucesso. O questionário foi respondido por 43 (61,4%) pacientes. De maneira geral, a teleorientação foi classificada como muito positiva por 41 (95,3%) pacientes. Em relação aos itens avaliados, 43 (100%) pacientes pontuaram 4 ou 5 (concordaram que a teleconsulta era benéfica) em relação à facilidade do serviço, seguido por 42 (97,2%) para a qualidade da interface, 41 (95,3%) tanto para a utilidade quanto para a qualidade da interação, 40 (93%) para satisfação e interesse em avaliação futura e 39 (90,6%) para confiabilidade em relação ao método. CONCLUSãO: A orientação teleoncológica em pacientes de baixa renda e com câncer de mama mostrou ser viável e com altas taxas de satisfação.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 191(3): 553-564, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544493

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate perceived access to health care and preferences for health care provision among patients (being) treated for breast cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Longitudinal study within the prospective, multicenter UMBRELLA cohort of patients (being) treated for breast cancer. All cohort participants enrolled in UMBRELLA between October 2013 and November 2020 were sent a COVID-19-specific survey during the first and second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, i.e., April 2020 and November 2020, respectively. RESULTS: In total, 1106 (69.3%) and 822 (50.9%) cohort participants completed the survey in the first and second wave, respectively. The proportion of patients experiencing that their treatment or follow-up care was affected due to COVID-19 decreased from 28.4% (n = 198) in April 2020 to 14.8% (n = 103) in November 2020. Throughout the pandemic, one or more hospital consultations were postponed in 10.0% (n = 82) of all patients and changed into a teleconsultation in 23.1% (n = 190). The proportion of patients who experienced a higher threshold to contact their general practitioner due to COVID-19 decreased from 29.9% (n = 204) in the first wave to 20.8% (n = 145) in the second wave. In-person consultations remained most preferred in 35.2% (n = 289) of all patients. Nearly half of all patients (48.3%, n = 396) indicated that telehealth would be a useful alternative for in-person consultations in future. CONCLUSION: Perceived access to health care has improved substantially throughout the pandemic. Digital care is well received by patients (being) treated for breast cancer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 191(2): 385-388, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530340

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Breast cancer survivors take vitamins and supplements to bolster their general health and to decrease the risk of cancer recurrence. Healthcare providers are frequently unaware of their patients non-prescription supplement use. The aim of this study was to study the type and the documentation of patients' dietary supplements and vitamins in the electronic medical record (EMR). METHODS: 50/51 female breast cancer survivors seen over a 7 week period consented to the study. Mean age was 70 and mean years since diagnosis was 13.9. Informed consent and documentation of supplement and vitamin use was obtained by the nurse practitioner the day before the visit. Study data were collected and managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at Weill Cornell Medicine. RESULTS: Of the 50 study patients, 90% were taking one or more vitamins and/or supplements (mean = 2.4, range = 1-9). The most common were Vitamin D, calcium, and vitamin C. Reasons for vitamin and supplement use included the recommendation by their physician or friend and prevention of bone loss or catching a cold. Five patients mentioned immunity or prevention of COVID-19. The patient reported list was compared with the medication list used by multiple providers in the electronic medical record (EMR). None of the 50 study patients had an accurate list of their vitamins and supplements in the EMR. CONCLUSION: 90% of the breast cancer survivors in our study were taking dietary supplements for a variety of reasons. None had an accurate list in the EMR. We strongly recommend more attention to accurate and easily accessed vitamin and supplement recording by providers.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Dietary Supplements , Documentation , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Acad Radiol ; 29(4): 501-507, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women who received a COVID-19 vaccination may display subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy on screening mammography, which can appear suspicious for malignancy, leading to additional diagnostic evaluation. PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy (sLAD) on screening mammogram in women who received either the first or second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech (Pfizer) or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines compared to women who have not. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this IRB-approved, HIPAA complaint study from 12/14/2020 to 4/14/2021, 1027 patients presented for screening mammography and met study inclusion criteria. Patients with history of baseline lymphadenopathy or prior cancer diagnosis were excluded. RESULTS: Of the 1027 women, 43 were recalled for unilateral sLAD. 34 women received a COVID-19 vaccination ipsilateral to the sLAD (Pfizer n=19, 44.2%; Moderna n=15, 34.9%), 9 did not (20.9%). Incidence of unilateral axillary sLAD was significantly higher (p-value<0.01) in those who received a COVID-19 vaccination within approximately 7 weeks preceding screening mammogram. 13.2% of patients who received the Pfizer vaccine and 9.5% of patients who received the Moderna vaccine developed sLAD. Moderna's vaccine elicited a more robust reaction in the elderly (Moderna 63.7 years vs. Pfizer 59.7 years). For both vaccines, sLAD resolved on average 46.5 days after the last COVID-19 vaccine (p=0.44). CONCLUSION: Women who have received either mRNA COVID-19 vaccines may benefit from scheduling their screening mammogram before vaccination or consider delaying screening mammography 8 weeks. While Pfizer may have an overall more robust immune response, Moderna may elicit a stronger immune response in elderly women. SUMMARY: Women who received a COVID-19 vaccination before screening mammography were significantly more likely to present with subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy than women who did not receive the vaccine. KEY RESULTS: 13.2% of women who received a Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine exhibited subclinical axillary lymphadenopathy compared to 9.5% of those who received the Moderna vaccine. Only 1.2 % of those who did not receive a vaccine presented with subclinical unilateral axillary lymphadenopathy. The average time of resolution of the lymphadenopathy on diagnostic mammogram was 46.5 days overall, with Pfizer-BioNTech taking 50.7 days and Moderna 41.5 days.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Lymphadenopathy , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Lymphadenopathy/chemically induced , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/epidemiology , Mammography , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Med Oncol ; 39(1): 5, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504271

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on patients undergoing radiotherapy by comparing the patterns of unplanned radiotherapy interruption before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. We enrolled patients who received their first dose of radiotherapy for breast cancer between January 28 and July 31, 2019 and between January 28, 2020, and July 31, 2020. We compared the radiotherapy interruption patterns in 2019 with those in 2020 to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on treatment interruption. Between January 28 and July 31, 2019, 287 patients with breast cancer received radiotherapy. Among them, 19 patients (6.6%) experienced treatment interruption; the reasons for treatment interruption were radiotherapy-related side effects (10 patients, 52.6%), other medical reasons (three patients, 15.8%), and personal reasons (six patients, 31.6%). Between January 28 and July 31, 2020, 279 patients with breast cancer received radiotherapy. Among them, 23 patients (8.2%) experienced treatment interruption; the reasons for treatment interruption were radiotherapy-related side effects (eight patients, 35%) and COVID-19 screening clinic-related reasons (six patients, 26.1%). Among the six patients with screening clinic-related causes of radiotherapy interruption, five had asymptomatic fever and one had mild cold-like symptoms. The duration of treatment interruption was longer in patients with screening clinic-related interruptions than in those with interruptions because of other causes (p = 0.019). Multivariate analysis showed that cancer stage and radiotherapy volume did not significantly affect treatment interruption. The radiotherapy of certain patients was suspended despite the lack of a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. Precise and systematic criteria for the management of patients with suspected COVID-19 are needed, and the opinion of radiation oncologist in charge of the patient must also be considered.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic
20.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 189(1): 285-296, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491193

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Advanced breast cancer (BC) at diagnosis is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including among women living with HIV (WLWH). In public hospitals across South Africa (SA), 10-15% of women present with stage IV BC, compared to < 5% in the United States (US); 20% of new BC diagnoses in SA are in WLWH. We evaluated the impact of HIV on overall survival (OS) among women with stage IV BC. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with stage IV BC between February 2, 2015 and September 18, 2019 at six public hospitals in SA. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate the association between HIV status and OS. RESULTS: Among 550 eligible women, 147 (26.7%) were WLWH. Compared to HIV-negative BC patients, WLWH were younger (median age 45 vs. 60 years, p < 0.001), predominantly black (95.9% vs. 77.9%, p < 0.001), and more likely to have hormone receptor-negative (hormone-negative) BC (32.7% vs. 22.6%, p = 0.016). Most women received systemic cancer-directed therapy (80.1%). HIV status was not associated with treatment or OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.13 [95%CI 0.89-1.44]). On exploratory subgroup analysis, WLWH and hormone-negative BC had shorter OS compared to HIV-uninfected women (1-year OS: 27.1% vs. 48.8%, p = 0.003; HR 1.94 [95%CI 1.27-2.94]; p = 0.002), which was not observed for hormone receptor-positive BC. CONCLUSION: HIV status was not associated with worse OS in women with stage IV BC in SA and cannot account for the poor survival in this cohort. Subgroup analysis revealed that WLWH with hormone-negative BC had worse OS, which warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , HIV Infections , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , South Africa/epidemiology , United States
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