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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723591

ABSTRACT

A woman in her 80s was referred as an emergency case with a large oedematous and ulcerating lesion of the right breast. There was a 5-month history of increasing breast volume with new onset skin breakdown and discharge. Imaging revealed an extensive heterogeneous mass requiring drainage. No diagnosis was received from multiple biopsies and immediate surgical resection of the breast and axillary sampling was prioritised given the deteriorating patient condition. Postoperative histology identified a biphasic Adenomyoepithelioma of low malignant potential, a rare presentation compounding the complexity of management. The diagnostic uncertainty of this case highlighted the importance of MDT collaboration and the flexibility of current management pathways when dealing with cases requiring urgent surgical intervention. Axillary sampling in the context of unsuccessful preoperative biopsy represented a comprehensive means for assessing the need for further surgical or systemic management in the context of unconfirmed malignancy in a deteriorating patient.


Subject(s)
Adenomyoepithelioma , Breast Neoplasms , Adenomyoepithelioma/diagnostic imaging , Adenomyoepithelioma/surgery , Biopsy , Breast/diagnostic imaging , Breast/surgery , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Uncertainty
2.
Can J Anaesth ; 69(4): 485-493, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has markedly increased delays in oncologic surgeries because of the virus's impact on traditional anesthetic management. Novel protocols, developed to protect patients and medical professionals, have altered the ways and instances in which general anesthesia (GA) can be safely performed. To reduce virus exposure related to aerosol-generating procedures, it is now recommended to avoid GA when feasible and promote regional anesthesia instead. At our institution, we observed faster postoperative recovery in patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery instead of GA. This led us to formally evaluate whether regional anesthesia instead of GA helped improve time to hospital discharge. METHODS: We conducted a historical cohort study to retrospectively analyze two cohorts of patients: prepandemic vs intrapandemic. We obtained approval from our institutional ethics committee to review files of consecutive patients who underwent breast cancer surgery between 30 March 2020 and 30 June 2020 (intrapandemic group; N = 106) and consecutive patients-moving backwards-from 28 February 2020 to 6 December 2019 (prepandemic group; N = 104). The primary outcome was the length of time between the end of surgery to readiness for hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), the need for postoperative analgesia, and the duration of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). RESULTS: The median [interquartile range (IQR)] time to readiness for hospital discharge was significantly lower in patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery compared with GA (intrapandemic group, 119 [99-170] min vs prepandemic group, 191 [164-234] min; P < 0.001) as was the incidence of PONV (3% vs 11%; P = 0.03) and median [IQR] PACU durations of stay (29 [21-39] min vs 46 [37-63] min; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received paravertebral blocks for breast cancer surgery in the intrapandemic group were ready for hospital discharge earlier, spent less time in the PACU, and experienced less PONV than those who received GA in the prepandemic group. With growing surgical wait times, concerns related to aerosol-generating procedures, and recommendations to avoid GA when feasible, paravertebral blocks as the principal anesthetic modality for breast cancer surgery offered benefits for patients and medical teams.


RéSUMé: CONTEXTE: La pandémie de COVID-19 a considérablement augmenté les retards dans les chirurgies oncologiques en raison de l'impact du virus sur la prise en charge anesthésique traditionnelle. De nouveaux protocoles, mis au point pour protéger les patients et les professionnels de la santé, ont modifié les façons et les cas dans lesquels une anesthésie générale (AG) peut être réalisée en toute sécurité. Afin de réduire l'exposition au virus liée aux interventions génératrices d'aérosols, il est maintenant recommandé d'éviter l'AG lorsque possible et de privilégier l'anesthésie régionale. Dans notre établissement, nous avons observé une récupération postopératoire plus rapide chez les patientes ayant reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein au lieu d'une AG. Cela nous a menés à évaluer de façon formelle si l'anesthésie régionale au lieu de l'AG avait contribué à réduire les délais jusqu'au congé de l'hôpital. MéTHODE: Nous avons réalisé une étude de cohorte historique afin d'analyser rétrospectivement deux cohortes de patientes : prépandémie vs intrapandémie. Nous avons obtenu l'approbation de notre comité d'éthique institutionnel pour examiner les dossiers de patientes consécutives ayant bénéficié d'une chirurgie de cancer du sein entre le 30 mars 2020 et le 30 juin 2020 (groupe intrapandémie; n = 106) et des patientes consécutives ­ en reculant ­ du 28 février 2020 au 6 décembre 2019 (groupe prépandémie; n = 104). Le critère d'évaluation principal était le délai entre la fin de la chirurgie et le moment où les patientes étaient prêtes à recevoir leur congé de l'hôpital. Les critères d'évaluation secondaires comprenaient l'incidence de nausées et vomissements postopératoires (NVPO), la nécessité d'une analgésie postopératoire et la durée de séjour en salle de réveil (SDR). RéSULTATS: Le délai médian [écart interquartile (ÉIQ)] jusqu'à la disposition au congé de l'hôpital était significativement plus court chez les patientes ayant reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein plutôt qu'une AG (groupe intrapandémie, 119 [99-170] min vs groupe prépandémie, 191 [164­234] min; P < 0,001), tout comme l'incidence de NVPO (3 % vs 11 %; P = 0,03) et les durées médianes [ÉIQ] de séjour en salle de réveil (29 [21­39] min vs 46 [37­63] min; P < 0,001). CONCLUSION: Les patientes qui ont reçu des blocs paravertébraux pour une chirurgie de cancer du sein dans le groupe intrapandémie étaient prêtes à quitter l'hôpital plus tôt, ont passé moins de temps en salle de réveil et ont ressenti moins de NVPO que celles qui ont reçu une AG dans le groupe prépandémie. Avec des temps d'attente pour accès à la chirurgie de plus en plus longs, des préoccupations liées aux interventions génératrices d'aérosols et les recommandations d'éviter l'AG lorsque possible, les blocs paravertébraux ont offert des avantages aux patientes et aux équipes médicales en tant que principale modalité anesthésique pour la chirurgie de cancer du sein.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Conduction , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Anesthesia, Conduction/adverse effects , Anesthesia, General/methods , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Pain, Postoperative/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
3.
Breast Dis ; 41(1): 1-3, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604128

ABSTRACT

During the first hit of SARS-COVID pandemic, an important reorganization of Healthcare Services has been done, and new protocols and pathways to protect frail patients like oncological patients were designed. The second hit of pandemic had stressed these new pathways and suggests to health-workers some improvements for safer management of patents.We reported our experience in organizing the clinical pathway of neoadjuvant therapy candidate patients based on the execution of sentinel lympho-node biopsy and the placement of implantable venous access port in the same access to operating room before neoadjuvant chemotherapy suggesting a possible organizational model. In the period October-December 2020 we have included in this new type of path twelve patients and we have not registered any cases of COVID among the patients included. We think this new path, adopted amid the second hit, will be useful for all Breast Units that are facing the challenge of guaranteeing the highest standards of care in a historical moment where the health emergency occupies the efforts of health workers and the economic resources of health systems.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Catheterization, Central Venous/methods , Infection Control/methods , Patient Safety , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Catheterization, Central Venous/instrumentation , Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Central Venous Catheters , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/standards
4.
J Surg Oncol ; 125(4): 596-602, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: With increased neoadjuvant therapy recommendations for early-stage breast cancer patients due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative that molecular diagnostic assays provide reliable results from preoperative core needle biopsies (CNB). The study objective was to determine the concordance of MammaPrint and BluePrint results between matched CNB and surgical resection (SR) specimens. METHODS: Matched tumor specimens (n = 121) were prospectively collected from women enrolled in the FLEX trial (NCT03053193). Concordance is reported using overall percentage agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient. Correlation is reported using Pearson correlation coefficient. RESULTS: We found good concordance for MammaPrint results between matched tumor samples (90.9%, κ = 0.817), and a very strong correlation of MammaPrint indices (r = 0.94). The concordance of BluePrint subtyping in matched samples was also excellent (98.3%). CONCLUSIONS: CNB samples demonstrated high concordance with paired SR samples for MammaPrint risk classification and BluePrint molecular subtyping, suggesting that physicians are provided with accurate prognostic information that can be used to guide therapy decisions.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Clinical Decision Rules , Genomics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment
5.
Semin Radiat Oncol ; 32(2): 155-158, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586521

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer in older patients presents an increasing health care challenge. Hypofractionated dose schedules of 15/16 daily fractions of postoperative radiotherapy over 3/3.5 weeks have been established in clinical trials with long term follow up as safe and effective and become the standard of care after breast conserving therapy for most older patients. Emerging clinical trial data are pushing the limits of hypofractionation to even shorter schedules over a week. In this mini-review the applicability of this new data to older patients is discussed and the development of guidelines for hypofractionated dose fractionation schedules adapted to the COVID19 pandemic for this age group.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Female , Humans , Mastectomy, Segmental , Radiation Dose Hypofractionation , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
6.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(4): 2244-2252, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533390

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen major shifts in the delivery of health care across the world, including adoption of telemedicine. We present a survey of patient experience with telemedicine for the treatment of breast cancer. METHODS: A questionnaire designed to assess patient satisfaction with telemedicine was distributed to all patients who underwent surgery at the Providence Breast Centre (PBC) for breast cancer or benign/high-risk lesions with surgery follow-up dates between October 13 and December 31, 2020. Surveys were conducted via phone or at in-person follow-ups. RESULTS: A total of 123 of 172 (72%) eligible patients completed the survey; 85% of these patients enjoyed their telemedicine consultation, 93% found there was enough time for dialogue, 66% would choose to have a telemedicine consultation again, 79% would recommend telemedicine at PBC to a friend or family member, and 92% found Zoom© easy to use. When asked whether they prefer a telemedicine initial consultation over an in-person, 28% of patients agreed. When patients are analyzed according to their home address, those more than 10-km away from PBC prefer telemedicine over in-person appointments (37%) more often than those who live less than 10-km away (23%) (p = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS: Patients report a high level of satisfaction with telemedicine. It may be worthwhile to continue telemedicine beyond the pandemic era, due to its convenience, efficiency, and low-cost while keeping patients, physicians, and office staff safe. It also may be more useful in large geographic areas, such as British Columbia to increase access to care.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Outcome Assessment , Patient Satisfaction
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21526, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500514

ABSTRACT

Earlier in 2020, seven Italian regions, which cover 62% of the Italian population, set up the Mimico-19 network to monitor the side effects of the restrictive measures against Covid-19 on volumes and quality of care. To this aim, we retrospectively analysed hospital discharges data, computing twelve indicators of volume and performance in three clinical areas: cardiology, oncology, and orthopaedics. Weekly indicators for the period January-July 2020 were compared with the corresponding average for 2018-2019; comparisons were performed within 3 sub-periods: pre-lockdown, lockdown, and post-lockdown. The weekly trend of hospitalisations for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) showed a 40% reduction, but the proportion of STEMI patients with a primary PTCA did not significantly change from previous years. Malignant neoplasms surgery volumes differed substantially by site, with a limited reduction for lung cancer (< 20%) and greater declines (30-40%) for breast and prostate cancers. The percentage of timely surgery for femoral neck in the elderly remained constantly higher than the previous 2 years whereas hip and knee replacements fell dramatically. Hospitalisations have generally decreased, but the capacity of a timely and effective response in time-dependent pathways of care was not jeopardized throughout the period. General trends did not show important differences across regions, regardless of the different burden of Covid-19. Preventive and primary care services should adopt a pro-active approach, moving towards the identification of at-risk conditions that were neglected during the pandemic and timely addressing patients to the secondary care system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/statistics & numerical data , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/pathology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
8.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1115, 2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Correct preoperative estimation of the malignant extent is crucial for optimal planning of breast cancer surgery. The sensitivity of mammography is lower in dense breasts, and additional imaging techniques are sometimes warranted. Contrast-enhanced mammography (CEM) has shown similar sensitivity and in some cases better specificity, than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in small, observational studies. CEM may be more cost-effective than MRI, and may provide better identification of the tumor extent, however, no randomized trials have been performed to date to investigate the added value of CEM. In a feasibility study, we found that the treatment was changed in 10/47 (21%) cases after additional CEM. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the added value of CEM in preoperative staging of breast cancer in a randomized study. METHOD: This prospective randomized study will include 440 patients with strongly suspected or established diagnosis of breast malignancy, based on assessment with mammography, ultrasound and core biopsy/cytology, and for whom primary surgery is planned. Patients will be randomized 1:1 using a web-based randomization tool to additional investigation with CEM or no further imaging. The CEM findings will be taken into consideration, which may lead to changes in primary treatment, which is the primary endpoint of this study. Secondary endpoints include rate of reoperation and number of avoidable mastectomies, as well as a cost-benefit analysis of additional CEM. Patient-reported health-related quality of life will be investigated at 1 year with the validated Breast-Q™ questionnaire. The rate of local recurrence or new cancer ipsi- or contralaterally within 5 years will be assessed from medical records and pathology reports. DISCUSSION: The aim of this trial is to explore the added value of CEM in preoperative staging of breast cancer. The results obtained from this study will contribute to our knowledge on CEM as an additional imaging method to standard investigation with digital mammography and ultrasound. The findings may also provide additional information on which patient groups would benefit from CEM, and on the economic aspects of CEM in standard preoperative practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov , registration no: NCT04437602 , date of registration: June 18, 2020.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Contrast Media/administration & dosage , Mammography/methods , Neoplasm Staging/methods , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Breast/diagnostic imaging , Breast/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mammography/economics , Mastectomy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Preoperative Care , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Reoperation , Sensitivity and Specificity , Ultrasonography, Mammary
9.
Surgery ; 171(3): 666-672, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, guidelines recommended that breast cancer centers delay estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer surgeries with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. We aimed to evaluate pathologic upstaging of breast cancer patients affected by these guidelines. METHODS: Female patients with stage I/II breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy were prospectively identified and were matched to a historical cohort of stage I/II estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with upfront surgery ≤35 days. Primary outcomes were pathologic T and N upstaging versus clinical staging. RESULTS: After matching, 28 neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and 48 control patients remained. Median age in each group was 65 (P = .68). Most patients (78.6% and 79.2%) had invasive ductal carcinoma with a clinical tumor size of 0.9 cm vs 1.7 cm (P = .056). Time to surgery was 68 days in the neoadjuvant endocrine therapy group and 26.5 days in the control (P < .001). A total of 23 neoadjuvant endocrine therapy patients (82.1%) had the same or lower pT-stage compared with 31 (64.5%) control patients (P = .115). Only 3 (10.7%) neoadjuvant endocrine therapy patients had increased pN-stage vs 14 (29.2%) control patients (P = .063). CONCLUSION: Despite 2.5-times longer delays, patients with early-stage estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy did not experience pathologic upstaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings may support the use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in similar patients if delays to surgery are projected.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Prospective Studies , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism
10.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(3): 1683-1691, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgical delays are associated with invasive cancer for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). During the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) was used as a bridge until postponed surgeries resumed. This study sought to determine the impact of NET on the rate of invasive cancer for patients with a diagnosis of DCIS who have a surgical delay compared with those not treated with NET. METHODS: Using the National Cancer Database, the study identified women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) DCIS. The presence of invasion on final pathology was evaluated after stratifying by receipt of NET and by intervals based on time from diagnosis to surgery (≤30, 31-60, 61-90, 91-120, or 121-365 days). RESULTS: Of 109,990 women identified with HR+ DCIS, 276 (0.3%) underwent NET. The mean duration of NET was 74.4 days. The overall unadjusted rate of invasive cancer was similar between those who received NET ((15.6%) and those who did not (12.3%) (p = 0.10). In the multivariable analysis, neither the use nor the duration of NET were independently associated with invasion, but the trend across time-to-surgery categories demonstrated a higher rate of upgrade to invasive cancer in the no-NET group (p < 0.001), but not in the NET group (p = 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis of a pre-COVID cohort showed evidence for a protective effect of NET in HR+ DCIS against the development of invasive cancer as the preoperative delay increased, although an appropriately powered prospective trial is needed for a definitive answer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/surgery , Female , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 75(1): 112-117, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458637

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has disrupted the provision of breast reconstructive services throughout the UK. Autologous free flap breast reconstruction was restarted in our unit on 3 June 2020. We aimed to compare the unit's performance of microsurgical autologous breast reconstruction in the "post-COVID" period compared with the exact time period in the preceding year. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data in the "pre-COVID" (from 3 June 2019 to 31 December 2019) and "post-COVID" period (from 3 June 2020 to 31 December 2020). Patient demographics included age, body mass index, co-morbidities, Anaesthesiologists (ASA) grade and smoking status. Surgical factors included neoadjuvant chemotherapy, previous chest wall radiotherapy, unilateral or bilateral reconstruction, reconstruction timing, number of pedicles, contralateral symmetrisation and other procedures. dependant variables were ischaemic time, operative time, mastectomy weight, flap weight, length of stay, return to theatre and complication rates. The number of trainers and trainees present in theatre was recorded and analysed. RESULTS: Fewer DIEP flaps were performed in the "post-COVID" period (45 vs. 29). No significant difference was observed in mastectomy resection weight, but flap weight was significantly increased. No significant difference was found in ischaemic time as well. The postoperative length of stay was significantly reduced. No significant difference was found in rates of return to theatre, unplanned admission, infection, haematoma, seroma or wound dehiscence. No cases of venous thromboembolism or flap failures were recorded. The mean number of trainers and trainees, and the trainee-to-trainer ratio was not found to be significantly different between cohorts. CONCLUSION: Although fewer cases were performed, autologous breast reconstruction was safely delivered throughout the COVID-19 pandemic in the first wave without affecting training.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Free Tissue Flaps/transplantation , Mammaplasty/methods , Microsurgery/methods , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplantation, Autologous , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
Am Surg ; 88(3): 471-479, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has required new treatment paradigms to limit exposures and optimize hospital resources, including the use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NAET) as bridging therapy for HR+/HER2-invasive tumors and DCIS. While this approach has been used in locally advanced disease, it is unclear how it may affect outcomes in resectable HR+/HER2- tumors. METHODS: Women ≥18 years diagnosed with in situ (Tis) or non-metastatic HR+/HER2- breast cancer from March-May 2019 and 2020 were included. Fisher's exact test and two-sample t test were used to compare baseline characteristics and surgical outcomes between strata. Sub-analysis was performed between patients who received primary surgery vs a bridging NAET approach. RESULTS: Despite similar clinical characteristics, patients in 2019 were more likely to have a surgery-first approach (75% vs 42%, P-value = .0007), receive surgery sooner (22 vs 29 days, P-value < .001), and within 60 days from diagnosis date (100% vs 85%, P-value = .0301). Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy was a more prevalent approach in 2020 (48% vs 7%, P-value < .0001). Rates of clinical to pathologic up-staging remained consistent across primary surgery vs bridging NAET subgroups (P-value = .9253). DISCUSSION: Pandemic-driven treatment protocols provide a unique opportunity to assess the utility of bridging endocrine therapy for resectable HR+/HER2- tumors. Differences in clinical and pathologic staging were similar across groups and did not appear to be affected by receipt of NAET. Our limited cohort demonstrates this strategic therapeutic avenue can optimize health care utilization and may be a reasonable approach when delaying surgery is preferred.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/drug therapy , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/chemistry , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/chemistry , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/pathology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/surgery , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , North Carolina , Probability , Receptor, ErbB-2 , Receptors, Estrogen , Receptors, Progesterone , Treatment Outcome
13.
In Vivo ; 35(5): 2763-2770, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441422

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Being scheduled for radiotherapy can cause emotional distress. This study aimed to identify risk factors in 338 patients assigned to radiotherapy for breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen potential risk factors including the COVID-19 pandemic were investigated for associations with the six emotional problems included in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Thermometer. RESULTS: Worry and fears were significantly associated with age ≤60 years; sadness with age and Karnofsky performance score (KPS) <90; depression with KPS and Charlson Comorbidity Index ≥3; loss of interest with KPS. Trends were found for associations between sadness and additional breast cancer/DCIS, Charlson Index and chemotherapy; between depression and additional breast cancer/DCIS, treatment volume and nodal stage N1-3; between nervousness and additional breast cancer/DCIS, mastectomy and triple-negativity; between loss of interest and Charlson Index, family history of breast cancer/DCIS, invasive cancer, chemotherapy, and treatment volume. The COVID-19 pandemic did not increase emotional problems. CONCLUSION: Several risk factors for emotional problems were identified. Patients with such factors should receive psychological support well before radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/surgery , Female , Humans , Mastectomy , Mastectomy, Segmental , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4535-4542, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395532

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, many scientific committees proposed neoadjuvant therapy (NACT) bridging treatment as a novel strategy and indication. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer patients undergoing NACT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All breast cancer patients referred to two Breast Units during COVID-19-pandemic were enrolled. RESULTS: Out of 814 patients, 43(5.3%) were enrolled in the COVID-19-group and compared with 94 (7.9%) similar Pre-COVID-19 patients. We observed a reduction in the number of patients undergoing NACT, p=0.0019. No difference was reported in terms of clinical presentation, indications, and tumor response. In contrast, a higher number of vascular adverse events was reported (6.9% vs. 0% p=0.029). Immediate breast cancer reconstructions following invasive surgery suffered a significant slowdown (5.9% vs. 47.7%, p=0.019). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 caused a reduction in the number of patients undergoing NACT, with no changes in terms of indications, clinical presentation, and tumor response. Furthermore, there was an increased incidence of vascular events.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammaplasty/statistics & numerical data , Neoadjuvant Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Drug Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(33): e26978, 2021 Aug 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367078

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has changed people's way of life and posed great challenges to plastic surgery. Most of plastic surgeries are considered elective surgeries and are recommended to be delayed. But breast reconstruction in plastic surgery is special. Doctors' associations from different countries have different rules on whether breast reconstruction surgery should be delayed. For the controversial topic of immediate breast reconstruction in the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted this study. METHODS: We searched English databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase. The publication time of papers was set to be from the establishment of the databases to February 2021. All studies on immediate breast reconstruction in the COVID-19 pandemic were included in our study. RESULTS: A total of 6 studies were included in this study. Four studies recommended the use of breast implants or tissue expansion for breast reconstruction surgery and had good results in their clinical practice. In addition, 1 study planned to use autologous free tissue transfer for breast reconstruction, and 1 study planned to use microsurgical techniques for breast reconstruction. But these 2 technologies are still in the planning stage and have not yet been implemented. CONCLUSIONS: In our opinion, breast cancer surgery belongs to confine operation, and breast reconstruction surgery should be performed immediately after the completion of breast cancer surgery. We recommend the use of breast implants for breast reconstruction surgery during the COVID-19 epidemic. Due to the limitations of the study, our proposed protocol for breast reconstruction surgery during the COVID-19 epidemic needs to be further validated in clinical studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammaplasty , Pandemics , Time-to-Treatment , Adipose Tissue/transplantation , Breast Implants , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Mammaplasty/methods , Mastectomy , Microsurgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Expansion Devices , Transplantation, Autologous
16.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(7): 989-994, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333014

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The early COVID-19 pandemic rapidly transformed healthcare and medical education. We sought to evaluate the professional and personal impact of the pandemic on 2019-2020 Breast Surgical Oncology (BSO) fellows in Society of Surgical Oncology approved programs to capture the experience and direct future changes. METHODS: From July 15, 2020 to August 4, 2020 a survey was administered to the American Society of Breast Surgeons' fellow members. The survey assessed the impact of the pandemic on clinical experience, education/research opportunities, personal health/well-being, and future career. Responses were collected and aggregated to quantify the collective experience of respondents. RESULTS: Twenty-eight of fifty-seven (54%) eligible fellows responded. Twenty-one (75%) indicated the clinical experience changed. Twenty-seven (96%) reported less time spent caring for ambulatory breast patients and sixteen (57%) reported the same/more time spent in the operating room. Fourteen (50%) stated their future job was impacted and eight (29%) delayed general surgery board examinations. Stress was increased in 26 (93%). Personal health was unaffected in 20 (71%), and 3 (10%) quarantined for COVID-19 exposure/infection. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic altered the clinical experience of BSO fellows; however, the operative experience was generally unaffected. The creation of frameworks and support mechanisms to mitigate potential challenges for fellows and fellowship programs in the ongoing pandemic and other times of national crisis should be considered.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surgeons/education , Surgical Oncology/education , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , United States/epidemiology
17.
Can J Surg ; 64(4): E377-E380, 2021 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323023

ABSTRACT

Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented challenges in health care, threatening access and delivery of medical services across all sectors. Patients with breast cancer desiring breast reconstruction require timely interdisciplinary care; resource limitations threaten access to this elective reconstructive element of cancer care. An expert panel was convened to identify challenges, recommend preliminary solutions, and identify important future directions in anticipation of prolonged restrictions. This paper presents consensus recommendations for care of breast cancer reconstruction patients during the pandemic based on expert opinion from the BC Breast Reconstruction Network.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammaplasty , Patient Selection , Algorithms , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Canada , Consensus , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Triage
18.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 28(13): 8729-8739, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Randomized clinical trials support deescalation of axillary surgery in breast cancer patients with low-volume axillary disease treated with a surgery-first approach. However, few data exist to guide axillary surgery following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). Therefore, we evaluated the extent and outcomes of axillary surgery in a contemporary cohort of NET patients, a treatment approach that has become particularly relevant during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified invasive breast cancer patients treated with NET between October 2008 and November 2019. Patients presenting with stage IV disease or recurrent disease were excluded. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. RESULTS: 194 invasive breast cancers in 186 patients (median age 66 years) were evaluated; 81 patients had breast-conserving surgery (BCS), while 113 underwent mastectomy. Eighty-four patients (43.3%) were biopsy-proven cN+ with 4/84 (4.8%) ypN0 following NET. Among cN+ patients, 14 (16.7%) had sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) only, 27 (32.1%) had SLNB + axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and 43 (51.2%) had ALND. Among 110 cN0 patients, 99 had axillary surgery with 28/99 (28.3%) ypN+: SLNB in 83 (75.5%), SLNB+ALND in 14 (12.7%), and ALND in 2 (1.8%). Among all ypN+ patients, 23/108 (21.3%) had SLNB alone: 18/43 (41.9%) of BCS and 5/65 (7.7%) mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). After median follow-up of 35 months, no regional recurrences were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Among biopsy-proven cN+ NET patients, we observed deescalation of axillary surgery in selected patients, despite a low nodal pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, without nodal recurrences. These data suggest that patients with low-volume axillary disease treated with NET may be managed similarly to patients treated with a surgery-first approach.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Aged , Axilla , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Lymph Node Excision , Mastectomy , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
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