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1.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 18(9): e1447-e1453, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140246

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic forced rapid adoption of telemedicine (TM) for breast oncology visits in the United States, but the appropriate role of postpandemic TM is uncertain. We sought to understand physician and advance practice practitioner perspectives on the use of TM for outpatient breast cancer care through an electronically administered survey. METHODS: Breast medical oncology clinicians at two academic cancer centers and five satellite locations affiliated with the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and the Massachusetts General Cancer Center were invited to respond to a 21-question survey administered in September 2021 about clinicians' perceptions and attitudes toward TM during the previous 12 months. RESULTS: Of the 71 survey invitations, 51 clinicians (36 physicians and 15 advance practice practitioners) provided survey responses (response rate = 72%). Ninety-two percent of respondents (n = 47) agreed that TM visits enhance patient care. Ninety-two percent of respondents (n = 46) also agreed that TM is valuable for early-stage breast cancer follow-up visits. Most respondents felt that there was no difference between TM and face-to-face (F2F) visits when it came to patient adherence, ease of ordering tests, ease of accessing patient records, and workflow outside of the visit (82%, 82%, 78%, and 53%, respectively). Fifty-one percent of respondents (n = 26) said that TM was better for timely access to follow-up appointments. Most respondents said that F2F visits were better for seeing physical problems, personal connection with patients, overall quality of visits, and patient-physician communication (100%, 75%, 65%, and 63%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Breast clinicians believe that TM is a valuable tool to enhance outpatient breast cancer care. TM was felt to be appropriate for routine follow-up visits and second opinion consultations and is as good as or better than F2F visits for several routine aspects of breast cancer care.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Oncologists , Telemedicine , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
2.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1403, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women undergoing treatment for breast cancer require frequent clinic visits for maintenance of therapy. With COVID-19 causing health care disruptions, it is important to learn about how this population's access to health care has changed. This study compares self-reported health care utilization and changes in factors related to health care access among women treated at a cancer center in the mid-South US before and during the pandemic. METHODS: Participants (N = 306) part of a longitudinal study to improve adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) adherence completed pre-intervention baseline surveys about their health care utilization prior to AET initiation. Questions about the impact of COVID-19 were added after the pandemic started assessing financial loss and factors related to care. Participants were categorized into three time periods based on the survey completion date: (1) pre-COVID (December 2018 to March 2020), (2) early COVID (April 2020 - December 2020), and later COVID (January 2021 to June 2021). Negative binomial regression analyses used to compare health care utilization at different phases of the pandemic controlling for patient characteristics. RESULTS: Adjusted analyses indicated office visits declined from pre-COVID, with an adjusted average of 17.7 visits, to 12.1 visits during the early COVID period (p = 0.01) and 9.9 visits during the later COVID period (p < 0.01). Hospitalizations declined from an adjusted average 0.45 admissions during early COVID to 0.21 during later COVID, after vaccines became available (p = 0.05). Among COVID period participants, the proportion reporting changes/gaps in health insurance coverage increased from 9.5% participants during early-COVID to 14.8% in the later-COVID period (p = 0.05). The proportion reporting financial loss due to the pandemic was similar during both COVID periods (34.3% early- and 37.7% later-COVID, p = 0.72). The proportion of participants reporting delaying care or refilling prescriptions decreased from 15.2% in early-COVID to 4.9% in the later-COVID period (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 caused disruptions to routine health care for women with breast cancer. Patients reported having fewer office visits at the start of the pandemic that continued to decrease even after vaccines were available. Fewer patients reported delaying in-person care as the pandemic progressed.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Longitudinal Studies , beta-Aminoethyl Isothiourea , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility , Ambulatory Care Facilities
3.
Eur J Cancer ; 177: 72-79, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117958

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We analysed the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (COVID-19) on the quality of breast cancer care in certified EUSOMA (European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists) breast centres. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The results of the EUSOMA quality indicators were compared, based on pseudonymised individual records, for the periods 1 March 2020 till 30 June 2020 (first COVID-19 peak in most countries in Europe) and 1 March 2019 till 30 June 2019. In addition, a questionnaire was sent to the participating Centres for investigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the organisation and the quality of breast cancer care. RESULTS: Forty-five centres provided data and 31 (67%) responded to the questionnaire. The total number of new cases dropped by 19% and there was a small significant higher tumour (p = 0.003) and lymph node (p = 0.011) stage at presentation. Comparing quality indicators (12,736 patients) by multivariable analysis showed mostly non-significant differences. Surgery could be performed in a COVID-free zone in 94% of the centres, COVID testing was performed before surgery in 96% of the centres, and surgical case load was reduced in 55% of the centres. Modifications of the indications for neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy were necessary in 23%, 23%, and 10% of the centres; changes in indications for adjuvant endocrine, chemo-, targeted, immune, and radiotherapy in 3%, 19%, 3%, 6%, and 10%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Quality of breast cancer care was well maintained in EUSOMA breast centres during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. A small but significantly higher tumour and lymph node stage at presentation was observed.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19 Testing
4.
Curr Oncol ; 29(11): 8483-8500, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109971

ABSTRACT

Rapid and efficient communication regarding quickly evolving medical information was paramount for healthcare providers and patients throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last several years, social media platforms such as Twitter have emerged as important tools for health promotion, virtual learning among healthcare providers, and patient support. We conducted a qualitative thematic content analysis on tweets using the hashtags #BreastSurgery, #BreastCancer, #BreastOncology, #Pandemic, and #COVID19. Advocacy organizations were the most frequent authors of tweets captured in this dataset, and most tweets came from the United States of America (64%). Seventy-three codes were generated from the data, and, through iterative, inductive analysis, three major themes were developed: patient hesitancy and vulnerability, increased efforts in knowledge sharing, and evolving best practices. We found that Twitter was an effective way to share evolving best practices, education, and collective experiences among key stakeholders. As Twitter is increasingly used as a tool for health promotion and knowledge translation, a better understanding of how key stakeholders engage with healthcare-related topics on the platform can help optimize the use of this powerful tool.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , United States , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Breast Neoplasms/therapy
6.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273576, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevention and treatment of chronic pain problems in breast cancer follow-up care require an adequate response from healthcare providers. Generally, this involves the uptake of evidence-based principles regarding pain management in everyday practice. However, despite the extensive literature on effective pain interventions, systematic and coordinated follow-up care is lacking for breast cancer survivors with pain problems in Flanders, Belgium. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to gather insight into healthcare providers' perceptions of pain prevention and treatment in breast cancer follow-up care, particularly with attention to the multilevel influences on pain follow-up. METHODS: We conducted four online focus groups with twenty-two healthcare providers from different disciplines such as oncologists, pharmacists, nurses, physiotherapists, and psychologists. Data analysis was guided by the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. This guide is inspired by the constant comparison method, based on Grounded Theory. RESULTS: The identified influencing factors were thematically grouped into four levels: at the level of the individual healthcare provider, in interaction with the patient, in interaction with colleagues, and at the context level. At each level, we distinguished factors related to healthcare providers' perceptions such as awareness, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, experiences, and intentions. For example, because of a lack of knowledge and certain beliefs among healthcare providers, referral to other disciplines often does not happen in the context of pain. CONCLUSION: This study points out the need to explore the prevention and treatment of chronic pain after breast cancer from a multidimensional point of view. This involves not only the characteristics of individual healthcare providers but is also inherently interactional and system-like in nature. This analysis provides opportunities for the development of interventions that target the influencing factors of prevention and treatment of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Chronic Pain , Attitude of Health Personnel , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Chronic Pain/prevention & control , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Qualitative Research
7.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(10): 6189-6196, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021413

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 disrupted health systems across the country. Pre-pandemic, patients accessing our urban safety-net hospital presented with three-fold higher rates of late-stage breast cancer than other Commission-on-Cancer sites. We sought to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on stage of breast cancer presentation and time to first treatment at our urban safety-net hospital. METHODS: An Institutional Review Board-approved cohort study of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients was conducted at our safety-net hospital comparing a COVID cohort (March 2020-February 2021, n = 82) with a pre-COVID cohort (March 2018-February 2019, n = 90). Demographic information, stage at presentation, and time to first treatment-subdivided into time from symptom to diagnosis and diagnosis to treatment-were collected and analyzed for effect of COVID pandemic. RESULTS: Cohorts were similar in age, race, and payor. More patients had late-stage disease during COVID (32%) than pre-COVID (19%, p = 0.05). There was a significantly longer time to first treatment during COVID (p = 0.0001) explained by a significantly longer time from symptom to diagnosis (p = 0.0001), with no difference in time from diagnosis to treatment. CONCLUSION: It was significantly more likely for patients to present to our safety-net hospital with late-stage breast cancer during COVID than pre-COVID. There was longer time to first treatment during COVID, driven by the increased time from symptom to diagnosis. Patients may have perceived that care was inaccessible during the pandemic or had competing priorities, driving delays. Efforts should be made to minimize disruption to safety-net hospitals during future shut-downs as these are among the most vulnerable patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Safety-net Providers , Time-to-Treatment
9.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 196(1): 87-95, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2014204

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: The study aims to evaluate the performance of selected, high-volume, highly specialized, Italian Breast Centers at the time of COVID-19 pandemic (year 2020), compared to pre-pandemic time (year 2019), highlighting differences in terms of clinical presentation of breast cancer (BC) and therapeutic strategies. METHODS: Patients' data were provided by the Senonetwork data warehouse Senonet. In order to examine changes in the surgical and oncological management of BC patients during different phases of COVID-19 pandemic, we took advantage of a selection quality indicators (QIs). We performed the analyses in two time-frames, from July to September (Jul-Sep) (2019 versus 2020) and from October to December (Oct-Dec) (2019 versus 2020). RESULTS: Our analysis did not show any statistically significant difference in terms of diagnosis, surgical, oncological and radiation therapy procedures between the two trimesters 2019 and 2020. Nevertheless, we observed statistically significant differences, favoring 2020, when analyzing time-to surgery and time-to radiotherapy. On the other hand, we observed a significant reduction of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and we did not recollect any data on a major use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. CONCLUSIONS: In Italian Breast Centers, partners of Senonetwork, we could not observe any treatment delay or change in standard clinical practice for BC care during the 2020 pandemic year, compared to 2019 pre-pandemic year. This finding is in contrast with the globally reported decrease in the performance of the Italian Breast Centers due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and has to be linked to the sharp selection of Senonetwork Breast Centers.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics
10.
Curr Oncol ; 29(8): 5919-5932, 2022 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997533

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate and quantify potential sociodemographic disparities in breast cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the use of telemedicine. METHODS: We fielded a 52-item web-based questionnaire from 14 May 2020 to 1 July 2020 in partnership with several U.S.-based breast cancer advocacy groups. Individuals aged 18 or older were eligible for this study if they: (1) received routine breast cancer screening; OR (2) were undergoing diagnostic evaluation for breast cancer; OR (3) had ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. We used descriptive statistics to understand the extent of cancer care delay and telemedicine adoption and used multivariable logistic regression models to estimate the association of sociodemographic factors with odds of COVID-19-related delays in care and telemedicine use. RESULTS: Of 554 eligible survey participants, 493 provided complete data on demographic and socioeconomic factors and were included in the analysis. Approximately half (n = 248, 50.3%) had a personal history of breast cancer. Overall, 188 (38.1%) participants had experienced any COVID-19-related delay in care including screening, diagnosis, or treatment, and 339 (68.8) reported having at least one virtual appointment during the study period. Compared to other insurance types, participants with Medicaid insurance were 2.58 times more likely to report a COVID-19-related delay in care (OR 2.58, 95% Cl: 1.05, 6.32; p = 0.039). Compared to participants with a household income of less than USD 50,000, those with a household income of USD 150,000 or more were 2.38 (OR 2.38, 95% Cl: 1.09, 5.17; p = 0.029) times more likely to adopt virtual appointments. Self-insured participants were 70% less likely to use virtual appointment compared to those in other insurance categories (OR 0.28, 95% Cl: 0.11, 0.73; p = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on breast cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and accelerated the delivery of virtual care. Lower-income groups and patients with certain insurance categories such as Medicaid or self-insured could be more likely to experience care delay or less likely to use telemedicine. Careful attention must be paid to vulnerable groups to insure equity in breast cancer-related service utilization and telemedicine access during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Time-to-Treatment , United States
11.
Breast ; 65: 164-171, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996049

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Breast cancer (BC) patients' (pts) management was affected by a global reorganization after Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our multicenter study aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on access to diagnosis, staging and treatment for BC pts compared to pre-pandemic. METHODS: Medical records of all consecutive newly diagnosed BC pts referred to 6 Italian Institutions between March and December 2020 were assessed. Monthly access rate and temporal intervals between date of symptoms onset, radiological, cytohistological diagnosis and treatment start were analyzed and compared with 2019. RESULTS: A reduction (25%) in newly diagnosed BC was observed compared to 2019 (666 vs 890). New BC pts in 2020 were less likely to be diagnosed with early stage BC (77% vs 83%, p < 0.01), had a worse performance status according to the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG PS) (19.8% had PS > 0 in 2020 vs 16.5% in 2019, p < 0.01) and fewer pts were asymptomatic at diagnosis in 2020 (54% vs 71%,p < 0.01). COVID-19 did not negatively impact in terms of access to diagnosis, staging and treatment. Time intervals between symptom onset and radiological diagnosis, symptom onset and cytohistological diagnosis, cytohistological diagnosis and treatment start were maintained or improved. However, less cases were discussed in multidisciplinary tumor meetings during 2020 (60% vs 73%, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our data proved an alarming reduction of early stage BC associated with the COVID-19 crisis in 2020. Despite the upheaval generated by the pandemic, our study shed light on the effective performance delivered by Italian Oncology Departments to guarantee diagnostic-therapeutic pathways.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics
12.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(6): e13668, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985793

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Covid-19 pandemic led to challenging discussions between oncology clinicians and patients regarding additional risks posed by SARS-CoV-2 infection whilst receiving systemic anti-cancer therapies (SACT). We assess the potential factors affecting discontinuation of adjuvant early breast cancer treatment during the pandemic. METHODS: Data were collected on all patients with early breast cancer undergoing adjuvant SACT, between 16 March and 17 April 2020 at a single UK cancer centre. Univariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed on variables including age, recurrence risk, Index of Multiple Deprivation decile, presence of physical comorbidities, modality of treatment (neoadjuvant or adjuvant), type of treatment (cytotoxic chemotherapy or monoclonal antibodies), percentage of cycles completed and availability of alternative treatments, with a binary dependent variable on treatment discontinuation. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients with early breast cancer were identified: 18 receiving neoadjuvant and 44 adjuvant therapies. Median age was 57.5 years (range 31-75 years). Age (P = 0.02), percentage of treatment cycles completed (P = 0.014) and presence of alternative treatment options (P = 0.019) were significant factors for SACT discontinuation during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: Factors affecting patients' decisions to discontinue SACT for early breast cancer during the Covid-19 pandemic were elucidated, which may help identify patients requiring additional support.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Female , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Neoadjuvant Therapy
13.
J Clin Pathol ; 75(8): 514-518, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1950226

ABSTRACT

In breast cancer, the quality of the pathology services is of paramount importance as inevitably, the pathologist makes the confirmatory diagnosis and provides prognostic and predictive information, informing treatment plans directly. Various national and international organisations provide a pathology reporting minimum dataset (MDS) to ensure consistency in reporting. While the use of MDS promotes clarity, there may be specific areas requiring the pathologist's input for individual patients and hence pathologists need to be aware of the clinical utility of pathology data to help tailor individualised patient treatment. In this article, we provide numerous examples of the role of pathology data in determining next steps in the patient pathway that are applicable to both the diagnostic and treatment pathways, including neoadjuvant treatment pathways. We also briefly discuss the important role and thereby the clinical utility of pathology data during the COVID-19 pandemic providing a template for the similar scenarios in the future if required.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Breast , Datasets as Topic , Breast/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pathologists
14.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(9): 7575-7586, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941712

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer accounts for 25% of all cancers among Canadian females. Despite successes of decreased mortality, adverse treatment effects, such as cardiotoxicity, contribute to a sedentary lifestyle and decreased quality of life. Physical activity (PA) is a possible therapy for the late effects; however, COVID-19 restricted access to in-person cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) programs. The purposes are as follows: (1) compare PA of breast cancer survivors' in-person CR to virtual CR following a transition during COVID-19 and (2) compare the PA of the pandemic cohort to a matched cohort who had completed the program in 2018/2019; (3) explore survivors' experiences of transitioning to and engaging in virtual CR. Mixed methods included analysis of CR PA data from a pandemic cohort (n = 18) and a 2018/2019 cohort (n = 18) and semi-structured focus group interviews with the pandemic cohort (n = 9) in the context of the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. After the transition, there were no significant differences in mean activity duration, frequency, and cumulative activity (expressed as MET-minutes) (p > 0.05). However, variation of PA duration doubled following the transition from in-person to virtual (p = 0.029), while for the 2018/2019 cohort, variation remained unchanged. Focus groups revealed that women valued their CR experiences pre-COVID-19 and had feelings of anxiety during the transition. Perceived factors affecting participation were environmental, personal, and behavioural. Recommendations for virtual programs were to increase comradery, technology, and professional guidance. PA experiences during a transition to virtual care prompted by a pandemic vary among breast cancer survivors. Targeting individualised strategies and exercise prescriptions are important for improving PA programs and patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Canada , Exercise , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life , Survivors
15.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 8: e2100371, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892245

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 caused a disruption in cancer management around the world, resulting in an estimated excess burden secondary to screening disruption and excess lag time for treatment initiation. METHODS: We gathered information from primary reimbursement data sets of the public health system of São Paulo, Brazil, from April 2020 to November 2021, and compared these data with those of the pre-COVID-19 period. We used an interrupted time series model to estimate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the rate of key procedures of breast and cervical cancer health care chain. RESULTS: We estimated that 1,149,727, 2,693, and 713,616 pap smears, conizations, and mammograms, respectively, were missed or delayed during the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with those in the years immediately before the COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions. Specifically, we observed an acute decrease of procedures after the COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions, with a trend to recovery in the long term. Regarding the systemic treatment analysis, we observed a 25% reduction in the rate of initiation of adjuvant systemic treatment for early breast cancer (stage I/II). However, we did not find a clear effect on the other settings of systemic treatment for breast cancer. We estimated an excess of 156 patients starting palliative care for cervical cancer after the COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly reduced the performance rate of pap smears, conizations, and mammograms. The initiation of adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer was most susceptible to COVID-19's health system disruption. Furthermore, the downward trend of treatment of advanced cervical cancer was interrupted. Therefore, public health policies are urgently needed to decrease the incidence of advanced cervical and breast cancers caused by delayed diagnosis and treatment initiation.The COVID-19 control policies resulted in reduction of cancer patients' delivery of care. This study evaluated the pandemic's influence in key procedures of breast and cervical cancer chain of care in São Paulo, Brazil. We observed a substantial reduction in the number of mammograms, pap smears, and conizations performed since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, stage I and II breast cancer adjuvant treatment presented a reduced realization rate, whereas palliative treatment delivered for advanced cervical cancer increased. Our results support the need for public health policies focused on mitigating the long-term effects of COVID-19 in cancer-related mortality.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Early Detection of Cancer , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Brazil/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pandemics , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy
16.
BMJ ; 377: o1421, 2022 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891793
17.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 194(2): 475-482, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866639

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The early months of the COVID-19 pandemic led to reduced cancer screenings and delayed cancer surgeries. We used insurance claims data to understand how breast cancer incidence and treatment after diagnosis changed nationwide over the course of the pandemic. METHODS: Using the Optum Research Database from January 2017 to March 2021, including approximately 19 million US adults with commercial health insurance, we identified new breast cancer diagnoses and first treatment after diagnosis. We compared breast cancer incidence and proportion of newly diagnosed patients receiving pre-operative systemic therapy pre-COVID, in the first 2 months of the COVID pandemic and in the later part of the COVID pandemic. RESULTS: Average monthly breast cancer incidence was 19.3 (95% CI 19.1-19.5) cases per 100,000 women and men pre-COVID, 11.6 (95% CI 10.8-12.4) per 100,000 in April-May 2020, and 19.7 (95% CI 19.3-20.1) per 100,000 in June 2020-February 2021. Use of pre-operative systemic therapy was 12.0% (11.7-12.4) pre-COVID, 37.7% (34.9-40.7) for patients diagnosed March-April 2020, and 14.8% (14.0-15.7) for patients diagnosed May 2020-January 2021. The changes in breast cancer incidence across the pandemic did not vary by demographic factors. Use of pre-operative systemic therapy across the pandemic varied by geographic region, but not by area socioeconomic deprivation or race/ethnicity. CONCLUSION: In this US-insured population, the dramatic changes in breast cancer incidence and the use of pre-operative systemic therapy experienced in the first 2 months of the pandemic did not persist, although a modest change in the initial management of breast cancer continued.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Insurance, Health , Male , Pandemics
18.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(7): 5801-5810, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864396

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We assessed breast cancer clinicians' perspectives on how the COVID-19 pandemic and increased use of telehealth affected their clinical communication about sexual heath. METHODS: Breast cancer clinicians participating in a sexual health communication intervention study (N = 29; 76% female; 66% oncologists; 34% advanced practice clinicians) completed an online survey. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. RESULTS: All clinicians were using telehealth, with most (66%) using it for up to half of their clinic appointments. Although only 14% of clinicians reported having shorter clinic visits, 28% reported having less time to discuss sexual health; 69% reported no change; and 3% said they had more time. Forty-one percent reported sexual health was less of a priority; 55% reported no change; and 3% said it was more of a priority. Thirty-five percent reported telehealth was less conducive to discussing sexual health; 59% reported no change; and 7% reported more conducive. Qualitative analysis revealed key issues underlying the perceived impact of the pandemic on discussions of sexual health including heightened clinician discomfort discussing such issues via telehealth, the less personal nature and privacy issues in telehealth visits, increased concerns about risk of COVID-19 infection and other health concerns (e.g., missing recurrence, mental health) taking priority, and clinician-perceived patient factors (e.g., discomfort, decreased priority) in discussing sexual concerns. CONCLUSION: Pandemic-related changes in breast cancer clinicians' practice could be exacerbating challenges to discussing sexual health. Methods for integrating sexual health into cancer care are needed, regardless of the mode of delivery.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Health Communication , Sexual Health , Telemedicine , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics
19.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 8: e2100357, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862198

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: An expert panel on breast cancer and COVID-19 disease was convened to address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for early breast cancer (eBC) management. METHODS: To ensure that the most clinically relevant information was addressed, essential information was drawn from several of the latest national and international guidelines and another technical document. The expert panel met in five virtual closed sessions from November 2020 to May 2021 to consult on the relevant data from evidence-based results. The data gathered were discussed on an online platform. RESULTS: This article reports the expert panel's highlights of these meetings' discussions. In addition, it provides practical recommendations covering topics regarding diagnosis, treatment, and management of patients with eBC in clinical settings routinely encountered by health care professionals amid the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: This article provided guidance on several topics regarding eBC management amid the COVID-19 pandemics to inform safer care practices.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
20.
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