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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1626, 2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661980

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is one of the biggest health challenges of recent decades. Among the causes of mortality triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection, the development of an inflammatory "cytokine storm" (CS) plays a determinant role. Here, we used transcriptomic data from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COVID-19 patients undergoing a CS to obtain gene-signatures associated to this pathology. Using these signatures, we interrogated the Connectivity Map (CMap) dataset that contains the effects of over 5000 small molecules on the transcriptome of human cell lines, and looked for molecules which effects on transcription mimic or oppose those of the CS. As expected, molecules that potentiate immune responses such as PKC activators are predicted to worsen the CS. In addition, we identified the negative regulation of female hormones among pathways potentially aggravating the CS, which helps to understand the gender-related differences in COVID-19 mortality. Regarding drugs potentially counteracting the CS, we identified glucocorticoids as a top hit, which validates our approach as this is the primary treatment for this pathology. Interestingly, our analysis also reveals a potential effect of MEK inhibitors in reverting the COVID-19 CS, which is supported by in vitro data that confirms the anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokines/blood , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Humans , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Male , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Sex Factors , Transcriptome/genetics
2.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 285: 114838, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509996

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Keguan-1, a new traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription contained seven Chinese herbs, is developed to treat coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). The first internationally registered COVID-19 randomised clinical trial on integrated therapy demonstrated that Keguan-1 significantly reduced the incidence of ARDS and inhibited the severe progression of COVID-19. AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate the protective mechanism of Keguan-1 on ARDS, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was used to simulate the pathological state of ARDS in patients with COVID-19, focusing on its effect and mechanism on ALI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were challenged with LPS (2 mg/kg) by intratracheal instillation (i.t.) and were orally administered Keguan-1 (low dose, 1.25 g/kg; medium dose, 2.5 g/kg; high dose, 5 g/kg) after 2 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected 6 h and 24 h after i.t. administration of LPS. The levels of inflammatory factors tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ß, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC or mCXCL1), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP2 or mCXCL2), angiotensin II (Ang II), and endothelial cell junction-associated proteins were analysed using ELISA or western blotting. RESULTS: Keguan-1 improved the survival rate, respiratory condition, and pathological lung injury; decreased the production of proinflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1ß, KC, and MIP2) in BALF and the number of neutrophils in the lung tissues; and ameliorated inflammatory injury in the lung tissues of the mice with LPS-induced ALI. Keguan-1 also reduced the expression of Ang II and the adhesion molecule ICAM-1; increased tight junction proteins (JAM-1 and claudin-5) and VE-cadherin expression; and alleviated pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in LPS-induced ALI. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that Keguan-1 can improve LPS-induced ALI by reducing inflammation and pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, providing scientific support for the clinical treatment of patients with COVID-19. Moreover, it also provides a theoretical basis and technical support for the scientific use of TCMs in emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19 , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Lung , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Capsules , Chemokine CXCL2/analysis , Coix , Forsythia , Interleukin-1beta/analysis , Interleukin-6/analysis , Lonicera , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mortality , Morus , Peptide Fragments/analysis , Prunus armeniaca , Respiration/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis
4.
Science ; 374(6573): 1343-1353, 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483979

ABSTRACT

Neutralizing antibody responses gradually wane against several variants of concern (VOCs) after vaccination with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine messenger RNA-1273 (mRNA-1273). We evaluated the immune responses in nonhuman primates that received a primary vaccination series of mRNA-1273 and were boosted about 6 months later with either homologous mRNA-1273 or heterologous mRNA-1273.ß, which encompasses the spike sequence of the B.1.351 Beta variant. After boost, animals had increased neutralizing antibody responses across all VOCs, which was sustained for at least 8 weeks after boost. Nine weeks after boost, animals were challenged with the SARS-CoV-2 Beta variant. Viral replication was low to undetectable in bronchoalveolar lavage and significantly reduced in nasal swabs in all boosted animals, suggesting that booster vaccinations may be required to sustain immunity and protection.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , /administration & dosage , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Immunity, Mucosal , Immunization, Secondary , Macaca mulatta , Nose/immunology , Nose/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T Follicular Helper Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Virus Replication
6.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0126021, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455683

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 pneumonia has been associated with the development of intense inflammatory responses during the course of infections with SARS-CoV-2. Given that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are known to be activated during and participate in inflammatory processes, we examined whether HERV dysregulation signatures are present in COVID-19 patients. By comparing transcriptomes of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COVID-19 patients and healthy controls, and peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) from patients and controls, we have shown that HERVs are intensely dysregulated in BALF of COVID-19 patients compared to those in BALF of healthy control patients but not in PBMCs. In particular, upregulation in the expression of specific HERV families was detected in BALF samples of COVID-19 patients, with HERV-FRD being the most highly upregulated family among the families analyzed. In addition, we compared the expression of HERVs in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) without and after senescence induction in an oncogene-induced senescence model in order to quantitatively measure changes in the expression of HERVs in bronchial cells during the process of cellular senescence. This apparent difference of HERV dysregulation between PBMCs and BALF warrants further studies in the involvement of HERVs in inflammatory pathogenetic mechanisms as well as exploration of HERVs as potential biomarkers for disease progression. Furthermore, the increase in the expression of HERVs in senescent HBECs in comparison to that in noninduced HBECs provides a potential link for increased COVID-19 severity and mortality in aged populations. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019 in China, causing a global pandemic. Severe COVID-19 is characterized by intensive inflammatory responses, and older age is an important risk factor for unfavorable outcomes. HERVs are remnants of ancient infections whose expression is upregulated in multiple conditions, including cancer and inflammation, and their expression is increased with increasing age. The significance of this work is that we were able to recognize dysregulated expression of endogenous retroviral elements in BALF samples but not in PBMCs of COVID-19 patients. At the same time, we were able to identify upregulated expression of multiple HERV families in senescence-induced HBECs in comparison to that in noninduced HBECs, a fact that could possibly explain the differences in disease severity among age groups. These results indicate that HERV expression might play a pathophysiological role in local inflammatory pathways in lungs afflicted by SARS-CoV-2 and their expression could be a potential therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
Bronchioles/virology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Endogenous Retroviruses/growth & development , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Bronchioles/cytology , Endogenous Retroviruses/isolation & purification , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome/genetics , Up-Regulation
7.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(12): e472-e474, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447657

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a 17-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who had mild disease when initially infected with SARS-CoV-2 but after recovering from acute infection developed fevers and a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate that persisted for several weeks without any ongoing respiratory symptoms. Multiple nasopharyngeal swabs were found to be negative for SARS-CoV-2 during the febrile period, but typical changes of COVID-19 on high resolution CT chest scan led to the detection of SARS-CoV-2 on RT-PCR in a sample from a bronchoalveolar lavage. His fevers completely resolved after a 5-day course of remdesivir.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinemia/complications , COVID-19/complications , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Fever , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/metabolism , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Nat Microbiol ; 6(10): 1245-1258, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380902

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure is associated with increased mortality in COVID-19 patients. There are no validated lower airway biomarkers to predict clinical outcome. We investigated whether bacterial respiratory infections were associated with poor clinical outcome of COVID-19 in a prospective, observational cohort of 589 critically ill adults, all of whom required mechanical ventilation. For a subset of 142 patients who underwent bronchoscopy, we quantified SARS-CoV-2 viral load, analysed the lower respiratory tract microbiome using metagenomics and metatranscriptomics and profiled the host immune response. Acquisition of a hospital-acquired respiratory pathogen was not associated with fatal outcome. Poor clinical outcome was associated with lower airway enrichment with an oral commensal (Mycoplasma salivarium). Increased SARS-CoV-2 abundance, low anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody response and a distinct host transcriptome profile of the lower airways were most predictive of mortality. Our data provide evidence that secondary respiratory infections do not drive mortality in COVID-19 and clinical management strategies should prioritize reducing viral replication and maximizing host responses to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adaptive Immunity , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Load , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Male , Microbiota , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiratory System/immunology , Respiratory System/microbiology , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Load
10.
Science ; 373(6561): eabj0299, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334532

ABSTRACT

Immune correlates of protection can be used as surrogate endpoints for vaccine efficacy. Here, nonhuman primates (NHPs) received either no vaccine or doses ranging from 0.3 to 100 µg of the mRNA-1273 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine. mRNA-1273 vaccination elicited circulating and mucosal antibody responses in a dose-dependent manner. Viral replication was significantly reduced in bronchoalveolar lavages and nasal swabs after SARS-CoV-2 challenge in vaccinated animals and most strongly correlated with levels of anti­S antibody and neutralizing activity. Lower antibody levels were needed for reduction of viral replication in the lower airway than in the upper airway. Passive transfer of mRNA-1273­induced immunoglobulin G to naïve hamsters was sufficient to mediate protection. Thus, mRNA-1273 vaccine­induced humoral immune responses are a mechanistic correlate of protection against SARS-CoV-2 in NHPs.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Affinity , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Immunization Schedule , Immunization, Passive , Immunization, Secondary , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mesocricetus , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccine Potency , Virus Replication
11.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322832

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: For the diagnosis of COVID-19, the yield of nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs is unclear, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is obtained to confirm the diagnosis. We assessed the utilisation of bronchoscopy for COVID-19 diagnosis in a multicenter study and compared the diagnostic yield of BAL versus NP swabs. METHODS: This retrospective study included all patients who were admitted with clinical presentation concerning for COVID-19 and underwent BAL from 1 March to 31 July 2020 at four tertiary care centres in North America. We also compared concordance of BAL with NP swabs for diagnosis of COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Fifty-three patients, with clinical suspicion for COVID-19 and admitted for respiratory failure, underwent bronchoscopy to collect BAL for SARS-CoV-2 testing. During the same period, 2039 bronchoscopies were performed on patients not infected with COVID-19. Of 42 patients with NP swabs and BAL collected within ≤7 days, 1 was NP swab negative but positive by BAL for SARS-CoV-2 (n=1/42 (2.4%)). Across a wide array of testing platforms, the overall agreement between NP swabs and BAL results was 97.6% (95% CI: 93.0% to 100%) with Cohen's k of 0.90 (95% CI: 0.69 to 1.00). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of NP swabs compared with BAL were 83.3% (95% CI: 53.5% to 100%), 100%, 100% and 97.3% (95% CI: 92.1% to 100%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: BAL was used infrequently to assess COVID-19 in busy institutions. NP swabs have a high concordance with BAL for COVID-19 testing, but negative NP swabs should be confirmed with BAL when clinical suspicion is high.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , Bronchoscopy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , North America , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies
12.
OMICS ; 25(8): 475-483, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316791

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the third virus that caused coronavirus-related outbreaks over the past 20 years. The outbreak was first reported in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, but rapidly progressed into a pandemic of an unprecedented scale since the 1918 flu pandemic. Besides respiratory complications in patients with COVID-19, clinical characterization of severe infection cases showed several other comorbidities, including multiple organ failure, and septic shock. To better understand the systemic pathogenesis of COVID-19, we interrogated the virus's presence in the peripheral blood cells, which might provide a form of trafficking or hiding to the virus. By analyzing >2 billion sequence reads of high-throughput transcriptome sequence data from 180 samples of patients with active SARS-CoV-2 infection or healthy controls collected from 6 studies, we found evidence of traces of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in two samples from two independent studies. In contrast, the viral RNA was abundant in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from the same patients. We also devised a "viral spike-to-actin" RNA normalization as a metric to compare across various samples and minimize errors caused by intersample variability in total human RNA abundance. Our observation suggests immune presentation and discounts the possibility of extensive viral infection of lymphocytes or monocytes.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
Nature ; 596(7872): 423-427, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279884

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that partially evade neutralizing antibodies poses a threat to the efficacy of current COVID-19 vaccines1,2. The Ad26.COV2.S vaccine expresses a stabilized spike protein from the WA1/2020 strain of SARS-CoV-2, and has recently demonstrated protective efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 in humans in several geographical regions-including in South Africa, where 95% of sequenced viruses in cases of COVID-19 were the B.1.351 variant3. Here we show that Ad26.COV2.S elicits humoral and cellular immune responses that cross-react with the B.1.351 variant and protects against B.1.351 challenge in rhesus macaques. Ad26.COV2.S induced lower binding and neutralizing antibodies against B.1.351 as compared to WA1/2020, but elicited comparable CD8 and CD4 T cell responses against the WA1/2020, B.1.351, B.1.1.7, P.1 and CAL.20C variants. B.1.351 infection of control rhesus macaques resulted in higher levels of virus replication in bronchoalveolar lavage and nasal swabs than did WA1/2020 infection. Ad26.COV2.S provided robust protection against both WA1/2020 and B.1.351, although we observed higher levels of virus in vaccinated macaques after B.1.351 challenge. These data demonstrate that Ad26.COV2.S provided robust protection against B.1.351 challenge in rhesus macaques. Our findings have important implications for vaccine control of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Macaca mulatta/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Macaca mulatta/virology , Male , Nose/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Virus Replication
14.
Cells ; 10(6)2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264420

ABSTRACT

The implications of the microbiome on Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prognosis has not been thoroughly studied. In this study we aimed to characterize the lung and blood microbiome and their implication on COVID-19 prognosis through analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, lung biopsy samples, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples. In all three tissue types, we found panels of microbes differentially abundant between COVID-19 and normal samples correlated to immune dysregulation and upregulation of inflammatory pathways, including key cytokine pathways such as interleukin (IL)-2, 3, 5-10 and 23 signaling pathways and downregulation of anti-inflammatory pathways including IL-4 signaling. In the PBMC samples, six microbes were correlated with worse COVID-19 severity, and one microbe was correlated with improved COVID-19 severity. Collectively, our findings contribute to the understanding of the human microbiome and suggest interplay between our identified microbes and key inflammatory pathways which may be leveraged in the development of immune therapies for treating COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , Microbiota/physiology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Liquid Biopsy , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Microbiota/genetics , Microbiota/immunology , Prognosis , RNA, Bacterial/analysis , RNA, Fungal/analysis , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
15.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 524, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), human coronaviruses (HCoVs) have recently attached worldwide attention as essential pathogens in respiratory infection. HCoV-229E has been described as a rare cause of lower respiratory infection in immunocompetent adults. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a 72-year-old man infected by HCoV-229E with rapid progression to acute respiratory distress syndrome, in conjunction with new onset atrial fibrillation, intensive care unit acquired weakness, and recurrent hospital acquired pneumonia. Clinical and radiological data were continuously collected. The absolute number of peripheral T cells and the level of complement components diminished initially and recovered after 2 months. The patient was successfully treated under intensive support care and discharged from the hospital after 3 months and followed. CONCLUSION: HCoV-229E might an essential causative agent of pulmonary inflammation and extensive lung damage. Supportive treatment was essential to HCoVs infection on account of a long duration of immunological recovery in critical HCoV-229E infection.


Subject(s)
Common Cold/diagnosis , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , Common Cold/complications , Common Cold/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Diabetes Mellitus , Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia/complications , Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia/drug therapy , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy
16.
J Infect Dis ; 223(9): 1512-1521, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238201

ABSTRACT

Lower respiratory tract (LRT) disease induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can deteriorate to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Because the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is implicated in ARDS pathogenesis, we investigated the presence of NETs and correlates of pathogenesis in blood and LRT samples of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Plasma NET levels peaked early after intensive care unit admission and were correlated with the SARS-CoV-2 RNA load in sputum and levels of neutrophil-recruiting chemokines and inflammatory markers in plasma samples. The baseline plasma NET quantity was correlated with disease severity but was not associated with soluble markers of thrombosis or with development of thrombosis. High NET levels were present in LRT samples and persisted during the course of COVID-19, consistent with the detection of NETs in bronchi and alveolar spaces in lung tissue from deceased patient with COVID-19. Thus, NETs are produced and retained in the LRT of critically ill patients with COVID-19 and could contribute to SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS disease.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Traps/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers , Chemokines/blood , Cohort Studies , Computed Tomography Angiography , Critical Illness , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/virology , Viral Load
18.
J Cell Mol Med ; 25(12): 5823-5827, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221608

ABSTRACT

The long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a critical regulatory role in the host response to the viral infection. However, little is understood about the transcriptome architecture, especially lncRNAs pattern during the SARS-CoV-2 infection. In the present study, using publicly available RNA sequencing data of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) samples from COVID-19 patients and healthy individuals, three interesting findings highlighted: (a) More than half of the interactions between lncRNAs-PCGs of BALF samples established by three trans-acting lncRNAs (HOTAIRM1, PVT1 and AL392172.1), which also exhibited the high affinity for binding to the SARS-CoV-2 genome, suggesting the major regulatory role of these lncRNAs during the SARS-CoV-2 infection. (b) lncRNAs of MALAT1 and NEAT1 are possibly contributed to the inflammation development in the SARS-CoV-2 infected cells. (c) In contrast to the 3' part of the SARS-CoV-2 genome, the 5' part can interact with many human lncRNAs. Therefore, the mRNA-based vaccines will not show any side effects because of the off-label interactions with the human lncRNAs. Overall, the putative functionalities of lncRNAs can be promising to design the non-coding RNA-based drugs and to inspect the efficiency of vaccines to overcome the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology
20.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(5)2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201763

ABSTRACT

Single-cell RNA sequencing of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples from COVID-19 patients has enabled us to examine gene expression changes of human tissue in response to the SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. However, the underlying mechanisms of COVID-19 pathogenesis at single-cell resolution, its transcriptional drivers, and dynamics require further investigation. In this study, we applied machine learning algorithms to infer the trajectories of cellular changes and identify their transcriptional programs. Our study generated cellular trajectories that show the COVID-19 pathogenesis of healthy-to-moderate and healthy-to-severe on macrophages and T cells, and we observed more diverse trajectories in macrophages compared to T cells. Furthermore, our deep-learning algorithm DrivAER identified several pathways (e.g., xenobiotic pathway and complement pathway) and transcription factors (e.g., MITF and GATA3) that could be potential drivers of the transcriptomic changes for COVID-19 pathogenesis and the markers of the COVID-19 severity. Moreover, macrophages-related functions corresponded more to the disease severity compared to T cells-related functions. Our findings more proficiently dissected the transcriptomic changes leading to the severity of a COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Macrophages , T-Lymphocytes , Algorithms , COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Machine Learning , Macrophages/physiology , Macrophages/virology , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Single-Cell Analysis , T-Lymphocytes/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/virology
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