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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 896, 2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The world has high hopes of vaccination against COVID-19 to protect the population, boost economies and return to normal life. Vaccination programmes are being rolled out in high income countries, but the pandemic continues to progress in many low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) despite implementation of strict hygiene measures. We aim to present a comprehensive research protocol that will generate epidemiological, sociological and anthropological data about the COVID-19 epidemic in Burkina Faso, a landlocked country in West Africa with scarce resources. METHODS: We will perform a multidisciplinary research using mixed methods in the two main cities in Burkina Faso (Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso). Data will be collected in the general population and in COVID-19 patients, caregivers and health care professionals in reference care centers: (i) to determine cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the Burkinabe population using blood samples collected from randomly selected households according to the WHO-recommended protocol; (ii) develop a score to predict severe complications of COVID-19 in persons infected with SARS-CoV-2 using retrospective and prospective data; (iii) perform semi-structured interviews and direct observation on site, to describe and analyze the healthcare pathways and experiences of patients with COVID-19 attending reference care centers, and to identify the perceptions, acceptability and application of preventive strategies among the population. DISCUSSION: This study will generate comprehensive data that will contribute to improving COVID-19 response strategies in Burkina Faso. The lessons learned from the management of this epidemic may serve as examples to the country authorities to better design preventive strategies in the case of future epidemics or pandemics. The protocol was approved by the Ministry for Health (N° 2020-00952/MS/CAB/INSP/CM) and the Health Research Ethics Committee in Burkina Faso (N° 2020-8-140).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Humans , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 45-52, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The overall death toll from COVID-19 in Africa is reported to be low but there is little individual-level evidence on the severity of the disease. This study examined the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients monitored in COVID-19 care centres (CCCs) in two West-African countries. METHODS: Burkina Faso and Guinea set up referral CCCs to hospitalise all symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 carriers, regardless of the severity of their symptoms. Data collected from hospitalised patients by November 2020 are presented. RESULT: A total of 1,805 patients (64% men, median age 41 years) were admitted with COVID-19. Symptoms lasted for a median of 7 days (IQR 4-11). During hospitalisation, 443 (25%) had a SpO2 < 94% at least once, 237 (13%) received oxygen and 266 (15%) took corticosteroids. Mortality was 5% overall, and 1%, 5% and 14% in patients aged <40, 40-59 and ≥60 years, respectively. In multivariable analysis, the risk of death was higher in men (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1; 3.6), people aged ≥60 years (aOR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7; 4.8) and those with chronic hypertension (aOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2; 3.4). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is as severe in Africa as elsewhere, and there must be more vigilance for common risk factors such as older age and hypertension.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 289-295, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351679

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is one of the world's major health crises. The objective of this study was to determine the predictive factors of severe hypoxemia in patients hospitalized in COVID-19 health facilities in Burkina Faso. PATIENTS AND METHOD: This study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study. The data collected relate to the period of the first wave of the epidemic (March 9 to June 30, 2020). All patients hospitalized for COVID-19 in the requisitioned health facilities of Ouagadougou were included in this study. Predictors of severe hypoxemia were identified using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: During the study period, 442 patients were included, representing 45.7% of the total number of positive patients in the entire country. The most common co-morbidities were diabetes (55; 12.4%) and arterial hypertension (97; 21.9%). Severe hypoxemia (SpO2 < 90%) was observed in 64 patients (14.5%). Age over 65 years (OR = 8.24; 95% CI: 2.83-24.01) and diabetes (OR = 2.43; 95% CI: 1.17-5.06) were the predictors for occurrence of severe hypoxemia in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: The predictive factors of COVID-19 are similar in African and Caucasian populations. The surveillance of COVID-19 in risk groups should be strengthened to reduce their morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Hypoxia/epidemiology , Hypoxia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Bull Soc Pathol Exot ; 113(4): 222-227, 2020.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172022

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on some representations of the origin of AIDS and Ebola in Burkina Faso, against a new background of Covid-19 which began in early 2020 in connection with two animals: the spider and the bat. These are also, if not first and foremost, heroes of oral literature (from tales to myths) from this region of West Africa. It is up to anthropologists to explore the meandering symbolism and imagination of these liminal animals that move back and forth between the worlds inhabited by humans and the "bush" worlds of non-humans. Here arises a mythological anamnesis. These "trickster" animals challenge categories and understanding of both virologists and anthropologists.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Chiroptera/virology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Spiders/virology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/history , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/transmission , Africa, Western/epidemiology , Animals , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/history , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/history , Congresses as Topic , Disease Vectors , Epidemics , HIV/physiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/history , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/transmission , History, 21st Century , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Humans , Museums , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(3): e1008776, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117465

ABSTRACT

In an epidemic, individuals can widely differ in the way they spread the infection depending on their age or on the number of days they have been infected for. In the absence of pharmaceutical interventions such as a vaccine or treatment, non-pharmaceutical interventions (e.g. physical or social distancing) are essential to mitigate the pandemic. We develop an original approach to identify the optimal age-stratified control strategy to implement as a function of the time since the onset of the epidemic. This is based on a model with a double continuous structure in terms of host age and time since infection. By applying optimal control theory to this model, we identify a solution that minimizes deaths and costs associated with the implementation of the control strategy itself. We also implement this strategy for three countries with contrasted age distributions (Burkina-Faso, France, and Vietnam). Overall, the optimal strategy varies throughout the epidemic, with a more intense control early on, and depending on host age, with a stronger control for the older population, except in the scenario where the cost associated with the control is low. In the latter scenario, we find strong differences across countries because the control extends to the younger population for France and Vietnam 2 to 3 months after the onset of the epidemic, but not for Burkina Faso. Finally, we show that the optimal control strategy strongly outperforms a constant uniform control exerted over the whole population or over its younger fraction. This improved understanding of the effect of age-based control interventions opens new perspectives for the field, especially for age-based contact tracing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Models, Biological , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Basic Reproduction Number/statistics & numerical data , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Computational Biology , Contact Tracing/methods , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mathematical Concepts , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Vietnam/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Rev Mal Respir ; 38(3): 240-248, 2021 Mar.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087254

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The development of acute respiratory distress syndrome indicates a serious form of COVID-19. Although there have been several studies on the prognostic factors of its severe form, no such study has been conducted in Burkina Faso. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted from March 9 to June 9, 2020 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso which involved 456 patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: Nearly a quarter of the patients (23.2%) had presented with acute respiratory distress and 44.3% of them died. Being over 65 years old (HR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.5-5.1) and having hypertension (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1-3.5) were independently associated with the risk of mortality. However, after adjustment, only age over 65 years (HR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2-4.3) was a risk factor for death. The survival rate for patients over 65 was 38.5% at 7 days and 30.3% at 15 days. CONCLUSIONS: Acute respiratory distress leading to death is mainly found in older people with COVID-19. Close monitoring of these high-risk patients may reduce the risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/mortality , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
8.
Int J Infect Dis ; 101: 194-200, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Absolute numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths reported to date in the sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region have been significantly lower than those across the Americas, Asia and Europe. As a result, there has been limited information about the demographic and clinical characteristics of deceased cases in the region, as well as the impacts of different case management strategies. METHODS: Data from deceased cases reported across SSA through 10 May 2020 and from hospitalized cases in Burkina Faso through 15 April 2020 were analyzed. Demographic, epidemiological and clinical information on deceased cases in SSA was derived through a line-list of publicly available information and, for cases in Burkina Faso, from aggregate records at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Tengandogo in Ouagadougou. A synthetic case population was probabilistically derived using distributions of age, sex and underlying conditions from populations of West African countries to assess individual risk factors and treatment effect sizes. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the adjusted odds of survival for patients receiving oxygen therapy or convalescent plasma, based on therapeutic effectiveness observed for other respiratory illnesses. RESULTS: Across SSA, deceased cases for which demographic data were available were predominantly male (63/103, 61.2%) and aged >50 years (59/75, 78.7%). In Burkina Faso, specifically, the majority of deceased cases either did not seek care at all or were hospitalized for a single day (59.4%, 19/32). Hypertension and diabetes were often reported as underlying conditions. After adjustment for sex, age and underlying conditions in the synthetic case population, the odds of mortality for cases not receiving oxygen therapy were significantly higher than for those receiving oxygen, such as due to disruptions to standard care (OR 2.07; 95% CI 1.56-2.75). Cases receiving convalescent plasma had 50% reduced odds of mortality than those who did not (95% CI 0.24-0.93). CONCLUSIONS: Investment in sustainable production and maintenance of supplies for oxygen therapy, along with messaging around early and appropriate use for healthcare providers, caregivers and patients could reduce COVID-19 deaths in SSA. Further investigation into convalescent plasma is warranted until data on its effectiveness specifically in treating COVID-19 becomes available. The success of supportive or curative clinical interventions will depend on earlier treatment seeking, such that community engagement and risk communication will be critical components of the response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara , Aged , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Asia/epidemiology , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Young Adult
9.
J Trop Pediatr ; 67(3)2021 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696409

ABSTRACT

Africa is the World Health Organization-region least affected by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. Here, we compare the situation in severely hit Italy with that in less hit Burkina Faso, focussing on the differences in epidemiological, geographical, demographical, cultural and medical conditions to highlight how a full-blown war on the pandemic can impact on other, equally important aspects of global child health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Italy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Infect Dis Health ; 25(3): 186-193, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-232539

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nosocomial pathogens are transmitted by contamination of surfaces causing healthcare-associated infections (HAI). The impact of locally produced disinfectant with operational training as a means to improve hygiene in resource-limited healthcare facilities and prevent HAI was evaluated. METHOD: In Burkina Faso, 4 types of electro-chlorinator devices that convert salt and water into sodium hypochlorite through electrolysis were installed in 26 healthcare facilities distributed across 3 sanitary districts. The program was evaluated at 4 months and 11 months and performance compared with a control group. RESULTS: After 11 months, over 90% of the facilities applied 8 of the 11 essential hygiene practices defined by the Ministry of Health, compared to 20% in the control group. 61.5% of the healthcare facilities improved the chlorine concentration of their sodium hypochlorite solutions, reaching an average concentration of 5.1 g/L compared to an average of 2.1 g/L in the control group. Additionally, a cost-benefit analysis demonstrated that locally produced sodium hypochlorite led to daily savings ranging between 2.7 and 53 euros depending on the device compared with the purchase of chlorine tablets. CONCLUSION: Results, therefore, suggest that electro-chlorinator devices in addition to hygiene sensitization can be a simple, cost-effective and tailored intervention to reduce the prevalence of HAI in low-resource settings.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Hygiene , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Electrolysis , Halogenation , Health Facilities , Humans
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