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2.
Rev Med Chil ; 150(10): 1342-1350, 2022 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic increased the prevalence of burnout syndrome. AIM: To describe the prevalence of burnout syndrome in health care workers of a private clinic in the Metropolitan Region of Chile. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study, the study population were health care workers of a private clinic. An online version of Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey was applied during June 2020. Variables such as age, sex, marital status, number of children, service, occupation, and night shift were studied. RESULTS: We collected 846 responses. A 36% (95% confidence intervals (CI) [32,8-39,2]) prevalence of high levels of burnout syndrome was found. Thirty one percent (95% CI [28,1-34,3]) of the respondents had high levels of emotional exhaustion (AE), 33% (95%CI [29,8-36,2]) had low personal fulfillment (RP) and 30% (95%CI [26,6-32,7]) had high levels of depersonalization (DP). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers showed concerning levels of burnout syndrome. It is recommended to pay special attention to high levels of emotional exhaustion in nursing and night shift staff. Institutions should develop and apply prevention and emotional support strategies in health personnel.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Prevalence
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239631

ABSTRACT

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) clinicians provide patient care within a high-stakes, unpredictable, and complex work environment in which conflict is inevitable. Our objective was to explore the extent to which added stressors of the pandemic exacerbated EMS workplace conflict. We administered our survey to a sample of U.S. nationally certified EMS clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2022. Out of 1881 respondents, 46% (n = 857) experienced conflict and 79% (n = 674) provided free-text descriptions of their experience. The responses were analyzed for themes using qualitative content analysis, and they were then sorted into codes using word unit sets. Code counts, frequencies, and rankings were tabulated, enabling quantitative comparisons of the codes. Of the fifteen codes to emerge, stress (a precursor of burnout) and burnout-related fatigue were the key factors contributing to EMS workplace conflict. We mapped our codes to a conceptual model guided by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report on using a systems approach to address clinician burnout and professional well-being to explore implications for addressing conflict within that framework. Factors attributed to conflict mapped to all levels of the NASEM model, lending empirical legitimacy to a broad systems approach to fostering worker well-being. Our findings lead us to propose that active surveillance (enhanced management information and feedback systems) of frontline clinicians' experiences during public health emergencies could increase the effectiveness of regulations and policies across the healthcare system. Ideally, the contributions of the occupational health discipline would become a mainstay of a sustained response to promote ongoing worker well-being. The maintenance of a robust EMS workforce, and by extension the health professionals in its operational sphere, is unquestionably essential to our preparedness for the likelihood that pandemic threats may become more commonplace.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce
4.
Nurs Adm Q ; 47(3): 269-276, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239003

ABSTRACT

In 2019, the National Academy of Science identified clinician burnout as a growing public health concern. The COVID-19 pandemic has only compounded this crisis and transformed it into an escalating fracture within the US health care system. Concurrently evolving with this emergency is a rise in the number of nurses who intend to leave the profession. Frontline nurse leaders are the lynchpin in ensuring health care systems function. These leaders have accountability over patient care and clinician well-being. Focused efforts must address clinician burnout. However, without addressing the well-being of frontline nurse leaders, the fault line in our health care system becomes a vast chasm. Recently, published literature began to emerge describing and addressing frontline clinician burnout. Unfortunately, only a few, if any, address issues related to leaders. The aim of this qualitative case study research was to explore and discover general themes in system chief nurse executive leadership practices that support, mentor, develop, and retain nurse leaders as a basis for future research. Three major themes were identified for future study and exploration: enhancing leadership development programs; improving leader work environments; and focusing on leader well-being and support. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these themes.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Humans , Leadership , Mentors , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
5.
Am J Health Behav ; 47(2): 397-407, 2023 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238443

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Unprecedented challenges in hospital care were imposed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic due to the highly contagious disease. Healthcare services adjusted for working with additional personal protection equipment and hygiene measures while attending to a large number of critically ill patients. In this study, we aimed to determine burnout rates and preferred interventions among healthcare staff, including nurses and physicians, at Bnai-Zion Medical Center during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The Copenhagen Burnout Inventory questionnaire was administered to 185 cross-sectional volunteer participants from the nursing and medical staff between June and August 2020, when Israel experienced its second surge of COVID-19. Results: We found a statistically significant correlation between work-related and personal burnout. COVID-19 ward staff had greater burnout levels than the rest of our institution's personnel. Most highly burned-out healthcare workers were interested in intervention therapy. Conclusions: Dealing with burnout is imperative to improve the well-being of our hospital staff and ensure the best possible performance. Nursing management should consider first-line responders' stressful conditions to be alleviated through support programs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Hospitals
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236675

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers (HCW) were categorized as "essential" and "non-essential", creating a division where some were "locked-in" a system with little ability to prepare for or control the oncoming crisis. Others were "locked-out" regardless of whether their skills might be useful. The purpose of this study was to systematically gather data over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic from HCW through an interprofessional lens to examine experiences of locked-out HCW. This convergent parallel mixed-methods study captured perspectives representing nearly two dozen professions through a survey, administered via social media, and video blogs. Analysis included logistic regression models of differences in outcome measures by professional category and Rapid Identification of Themes from Audio recordings (RITA) of video blogs. We collected 1299 baseline responses from 15 April 2020 to 16 March 2021. Of those responses, 12.1% reported no signs of burnout, while 21.9% reported four or more signs. Qualitative analysis identified four themes: (1) professional identity, (2) intrinsic stressors, (3) extrinsic factors, and (4) coping strategies. There are some differences in the experiences of locked-in and locked-out HCW. This did not always lead to differing reports of moral distress and burnout, and both groups struggled to cope with the realities of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Blogging , Health Personnel
8.
Acad Radiol ; 30(6): 1031-1032, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234050
9.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 44(5): 437-452, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233563

ABSTRACT

Violence against nurses is a disturbing trend in healthcare that has reached epidemic proportions globally. These violent incidents can result in physical and psychological injury, exacerbating already elevated levels of stress and burnout among nurses, further contributing to absenteeism, turnover, and intent to leave the profession. To ensure the physical and mental well-being of nurses and patients, attention to the development of strategies to reduce violence against nurses must be a priority. Caring knowledge-rooted in the philosophy of care-is a potential strategy for mitigating violence against nurses in healthcare settings. We present what caring knowledge is, analyze its barriers to implementation at the health system and education levels and explore potential solutions to navigate those barriers. We conclude how the application of models of caring knowledge to the nurse-patient relationship has the potential to generate improved patient safety and increased satisfaction for both nurses and patients.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Workplace Violence , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Violence/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Workplace Violence/psychology , Personnel Turnover
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232822

ABSTRACT

The health crisis has had a strong impact on intensive care units. The objective of this study was to investigate the experience of resuscitation physicians during the COVID-19 health crisis to understand the associated determinants of quality of life, burnout, and brownout. This qualitative, longitudinal study covered two periods (T1, February 2021, and T2, May 2021). The data were collected in individual semi-directed interviews with 17 intensive care physicians (ICPs) (T1). Nine of the latter also participated in a second interview (T2). The data were examined using grounded theory analysis. We identified a multiplication of burnout and brownout indicators and factors already known in intensive care. In addition, burnout and brownout indicators and factors specific to the COVID-19 crisis were added. The evolution of professional practices has disrupted the professional identity, the meaning of work, and the boundaries between private and professional life, leading to a brownout and blur-out syndrome. The added value of our study lies in identifying the positive effects of the crisis in the professional domain. Our study revealed indicators and factors of burnout and brownout associated with the crisis among ICPs. Finally, it highlights the beneficial effects of the COVID-19 crisis on work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Quality of Life , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Critical Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Perm J ; 27(2): 179-183, 2023 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245286

ABSTRACT

Burnout is not a new concept in the health care field. Most, if not all, resident physicians (residents) experience burnout at least once during their training. However, the COVID-19 pandemic placed a large strain on the health care system and exacerbated stressors that contribute to burnout, including anxiety, depression, and work overload. The authors reviewed the literature on resident burnout in the era of COVID-19 to elucidate common stressors across the specialties and identify successful interventions or initiatives that may be most effective for residency programs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Physicians , Humans , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Environ Public Health ; 2023: 5719241, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243138

ABSTRACT

Objective: To study prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic related to Burnout syndrome (BOS) among Thai healthcare providers (HCPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study among HCPs, involved in caring for patients during the pandemic in two periods (1st period, May-Jun 2021, and 2nd period, Sep-Oct 2021). Data were distributed using electronic questionnaires. BOS was defined if respondents exhibited a high level of at least one domain in the Maslach Burnout Inventory criteria. The primary outcome was prevalence of BOS. Results: Altogether, 2,027 and 1,146 respondents were enrolled in the 1st and 2nd periods, respectively. Most respondents were female (73.3, 68.2%). The top three job positions were physicians (49.2, 58.9%), nurses (41.2, 30.6%), and nursing assistants (4.8, 6.5%), respectively. No difference was found in overall prevalence of Burnout syndrome during the 1st and 2nd periods (73 vs. 73.5%, p=0.80). Using multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for Burnout syndrome in both periods were (1) living with family (odds ratio (OR) 1.3 and 1.5), (2) tertiary care hospital (OR 1.92 and 2.13), (3) nurse (OR 1.38 and 2.29), (4) nursing assistant (OR 0.92 and 4.81), (5) salary ≤40,000 THB (OR 1.53 and 1.53), (6) >20 patients per shift (OR 1.55 and 1.88), (7) >6 shifts after hours monthly (OR 1.26 and 1.49), and (8) ≤1 rest day weekly (OR 1.3 and 1.4). Conclusion: We found a high prevalence of Burnout syndrome among Thai HCPs during the pandemic. Knowing those risk factors may provide a strategy to BOS during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Thailand/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Perm J ; 27(2): 160-168, 2023 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242879

ABSTRACT

Perioperative care delivery is a patient-centered, multidisciplinary process. It relies heavily on synchronized teamwork from a well-coordinated team. Perioperative physicians-surgeons and anesthesiologists-face enormous challenges in surgical care delivery due to changing work environments, post-COVID consequences, shift work disorder, value conflict, escalating demands, regulatory complexity, and financial uncertainties. Physician burnout in this working environment has become increasingly prevalent. It is not only harmful to physicians' health and well-being, but it also affects the quality and safety of patient care. Additionally, the economic costs associated with physician burnout are untenable due to the high turnover rate, high recruitment expenses, and potential early permanent exit from medical practice. In this deteriorating environment of unbalanced physician supply/demand, recognizing, managing, and preventing physician burnout may help preserve the system's most valuable asset and contribute to higher quality and safety of patient care. Leaders in government agencies, health care systems, and organizations must work together to re-engineer the health care system for better physicians and patient care.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Perioperative Medicine , Physicians , Humans , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological , Patient Care , Quality of Health Care
14.
Br J Nurs ; 32(11): 514-520, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235456

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses are experiencing increasing stress, burnout and mental health problems. The Advocating and Educating for Quality ImProvement (A-EQUIP) model of clinical supervision aims to support staff wellbeing, promote positive work cultures and improve patient care. Although a growing body of empirical evidence supports the positive impact of clinical supervision, several individual and organisational barriers may impede the implementation of A-EQUIP in practice. Organisational culture, staffing and workforce pressures all affect employees' ability to engage with supervision, and organisations and clinical leaders must consciously work to sustain lasting change.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Preceptorship , Organizational Culture , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology
15.
Phys Ther ; 103(5)2023 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242161

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Research on burnout among physical therapists and occupational therapists in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is limited. Resilience may be important for reducing burnout and promoting well-being among rehabilitation specialists, especially during periods of elevated occupational demand and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate experiences of burnout, COVID-19 pandemic-related distress, and resilience among physical therapists and occupational therapists during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Physical therapists and occupational therapists working in a university-affiliated health system were invited to complete an online survey assessing burnout, COVID-19 pandemic-related distress, state- and trait-like resilience, physical activity, sleep disturbance, and financial concerns. Multiple linear regressions were used to examine variables associated with burnout as well as the contribution of specific aspects of resilience to burnout. RESULTS: Greater COVID-19 pandemic-related distress was associated with greater emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, whereas state-like resilience at work was associated with lower emotional exhaustion, greater personal accomplishment, and lower depersonalization. Analyses examining the impact of specific components of resilience at work suggested that several components are associated with less burnout, with finding one's calling being particularly relevant for all 3 domains of burnout. CONCLUSION: Symptoms of burnout were reported by many physical therapists and occupational therapists. COVID-19-related distress and state-like resilience at work, particularly the perception of finding one's calling, emerged as consistently being associated with burnout in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPACT: These findings can inform the development of interventions to reduce burnout among physical therapists and occupational therapists amid the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Humans , Occupational Therapists , Physical Therapists/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 302, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout and depression among medical students is linked to serious problems that require appropriate solutions. Subthreshold autism traits or autistic-like traits (ALTs) may be possible factors associated with burnout and depression. The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for burnout and depression has been widely reported. The treatment aims to improve psychological flexibility, a concept indicating engagement in personal value-based behaviors without avoiding uncomfortable private experiences. This study examined whether ALTs were associated with burnout or depression among medical students during clinical clerkships in Japan, and then investigated what psychological flexibility processes might mediate these associations. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was administered to 284 medical students at Nagoya City University School of Medical Sciences who had been in clinical clerkships for 10 months or longer. Linear multiple regressions were performed with each burnout factor or depression as the outcome variable using validated tools measuring burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), ALT (Autism-Spectrum Quotient Japanese version-21), and psychological flexibility processes (Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire-7 and Valuing Questionnaire). Additionally, a mediation analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: A linear multiple regression analysis that controlled for age and gender found that ALTs were significantly associated with lower personal accomplishment, a factor of burnout, and depression. Lower personal accomplishment was also associated with males and lower progress toward values of the psychological flexibility process. Depression was also associated with males and higher cognitive fusion, lower progress towards values, and higher obstruction to values of the psychological flexibility process. Surprisingly, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were not significantly associated with ALTs. The mediation analysis revealed that the relationship between ALTs and personal accomplishment was partially mediated by a process of progress toward values, while the relationship between ALTs and depression was partially mediated by both processes of progress toward values and cognitive fusion. CONCLUSIONS: ALTs were significantly associated with lower personal accomplishment of burnout and depression among medical students in clinical clerkships. Consideration should be given to the psychological flexibility processes that focus on interventions targeting psychological flexibility for medical students with ALTs to reduce burnout and depression.


Subject(s)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , Autistic Disorder , Burnout, Professional , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , Male , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Universities , Students, Medical/psychology , Japan , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 31: e3893, 2023.
Article in Spanish, English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325580

ABSTRACT

evaluar la satisfacción laboral de profesionales de enfermería actuantes en atención y gestión durante la pandemia de COVID-19. estudio epidemiológico de corte transversal. Participaron 334 profesionales de enfermería de un hospital de enseñanza. Fueron calculadas las frecuencias absolutas y relativas de las variables cualitativas y los promedios de las variables numéricas. Se compararon los promedios de resultados de los dominios de la escala de satisfacción profesional ( Job Satisfaction Survey) con variables sociodemográficaslaborales. Fueron aplicadas las pruebas t de Student, Mann-Whitney, Anova con posprueba de Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis o Dunn para verificar la significancia estadística de los resultados con nivel crítico de 0,05. noventa profesionales se mostraron satisfechos con su trabajo, tres profesionales se mostraron insatisfechos y doscientos cuarenta y un profesionales mostraron ambivalencia. Se evidenció ambivalencia en los trabajadores de enfermería en relación a su satisfacción laboral durante el período de la pandemia de COVID-19. Los hallazgos señalan un camino para que los gestores y formuladores de políticas de salud encaucen inversiones en planes de carrera y ambientes laborales que mejoren las condiciones de los trabajadores de enfermería.


(1) Se evidenció ambivalencia respecto a la satisfacción con el trabajo. (2) Se evidenció insatisfacción respecto a Remuneración, Beneficios, Promoción y Ambiente. (3) Se evidenció satisfacción respecto de Compañeros de Trabajo y Supervisión. (4) Importancia de: Planes de Carrera, Remuneración y Beneficios dignos.


avaliar a satisfação com o trabalho de profissionais de enfermagem que atuaram na assistência e na gestão, durante a pandemia de COVID-19. estudo epidemiológico de corte transversal. Participaram 334 profissionais de enfermagem de um hospital de ensino. Foram calculadas as frequências absolutas e relativas das variáveis qualitativas e as médias das variáveis numéricas. Foram comparadas as médias dos resultados dos domínios da escala de satisfação profissional (Job Satisfaction Survey) com variáveis sociodemográficas-laborais. Foram aplicados os testes t de Student, Mann-Whitney, Anova seguidos de pós-teste de Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis ou Dunn, para verificar a significância estatística dos resultados com nível crítico de 0,05. 90 profissionais demonstraram-se satisfeitos com o trabalho, três profissionais demonstraram-se insatisfeitos e 241 profissionais demonstraram-se ambivalentes. foi evidenciada uma ambivalência dos trabalhadores de enfermagem em relação à sua satisfação com o trabalho, durante o período da pandemia de COVID-19. Os achados indicam um caminho para que gerentes e formuladores de política em saúde façam investimentos em planos de carreira e ambiente de trabalho que melhorem as condições de trabalho dos trabalhadores de enfermagem.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
18.
J Clin Nurs ; 32(15-16): 5076-5083, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325161

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between nurse burnout, missed nursing care, and care quality following the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Quality of care and missed nursing care can be consequences of nurse burnout. Little is known about how these factors related to nurse burnout following the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: This study used a cross-sectional correlational design and was conducted in 12 general hospitals across Thailand from August to October 2022. METHODS: 394 nurses providing direct nursing care to patients during the COVID-19 pandemic completed the survey. The Emotional Exhaustion (EE) subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), MISSCARE survey, and quality of care reported by nurses were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Approximately thirty-six percent of nurses had burnout following the COVID-19 pandemic. Missed nursing care was higher among nurses with burnout. Most participants reported illness/symptoms such as anxiety, fatigue, a lack of concentration, and sleeping problems. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, every additional unit of emotional exhaustion was associated with 1.61 times higher odds of missed nursing care, 3.37 times higher odds of poor quality of nurse care, and 2.62 times higher odds of poor quality of care for the overall unit. CONCLUSION: The study findings demonstrate that burnout is associated with missed nursing care and poor quality of care following the COVID-19 pandemic. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Policymakers, hospital administrators, and nurse managers should invest in strategies to reduce nurse burnout, which can increase patient safety and quality of care.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nursing Care , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Job Satisfaction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
West J Emerg Med ; 24(3): 597-604, 2023 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322548

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Hospitals have implemented various wellness interventions to offset the negative effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on emergency physician morale and burnout. There is limited high quality evidence regarding effectiveness of hospital-directed wellness interventions, leaving hospitals without guidance on best practices. We sought to determine intervention effectiveness and frequency of use in the spring/summer 2020. The goal was to facilitate evidence-based guidance for hospital wellness program planning. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study we used a novel survey tool piloted at a single hospital and then distributed throughout the United States via major emergency medicine (EM) society listservs and closed social media groups. Subjects reported their morale levels using a slider scale from 1 (lowest) to 10 (highest) at the time of the survey and, retrospectively, at their respective COVID-19 peak in 2020. Subjects also rated effectiveness of wellness interventions using a Likert scale from 1 (not at all effective) to 5 (very effective). Subjects indicated their hospital's usage frequency of common wellness interventions. We analyzed results using descriptive statistics and t-tests. RESULTS: Of 76,100 EM society and closed social media group members, 522 (0.69%) subjects were enrolled. Study population demographics were similar to the national emergency physician population. Morale at the time of the survey was worse (mean [M] 4.36, SD 2.29) than the spring/summer 2020 peak (M 4.57, SD 2.13) [t(458)=-2.27, P=0.024]. The most effective interventions were hazard pay (M 3.59, SD 1.12), staff debriefing groups (M 3.51, SD 1.16), and free food (M 3.34, SD 1.14). The most frequently used interventions were free food (350/522, 67.1%), support sign display (300/522, 57.5%), and daily email updates (266/522, 51.0%). Infrequently used were hazard pay (53/522, 10.2%) and staff debriefing groups (127/522, 24.3%). CONCLUSION: There is discordance between the most effective and most frequently used hospital-directed wellness interventions. Only free food was both highly effective and frequently used. Hazard pay and staff debriefing groups were the two most effective interventions but were infrequently used. Daily email updates and support sign display were the most frequently used interventions but were not as effective. Hospitals should focus effort and resources on the most effective wellness interventions.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Hospitals
20.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1169604, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325964

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of the pilot study conducted by the authors was to assess occupational risk in selected areas of psychosocial risk factors among health professions in a pilot study. Medical staff working in the healthcare sector experience stress, job burnout and bullying on a daily basis. Monitoring occupational risks in the above areas provides an opportunity to take appropriate preventive measures. Methods: The prospective online survey included 143 health care workers from various professional groups. Eighteen participants did not complete the survey, and the results of 125 participants were eventually included in the analysis. The study used health and safety questionnaires in the healthcare sector, which are not widely used as screening tools in Poland. Results: The following statistical methods were performed in the study: the Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Dunn's test. In addition, multivariate analysis was performed. The results obtained in the study indicate that the questionnaires used in the study can be widely used by employers or occupational medicine as screening tools. Conclusions: Our findings show that level of education attainment in healthcare is correlated with higher chance of experiencing stress and burnout. Among the surveyed professions, nurses reported a higher amount of stress and burnout. Paramedics reported the highest chance of being bullied at work. This can be explained by their nature of work which requires directly interacting with patients and their families. In addition, it should be noted that the tools used can be successfully applied in workplaces as elements of workplace ergonomics assessment in the context of cognitive ergonomics.


Subject(s)
Bullying , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Pilot Projects , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workplace , Ergonomics , Medical Staff
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