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1.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 152: w30229, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202464

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: To estimate the prevalence of occupational burnout among the Swiss working population. METHODS: We interrogated three international databases (Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, and PsycINFO) and the databases of 15 Swiss universities to identify studies reporting the prevalence of occupational burnout in Swiss workers over the last 10 years, before the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were summarised descriptively and quantitatively using random-effects meta-analysis. We investigated between-study heterogeneity by stratifying results according to the type of burnout measurement tool, by occupation and by cut-off values. Three outcomes were considered: clinical/severe burnout, overall burnout and emotional exhaustion. RESULTS: We identified 23 studies about workers in Switzerland and estimated the prevalence of clinical or severe burnout at 4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2-6%). The average prevalence estimates for overall burnout and emotional exhaustion were similar at 18% (95% CI 12-25%) and 18% (95% CI 15-22%), respectively. When stratified by occupation, the clinical or severe burnout rates were higher among the healthcare workers than the general working population. CONCLUSIONS: These estimates of prepandemic (baseline) prevalence of occupational burnout are comparable with those available in the other countries where it is recognised and treated as a disease. They may prove useful in planning and assessing the effectiveness of interventions for prevention of occupational burnout and in minimising its negative consequences on individuals and on societies during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Switzerland/epidemiology
2.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(6): 385-401A, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198270

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of burnout among primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries and to identify factors associated with burnout. Methods: We systematically searched nine databases up to February 2022 to identify studies investigating burnout in primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries. There were no language limitations and we included observational studies. Two independent reviewers completed screening, study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate overall burnout prevalence as assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. We narratively report factors associated with burnout. Findings: The search returned 1568 articles. After selection, 60 studies from 20 countries were included in the narrative review and 31 were included in the meta-analysis. Three studies collected data during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic but provided limited evidence on the impact of the disease on burnout. The overall single-point prevalence of burnout ranged from 2.5% to 87.9% (43 studies). In the meta-analysis (31 studies), the pooled prevalence of a high level of emotional exhaustion was 28.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 21.5-33.5), a high level of depersonalization was 16.4% (95% CI: 10.1-22.9) and a high level of reduced personal accomplishment was 31.9% (95% CI: 21.7-39.1). Conclusion: The substantial prevalence of burnout among primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries has implications for patient safety, care quality and workforce planning. Further cross-sectional studies are needed to help identify evidence-based solutions, particularly in Africa and South-East Asia.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Developing Countries , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Prevalence
6.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(6): e24312, 2021 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197877

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has imposed physical and psychological pressure on health care professionals, including frontline physicians. Hence, evaluating the mental health status of physicians during the current pandemic is important to define future preventive guidelines among health care stakeholders. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we intended to study alterations in the mental health status of Portuguese physicians working at the frontline during the COVID-19 pandemic and potential sociodemographic factors influencing their mental health status. METHODS: A nationwide survey was conducted during May 4-25, 2020, to infer differences in mental health status (depression, anxiety, stress, and obsessive compulsive symptoms) between Portuguese physicians working at the frontline during the COVID-19 pandemic and other nonfrontline physicians. A representative sample of 420 participants stratified by age, sex, and the geographic region was analyzed (200 frontline and 220 nonfrontline participants). Moreover, we explored the influence of several sociodemographic factors on mental health variables including age, sex, living conditions, and household composition. RESULTS: Our results show that being female (ß=1.1; t=2.5; P=.01) and working at the frontline (ß=1.4; t=2.9; P=.004) are potential risk factors for stress. In contrast, having a house with green space was a potentially beneficial factor for stress (ß=-1.5; t=-2.5; P=.01) and anxiety (ß=-1.1; t=-2.4; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to apply protective mental health measures for physicians to avoid the long-term effects of stress, such as burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety , Depression , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Portugal , Professional Role , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto, Online) ; 32: e3234, 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2197535

ABSTRACT

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic evidenced a scenario of increased demands on health professionals that can lead to professional burnout. This study aimed to investigate Burnout Syndrome (BS) and associated factors in nursing professionals working in intensive care units (ICU) of the public service during the COVID-19 pandemic. 157 professionals were evaluated regarding sociodemographic, occupational and working conditions variables, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used. The prevalence of BS was 45.2%, with some professionals suffering from more than one factor of the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (28.7%), depersonalization (3.8%) and low professional fulfillment (24.8%). Logistic regression analysis in the final model showed that female gender, not having children, statutory bond, professionals who had COVID-19 and declared wanting to leave the ICU environment had a higher risk of BS. The results showed BS in nursing professionals and that new risk factors were added with the advent of the pandemic.


Resumo A pandemia de COVID-19 evidenciou um cenário de acréscimo de demandas aos profissionais de saúde que pode levar ao esgotamento profissional. Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar a Síndrome de Burnout (SB) e fatores associados em profissionais de enfermagem nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI) durante a pandemia de COVID-19. Foram avaliados 157 profissionais em relação às variáveis sociodemográficas, ocupacionais e condições de trabalho, e o Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) foi utilizado. A prevalência da SB foi de 45,2%, com alguns profissionais em mais de um fator da síndrome: exaustão emocional (28,7%), despersonalização (3,8%) e baixa realização profissional (24,8%). Análise de regressão logística no modelo final mostrou que o gênero feminino, não ter filhos, vínculo estatutário, profissionais que tiveram COVID-19 e que declararam querer sair do ambiente de UTI tiveram maior risco de presença da SB. Os resultados evidenciaram SB nos profissionais de enfermagem e que novos fatores de risco foram acrescidos com o advento da pandemia.


Resumen La pandemia de la COVID-19 evidenció un escenario de mayores exigencias a los profesionales de la salud que puede derivar en desgaste profesional. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo investigar el Síndrome de Burnout (BS) y factores asociados en los profesionales de enfermería en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) durante la pandemia. Los 157 profesionales fueron evaluados con relación a las variables sociodemográficas, ocupacionales y condiciones de trabajo, y se utilizó el Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). La prevalencia de SB fue del 45,2%, con algunos profesionales que sufren de más de un factor del síndrome: agotamiento emocional (28,7%), despersonalización (3,8%) y baja realización profesional (24,8%). El análisis de regresión logística mostró que el sexo femenino, no tener hijos, la relación laboral reglamentaria, los profesionales que contrajeron COVID-19 y que declararon querer salir del entorno de la UCI tuvieron un mayor riesgo de presencia de SB. Los resultados mostraron SB en profesionales de enfermería y que se agregaron nuevos factores de riesgo con el advenimiento de la pandemia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Burnout, Professional , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Nurse Practitioners , Nurses , Risk Factors , Pandemics
9.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 686-694, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152243

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We aim to describe the extent of psychological trauma and moral distress in healthcare workers (HCW) working in the intensive care unit (ICU) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, we review reports on prevalence of mental health symptoms, highlight vulnerable populations and summarize modifiable risk factors associated with mental health symptoms in ICU HCW. RECENT FINDINGS: The pandemic has resulted in a multitude of closely intertwined professional and personal challenges for ICU HCW. High rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (14-47%), burnout (45-85%), anxiety (31-60%), and depression (16-65%) have been reported, and these mental health symptoms are often interrelated. Most studies suggest that nurses and female HCW are at highest risk for developing mental health symptoms. The main personal concerns associated with reporting mental health symptoms among ICU HCW were worries about transmitting COVID-19 to their families, worries about their own health, witnessing colleagues contract the disease, and experiencing stigma from their communities. Major modifiable work-related risk factors were experiencing poor communication from supervisors, perceived lack of support from administrative leadership, and concerns about insufficient access to personal protective equipment, inability to rest, witnessing hasty end-of-life decisions, and restriction of family visitation policies. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted ICU HCW worldwide. The psychological trauma, manifesting as posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout, anxiety, and depression, is substantial and concerning. Urgent action by lawmakers and healthcare administrators is required to protect ICU HCW and sustain a healthy workforce.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Intensive Care Units , Psychological Trauma/epidemiology
11.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 380, 2022 06 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Demand for mental health services in New Zealand and internationally is growing. Little is known about how psychiatrists are faring in this environment. This study aimed to investigate wellbeing of psychiatrists working in the public health system in New Zealand, identify the main risk factors for work-related stress, gauge perceptions of how workload has changed over time, assess job satisfaction and whether individuals intend or desire to leave their work. METHODS: Psychiatrists working in New Zealand who were also members of the Association of Salaried Medical Specialists were invited to participate in an online survey. Main outcome measures were degree of burnout and stress experienced at work. Supplementary measures included perceived workplace demands and levels of support. Predictor variables included perceptions of changes to workloads over time, degree of job satisfaction and intentions to leave work. Logistic regression assessed characteristics associated with burnout and job satisfaction as well as intentions to leave work. Free text comments were analysed thematically alongside quantitative trends. RESULTS: 368/526 responded (70% response rate). 34.6% met the criteria for burnout and 35.3% scored with high work stress. There were no significant patterns of association with demographic variables but significant correlation with all but one predictor variable; having experienced a change to the demands of the on-call workload. 45% agreed they would leave their current job if able and 87% disagreed that they are working in a well-resourced mental health service. Respondents emphasised the impact of growing workloads and expressed concerns about their ability to provide optimal care in these circumstances. CONCLUSIONS: High burnout appears to affect one in three psychiatrists in New Zealand. Many attribute their feelings of burnout to demand for their services. These findings may assist with better workforce planning for psychiatry and emphasises potential consequences of demand for and poor resourcing of mental health services for the retention and wellbeing of doctors in psychiatry worldwide.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Occupational Stress , Psychiatry , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , New Zealand , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143130

ABSTRACT

Stress research has widely documented how uncertainty represents a strong stressor that, in general, is negatively associated with well-being. While the literature on job insecurity about this topic is extensive and exhaustive, empirical research on the outcomes of life uncertainty, namely the perception and feeling of precariousness regarding the present and future of one's own life, is yet to be fully explored. In the present paper, we aimed to investigate the relationships among job insecurity, life uncertainty, and psychosocial well-being outcomes, specifically, with a focus on job satisfaction and burnout. The participants were 357 workers (M = 146 and F = 211), with an average age of 41.78 y.o. (SD = 13.49), who completed an online questionnaire containing, in addition to sociodemographics information, measures of the study variables, namely job insecurity, life uncertainty, job satisfaction, and burnout. The results pointed out negative relationships of both job insecurity and life uncertainty with individual well-being, as they were negatively associated with job satisfaction and positively related to burnout. In a path analysis with latent variables, life uncertainty proved to fully mediate the relationship between job insecurity and psychosocial well-being.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Employment , Humans , Adult , Uncertainty , Employment/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142971

ABSTRACT

Many studies have investigated the state of the health of healthcare workers during the acute period of the pandemic. Yet, few studies have assessed the health of such professionals after the pandemic and in a less dramatic period. This study involved a particular sample represented by residents in anaesthesia-resuscitation and psychiatry at a university in northern Italy particularly affected by the pandemic. The objectives were to investigate some indicators of health and well-being and compare the two groups of trainees. Using Google Forms, the following tests were proposed: the General Health Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Subjective Happiness Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, Brief Resilience Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, as well as an ad hoc questionnaire. A qualifying element of the work was the discussion of the results with the trainees. Various strengths have emerged, such as high values of resilience and job satisfaction; a positive assessment of the support received from the work team; an articulate use of coping strategies; and good levels of happiness and satisfaction with life, in both specialities. However, a widespread anxiety also emerged, which appears to be more attributable to concerns about professional evaluation, rather than the pandemic itself. In summary, the trainees seem to have found a fair amount of personal balance, whereas the relationship with the patient seems to be more compromised. In the comparison between specialities, the only significant differences are the levels of depersonalisation and resilience, both of which are higher in anaesthetists.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142970

ABSTRACT

The main objective of the present study is to examine the impact of job stress, role ambiguity, work-life imbalance and burnout on employee turnover intention. Moreover, the mediating role of burnout between job stress, role ambiguity, work-life imbalance and turnover intention is also examined. The data collection for this quantitative research was conducted through the "Questionnaire" technique. The questionnaire was developed based on previously established questions available in the literature. The data were collected using simple random sampling from the healthcare workers of KSA. From the distributed questionnaire, 73.5% of the usable questionnaires were returned. This study used SPSS and PLS for the analysis of the data to highlight the most significant variables that impact the employees' turnover intentions among KSA health workers. The findings show that job burnout is clearly related to turnover intentions and is positively affected by both role stress and role ambiguity. Moreover, a statistically positive association is found between work-life imbalance and burnout among the healthcare workers in KSA. Furthermore, the mediating role of burnout is also confirmed in this study. The study also indicates that role ambiguity and role stress due to COVID-19 may create burnout among employees, which may lead to turnover intention among healthcare workers. There is a lack of research on the assessment of the impact of the novel COVID-19-related job stress, role ambiguity and work-life imbalance on the medical staff's turnover intentions in hospitals. This study fills the gap of the limited studies conducted regarding the identification of the factors that can create turnover intention among healthcare workers of KSA by providing empirical evidence from a Gulf country, Saudi Arabia. This study provides managerial implications for hospital management and health policymakers to develop a strategy to retain the employees. Furthermore, healthcare administrators need to pay close attention to front line workers' turnover intentions as these medical heroes are the vital part of our society who assist patients to receive their initial treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Personnel Turnover , Intention , COVID-19/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277875, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140667

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers had a high workload and were exposed to multiple psychosocial stressors. However, a knowledge gap exists about the levels of burnout among Bangladeshi frontline doctors during this COVID-19 pandemic. The study investigated burnout syndrome (BOS) among frontline doctors in two public secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Chattogram, Bangladesh. MATERIALS & METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved frontline doctors working at two hospitals treating COVID-19 and non-COVID patients from June to August 2020. A self-administered questionnaire that included Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) was used to capture demographic and workplace environment information. ANOVA and t-test were used to determine the statistical differences in the mean values of the three dimensions of MBI-HSS. Scores for three domains of burnout: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA) were calculated. Post-hoc analysis was done to identify the significant pair-wise differences when the ANOVA test result was significant. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of factors associated with BOS. RESULTS: A total of 185 frontline doctors were invited to participate by convenience sampling, and 168 responded. The response rate was 90.81%. The overall prevalence of BOS was 55.4% (93/168) (95% CI: 47.5% to 63.0%). Moderate to high levels of EE was found in 95.8% of the participants. High DP and reduced PA were observed in 98.2% and 97% of participants. Younger age (25-29 years), being female, and working as a medical officer were independently associated with high levels of burnout in all three domains. EE was significantly higher in females (P = 0.011). DP was significantly higher in medical officers, those at earlier job periods, and those working more than 8 hours per day. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak, BOS was common among Bangladeshi frontline doctors. Females, medical officers, and younger doctors tended to be more susceptible to BOS. Less BOS was experienced when working in the non-COVID ward than in the mixed ward.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
16.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0267530, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140386

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, health professionals have been working under extreme conditions, increasing the risk of physical and mental illness. We evaluated the prevalence of burnout and its associated factors among postgraduate student residents in health professions during the global health crisis. METHODS: Healthcare residents were recruited from all across Brazil between July and September 2020 through digital forms containing instruments for assessing burnout (Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI)), resilience (brief resilient coping scale (BRCS)) and anxiety, stress and depression (depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)). Additionally, the relationships between burnout and chronic diseases, autonomy and educational adequacy in the residency programme, personal protective equipment (PPE), workload and care for patients with COVID-19 were evaluated. The chi-square test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation test and logistic regression were performed. RESULTS: A total of 1,313 participants were included: mean (standard deviation) age, 27.8 (4.4) years; female gender, 78.1%; white race, 59.3%; and physicians, 51.3%. The overall prevalence of burnout was 33.4%. The odds (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) of burnout were higher in the presence of pre-existing diseases (1.76 [1.26-2.47]) and weekly work > 60 h (1.36 [1.03-1.79]) and were lower in the presence of high resilience (0.84 [0.81-0.88]), autonomy (0.87 [0.81-0.93]), and educational structure (0.77 [0.73-0.82]), adequate availability of PPE (0.72 [0.63-0.83]) and non-white race (0.63 [0.47-0.83]). Burnout was correlated with anxiety (r = 0.47; p < 0.05), stress (r: 0.58; p < 0.05) and depression (r: 0.65; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We observed a high prevalence of burnout among residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Individual characteristics and conditions related to the work environment were associated with a higher or lower occurrence of the syndrome.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prevalence , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology
17.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 79, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses are frequently exposed to chronic stress in the workplace generating harmful effects such as job strain and burnout. On the contrary, resilience has been shown to be a beneficial variable. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between dimensions of the Job Demand Control-Support model, resilience and burnout in nurses, and examine the mediating role of resilience between job strain and burnout. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional study reported in line with the STROBE guidelines. Active nurses were invited to complete an online questionnaire in September, 2020. With snowball sampling, 1013 nurses, with a mean age of 34.71, filled out the Job Content Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Resilience Scale. RESULTS: The results showed the existence of four groups of professionals based on job strain. The nurses in the "High Strain" group (high demands and low control) showed higher scores in emotional exhaustion and cynicism, while those in the "Active Job" group scored higher in personal realization and resilience. The findings showed that job strain affects burnout in nurses, and this effect is mediated by resilience. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that a high level of resilience could exert a fundamental role in ensuring well-being and proper job performance by nurses. Nursing managers should see to the personable variables or competencies that provide and favor an opportunity for nurses to widen and improve their practice, in pursuance of satisfying and responding better to people's needs and the systems they work for.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Protective Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology
18.
J Healthc Manag ; 67(6): 425-435, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135684

ABSTRACT

GOAL: Administrative burden is one of many potential root causes of physician burnout. Scribe documentation assistance can reduce this burden. However, traditional in-person scribe services are challenged by consistent staffing because the model requires the physical presence of a scribe and limits the team to a single individual. In addition, in-person scribes cannot provide the flexible support required for virtual care encounters, which can now pivot geographically and temporally. To respond to these challenges, our health network implemented an asynchronous virtual scribe model and evaluated the program's impact on clinician perceptions of burnout across multiple outpatient specialties. METHODS: Using a mixed-methods, pre-/postdesign, this evaluation measured the impact of an asynchronous virtual scribe program on physician burnout. Physicians were given the Professional Fulfillment Index tool (to self-assess their mental state) and free-text comment surveys before virtual scribe initiation and again at 3-, 6-, and 12-month intervals after program implementation. Descriptive statistics of survey results and qualitative review of free-text entries were analyzed for themes of facilitation and barriers to virtual scribe use. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 50 physician participants in this study, 42 (84%) completed the preintervention survey and 15 (36%) completed all 4 surveys; 25 participants (50%) discontinued scribe use after 12 months. Burnout levels-as defined by dread, exhaustion, lack of enthusiasm, decrease in empathy, and decrease in colleague connection-all trended toward improvement during this study. Importantly, quality, time savings, burnout, and productivity moved in positive directions as well. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: The cost burden to physicians and the COVID-19 pandemic inhibited the continued use of asynchronous virtual medical scribes. Nevertheless, those who continued in the program have reported positive outcomes, which indicates that the service can be a viable and effective tool to reduce physician burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Electronic Health Records , Pandemics , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control
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