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1.
Trop Doct ; 52(1): 46-52, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759598

ABSTRACT

Our study looks at the effects of burnout and stress levels of nurses, behaviour regarding medical waste, and other effective risk factors on the first time and recurrent diagnosis of nosocomial infection (NI) in neonatal intensive care units in Hargeisa, Somaliland. This multicentric follow-up study was conducted and repeated measurements were taken from 72 neonates and 45 nurses working in three hospitals for a period of five months. Nurses with high burnout levels had 3.7 times higher risk of neonates under their care being diagnosed with an NI (odds ratio: 3.743; 95% CI: 1.498-9.356). By controlling other variables, the stress level of nurses increased the incidence rate of neonates being diagnosed more than once with NI by 3.2 times. Statistically, the direction of causal association was from the high burnout among nurses to the diagnosis of NI, and high stress was associated with the recurrent diagnosis of infections in neonates.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Cross Infection , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Risk Factors
2.
Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets ; 21(12): 2238-2252, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714873

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some endocrinologists were involved in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic. This study aims to analyze burnout levels among the Association of Medical Endocrinologists (AME) members before and during the pandemic. METHODS: We recruited two AME members samples at two different times: before COVID-19 (n = 811) and during the first wave of the ongoing pandemic (n = 579). Both the samples filled the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We performed MANOVAs to evaluate demographic and COVID-19 related differences in burnout levels and Pearson's Chi-square test to compare burnout severity before and during the pandemic. RESULTS: Women reported higher Emotional Exhaustion and reduced Professional Accomplishment than men. The oldest physicians had lower levels of Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization and higher Professional Accomplishment than younger workers. Independent contractors displayed lower levels of burnout compared to established contractors. Finally, the pandemic, per se, did not lead to changes in burnout levels. DISCUSSION: Women and young physicians are at higher risk of burnout. It is also possible that front- line professionals are at higher risk during a health care crisis. Moreover, it is likely that the length of exposure to the pandemic has not been sufficient to impact burnout levels. CONCLUSION: Short-term exposure to pandemic-related activities seemed to have a low impact on burnout severity, except for physicians directly involved in managing COVID-19 cases. It is strongly recommended the availability of psychological support in public hospitals.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Endocrinologists/psychology , Occupational Health , Psychological Distress , Workload/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians, Women/psychology , Prevalence , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Time Factors , Women, Working/psychology
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0262703, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677579

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) has taken an immense physical, social, and emotional toll on frontline healthcare workers. Research has documented higher levels of anxiety, depression, and burnout among healthcare workers during the pandemic. Thus, creative interventions are needed now more than ever to provide brief, accessible support to frontline workers. Virtual reality is a rapidly growing technology with potential psychological applications. In this study, we piloted a three-minute Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation of a nature scene to lower subjective stress among frontline healthcare workers in COVID-19 treatment units. We chose to film a nature scene because of the extensive empirical literature documenting the benefits of nature exposure and health. METHODS: A convenience sample of frontline healthcare workers, including direct care providers, indirect care providers, and support or administrative services, were recruited from three COVID-19 units located in the United States. Inclusion criteria for participation included adults aged 18 years and older who could read and speak in English and were currently employed by the healthcare system. Participants viewed a 360-degree video capture of a lush, green nature preserve in an Oculus Go or Pico G2 4K head-mounted display. Prior to viewing the simulation, participants completed a brief demographic questionnaire and the visual analogue scale to rate their subjective stress on a 10-point scale, with 1 = 'Not at all stressed' to 10 = 'Extremely stressed.' We conducted paired t-tests to examine pre- and post-simulation changes in subjective stress as well as Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U tests to examine differences by demographic variables. All analyses were conducted in SPSS statistical software version 28.0. We defined statistical significance as a p-value less than .05. RESULTS: A total of 102 individuals consented to participate in the study. Eighty-four (82.4%) participants reported providing direct patient care, 73 (71.6%) identified as women, 49 (48.0%) were between the ages of 25-34 years old, and 35 (34.3%) had prior experience with VR. The pre-simulation mean stress score was 5.5±2.2, with a range of 1 to 10. Thirty-three (32.4%) participants met the 6.8 cutoff for high stress pre-simulation. Pre-simulation stress scores did not differ by any demographic variables. Post-simulation, we observed a significant reduction in subjective stress scores from pre- to post-simulation (mean change = -2.2±1.7, t = 12.749, p < .001), with a Cohen's d of 1.08, indicating a very large effect. Further, only four (3.9%) participants met the cutoff for high stress after the simulation. Post-simulations scores did not differ by provider type, age range, gender, or prior experience with virtual reality. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this pilot study suggest that the application of this Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation was effective in reducing subjective stress among frontline healthcare workers in the short-term. More research is needed to compare the Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation to a control condition and assess subjective and objective measures of stress over time.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/therapy , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Virtual Reality , Adult , Anxiety , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Complementary Therapies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Young Adult
5.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 210: 106958, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439944

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has posed unprecedented new stressors to medical student education. This national survey investigated the prevalence of burnout in U.S. medical students interested in pursuing neurosurgical residency during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A 24-question survey was sent to all American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) medical student chapter members. The abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory (aMBI) was used to measure the following burnout metrics: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Bivariate analyses were conducted and multivariate analyses were performed using a logistic regression models. RESULTS: 254 medical students were included (response rate of 14.5%). The majority were male (55.1%), White (66.1%), and between their 2nd and 3rd years in medical school (62.6%). Burnout was identified in 38 (15.0%) respondents, a rate lower than reported in the pre-COVID era. In multivariate analysis, burnout was significantly associated with choosing not to pursue, or feeling uncertain about pursuing, a medical career again if given the choice (OR = 3.40, p = 0.0075), having second thoughts about choosing to pursue neurosurgery (OR = 3.47, p = 0.0025), attending a medical program in the Northeast compared to the Southeast (OR = 0.32, p = 0.027) or Southwest U.S. (OR = 0.30, p = 0.046), and indicating that one's future clinical performance will have worsened due to COVID-19 (OR = 2.71, p = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates relatively low rates of burnout among U.S. medical students interested in pursuing neurosurgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings also demonstrate multiple factors may aid in early identification of burnout, highlighting potential opportunities for intervention.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Neurosurgery/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Neurosurgery/education , Young Adult
7.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1841-1848, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369637

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In a previous study, we assessed burnout in geriatric healthcare workers during the first lockdown that lasted from March to May 2020 in France, in response to the COVID-19 crisis. OBJECTIVE: We carried out a follow-up study to assess burnout in the same population during the second lockdown that was implemented at the end of October 2020. METHODS: We used an online survey to assess burnout in terms of exhaustion and disengagement in a sample of 58 geriatric healthcare workers. RESULTS: We found higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement, and burnout among geriatric healthcare workers during the second than during the first lockdown. We also found high levels of exhaustion but moderate disengagement and burnout during the second lockdown. CONCLUSION: The increased exhaustion, disengagement, and burnout during the second lockdown can be attributed to the increased workload in geriatric facilities throughout this crisis and during the second lockdown due to shortage in staff and increased number of shifts and allocated duties. The high levels of exhaustion reported among geriatric healthcare workers during the second lockdown can reflect their physical fatigue, as well as their feelings of being emotionally overextended and exhausted by their workload.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Caregiver Burden , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Services for the Aged , Work Engagement , Adult , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Caregiver Burden/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Services for the Aged/organization & administration , Health Services for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 65: 103059, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188596

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Burnout is a global work-related phenomenon. Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are at risk of burnout and the COVID-19 pandemic may increase this risk. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of burnout risk and identify risk factors among ICU nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: Web-based survey performed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in French speaking Belgium. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory scale. RESULTS: A total of 1135 ICU nurses responded to the questionnaire. The overall prevalence of burnout risk was 68%. A total of 29% of ICU nurses were at risk of depersonalisation (DP), 31% of reduced personal accomplishment (PA), and 38% of emotional exhaustion (EE). A 1:3 nurse-to-patient ratio increased the risk of EE (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.07-2.95) and DP (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09-2.40). Those who reported having a higher perceived workload during the COVID-19 pandemic were at higher risk for all dimensions of burnout. Shortage of personal protective equipment increased the risk of EE (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.35-3.34) and nurses who reported having symptoms of COVID-19 without being tested were at higher risk of EE (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.68-1.87). CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of ICU nurses were at risk of burnout and this risk was associated with their working conditions during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. We recommend monitoring the risk of burnout and implementing interventions to prevent and manage it, taking into account the factors identified in this study.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Belgium , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Prevalence , Psychometrics/instrumentation , Psychometrics/methods , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology , Workload/standards
9.
Psychoneuroendocrinology ; 128: 105213, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164355

ABSTRACT

In the critical context of COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers are on the front line, participating directly in the care, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with COVID-19. This exposes them to a higher risk of developing chronic stress, psychological distress, and any other mental health symptoms. OBJECTIVE: to evaluate stress and burnout in a health workers population and, in addition, to measure hair cortisol concentration as a current biomarker of stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 234 health workers from Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín", Buenos Aires University, were included in this study. In this population hair samples were obtained from the posterior vertex as close to the scalp as possible and the individuals completed the following surveys: perceived stress, social support, burnout scale, life event scale, and sociodemographic data. Hair cortisol was measured by an automated chemiluminescent method. The studied population was divided into three groups considering those individuals below the healthy reference sample range (< 40 pg/mg hair), within the healthy reference range (40-128 pg/mg hair) and above the reference range (> 128 pg/mg hair). This study used a transversal and observational design. RESULTS: Our results show that 40% of the studied population presented hair cortisol values outside of the healthy reference range. In the whole studied population, a direct correlation was found between hair cortisol concentration and perceived stress as well as between hair cortisol concentration and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout (r = 0.142, p = 0.030; r = 0.143, p = 0.029, respectively). 12% of the studied population showed Burnout (52% doctors and residents, 19% nurses, 19% administrative personnel). Higher values in hair cortisol levels were found in the group with burnout versus individuals without burnout (p = 0.034). Finally, a mediation analysis was performed, finding that depersonalization is a mediating variable in the relationship between self-perceived stress and hair cortisol level (F = 4.86, p = 0.0086; indirect effect IC: 0.0987-1.8840). CONCLUSION: This is the first study in which a stress biomarker such as hair cortisol is evaluated in this population and in this context. Healthcare workers are subjected to increased levels of stress and burnout. High depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and decreased personal sense of accomplishment characterize this population. It is the responsibility of the health authorities to implement strategies to manage this psychological emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/metabolism , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Argentina/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/metabolism , Burnout, Professional/physiopathology , Female , Hair/chemistry , Health Care Surveys , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/physiopathology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e24191, 2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143363

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, health professionals have been directly confronted with the suffering of patients and their families. By making them main actors in the management of this health crisis, they have been exposed to various psychosocial risks (stress, trauma, fatigue, etc). Paradoxically, stress-related symptoms are often underreported in this vulnerable population but are potentially detectable through passive monitoring of changes in speech behavior. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the use of rapid and remote measures of stress levels in health professionals working during the COVID-19 outbreak. This was done through the analysis of participants' speech behavior during a short phone call conversation and, in particular, via positive, negative, and neutral storytelling tasks. METHODS: Speech samples from 89 health care professionals were collected over the phone during positive, negative, and neutral storytelling tasks; various voice features were extracted and compared with classical stress measures via standard questionnaires. Additionally, a regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Certain speech characteristics correlated with stress levels in both genders; mainly, spectral (ie, formant) features, such as the mel-frequency cepstral coefficient, and prosodic characteristics, such as the fundamental frequency, appeared to be sensitive to stress. Overall, for both male and female participants, using vocal features from the positive tasks for regression yielded the most accurate prediction results of stress scores (mean absolute error 5.31). CONCLUSIONS: Automatic speech analysis could help with early detection of subtle signs of stress in vulnerable populations over the phone. By combining the use of this technology with timely intervention strategies, it could contribute to the prevention of burnout and the development of comorbidities, such as depression or anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Speech Acoustics , Speech/physiology , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e21445, 2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical professionals are exposed to multiple and often excessive demands in their work environment. Low-intensity internet interventions allow them to benefit from psychological support even when institutional help is not available. Focusing on enhancing psychological resources-self-efficacy and perceived social support-makes an intervention relevant for various occupations within the medical profession. Previously, these resources were found to operate both individually or sequentially with self-efficacy either preceding social support (cultivation process) or following it (enabling process). OBJECTIVE: The objective of this randomized controlled trial is to compare the efficacy of 4 variants of Med-Stress, a self-guided internet intervention that aims to improve the multifaceted well-being of medical professionals. METHODS: This study was conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (N=1240) were recruited mainly via media campaigns and social media targeted ads. They were assigned to 1 of the following 4 groups: experimental condition reflecting the cultivation process, experimental condition reflecting the enabling process, active comparator enhancing only self-efficacy, and active comparator enhancing only perceived social support. Outcomes included 5 facets of well-being: job stress, job burnout, work engagement, depression, and job-related traumatic stress. Measurements were taken on the web at baseline (time 1), immediately after intervention (time 2), and at a 6-month follow-up (time 3). To analyze the data, linear mixed effects models were used on the intention-to-treat sample. The trial was partially blinded as the information about the duration of the trial, which was different for experimental and control conditions, was public. RESULTS: At time 2, job stress was lower in the condition reflecting the cultivation process than in the one enhancing social support only (d=-0.21), and at time 3, participants in that experimental condition reported the lowest job stress when compared with all 3 remaining study groups (ds between -0.24 and -0.41). For job-related traumatic stress, we found a significant difference between study groups only at time 3: stress was lower in the experimental condition in which self-efficacy was enhanced first than in the active comparator enhancing solely social support (d=-0.24). The same result was found for work engagement (d=-0.20), which means that it was lower in exactly the same condition that was found beneficial for stress relief. There were no differences between study conditions for burnout and depression neither at time 2 nor at time 3. There was a high dropout in the study (1023/1240, 82.50% at posttest), reflecting the pragmatic nature of this trial. CONCLUSIONS: The Med-Stress internet intervention improves some components of well-being-most notably job stress-when activities are completed in a specific sequence. The decrease in work engagement could support the notion of dark side of this phenomenon, but further research is needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03475290; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03475290. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s13063-019-3401-9.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel/psychology , Health Status , Internet-Based Intervention , Occupational Stress/therapy , Adult , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/therapy , COVID-19 , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Self Efficacy , Social Support , Workplace
13.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 1494-1509, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814636

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a global impact, and Singapore has seen 33,000 confirmed cases. Patients with cancer, their caregivers, and health care workers (HCWs) need to balance the challenges associated with COVID-19 while ensuring that cancer care is not compromised. This study aimed to evaluate the psychological effect of COVID-19 on these groups and the prevalence of burnout among HCWs. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of patients, caregivers, and HCWs at the National Cancer Centre Singapore was performed over 17 days during the lockdown. The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to assess for anxiety and burnout, respectively. Self-reported fears related to COVID-19 were collected. RESULTS: A total of 624 patients, 408 caregivers, and 421 HCWs participated in the study, with a response rate of 84%, 88%, and 92% respectively. Sixty-six percent of patients, 72.8% of caregivers, and 41.6% of HCWs reported a high level of fear from COVID-19. The top concern of patients was the wide community spread of COVID-19. Caregivers were primarily worried about patients dying alone. HCWs were most worried about the relatively mild symptoms of COVID-19. The prevalence of anxiety was 19.1%, 22.5%, and 14.0% for patients, caregivers, and HCWs, respectively. Patients who were nongraduates and married, and caregivers who were married were more anxious. The prevalence of burnout in HCWs was 43.5%, with more anxious and fearful HCWs reporting higher burnout rates. CONCLUSION: Fears and anxiety related to COVID-19 are high. Burnout among HCWs is similar to rates reported prepandemic. An individualized approach to target the specific fears of each group will be crucial to maintain the well-being of these vulnerable groups and prevent burnout of HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Neoplasms/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Male , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Workload/psychology
14.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 198: 106193, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738292

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has posed significant changes to physician workflow and healthcare delivery. This national survey investigated the impact of the pandemic on burnout and career satisfaction among U.S. attending neurosurgeons. METHODS: A 24-question survey was sent electronically to all American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) attending members. The abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory (aMBI) was used to measure the following burnout and career satisfaction indices: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Bivariate analyses were conducted and multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. RESULTS: 407 attending neurosurgeons were included in the present study, with an overall response rate of 17.7 %. The majority of respondents were male (88.7 %), White (84.3 %), and in practice for 15 years or more (64.6 %). The majority reported a decrease in work hours due to the pandemic (82.6 %), uncertainty about future earnings (80.3 %), and uncertainty regarding future healthcare reform (84.5 %). Burnout was identified in 83 (20.4 %) respondents, whereas career satisfaction was identified in 316 (77.6 %) respondents. Rate of burnout was decreased when compared to rates reported in the pre-COVID era. In multivariate analysis, burnout was associated with working in a hostile or difficult environment since the rise of COVID-19 (OR = 2.534, p = 0.008), not having children (OR = 3.294, p = 0.011), being in practice for 5-15 years (vs. < 5 years) (OR = 4.568, p = 0.014), spending increased time conducting non-neurosurgical medical care due to COVID-19 (OR = 2.362, p = 0.019), feeling uncertain about future earnings due to COVID-19 (OR = 4.031, p = 0.035), and choosing not to pursue or feeling uncertain about pursuing neurosurgery again if given the choice (OR = 7.492, p < 0.001). Career satisfaction was associated with cerebrovascular subspecialty training (OR = 2.614, p = 0.046) and a willingness to pursue neurosurgery again if given the choice (OR = 2.962, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Factors related to the novel COVID-19 pandemic have contributed to changes in workflow among U.S. attending neurosurgeons. Despite these changes, we report decreased burnout and high career satisfaction among U.S. neurosurgeons. Understanding modifiable stressors among neurosurgeons during the pandemic may help to identify effective future interventions to mitigate burnout and improve career satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Neurosurgery/education , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Workload
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