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1.
Br J Nurs ; 31(1): S10-S15, 2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622855

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a set of unprecedented challenges for healthcare services and staff. The authors conducted a national online survey of nurses employed to work in HIV services in England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to establish how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the professional quality of life of HIV nurses. Professional quality of life was assessed using the ProQOL scale; 132 nurses completed the survey, 99 of whom completed the ProQOL scale. Just over 1 in 3 were redeployed in the first pandemic wave, dropping to 1 in 6 in subsequent waves. In multivariate analysis, redeployment in both waves increased burnout scores by nearly 10 points and decreased compassion satisfaction scores by nearly 5 points, with no effect on secondary traumatic stress scores. A supportive workplace environment will have a key role in supporting the path to recovery.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12311, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620088

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to develop a comprehensive list of stressors relevant to junior doctors and will also report findings exploring the associations between burnout and stressors, which include work and non-work-related stressors as well as pandemic-related stressors. METHODS: An anonymous online questionnaire was sent to 1000 randomly selected junior doctors in the North-West of England. The questionnaire included 37 questions on general and pandemic-specific stressors, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory Health Services Survey. The main outcomes of interest were junior doctor ratings of stressors and scores for burnout (emotional exhaustion [EE], depersonalisation [DP], and personal accomplishment [PA]). Stepwise regression analysis was undertaken to assess associations between stressors and burnout. RESULTS: In total, 326 responses were collected (response rate = 33%). Of the top 10 stressors rated by junior doctors, 60% were related to the pandemic. Multiple stressors were found to be associated with the burnout dimensions. Fatigue (ß = .43), pandemic-related workload increase (ß = .33), and feeling isolated (ß = .24) had the strongest associations with EE, whereas fatigue (ß = .21), uncertainty around COVID-19 information (ß = .22) and doing unproductive tasks (ß = .17) had the strongest associations with DP. Working beyond normal scope due to COVID-19 (ß = -.26), not confident in own ability (ß = -.24) and not feeling valued (ß = -.20) were found to have the strongest associations with PA. CONCLUSIONS: Junior doctors experience a combination of general stressors and additional stressors emerging from the pandemic which significantly impact burnout. Monitoring these stressors and targeting them as part of interventions could help mitigating burnout in junior doctors.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613767

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to identify the mediating effects of perceived health status (PHS) and perceived organizational support (POS) in the association between emotional labor and burnout in public health nurses (PHNs). The participants were 207 PHNs convenience sampled from 30 public health centers and offices in Jeju, Korea. Data regarding emotional labor, PHS, POS, and burnout were collected between February and March 2021 using a structured questionnaire. Collected data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Burnout of PHNs was positively correlated with emotional labor (r = 0.64, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with PHS (r = -0.51, p < 0.001) and POS (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). In the association between emotional labor and burnout, PHS (B = -1.36, p < 0.001) and POS (B = -0.42, p = 0.001) had a partial mediating effect. Reduction of burnout among PHNs requires not only effective management of emotional labor but also personal and organizational efforts to improve PHS and POS.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses, Public Health , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Nursing ; 52(1): 29-32, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606527

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Pandemic-related stress factors have been profoundly impacting the wellness of nurses, resulting in job burnout, moral distress, and some nurses deciding to leave the profession. This article examines strategies to identify stressors and develop self-care and coping skills.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580718

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the mental health outcomes of health care workers (HCWs) of the Verona academic hospital trust (Italy) one year after the outbreak of COVID-19 and to identify predicted risk factors. A web-based survey was conducted from mid-April to mid-May 2021 on hospital workers one year after the first evaluation performed during the lock-down phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Post-traumatic stress, general anxiety, depression, and burnout were assessed by using, respectively, the impact of event scale (IES-R), the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Maslach burnout inventory-general survey (MBI-GS). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with each of the four mental health outcomes one year after the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of 1033 HCWs participated. The percentage of HCWs scoring above the cut-off increased from 2020 to 2021 in all of the outcome domains (anxiety, 50.1% vs. 55.7, p < 0.05; depression, 26.6% vs. 40.6%, p < 0.001; burnout, 28.6% vs. 40.6%, p < 0.001; chi-square test), with the exception of post-traumatic distress. There was also an increase when stratifying by occupation and workplace, with a greater increase for depression and burnout. Multivariate analysis revealed that, one year after the COVID-19 outbreak, nurses were at the greatest risk of anxiety and depression, whereas residents were at the greatest risk of burnout (in terms of low professional efficacy). Working in intensive care units was associated with an increased risk of developing severe emotional exhaustion and a cynical attitude towards work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
6.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1951, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This paper is an empirical investigation that examines a path model linking COVID-19 perceptions to organisational citizenship behaviour (OCBs) via three mediators: job insecurity, burnout, and job satisfaction. The research examines the path model invariance spanning Generations X, Y, and Z. Three countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) were the focus of the study. METHODS: The data was collected from a sample of employees in service companies (n = 578). We used a Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) to analyse the data. RESULTS: Our findings reveal that COVID-19 perceptions positively predict job insecurity, which positively impacts burnout levels. Burnout negatively predicts job satisfaction. The findings established that job satisfaction positively predicts OCBs. The mediation analysis determined that job insecurity, burnout and job satisfaction convey the indirect effects of COVID-19 perceptions onto OCBs. Finally, our hypothesised model is non-equivalent across Generations X, Y and Z. In that regard, our multi-group analysis revealed that the indirect effects of COVID-19 perceptions on OCBs were only valid amongst younger generations, i.e., Generation Y and Generation Z. Specifically, younger generations are substantially more vulnerable to the indirect effects of COVID-19 perceptions on their engagement in OCBs than Generation X whose job satisfaction blocks the effects of COVID-19 perceptions on OCBs. CONCLUSIONS: The present study extends our knowledge of workplace generational differences in responding to the perceptions of crises or pandemics. It offers evidence that suggests that burnout, job attitudes and organisational outcomes change differently across generations in pandemic times.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
7.
Work ; 68(4): 969-979, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557738

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professionalism, stress and demographic factors are the three key influences in nurses' intention to provide care. OBJECTIVES: This study examined the levels of work intention, stress and professionalism of nurses and determine the relationship between nursing work intention and factors in response to COVID-19. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 362 nurses from COVID-19-devoted hospitals in Iran. A self-administered electronic-based questionnaire was developed and used to determine levels of stress, professionalism, and nursing intention. Multiple regression analysis was carried out to analyze the correlation between nursing intention with respect to stress and professionalism. RESULTS: The overall stress, professionalism, and nursing intention scores were 48.56, 21.46, and 17.83 respectively. There were significant differences in nursing intention scores between gender, marital status, and having training groups (p < 0.05). The regression analysis revealed that nursing intention had a significant relationship with older age (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.11,B = 17.02), higher income level (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.81,B = 6.98), having previous training (p = 0.008,S.E = 1.22,B = 3.27), higher stress level (p < 0.001,S.E = 2.37,B = -21.39), and high professionalism level (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.16,B = 11.99). CONCLUSION: Having an adequate staff requirement plan, planning appropriate training for nurses, and proactive psychological support are crucial to prevent burnout and continue to provide nursing services.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Intention , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Professionalism , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 34(1): 122-126, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555548

ABSTRACT

Columbia University's Papper Symposium, a virtual event held on March 20, 2021, was dedicated to the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This article summarizes a lecture by Dr. Roberta Hines, Nicholas M. Greene Professor of Anesthesiology and Department Chair and Chief of Anesthesiology at Yale-New Haven Hospital titled "The impact of COVID-19 on trainees: lessons learned and unanticipated opportunities," in addition draws from experiences at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and a focused review of the literature on the toll of the pandemic on trainee well-being and mental health. Early research has demonstrated that rates of burnout and acute stress were higher among health care providers who cared for COVID-19 patients than those who did not and that COVID-19 frontline health care providers are at high risk for common psychological disorders, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Trainees working on the frontlines may be at particularly high risk for these mental health disorders and are less likely to access resources available to them. Program directors and hospital graduate medical education leaders should be aware of the threats to physiological and psychological safety and take action to prevent further detrimental effects. The rates of burnout and mental health disorders among trainees are expected to rise as a result of the pandemic, making screening programs and increased access to mental health treatment an essential feature of all residency and fellowship programs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Depress Anxiety ; 38(10): 1007-1017, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525429

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the relationship between moral distress and mental health problems. We examined moral distress in 2579 frontline healthcare workers (FHCWs) caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients during the height of the spring 2020 pandemic surge in New York City. The goals of the study were to identify common dimensions of COVID-19 moral distress; and to examine the relationship between moral distress, and positive screen for COVID-19-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, burnout, and work and interpersonal functional difficulties. METHOD: Data were collected in spring 2020, through an anonymous survey delivered to a purposively-selected sample of 6026 FHCWs at Mount Sinai Hospital; 2579 endorsed treating COVID-19 patients and provided complete survey responses. Physicians, house staff, nurses, physician assistants, social workers, chaplains, and clinical dietitians comprised the sample. RESULTS: The majority of the sample (52.7%-87.8%) endorsed moral distress. Factor analyses revealed three dimensions of COVID-19 moral distress: negative impact on family, fear of infecting others, and work-related concerns. All three factors were significantly associated with severity and positive screen for COVID-19-related PTSD symptoms, burnout, and work and interpersonal difficulties. Relative importance analyses revealed that concerns about work competencies and personal relationships were most strongly related to all outcomes. CONCLUSION: Moral distress is prevalent in FHCWs and includes family-, infection-, and work-related concerns. Prevention and treatment efforts to address moral distress during the acute phase of potentially morally injurious events may help mitigate risk for PTSD, burnout, and functional difficulties.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Morals , Pandemics , Psychosocial Functioning , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
10.
Front Public Health ; 9: 750529, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518575

ABSTRACT

In the current period of global public health crisis due to the COVID-19, healthcare workers are more exposed to physical and mental exhaustion - burnout - for the torment of difficult decisions, the pain of losing patients and colleagues, and the risk of infection, for themselves and their families. The very high number of cases and deaths, and the probable future "waves" raise awareness of these challenging working conditions and the need to address burnout by identifying possible solutions. Measures have been suggested to prevent or reduce burnout at individual level (physical activity, balanced diet, good sleep hygiene, family support, meaningful relationships, reflective practices and small group discussions), organizational level (blame-free environments for sharing experiences and advices, broad involvement in management decisions, multi-disciplinary psychosocial support teams, safe areas to withdraw quickly from stressful situations, adequate time planning, social support), and cultural level (involvement of healthcare workers in the development, implementation, testing, and evaluation of measures against burnout). Although some progress has been made in removing the barrier to psychological support to cope with work-related stress, a cultural change is still needed for the stigma associated with mental illness. The key recommendation is to address the challenges that the emergency poses and to aggregate health, well-being and behavioral science expertise through long term researches with rigorous planning and reporting to drive the necessary cultural change and the improvement of public health systems.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 226, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518258

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on resident training in different branches and affected the physical and mental health of frontline residents adversely. This nationwide cross-sectional survey aimed to investigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on family medicine residents in Turkey, including the levels of depression and burnout. METHODS: An anonymous online survey was distributed to all family medicine residents via e-mail and a web link between 28.11.2020 and 12.12.2020. Information on sociodemographic data and the residency programme were evaluated, and factors associated with depression and burnout were examined using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Burnout Measure-Short Version (BMS) respectively. RESULTS: Although the weekly average working hours of the 477 respondents increased significantly during the pandemic (p < 0.05), the average weekly working time in the Family Medicine (FM) outpatient clinic decreased. The greatest concern of 58.3% of the residents was fear of transmitting COVID-19 to their family members. 90.2% of the residents stated that training programmes were negatively or very negatively affected. According to PHQ-9 scores, 15.7% of residents had moderately severe, and 14.9% severe depression. The BMS scores of the residents demonstrated that 24.1% had a very severe burnout problem, and 23.3% should seek professional help as soon as possible. Being single, having no children, female gender, lack of personal protective equipments and increased contact time with COVID-19 patients were associated with higher scores in the depression and burnout scales (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on training programmes for FM residents, who are at the forefront of the pandemic in Turkey, and this situation is closely related to depression and burnout. Due to the unpredictability of the pandemic, long-term plans should be made for the training needs of residents in order to protect their physical and mental health.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Practice , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512322

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to identify the factors that influence the components of burnout-emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA)-among hospital health workers, including doctors and nurses, during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed 200 healthcare workers' responses to the Employee Health Promotion Survey conducted at a general hospital in Seoul with over 200 hospital beds. The questionnaire included items about COVID-19-related burnout and its influencing factors. We performed three different multiple regression analyses using EE, DP, and PA as the dependent variables. The results show that sex, marital status, workload of treating suspected COVID-19 patients, fear of COVID-19 infection, anxiety, and depression predicted EE. The predictors of DP were job category, consecutive months of work in the current department, satisfaction with work environment, anxiety, and depression. The predictors of PA were the workload of directly interacting with patients, socioeconomic status, and job stress. For EE and DP, burnout was found to be worse in doctors and nurses than in other health workers; moreover, burnout was worse among nurses than among doctors across all three aspects of burnout. The findings can be used to establish tailored policies to address each burnout component.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 317-324, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1502723

ABSTRACT

Introducción. Los trabajadores de la salud se encuentran sometidos a una gran tensión en el desarrollo de sus actividades, lo que genera alta frecuencia de estrés, desgaste laboral e impacto psicopatológico. La pandemia de COVID-19 podría provocar un incremento de estas entidades en los médicos. El objetivo fue describir la frecuencia de estrés, síndrome de desgaste profesional (burnout), ansiedad y depresión durante la pandemia, y analizar las asociaciones con distintas variables independientes. Métodos. Estudio observacional, transversal, realizado dos meses después del inicio de la cuarentena en Argentina. Se encuestó a médicos de especialidades clínicas, quirúrgicas, solo de emergencias, y a aquellos sin contacto directo con pacientes, mediante un cuestionario sociodemográfico y tres inventarios autoadministrados: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory y la Escala de ansiedad y depresión hospitalaria. Resultados. La prevalencia de estrés fue del 93,7 % (IC95 %: 90,33-96,2), burnout 73,5 % (IC95 %: 68,2-78,4), ansiedad 44 % (IC95 %: 38,4-49,8) y depresión 21,9 % (IC95 %: 17,3-26,9). No se observó asociación entre la frecuencia y el tipo de especialidad realizada. La frecuencia de burnout, ansiedad y depresión fue significativamente mayor en los médicos residentes y en aquellos que trabajan en emergencias. Conclusiones. Los médicos residentes y quienes trabajan en emergencias en turnos de 24 horas mostraron porcentajes significativamente más altos de burnout, ansiedad y depresión, en comparación con médicos de planta y con aquellos en posiciones de liderazgo. Estos hallazgos pueden estar asociados con una mayor carga de trabajo y una menor experiencia. Es mandatorio tomar medidas preventivas y terapéuticas para preservar a quienes hacen frente a esta pandemia.


Introduction. Health care workers experience a tremendous strain while performing their activities, very frequently leading to stress, burnout syndrome, and psychopathological impact. The COVID-19 pandemic may cause physicians to suffer these effects even to a greater extent. Our objective was to describe the frequency of stress, burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression during the pandemic, and analyze the associations with different independent outcome measures. Methods. Observational, cross-sectional study conducted 2 months after the lockdown was established in Argentina. Clinical specialists, surgeons, emergency physicians, and those with no direct contact with patients were surveyed using a sociodemographic questionnaire and 3 self-administered inventories: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. The prevalence of stress was 93.7 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 90.33-96.2), burnout syndrome 73.5 % (95 % CI: 68.2-78.4), anxiety 44 % (95 % CI: 38.4-49.8), and depression 21.9 % (95 % CI: 17.3-26.9). No association was observed between the frequency and medical specialty. The frequency of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression was significantly higher among residents and physicians working in the emergency department. Conclusions. Residents and emergency physicians working 24-hour shifts showed significantly higher percentages of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression compared to staff and head physicians. These findings may be associated with a higher workload and less experience. It is compulsory to take preventive and therapeutic measures to protect those in the pandemic front line.


Subject(s)
Humans , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals, Teaching
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502431

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has posed a significant challenge to the modern healthcare system and led to increased burnout among healthcare workers (HCWs). We previously reported that HCWs who engaged in COVID-19 patient care had a significantly higher prevalence of burnout (50.0%) than those who did not in November 2020 (period 1). We performed follow-up surveys in HCWs in a Japanese national university hospital, including basic demographics, whether a participant engaged in care of COVID-19 patients in the past 2 weeks, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory in February 2021 (period 2) and May 2021 (period 3). Periods 1 and 3 were amid the surges of COVID-19 cases, and period 2 was a post-surge period with a comparatively small number of COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization. Response rates to the surveys were 33/130 (25.4%) in period 1, 36/130 (27.7%) in period 2, and 56/162 (34.6%) in period 3, respectively. While no consistent tendency in the prevalence of burnout based on variables was observed throughout the periods, the prevalence of burnout tends to be higher in periods 1 and 3 in those who engaged in COVID-19 patient care in the last 2 weeks (50.0%, 30.8%, 43.1% in period 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Given the prolonged pandemic causing stigmatization and hatred against HCWs leading to increased prevalence of burnout, high-level interventions and supports are warranted.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 543, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501993

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has increased the physical and psychological stress of medical workers. This study was designed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of job burnout and its impact on work ability among Biosafety Laboratory (BSL) staffs during the COVID-19 epidemic in Xinjiang. METHODS: A total of 7911 qualified BSL staffs in Xinjiang were investigated by electronic questionnaires. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) was used for job burnout survey. Work Ability Index (WAI) was used for work ability survey. The prevalence and risk factors of job burnout in BSL staffs were analyzed through chi square test, t-test and one-way ANOVA. And then, the influence of demographic and job-related variables, i.e., confounding factors, were eliminated to the greatest extent by the propensity score analysis (PSA) method, to investigate the impact of job burnout on work ability in BSL staffs. RESULTS: A total of 67.6% BSL staffs experienced job burnout. There were significant differences in the detection rate of job burnout among demographic and job-related variables, including gender, age, ethnicity, education, working years, professional title, marital status, number of night shift per month and overall sleep condition (all P < 0.05). The detection rate of job burnout in female was higher than that in male. The detection rates of job burnout in 45-50 years old, Han ethnicity, education of postgraduate or above, 11-20 years of working, intermediate professional title, married, staff with many night shifts per month and poor overall sleep condition were higher than that of other groups. The average burnout scores of the Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Cynicism (CY), Reduced Personal Accomplishment (PA) scale were 10.00 ± 5.99, 4.64 ± 4.59 and 15.25 ± 8.16, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the three dimensions of job burnout, i.e., EE, CY, PE, were negatively correlated with work ability and significantly affected the work ability of BSL staffs (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the prevalence of job burnout is extremely common among BSL staffs. In addition, the work ability decreases with the increase of job burnout and the improvement of job burnout can enhance work ability among BSL staffs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Epidemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Containment of Biohazards , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Laboratories , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Capacity Evaluation
16.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 133, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The provision of healthcare during the pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus represented a challenge for the management of the resources in the primary care centres. We proposed assessing burnout among the staff of those centres and identifying factors that contributed to its appearance and those that limited it. METHODS: An observational study which, by means of anonymous questionnaires, collected information about: (i) demographic variables; (ii) the characteristics of each position; (iii) the measures implemented by the medical decision-makers in order to provide care during the pandemic; and (iv) the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-36). We performed a descriptive analysis of the burnout mentioned by the staff, and, by means of a multivariate analysis, we identified the factors which influenced it. Using logit models, we analysed whether receiving specific training in COVID-19, feeling involved in decision-making processes, and/or working within different healthcare systems had effects on the development of burnout. RESULTS: We analysed the replies of 252 employees of primary care centres in Spain with an average age of 45 (SD = 15.7) and 22 (SD = 11.4) years of experience. 68% of the participants (n = 173) indicated burnout of the frenetic subtype. 79% (n = 200) of the employees had high scores in at least one burnout subtype, and 62% (n = 156) in at least two. Women older than 45 had a lower probability of suffering burnout. Receiving specific training (OR = 0.28; CI95%: 0.11-0.73) and feeling involved in decision-making (OR = 0.32; CI95%:0.15-0.70) each reduced the probability of developing burnout. Working in a different department increased the likelihood of developing burnout of at least one clinical subtype (OR = 2.85; CI95%: 1.38-5.86). CONCLUSIONS: The staff in primary care centres have developed high levels of burnout. Participation in decision-making and receiving specific training are revealed as factors that protect against the development of burnout. The measures taken to contain the adverse effects of a heavy workload appear to be insufficient. Certain factors that were not observed, but which are related to decisions taken by the healthcare management, appear to have had an effect on the development of some burnout subtypes.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 310-316, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1488844

ABSTRACT

Introducción. A fin de 2019 se identificó una nueva variedad de coronavirus causante de COVID-19 que alcanzó categoría de pandemia. En Argentina, el área metropolitana de Buenos Aires (AMBA) concentra alrededor del 37 % de la población total y el mayor número de casos diagnosticados. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir las características clínico-epidemiológicas de los pacientes con COVID-19 y describir el impacto en el funcionamiento del Servicio de Pediatría de una institución privada de la zona. Métodos. Diseño retrospectivo, observacional, desarrollado en una institución de la zona oeste del AMBA entre el 12 de marzo y el 31 de agosto de 2020. Se incluyeron todos los menores de 16 años con diagnóstico de COVID-19. Se registraron características demográficas, epidemiológicas, clínicas, indicación de internación/control ambulatorio, número de consultas externas, internación por infecciones virales estacionales, licenciamiento del personal, modificación del número de camas y de las actividades de los profesionales. Resultados. Hubo 5454 consultas ambulatorias pediátricas totales, sospecha de COVID-19 en 753/5 454 (13,8 %), se confirmaron 152/753 (20,2 %). Mediana de edad 82 meses (rango intercuartílico: 20,5-147 m), el 50 % fueron varones. La fiebre fue el síntoma más frecuente. Se internaron 22/152 (14,5 %). Las consultas disminuyeron el 87 %, no hubo internación por infecciones virales estacionales y el 52,9 % (91/172) del personal fue licenciado. Conclusiones. La mayoría de los casos fueron leves y la fiebre fue el principal síntoma. Observamos un notable impacto en el funcionamiento del servicio en cuanto al recurso humano. Destacamos la necesidad de la organización logística del servicio para enfrentar esta contingencia.


Introduction. Towards the end of 2019, a novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 was identified and became a pandemic. In Argentina, approximately 37 % of the total population lives in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (AMBA), where most cases have been diagnosed. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 patients and the impact on the operations of the Department of Pediatrics of a private facility located in the AMBA. Methods. Retrospective, observational study conducted at a facility in the west of AMBA between March 12th and August 31st, 2020. All patients younger than 16 years diagnosed with COVID-19 were included. Demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics; indication for hospitalization/outpatient follow-up; number of outpatient visits; hospitalization due to seasonal viral infections; staff on leave; changes in bed availability and health care providers' activities were recorded. Results. There were 5454 pediatric outpatient visits, COVID-19 was suspected in 753/5454 (13.8 %) and 152/753 (20.2 %) were confirmed cases. Their median age was 82 months (interquartile range: 20.5-147 months); 50 % were males. Fever was the most common symptom. In total, 22/152 (14.5 %) patients were hospitalized. Outpatients visits decreased by 87 %; there were no hospitalizations due to seasonal viral infections; and 52.9 % (91/172) of staff took a leave. Conclusions. Most cases were mild, and fever was the main symptom. The department operations were considerably affected in terms of human resources. It is worth noting the need for a logistic organization at the Department of Pediatrics to face such contingency.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Pediatrics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Private Facilities , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 554-560, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483691

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the predictors associated with severe burnout and poor mental health among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic as a learning opportunity for future emergent situations. BACKGROUND: Modifiable predictors of mental health need to be further examined and quantified to prioritize human resource support in organizations as healthcare workers confront stressful situations. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 271 healthcare workers from September 8 to October 10, 2020. RESULTS: Approximately one-third reported severe burnout, as well as moderate/severe anxiety and depression. Feeling protected working with COVID-19 patients, high family functioning, and spirituality were associated with 2- to 4-fold lower odds of severe burnout. Satisfaction with the organization's communications predicted 2-fold lower odds of anxiety, whereas high resilience was associated with almost 4-fold lower odds of stress and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare organizations may consider adopting programs to foster resilience, family and spiritual support, and effective communication strategies to reduce burnout and poor mental health among healthcare workers during pandemics and other situations of high stress.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Emergencies , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Stress, Psychological/psychology
19.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
20.
ESMO Open ; 6(4): 100199, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant changes to professional and personal lives of oncology professionals globally. The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Resilience Task Force collaboration aimed to provide contemporaneous reports on the impact of COVID-19 on the lived experiences and well-being in oncology. METHODS: This online anonymous survey (July-August 2020) is the second of a series of global surveys launched during the course of the pandemic. Longitudinal key outcome measures including well-being/distress (expanded Well-being Index-9 items), burnout (1 item from expanded Well-being Index), and job performance since COVID-19 were tracked. RESULTS: A total of 942 participants from 99 countries were included for final analysis: 58% (n = 544) from Europe, 52% (n = 485) female, 43% (n = 409) ≤40 years old, and 36% (n = 343) of non-white ethnicity. In July/August 2020, 60% (n = 525) continued to report a change in professional duties compared with the pre-COVID-19 era. The proportion of participants at risk of poor well-being (33%, n = 310) and who reported feeling burnout (49%, n = 460) had increased significantly compared with April/May 2020 (25% and 38%, respectively; P < 0.001), despite improved job performance since COVID-19 (34% versus 51%; P < 0.001). Of those who had been tested for COVID-19, 8% (n = 39/484) tested positive; 18% (n = 7/39) felt they had not been given adequate time to recover before return to work. Since the pandemic, 39% (n = 353/908) had expressed concerns that COVID-19 would have a negative impact on their career development or training and 40% (n = 366/917) felt that their job security had been compromised. More than two-thirds (n = 608/879) revealed that COVID-19 has changed their outlook on their work-personal life balance. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact the well-being of oncology professionals globally, with significantly more in distress and feeling burnout compared with the first wave. Collective efforts from both national and international communities addressing support and coping strategies will be crucial as we recover from the COVID-19 crisis. In particular, an action plan should also be devised to tackle concerns raised regarding the negative impact of COVID-19 on career development, training, and job security.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Medical Oncology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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