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1.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 152: w30229, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202464

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: To estimate the prevalence of occupational burnout among the Swiss working population. METHODS: We interrogated three international databases (Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, and PsycINFO) and the databases of 15 Swiss universities to identify studies reporting the prevalence of occupational burnout in Swiss workers over the last 10 years, before the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were summarised descriptively and quantitatively using random-effects meta-analysis. We investigated between-study heterogeneity by stratifying results according to the type of burnout measurement tool, by occupation and by cut-off values. Three outcomes were considered: clinical/severe burnout, overall burnout and emotional exhaustion. RESULTS: We identified 23 studies about workers in Switzerland and estimated the prevalence of clinical or severe burnout at 4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2-6%). The average prevalence estimates for overall burnout and emotional exhaustion were similar at 18% (95% CI 12-25%) and 18% (95% CI 15-22%), respectively. When stratified by occupation, the clinical or severe burnout rates were higher among the healthcare workers than the general working population. CONCLUSIONS: These estimates of prepandemic (baseline) prevalence of occupational burnout are comparable with those available in the other countries where it is recognised and treated as a disease. They may prove useful in planning and assessing the effectiveness of interventions for prevention of occupational burnout and in minimising its negative consequences on individuals and on societies during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Switzerland/epidemiology
2.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(6): 385-401A, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198270

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of burnout among primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries and to identify factors associated with burnout. Methods: We systematically searched nine databases up to February 2022 to identify studies investigating burnout in primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries. There were no language limitations and we included observational studies. Two independent reviewers completed screening, study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate overall burnout prevalence as assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. We narratively report factors associated with burnout. Findings: The search returned 1568 articles. After selection, 60 studies from 20 countries were included in the narrative review and 31 were included in the meta-analysis. Three studies collected data during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic but provided limited evidence on the impact of the disease on burnout. The overall single-point prevalence of burnout ranged from 2.5% to 87.9% (43 studies). In the meta-analysis (31 studies), the pooled prevalence of a high level of emotional exhaustion was 28.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 21.5-33.5), a high level of depersonalization was 16.4% (95% CI: 10.1-22.9) and a high level of reduced personal accomplishment was 31.9% (95% CI: 21.7-39.1). Conclusion: The substantial prevalence of burnout among primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries has implications for patient safety, care quality and workforce planning. Further cross-sectional studies are needed to help identify evidence-based solutions, particularly in Africa and South-East Asia.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Developing Countries , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Prevalence
4.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 686-694, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152243

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We aim to describe the extent of psychological trauma and moral distress in healthcare workers (HCW) working in the intensive care unit (ICU) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, we review reports on prevalence of mental health symptoms, highlight vulnerable populations and summarize modifiable risk factors associated with mental health symptoms in ICU HCW. RECENT FINDINGS: The pandemic has resulted in a multitude of closely intertwined professional and personal challenges for ICU HCW. High rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (14-47%), burnout (45-85%), anxiety (31-60%), and depression (16-65%) have been reported, and these mental health symptoms are often interrelated. Most studies suggest that nurses and female HCW are at highest risk for developing mental health symptoms. The main personal concerns associated with reporting mental health symptoms among ICU HCW were worries about transmitting COVID-19 to their families, worries about their own health, witnessing colleagues contract the disease, and experiencing stigma from their communities. Major modifiable work-related risk factors were experiencing poor communication from supervisors, perceived lack of support from administrative leadership, and concerns about insufficient access to personal protective equipment, inability to rest, witnessing hasty end-of-life decisions, and restriction of family visitation policies. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted ICU HCW worldwide. The psychological trauma, manifesting as posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout, anxiety, and depression, is substantial and concerning. Urgent action by lawmakers and healthcare administrators is required to protect ICU HCW and sustain a healthy workforce.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Intensive Care Units , Psychological Trauma/epidemiology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143130

ABSTRACT

Stress research has widely documented how uncertainty represents a strong stressor that, in general, is negatively associated with well-being. While the literature on job insecurity about this topic is extensive and exhaustive, empirical research on the outcomes of life uncertainty, namely the perception and feeling of precariousness regarding the present and future of one's own life, is yet to be fully explored. In the present paper, we aimed to investigate the relationships among job insecurity, life uncertainty, and psychosocial well-being outcomes, specifically, with a focus on job satisfaction and burnout. The participants were 357 workers (M = 146 and F = 211), with an average age of 41.78 y.o. (SD = 13.49), who completed an online questionnaire containing, in addition to sociodemographics information, measures of the study variables, namely job insecurity, life uncertainty, job satisfaction, and burnout. The results pointed out negative relationships of both job insecurity and life uncertainty with individual well-being, as they were negatively associated with job satisfaction and positively related to burnout. In a path analysis with latent variables, life uncertainty proved to fully mediate the relationship between job insecurity and psychosocial well-being.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Employment , Humans , Adult , Uncertainty , Employment/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142971

ABSTRACT

Many studies have investigated the state of the health of healthcare workers during the acute period of the pandemic. Yet, few studies have assessed the health of such professionals after the pandemic and in a less dramatic period. This study involved a particular sample represented by residents in anaesthesia-resuscitation and psychiatry at a university in northern Italy particularly affected by the pandemic. The objectives were to investigate some indicators of health and well-being and compare the two groups of trainees. Using Google Forms, the following tests were proposed: the General Health Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Subjective Happiness Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, Brief Resilience Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, as well as an ad hoc questionnaire. A qualifying element of the work was the discussion of the results with the trainees. Various strengths have emerged, such as high values of resilience and job satisfaction; a positive assessment of the support received from the work team; an articulate use of coping strategies; and good levels of happiness and satisfaction with life, in both specialities. However, a widespread anxiety also emerged, which appears to be more attributable to concerns about professional evaluation, rather than the pandemic itself. In summary, the trainees seem to have found a fair amount of personal balance, whereas the relationship with the patient seems to be more compromised. In the comparison between specialities, the only significant differences are the levels of depersonalisation and resilience, both of which are higher in anaesthetists.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142970

ABSTRACT

The main objective of the present study is to examine the impact of job stress, role ambiguity, work-life imbalance and burnout on employee turnover intention. Moreover, the mediating role of burnout between job stress, role ambiguity, work-life imbalance and turnover intention is also examined. The data collection for this quantitative research was conducted through the "Questionnaire" technique. The questionnaire was developed based on previously established questions available in the literature. The data were collected using simple random sampling from the healthcare workers of KSA. From the distributed questionnaire, 73.5% of the usable questionnaires were returned. This study used SPSS and PLS for the analysis of the data to highlight the most significant variables that impact the employees' turnover intentions among KSA health workers. The findings show that job burnout is clearly related to turnover intentions and is positively affected by both role stress and role ambiguity. Moreover, a statistically positive association is found between work-life imbalance and burnout among the healthcare workers in KSA. Furthermore, the mediating role of burnout is also confirmed in this study. The study also indicates that role ambiguity and role stress due to COVID-19 may create burnout among employees, which may lead to turnover intention among healthcare workers. There is a lack of research on the assessment of the impact of the novel COVID-19-related job stress, role ambiguity and work-life imbalance on the medical staff's turnover intentions in hospitals. This study fills the gap of the limited studies conducted regarding the identification of the factors that can create turnover intention among healthcare workers of KSA by providing empirical evidence from a Gulf country, Saudi Arabia. This study provides managerial implications for hospital management and health policymakers to develop a strategy to retain the employees. Furthermore, healthcare administrators need to pay close attention to front line workers' turnover intentions as these medical heroes are the vital part of our society who assist patients to receive their initial treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Personnel Turnover , Intention , COVID-19/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277875, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140667

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers had a high workload and were exposed to multiple psychosocial stressors. However, a knowledge gap exists about the levels of burnout among Bangladeshi frontline doctors during this COVID-19 pandemic. The study investigated burnout syndrome (BOS) among frontline doctors in two public secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Chattogram, Bangladesh. MATERIALS & METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved frontline doctors working at two hospitals treating COVID-19 and non-COVID patients from June to August 2020. A self-administered questionnaire that included Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) was used to capture demographic and workplace environment information. ANOVA and t-test were used to determine the statistical differences in the mean values of the three dimensions of MBI-HSS. Scores for three domains of burnout: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA) were calculated. Post-hoc analysis was done to identify the significant pair-wise differences when the ANOVA test result was significant. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of factors associated with BOS. RESULTS: A total of 185 frontline doctors were invited to participate by convenience sampling, and 168 responded. The response rate was 90.81%. The overall prevalence of BOS was 55.4% (93/168) (95% CI: 47.5% to 63.0%). Moderate to high levels of EE was found in 95.8% of the participants. High DP and reduced PA were observed in 98.2% and 97% of participants. Younger age (25-29 years), being female, and working as a medical officer were independently associated with high levels of burnout in all three domains. EE was significantly higher in females (P = 0.011). DP was significantly higher in medical officers, those at earlier job periods, and those working more than 8 hours per day. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak, BOS was common among Bangladeshi frontline doctors. Females, medical officers, and younger doctors tended to be more susceptible to BOS. Less BOS was experienced when working in the non-COVID ward than in the mixed ward.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
9.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e064716, 2022 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137773

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and the associated factors of burnout among both healthcare workers (HCWs) and the general working population, which has not yet been unknown, using large-scale, nationwide data. DESIGN: Cross-sectional internet-based study. SETTING: Nationwide internet survey conducted between 8 and 26 February 2021 in Japan. PARTICIPANTS: Workers aged 20-64 years. We classified the workers as HCWs and the general working population. EXPOSURES: Demographic characteristics (age, sex and marital status), socioeconomic status (education, employment and income), health-related, work-related and industry-related factors (smoking, alcohol use, physical and psychiatric comorbidities, working hours, types of healthcare professionals, experience on the COVID-19 frontline and working industries). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Burnout defined as a score of ≥3 points on the Mini-Z Single-Item Burnout Scale. RESULTS: Of the included 12 650 workers, 1087 were HCWs. After inverse probability weighting on data from the 2016 Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions, burnout in HCWs and the general working population was 33.5% (95% CI 29.2% to 38.0%) and 31.0% (95% CI 29.7% to 32.4%), respectively. In the weighted multivariable modified Poisson regression models, working 60 hours or more was associated with burnout in all workers (HCWs: prevalence ratio (PR) 2.52, 95% CI 1.68 to 3.76; general population: PR 1.26, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.48). Widowed/separated compared with married was associated with burnout only among HCWs (PR 1.69, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.47), whereas presence of physical or psychiatric comorbidities was associated with burnout among the general working population (PR 1.14, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.28; and PR 1.65, 95% CI 1.45 to 1.87, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Burnout was prevalent in both HCWs and the general working population in Japan. Both common and specific risk factors were observed. Our findings highlight the need for the general workplace policy and targeted interventions for burnout prevention.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Internet
12.
JAMA Health Forum ; 3(11): e224163, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127435

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected clinician health and retention. Objective: To describe trends in burnout from 2019 through 2021 with associated mitigating and aggravating factors. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional surveys were sent to physicians and advanced practice clinicians throughout 120 large US health care organizations between February 2019 and December 2021. From 56 090 surveys, there were 20 627 respondents. Exposures: Work conditions and COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Surveys measured time pressure, chaos, work control, teamwork, electronic health record use, values alignment, satisfaction, burnout, intent to leave, and in 2021, feeling valued. Multivariate regressions controlling for gender, race and ethnicity, years in practice, and role determined burnout, satisfaction, and intent-to-leave correlates. Results: Of the 20 627 respondents (median response rate, 58% [IQR, 34%-86%; difference, 52%]), 67% were physicians, 51% female, and 66% White. Burnout was 45% in 2019, 40% to 45% in early 2020, 50% in late 2020, and 60% in late 2021. Intent to leave increased from 24% in 2019 to more than 40% as job satisfaction decreased. Higher burnout was seen in chaotic workplaces (odds ratio [OR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.38-1.66; P < .001) and with low work control (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.91-2.30; P < .001). Higher burnout was associated with poor teamwork (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.78-2.43; P < .001), while feeling valued was associated with lower burnout (OR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.27; P < .001). In time trends, burnout was consistently higher with chaos and poor work control. For example, in the fourth quarter of 2021 burnout was 36% (95% CI, 31%-42%) in calm environments vs 78% (95% CI, 73%-84%) if chaotic (absolute difference, 42%; 95% CI, 34%-49%; P < .001), and 39% (95% CI, 33%-44%) with good work control vs 75% (95% CI, 69%-81%) if poor (absolute difference, 36%; 95% CI, 27%-44%; P < .001). Good teamwork was associated with lower burnout rates (49%; 95% CI, 44%-54%) vs poor teamwork (88%; 95% CI, 80%-97%; absolute difference, 39%; 95% CI, 29%-48%; P < .001), as was feeling valued (37%; 95% CI, 31%-44%) vs not feeling valued (69%; 95% CI, 63%-74%; absolute difference, 32%; 95% CI, 22%-39%; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: Results of this survey study show that in 2020 through 2021, burnout and intent to leave gradually increased, rose sharply in late 2021, and varied by chaos, work control, teamwork, and feeling valued. Monitoring these variables could provide mechanisms for worker protection.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction
13.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0267530, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140386

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, health professionals have been working under extreme conditions, increasing the risk of physical and mental illness. We evaluated the prevalence of burnout and its associated factors among postgraduate student residents in health professions during the global health crisis. METHODS: Healthcare residents were recruited from all across Brazil between July and September 2020 through digital forms containing instruments for assessing burnout (Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI)), resilience (brief resilient coping scale (BRCS)) and anxiety, stress and depression (depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)). Additionally, the relationships between burnout and chronic diseases, autonomy and educational adequacy in the residency programme, personal protective equipment (PPE), workload and care for patients with COVID-19 were evaluated. The chi-square test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation test and logistic regression were performed. RESULTS: A total of 1,313 participants were included: mean (standard deviation) age, 27.8 (4.4) years; female gender, 78.1%; white race, 59.3%; and physicians, 51.3%. The overall prevalence of burnout was 33.4%. The odds (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) of burnout were higher in the presence of pre-existing diseases (1.76 [1.26-2.47]) and weekly work > 60 h (1.36 [1.03-1.79]) and were lower in the presence of high resilience (0.84 [0.81-0.88]), autonomy (0.87 [0.81-0.93]), and educational structure (0.77 [0.73-0.82]), adequate availability of PPE (0.72 [0.63-0.83]) and non-white race (0.63 [0.47-0.83]). Burnout was correlated with anxiety (r = 0.47; p < 0.05), stress (r: 0.58; p < 0.05) and depression (r: 0.65; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We observed a high prevalence of burnout among residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Individual characteristics and conditions related to the work environment were associated with a higher or lower occurrence of the syndrome.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prevalence , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology
14.
Work ; 73(3): 787-798, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers are known to experience higher stress levels compared to other industry workers due to challenges presented in their work environment. The global pandemic of COVID-19 has seen many countries' healthcare systems struggle to meet the demands of healthcare seekers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the article is to explore healthcare professionals' perceptions and experiences of the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on their personal and work performance. METHODS: Twelve individuals working in the health sector participated in this study. The researchers used a qualitative exploratory and descriptive research design. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. RESULTS: Theme one "A feeling of ambivalence", describes the positive and negative influence that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on HCWs. Theme two "Unfortunately, the support from the government is not as much as it's said to be in the news", describes the support required from government services during the pandemic. Theme three "Changes experienced by the individual related to his or her personal and work routine", describes the changes experienced by healthcare professionals in their daily tasks during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The study found that the work environment contributed to experiences of burnout and anxiety due to staff shortages, lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) and an increase in work pressure. More research needs to be conducted to inform policies and organizations on how to best support healthcare workers to prevent burnout and anxiety.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Work Performance , Male , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care
15.
Work ; 73(3): 769-775, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive stress. Burnout weakens the energy of an individual which reduces productivity and leaves this individual helpless, hopeless, cynical, and resentful. Thus, an early diagnosis of this syndrome has to be done and ways to prevent the level of progression and complication of burnout syndrome has to be planned. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of self-supervised Jacobson's relaxation technique along with Bhastrika Pranayama in reducing the level of burnout among the work-from-home IT professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: Thirty participants with burnout syndrome were randomly divided into two groups (15 participants in each group) using random allocation. The experimental group received Jacobson's relaxation technique along with Bhastrika Pranayama, whereas the control group received diaphragmatic breathing exercises and chest expansion exercises. Pre-test and post-test values using Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to interpret the results. RESULTS: Data collected were analyzed statistically by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. It shows that there is a significant reduction in the level of burnout in the experimental group when compared to the control group at a p-value of 0.001. CONCLUSION: From the results, it is concluded that Jacobson's relaxation technique along with diaphragmatic breathing exercises showed significant improvement in the reduction of burnout levels.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Breathing Exercises
16.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276791, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117901

ABSTRACT

According to the World Health Organization, pandemic fatigue poses a serious threat for managing COVID-19. Pandemic fatigue is characterized by progressive decline in adherence to social distancing (SDIS) guidelines, and is thought to be associated with pandemic-related emotional burnout. Little is known about the nature of pandemic fatigue; for example, it is unclear who is most likely to develop pandemic fatigue. We sought to evaluate this issue based on data from 5,812 American and Canadian adults recruited during the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Past-year decline in adherence to SDIS had a categorical latent structure according to Latent Class Analysis, consisting of a group adherent to SDIS (Class 1: 92% of the sample) and a group reporting a progressive decline in adherence to SDIS (i.e., pandemic fatigue; Class 2: 8% of the sample). Class 2, compared to Class 1, was associated with greater pandemic-related burnout, pessimism, and apathy about the COVID-19 pandemic. They also tended to be younger, perceived themselves to be more affluent, tended to have greater levels of narcissism, entitlement, and gregariousness, and were more likely to report having been previously infected with SARSCOV2, which they regarded as an exaggerated threat. People in Class 2 also self-reported higher levels of pandemic-related stress, anxiety, and depression, and described making active efforts at coping with SDIS restrictions, which they perceived as unnecessary and stressful. People in Class 1 generally reported that they engaged in SDIS for the benefit of themselves and their community, although 35% of this class also feared they would be publicly shamed if they did not comply with SDIS guidelines. The findings suggest that pandemic fatigue affects a substantial minority of people and even many SDIS-adherent people experience emotionally adverse effects (i.e., fear of being shamed). Implications for the future of SDIS are discussed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , United States , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Latent Class Analysis , RNA, Viral , Canada/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 773, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global spread of the COVID-19 virus caused unprecedented interruptions in medical education. This paper evaluates Relational Coordination (RC): communicating and relating for task integration; between the distinct stakeholders responsible for scheduling,delivering and receiving clinical teaching in the wake of the pandemic. METHODOLOGY: Using a cross-sectional design, the level of Relational Coordination was assessed between twelve groups within a Clinical Skills Program at a Medical School in the United Arab Emirates. It also measures three relevant mental health factors: namely, Job satisfaction, Work Engagement, and Burnout. RESULTS: Overall, RC scores were moderate (3.65 out of 5.00). Controlling for participants' position, RC was found to positively and significantly increase both job satisfaction (ß = 1.10, p < 0.001) and work engagement (ß = 0.78, p < 0.01)., Additionally, RC was significantly associated with lower burnout (ß = -0.56, p = 0.05). Fifty percent of participants experienced high job satisfaction, with a mean score of 5.0 out of 7.0, while 73% reported being enthusiastic about their job, with a mean score of 6.0 out of 7.0. About a third of participants (27%) reported feeling burnout. CONCLUSIONS: During times of disruption and crisis, medical education can benefit from higher levels of relational coordination. Our study shows the significant impact of relational coordination on mental health measures like job satisfaction and work engagement. To achieve the full potential and benefits of excellent levels of relational coordination in this program, we recommend six interventions focusing on improving communication, work processes, regular meetings, education innovations, capacity building, and the establishment of coaching and counseling programs for students and faculty.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Job Satisfaction , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099528

ABSTRACT

While the COVID-19 pandemic has created psychological distress in the general population and increased the need for psychological care, little research has been done on how mental health practitioners (MHP) have been affected by the pandemic, and these health professionals have received little attention from public authorities. In this article, we focus on psychologists and the impact that the pandemic has had on their mental health and practices by exploring the adaptive and innovative responses generated. This study is based on an online survey (including multiple choice questions, several validated scales, and eight free text items) completed by 187 psychologists (86% female) one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium (February-April 2021). Most participants considered that the crisis had an impact on their well-being and mental health. However, the prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety was relatively low (17%; 12%). On the other hand, the majority of psychologists (72%) suffered from a medium level of burnout (BO), 7% suffered from a high level of BO, and only 21% had low levels of BO. Psychologists working in face-to-face settings had the highest scores on the "exhaustion" subscale of the BO, and those working primarily with patients in precarious situations had significantly higher scores of BO and exhaustion. Qualitative analysis of free text items showed that MHP were resilience and developed new frameworks and modes for proactive interventions in order to reach their patients, meet the psychological and social population's needs, and maintain their relationships with the network. In a crisis or pandemic context, public policies should take into account the psychological and social needs of the most socially precarious populations in reinforcing and supporting mental health professionals working in this sector.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Belgium/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 973690, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099264

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Shift work of clinical faculty members in the COVID-19 pandemic may cause burnout and occupational fatigue and as a result, may reduce the quality of student education and disrupt the treatment of patients, so this study was conducted to evaluate this case. Materials and methods: The statistical population of this cross-sectional research included all clinical faculty members of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in southwestern Iran, who experienced a shift work system (night shift from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.) during the COVID-19 pandemic, and finally, 71 of them participated in it. The sampling method was also available. Two inventories were used to collect data, namely the Maslach Burnout Inventory [MBI-HSS (MP)] and the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI-20). Results: The self-reported burnout of faculty members was high (mean ± SD = 98.18 ± 17.18), which was graded into the range of emotional exhaustion (38.01 ± 10.2), range of personal accomplishment, (33.75 ± 6.75), and the range of depersonalization (26.42 ± 3.5), respectively. Perceived occupational fatigue of faculty members was also high (M ± SD = 82.25 ± 34.79), which included the dimensions of lack of motivation (18.69 ± 8.65), drowsiness (17.43 ± 8.7), lack of energy (16.33 ± 7.67), physical discomfort (15.65 ± 8.62), and physical stress (13.51 ± 6.9), respectively. In terms of demographic characteristics, occupational fatigue was significantly more common among women. Discussion and conclusion: The self-reported burnout and occupational fatigue of clinical faculty members due to shift work were reported to be high in this study. Although our knowledge of burnout has advanced in recent years, many gaps in our knowledge still remain. In order for clinical faculty members to properly fulfill their mission to treat patients, educate students, and promote public health, it is necessary to provide all the necessary conditions for their effective activity. Some interventions, such as improving organizational strategies and providing technical solutions, incentives, and occupational facilities, can help reduce or eliminate these problems.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Shift Work Schedule , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Faculty , Fatigue/epidemiology
20.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276739, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098754

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To quantify the burnout and spiritual health of general practitioners (GPs) in the United Kingdom (UK) who worked during the Covid-19 Pandemic. DESIGN: Online survey, April/May 2021, distributed via emails to general practices, Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), Health boards, Clinical Research Networks, professional groups, social media GP groups and networks. SETTING: United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: 1318 GPs who had worked in the National Health Service (NHS) during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020 -May 2021). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Burnout scores, measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) for Medical Personnel; spiritual health, measured using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being, Non-Illness (FACIT-SP-NI). RESULTS: 19% of surveyed GPs were at the highest risk for burnout, using accepted MBI 'cut off' levels. There was no evidence of a difference in burnout by gender, ethnicity, or length of service. GP burnout was associated with GP spiritual health, regardless of identification with a religion. GPs with low spiritual health were five times more likely to be in the highest risk group for burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Burnout is at crisis levels amongst GPs in the UK NHS. A comprehensive response is required, identifying protective and precipitating factors for burnout. The potentially protective impact of spiritual health merits further investigation.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Humans , State Medicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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