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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232822

ABSTRACT

The health crisis has had a strong impact on intensive care units. The objective of this study was to investigate the experience of resuscitation physicians during the COVID-19 health crisis to understand the associated determinants of quality of life, burnout, and brownout. This qualitative, longitudinal study covered two periods (T1, February 2021, and T2, May 2021). The data were collected in individual semi-directed interviews with 17 intensive care physicians (ICPs) (T1). Nine of the latter also participated in a second interview (T2). The data were examined using grounded theory analysis. We identified a multiplication of burnout and brownout indicators and factors already known in intensive care. In addition, burnout and brownout indicators and factors specific to the COVID-19 crisis were added. The evolution of professional practices has disrupted the professional identity, the meaning of work, and the boundaries between private and professional life, leading to a brownout and blur-out syndrome. The added value of our study lies in identifying the positive effects of the crisis in the professional domain. Our study revealed indicators and factors of burnout and brownout associated with the crisis among ICPs. Finally, it highlights the beneficial effects of the COVID-19 crisis on work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Quality of Life , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Critical Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Rev Med Chil ; 150(10): 1342-1350, 2022 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic increased the prevalence of burnout syndrome. AIM: To describe the prevalence of burnout syndrome in health care workers of a private clinic in the Metropolitan Region of Chile. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study, the study population were health care workers of a private clinic. An online version of Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey was applied during June 2020. Variables such as age, sex, marital status, number of children, service, occupation, and night shift were studied. RESULTS: We collected 846 responses. A 36% (95% confidence intervals (CI) [32,8-39,2]) prevalence of high levels of burnout syndrome was found. Thirty one percent (95% CI [28,1-34,3]) of the respondents had high levels of emotional exhaustion (AE), 33% (95%CI [29,8-36,2]) had low personal fulfillment (RP) and 30% (95%CI [26,6-32,7]) had high levels of depersonalization (DP). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers showed concerning levels of burnout syndrome. It is recommended to pay special attention to high levels of emotional exhaustion in nursing and night shift staff. Institutions should develop and apply prevention and emotional support strategies in health personnel.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Prevalence
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239631

ABSTRACT

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) clinicians provide patient care within a high-stakes, unpredictable, and complex work environment in which conflict is inevitable. Our objective was to explore the extent to which added stressors of the pandemic exacerbated EMS workplace conflict. We administered our survey to a sample of U.S. nationally certified EMS clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2022. Out of 1881 respondents, 46% (n = 857) experienced conflict and 79% (n = 674) provided free-text descriptions of their experience. The responses were analyzed for themes using qualitative content analysis, and they were then sorted into codes using word unit sets. Code counts, frequencies, and rankings were tabulated, enabling quantitative comparisons of the codes. Of the fifteen codes to emerge, stress (a precursor of burnout) and burnout-related fatigue were the key factors contributing to EMS workplace conflict. We mapped our codes to a conceptual model guided by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report on using a systems approach to address clinician burnout and professional well-being to explore implications for addressing conflict within that framework. Factors attributed to conflict mapped to all levels of the NASEM model, lending empirical legitimacy to a broad systems approach to fostering worker well-being. Our findings lead us to propose that active surveillance (enhanced management information and feedback systems) of frontline clinicians' experiences during public health emergencies could increase the effectiveness of regulations and policies across the healthcare system. Ideally, the contributions of the occupational health discipline would become a mainstay of a sustained response to promote ongoing worker well-being. The maintenance of a robust EMS workforce, and by extension the health professionals in its operational sphere, is unquestionably essential to our preparedness for the likelihood that pandemic threats may become more commonplace.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce
4.
Perm J ; 27(2): 179-183, 2023 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245286

ABSTRACT

Burnout is not a new concept in the health care field. Most, if not all, resident physicians (residents) experience burnout at least once during their training. However, the COVID-19 pandemic placed a large strain on the health care system and exacerbated stressors that contribute to burnout, including anxiety, depression, and work overload. The authors reviewed the literature on resident burnout in the era of COVID-19 to elucidate common stressors across the specialties and identify successful interventions or initiatives that may be most effective for residency programs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Physicians , Humans , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Environ Public Health ; 2023: 5719241, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243138

ABSTRACT

Objective: To study prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic related to Burnout syndrome (BOS) among Thai healthcare providers (HCPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study among HCPs, involved in caring for patients during the pandemic in two periods (1st period, May-Jun 2021, and 2nd period, Sep-Oct 2021). Data were distributed using electronic questionnaires. BOS was defined if respondents exhibited a high level of at least one domain in the Maslach Burnout Inventory criteria. The primary outcome was prevalence of BOS. Results: Altogether, 2,027 and 1,146 respondents were enrolled in the 1st and 2nd periods, respectively. Most respondents were female (73.3, 68.2%). The top three job positions were physicians (49.2, 58.9%), nurses (41.2, 30.6%), and nursing assistants (4.8, 6.5%), respectively. No difference was found in overall prevalence of Burnout syndrome during the 1st and 2nd periods (73 vs. 73.5%, p=0.80). Using multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for Burnout syndrome in both periods were (1) living with family (odds ratio (OR) 1.3 and 1.5), (2) tertiary care hospital (OR 1.92 and 2.13), (3) nurse (OR 1.38 and 2.29), (4) nursing assistant (OR 0.92 and 4.81), (5) salary ≤40,000 THB (OR 1.53 and 1.53), (6) >20 patients per shift (OR 1.55 and 1.88), (7) >6 shifts after hours monthly (OR 1.26 and 1.49), and (8) ≤1 rest day weekly (OR 1.3 and 1.4). Conclusion: We found a high prevalence of Burnout syndrome among Thai HCPs during the pandemic. Knowing those risk factors may provide a strategy to BOS during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Thailand/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Phys Ther ; 103(5)2023 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242161

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Research on burnout among physical therapists and occupational therapists in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is limited. Resilience may be important for reducing burnout and promoting well-being among rehabilitation specialists, especially during periods of elevated occupational demand and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate experiences of burnout, COVID-19 pandemic-related distress, and resilience among physical therapists and occupational therapists during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Physical therapists and occupational therapists working in a university-affiliated health system were invited to complete an online survey assessing burnout, COVID-19 pandemic-related distress, state- and trait-like resilience, physical activity, sleep disturbance, and financial concerns. Multiple linear regressions were used to examine variables associated with burnout as well as the contribution of specific aspects of resilience to burnout. RESULTS: Greater COVID-19 pandemic-related distress was associated with greater emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, whereas state-like resilience at work was associated with lower emotional exhaustion, greater personal accomplishment, and lower depersonalization. Analyses examining the impact of specific components of resilience at work suggested that several components are associated with less burnout, with finding one's calling being particularly relevant for all 3 domains of burnout. CONCLUSION: Symptoms of burnout were reported by many physical therapists and occupational therapists. COVID-19-related distress and state-like resilience at work, particularly the perception of finding one's calling, emerged as consistently being associated with burnout in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPACT: These findings can inform the development of interventions to reduce burnout among physical therapists and occupational therapists amid the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Humans , Occupational Therapists , Physical Therapists/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
West J Emerg Med ; 24(3): 597-604, 2023 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322548

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Hospitals have implemented various wellness interventions to offset the negative effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on emergency physician morale and burnout. There is limited high quality evidence regarding effectiveness of hospital-directed wellness interventions, leaving hospitals without guidance on best practices. We sought to determine intervention effectiveness and frequency of use in the spring/summer 2020. The goal was to facilitate evidence-based guidance for hospital wellness program planning. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study we used a novel survey tool piloted at a single hospital and then distributed throughout the United States via major emergency medicine (EM) society listservs and closed social media groups. Subjects reported their morale levels using a slider scale from 1 (lowest) to 10 (highest) at the time of the survey and, retrospectively, at their respective COVID-19 peak in 2020. Subjects also rated effectiveness of wellness interventions using a Likert scale from 1 (not at all effective) to 5 (very effective). Subjects indicated their hospital's usage frequency of common wellness interventions. We analyzed results using descriptive statistics and t-tests. RESULTS: Of 76,100 EM society and closed social media group members, 522 (0.69%) subjects were enrolled. Study population demographics were similar to the national emergency physician population. Morale at the time of the survey was worse (mean [M] 4.36, SD 2.29) than the spring/summer 2020 peak (M 4.57, SD 2.13) [t(458)=-2.27, P=0.024]. The most effective interventions were hazard pay (M 3.59, SD 1.12), staff debriefing groups (M 3.51, SD 1.16), and free food (M 3.34, SD 1.14). The most frequently used interventions were free food (350/522, 67.1%), support sign display (300/522, 57.5%), and daily email updates (266/522, 51.0%). Infrequently used were hazard pay (53/522, 10.2%) and staff debriefing groups (127/522, 24.3%). CONCLUSION: There is discordance between the most effective and most frequently used hospital-directed wellness interventions. Only free food was both highly effective and frequently used. Hazard pay and staff debriefing groups were the two most effective interventions but were infrequently used. Daily email updates and support sign display were the most frequently used interventions but were not as effective. Hospitals should focus effort and resources on the most effective wellness interventions.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Hospitals
8.
J Clin Nurs ; 32(15-16): 5076-5083, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325161

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between nurse burnout, missed nursing care, and care quality following the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Quality of care and missed nursing care can be consequences of nurse burnout. Little is known about how these factors related to nurse burnout following the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: This study used a cross-sectional correlational design and was conducted in 12 general hospitals across Thailand from August to October 2022. METHODS: 394 nurses providing direct nursing care to patients during the COVID-19 pandemic completed the survey. The Emotional Exhaustion (EE) subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), MISSCARE survey, and quality of care reported by nurses were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Approximately thirty-six percent of nurses had burnout following the COVID-19 pandemic. Missed nursing care was higher among nurses with burnout. Most participants reported illness/symptoms such as anxiety, fatigue, a lack of concentration, and sleeping problems. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, every additional unit of emotional exhaustion was associated with 1.61 times higher odds of missed nursing care, 3.37 times higher odds of poor quality of nurse care, and 2.62 times higher odds of poor quality of care for the overall unit. CONCLUSION: The study findings demonstrate that burnout is associated with missed nursing care and poor quality of care following the COVID-19 pandemic. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Policymakers, hospital administrators, and nurse managers should invest in strategies to reduce nurse burnout, which can increase patient safety and quality of care.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nursing Care , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Job Satisfaction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604769, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322459

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate burnout among Bangladeshi nurses and the factors that influence it, particularly the association of workplace bullying (WPB) and workplace violence (WPV) with burnout. Methods: This cross-sectional study collected data from 1,264 Bangladeshi nurses. Mixed-effects Poisson regression models were fitted to find the adjusted association between WPB, WPV, and burnout. Results: Burnout was found to be prevalent in 54.19% of 1,264 nurses. 61.79% of nurses reported that they had been bullied, and 16.3% of nurses reported experience of "intermediate and high" levels of workplace violence in the previous year. Nurses who were exposed to "high risk bullying" (RR = 2.29, CI: 1.53-3.41) and "targeted bullying" (RR = 4.86, CI: 3.32-7.11) had a higher risk of burnout than those who were not. Similarly, WPV exposed groups at "intermediate and high" levels had a higher risk of burnout (RR = 3.65, CI: 2.40-5.56) than WPV non-exposed groups. Conclusion: Nurses' burnout could be decreased if issues like violence and bullying were addressed in the workplace. Hospital administrators, policymakers, and the government must all promote and implement an acceptable working environment.


Subject(s)
Bullying , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Workplace Violence , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Workplace , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285402, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315506

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a shift to virtual curriculum delivery at Canadian medical schools. At the NOSM University, some learners transitioned to entirely online learning, while others continued in-person, in-clinic learning. This study aimed to show that medical learners who transitioned to exclusively online learning exhibited higher levels of burnout compared to their peers who continued in-person, clinical learning. Analysis of factors that protect against burnout including resilience, mindfulness, and self-compassion exhibited by online and in-person learners at NOSM University during this curriculum shift were also explored. METHODS: As part of a pilot wellness initiative, a cross-sectional online survey-based study of learner wellness was conducted at NOSM University during the 2020-2021 academic year. Seventy-four learners responded. The survey utilized the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Brief Resilience Scale, Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale-Revised, and the Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form. T-tests were utilized to compare these parameters in those who studied exclusively online and those who continued learning in-person in a clinical setting. RESULTS: Medical learners who engaged in online learning exhibited significantly higher levels of burnout when compared with learners who continued in-person learning in a clinical setting, despite scoring equally on protective factors such as resilience, mindfulness, and self-compassion. CONCLUSION: The results discussed in this paper suggest that the increased time spent in a virtual learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic might be associated with burnout among exclusively online learners, as compared to learners who were educated in clinical, in-person settings. Further inquiry should investigate causality and any protective factors that could mitigate negative effects of the virtual learning environment.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Schools, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
11.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 313, 2023 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers who are exposed to coronavirus disease 2019 are psychologically distressed. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health outcomes of hospital workers 2 years after the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 and to identify changes in the stress of hospital workers and predicted risk factors. METHODS: This survey was conducted 2 years after the initial evaluation performed under the first emergency declaration of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic among hospital workers at the same hospital in an ordinance-designated city in Japan from June to July 2022. Sociodemographic data, 19 stress-related question responses, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Maslach burnout inventory-general survey were collected. Multiple regression models were used to identify factors associated with each of the mental health outcomes 2 years after the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak. RESULTS: We received 719 valid responses. Between 2020 and 2022, hospital workers' anxiety about infection decreased, whereas their exhaustion and workload increased. Multiple regression analysis revealed that 2 years after the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, nurses and young people were at a higher risk of experiencing stress and burnout due to emotional exhaustion, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to examine the long-term stress of hospital workers measured in Japan. Exhaustion and workload were worsened 2 years into the pandemic. Therefore, health and medical institutions should continuously monitor the physical and psychological health of staff members.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Personnel, Hospital , Health Personnel/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Hospitals
12.
Int J Occup Med Environ Health ; 36(2): 229-249, 2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319543

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic contributing to the dissemination of alternative work models such as fully remote or hybrid work models. The present study focused on these 2 types of unplanned changes in the working environment. The conservation of resources theory, the first aim of this study was to examine the predictive role of resource losses and gains since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in job burnout. Moreover, the authors investigated how non-remote, remote, and hybrid employees differ in resource losses and gains and job burnout. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional online comparative study was conducted a year after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The respondents provided sociodemographic data, reported their current work model, and completed validated measures of resource losses and gains and job burnout: the Conservation of Resources Evaluation and the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory. Based on the data collected from 1000 working adults from the Polish population, the authors tested the differences in losses and gains of different categories of resources and job burnout components between the 3 groups of employees representing distinct working models, i.e., non-remote, hybrid, and remote. RESULTS: In general, the associations of losses and gains with job burnout subscales have been confirmed, regardless of the level of analysis of losses and gains. The authors' findings indicated that hybrid workers experienced significantly higher resource losses and gains (both in general and in different domains) in comparison to non-remote and remote workers. In turn, non-remote employees scored significantly higher on disengagement, which is one of the job burnout components. CONCLUSIONS: Hybrid workers experienced the highest levels of both resource losses and gains during the COVID-19 pandemic, compared to non-remote and remote workers, suggesting that this form of working arrangement involves the greatest changes in different life domains, bringing both positive and negative consequences for the employee. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2023;36(2):229-49.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Poland/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
J Healthc Risk Manag ; 43(1): 32-37, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319040

ABSTRACT

Occupational burnout has become widespread. The syndrome can be especially harmful in health care settings, affecting clinicians, organizational effectiveness, and patient safety. Certain approaches have proven helpful in some cases in combatting the syndrome. The coronavirus pandemic presented physicians with unique challenges, which appeared to have magnified work stress This national survey specifically explored interventions used by health care leaders to reduce burnout and whether these interventions proved effective during a pandemic. We also discuss effective and appropriate organizational measures to reduce physician burnout and its associated risks during crises.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Pandemics/prevention & control
14.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 25(4): 298-303, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312983

ABSTRACT

Background: Research has not explicitly explored differences between male and female microvascular head and neck (MHN) surgeon burnout, which should be identified and addressed to ensure career satisfaction and longevity. Objective: To measure and compare the prevalence of burnout among male versus female MHN surgeons. Methods: A prospective questionnaire based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was distributed through a web-based survey to the American Association of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons and American Head and Neck Society in 2021 and 2022. Additional variables collected included demographics, relationship and parental status, academic rank, annual salary, and COVID-19-related questions. Results: One hundred thirteen surveys were collected. Twenty-nine (25.7%) were women and all completed MHN surgery fellowships. Women trended toward more emotional exhaustion than men (2.8 mean MBI vs. 2.3 mean MBI) but reported similar personal achievement (4.8 mean MBI vs. 4.9 mean MBI). Men experienced less workplace sexual harassment (p < 0.001). Women experienced more burnout (69% vs. 39%, p = 0.006) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: Female MHN surgeons reported in this survey to experience more workplace sexual harassment and higher COVID-19-related burnout than their male counterparts.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Surgeons , Humans , Male , Female , United States/epidemiology , Prevalence , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
15.
J Osteopath Med ; 123(7): 351-355, 2023 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306278

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Healthcare workers are at a high risk of infection during infectious disease outbreaks, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the availability of several vaccines against COVID-19, the absence of vaccination in patients and colleagues remains a continuous source of stress in healthcare workers. We conducted a survey of physician preceptors, both MDs and DOs, to explore the impact of differences in the patients' and colleagues' vaccination status on their well-being, stress, and burnout. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to determine whether exposure to unvaccinated patients and/or colleagues increases stress and burnout in physician preceptors by utilizing a self-reported survey. METHODS: This multi-institutional study was carried out in the United States in 2022. An online survey questionnaire was utilized to collect data from physicians working as preceptors for multiple academic institutions. The anonymous Qualtrics® survey utilized a modified version of the questionnaire from the expanded Physician Well-being Index (ePWBI) designed by MedEd Web Solutions (MEWS). Statistical analysis on both descriptive and qualitative data were performed. Utilizing a threshold of p≤0.05, data analysis revealed many statistically significant relationships between the variables. RESULTS: A total of 218 physician preceptors completed the survey. The survey results showed that physicians overwhelmingly (p < 0.001) felt that all patients (and healthcare workers) should be vaccinated. The results also indicated that physicians experienced more stress when working with unvaccinated patients (p<0.001), and these stressors were often associated with the physician's gender and age. Furthermore, physicians stated that both their assessment and treatment plans were significantly different for vaccinated vs unvaccinated patients (p=0.039 and p=0.0167, respectively). Most importantly, stress levels (p<0.001) and burnout characteristics (p=0.024) were noted by physicians, both in themselves and in their colleagues. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that physician stress and burnout is a common theme due to the differences in vaccination status of patients admitted to COVID-19 clinics. Due to a more rapid progression of COVID-19 in unvaccinated patients, treatment plans for vaccinated vs unvaccinated patients were also considerably different.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology
16.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 5743, 2023 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305756

ABSTRACT

The nature of physiotherapists' work involves an increased risk of occupational stress and burnout, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, the aim of the study was to analyse the level of perceived generalised stress, the occupational stress and the occupational burnout syndrome among physiotherapists during the COVID-19 pandemic. One hundred seventy professionally active physiotherapists participated in the study: 100-during the pandemic and 70 before the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was carried out using the authors' survey, the Subjective Work Assessment Questionnaire (SWAQ), the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), and the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (Mini-COPE) inventory. The physiotherapists examined prior to the pandemic exhibited a higher level of generalised stress and higher level of occupational stress and occupational burnout (p = 0.0342; p < 0.00001; p < 0.00001, respectively). The key factors which caused intensified occupational stress in both groups included the lack of rewards at work, social interaction, and the lack of support. The results suggest that healthcare professionals including physiotherapists are exposed to occupational stress and a high risk of occupational burnout, not only during the COVID-19 pandemic. Occupational stress prevention programmes should be based on the identification and elimination of all occupational risks.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Physical Therapists , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Pandemics , Occupational Stress/epidemiology
17.
Med Lav ; 114(2): e2023012, 2023 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic created an extremely difficult situation for healthcare workers (HCWs) worldwide. We aimed to compare the mental health and professional quality of life of residents and specialist physicians in a cohort of Italian HCWs caring for patients with COVID-19 about two years after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In November 2021, an online survey investigating the emotional states of depression, anxiety, stress, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue was administered to HCWs (N= 78) at the Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that from 5 to 20% of our cohort of HCWs still showed the effects of the adverse psychological impact of the pandemic and more than half of them experienced medium levels of compassion fatigue as well as a medium level of compassion satisfaction. Our results also show that those with fewer years of clinical practice might be at greater risk of burnout (p= 0.021), anxiety and stress symptoms (both ps= 0.027) and might develop a lower level of compassion satisfaction (p=0.018). Moreover, the factors that potentially contribute to poor mental health, compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction seem to differ between residents and specialist physicians. CONCLUSIONS: This overview presents one of the first pictures of the long-term effects of the pandemic on the mental health and professional quality of life of an Italian sample of HCWs. Moreover, it also helps identify professionals who are most in need of support and emphasises the importance of improving the psychological and professional wellbeing of these individuals especially during a pandemic-like crisis with long lasting effects.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Physicians , Humans , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292083

ABSTRACT

We examined the relationship between age, coping, and burnout during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic with nurses in Texas (N = 376). Nurses were recruited through a professional association and snowball sampling methodology for the cross-sectional survey study. Framed in lifespan development theories, we expected that nurse age and experience would be positively correlated with positive coping strategies (e.g., getting emotional support from others) and negatively correlated with negative coping strategies (e.g., drinking and drug use). We also expected age to be negatively related to the emotional exhaustion and depersonalization facets of burnout and positively related to the personal accomplishment facet of burnout. Findings were largely supported in that age was positively associated with positive coping and personal accomplishment and age and experience were negatively correlated with negative coping and depersonalization. Age was not, however, associated with emotional exhaustion. Mediation models further suggest that coping explains some of the effect of age on burnout. A theoretical extension of lifespan development models into an extreme environment and practical implications for coping in these environments are discussed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Aging
19.
J Occup Health ; 65(1): e12398, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299233

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to spread worldwide, nucleic acid detection is a key step in controlling it. Psychological issues and job burnout of nurses working in nucleic acid sampling roles for long periods have become apparent. This study aimed to explore the effects of mindfulness decompression therapy on mental health and job burnout in front-line nurses working in nucleic acid sampling during the pandemic. METHODS: Nucleic acid sampling frontline nurses who were positive for burnout on both the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Scale (MBI-GS) were selected as the participants. Frontline nurses in the nucleic acid testing area who received routine psychological nursing intervention from June 2020 to April 2021 were used as the control group. Nurses who received both routine psychological nursing and mindfulness decompression therapy from May 2021 to December 2021 formed the "mindfulness" subject group. We compared the two groups' primary outcome measures of SCL-90 and MBI-GS scores. RESULTS: Before the intervention, there were no significant differences between the two groups in general data, SCL-90 scores, and MBI-GS scores. After the mindfulness decompression therapy, according to SCL-90 and MBI-GS scales, psychological distress and job burnout of nurses in the mindfulness group were significantly better than those in the control group. CONCLUSION: Mindfulness decompression therapy can effectively improve mental health and relieve job burnout in frontline nurses in nucleic acid sampling areas, which is worthy of clinical application. Randomized controlled trials are still needed, however, to fully confirm the effects of mindfulness decompression therapy.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Mental Health , COVID-19/therapy , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Decompression
20.
Pediatr Crit Care Med ; 24(4): 277-288, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298869

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of burnout, anxiety and depression symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in PICU workers in Brazil during the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. To compare the results of subgroups stratified by age, gender, professional category, health system, and previous mental health disorders. DESIGN: Multicenter, cross-sectional study using an electronic survey. SETTING: Twenty-nine public and private Brazilian PICUs. SUBJECTS: Multidisciplinary PICU workers. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Self-reported questionnaires were used to measure burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition [PCL-5]) in 1,084 respondents. Subjects were mainly young (37.1 ± 8.4 yr old) and females (85%), with a median workload of 50 hours per week. The prevalence of anxiety and depression was 33% and 19%, respectively, whereas PTSD was 13%. The overall median burnout scores were high in the emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment dimensions (16 [interquartile range (IQR), 8-24] and 40 [IQR, 33-44], respectively) whereas low in the depersonalization one (2 [IQR, 0-5]), suggesting a profile of overextended professionals, with a burnout prevalence of 24%. Professionals reporting prior mental health disorders had higher prevalence of burnout (30% vs 22%; p = 0.02), anxiety (51% vs 29%; p < 0.001), and depression symptoms (32.5% vs 15%; p < 0.001), with superior PCL-5 scores for PTSD ( p < 0.001). Public hospital workers presented more burnout (29% vs 18.6%, p < 0.001) and more PTSD levels (14.8% vs 10%, p = 0.03). Younger professionals were also more burned out ( p < 0.05 in all three dimensions). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of mental health disorders in Brazilian PICU workers during the first 2020 peak of COVID-19 was as high as those described in adult ICU workers. Some subgroups, particularly those reporting previous mental disorders and younger professionals, should receive special attention to prevent future crises.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Child , Mental Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Health Personnel/psychology
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