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1.
Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am ; 31(4): 641-653, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814429

ABSTRACT

Physician fatigue, also known as burnout, is a highly prevalent but often underrecognized result of workplace stressors. The consequences of burnout can include poor work-life integration, isolation, depression, and suicide. As a result, an organization may experience high physician turnover, patient safety issues, malpractice suits, and financial losses. Physicians should be encouraged to play a role in their wellness by taking mental time away from work, pursuing hobbies, attending wellness programs, and ensuring quality time with family. Ultimately, it is an organization that must acknowledge physician burnout, identify risk factors, and invest in targeted interventions to prevent this immense threat to their stability.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans
2.
Yonsei Med J ; 63(4): 372-379, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771026

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate burnout and resilience among emergency physicians (EPs) at university teaching hospitals during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In April to May 2021, a survey was administered to 331 and 309 emergency medicine specialists and residents, respectively, from 31 university teaching hospitals in Korea. Data on the respondents' age, sex, designation, working area, experience with treating COVID-19 patients, and personal experience with COVID-19 were collected. Based on the participants' characteristics, quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress), resilience, emotional content, and self-image were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 247 responses were analyzed. Compared to specialists, compassion satisfaction and resilience in residents were not good, burnout was severe, and emotional content and self-image were less positive. Experiences with treating COVID-19 patients did not cause any difference in quality of life, resilience, emotional content, and self-image among participant subgroups. Personal COVID-19 experiences were associated with poor compassion satisfaction, resilience, less positive emotional content and self-image, and severe burnout. Compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress, and resilience can definitively affect burnout. CONCLUSION: The quality of life and resilience of EPs in university teaching hospitals in Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic have been low. Supportive measures to improve resilience can prevent burnout among emergency staff, particularly residents and EPs, with personal experiences related to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life
3.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 35(2): 195-200, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684842

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: COVID-19 pandemic has created profound ethical challenges, not only for clinical decision-making but also for defining physician professional conduct. RECENT FINDINGS: Multiple ethical questions arose as the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged globally, including physician obligations in a pandemic, allotment of personal protective equipment, care of unvaccinated patients, discern between evidence-based and unreliable information, addressing end-of-life wishes, implications of involving medical students in a public health crisis, and finally physician burnout aggravated by a pandemic. SUMMARY: There is a need to redefine existing medical professionalism standards so that future healthcare professionals are well prepared to deal with similar public health crisis.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 153-169, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1668795

ABSTRACT

Burnout in nurses can have negative consequences for the organizational health of the institution and the mental and physical health of the nurse. In this article, the authors identify the incidence of burnout in nursing and risk and protective factors. Next, they discuss the relationship between burnout and health, highlighting the critical relationship between burnout, stress, inflammation, and declines in physical health. Lastly, they review articles from the Zangaro and colleagues' systematic review related to mental and physical health to create a picture of the existing research on burnout and health.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Psychological , Humans
5.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643785

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has been widely adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic as virtual patient care promotes social distancing and decreases viral exposure risk. As teledermatology has become more prominent during this period, it is essential to assess whether virtual visits allow for adequate patient care. To assess perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of teledermatology, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv. Of the physicians surveyed, 94% reported their departments had implemented teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority (64%) described teledermatology as an effective tool for patient care because of improved access to care, decreased risk of COVID-19 exposure, and convenience. Frequently cited limitations of teledermatology were image quality, technical difficulties, and inability to perform a comprehensive skin examination. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported teledermatology as a contributor to their professional burnout. Although teledermatology has become more prevalent as a result of the pandemic, its role moving forward is uncertain given its limitations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Dermatology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Terminals/standards , Dermatologists/psychology , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Examination , Sex Distribution , Telemedicine/trends , Uncertainty
6.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262774, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643281

ABSTRACT

Recent studies on burnout (BO) have included both individual and situational factors, referred to as job-person fit (JPF). The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence rate of BO in the hospital staff working at a tertiary referral hospital in southwest Iran and then to highlight the importance of the person in the context of his/her work life. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2020 on all hospital staff using a three-part questionnaire comprised of personal and work-situational factors, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the Psychological Empowerment Scale (PES). The partial least squares (PLS) path modelling and the neural network (NN) model were used to identify the significant variables within the BO dimensions. A total of 358 staff completed the questionnaire and were recruited for the study. Emotional exhaustion (EE) was seen in 137 medical staff (38.3%) and depersonalization (DP) was observed in 75 individuals (20.1%). Thinking about job change was the most important factor positively correlated with EE. Positive stress and work experience were among the most significant factors negatively associated with PA and DP, respectively. The hospital staff experienced BO in a way comparable to the national results. Work-situational and personal variables interacted with the three dimensions of BO in the hospital staff. More experienced staff also felt more accomplished and successful, resulting in the identification of a decreased level of DP and elevated PA.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Least-Squares Analysis , Male , Marital Status , Models, Statistical , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Personnel Turnover/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 69: 103154, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561993

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore gender and occupational role impact on work-related Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, burnout and global functioning in a sample of emergency healthcare workers. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING: 126 healthcare workers of the Emergency Department, including Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Room and Emergency Medicine, of a major University Hospital in central Italy were recruited. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants were assessed by means of the: Trauma and Loss Spectrum-Self Report (TALS-SR) to explore Post-Traumatic Stress Spectrum Symptoms, Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) Scale to assess Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Compassion Fatigue and Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS) to measure global functioning. RESULTS: The present findings showed females were more prone to develop Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms, particularly re-experiencing (p = .010) and hyperarousal (p = .026) symptoms and medical doctors reporting higher Burnout (p < .001) and lower Compassion Satisfaction (p = .009) mean scores than nurses. Higher levels of functioning impairment emerged amongst medical doctors rather than nurses, in both social (p = .029) and private (p = .020) leisure activities. Linear correlations highlighted relationships between the TALS-SR, ProQOL and WSAS scores. Finally, medical doctor status was significantly associated with lower Compassion Satisfaction (p = .029) and higher Burnout (p = .015). CONCLUSION: Our results highlight high post-traumatic stress symptoms and burnout levels in emergency healthcare workers with a relevant impact of female gender and occupational role, supporting the need for preventive strategies, also in light of the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260410, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546955

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Studies carried out during previous pandemics revealed an increase in the prevalence of Burnout Syndrome and other psychiatric disorders among health professionals. A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders is also observed in some health categories, during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review/meta-analysis study aims to assess the prevalence of Burnout Syndrome and other psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia) among health care professionals and other support professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Observational studies published from December 2019, without language restrictions in which the prevalence of Burnout Syndrome and other psychiatric disorders among health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic will be assessed. METHODS: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, CINAHAL, PsycINFO, LILACS, SCOPUS, and The Cochrane Library will be searched for eligible studies. Two reviewers will independently screen and select studies, assess methodological quality, and extract data. A meta-analysis will be performed, if possible, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation (GRADE). ETHICS AND DISCLOSURE: This study will use secondary data. Thus, there is no need for submission to the ethics committee. The results of this systematic review will be published in a journal after a peer-review process. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Systematic review registration number: CRD42020212036.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mental Disorders/etiology , Prevalence
10.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 35(9): 520, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485808
11.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
13.
Nurs Ethics ; 29(2): 293-303, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379733

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has produced high stress in nurses, affecting their professional quality of life. Different variables affect psychological stress response and professional quality of life. In this context, the role of professional values represents an interesting object of research. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the relationship between professional values, perceived stress, and professional quality of life among nurses during the COVID-19 crisis. RESEARCH DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND RESEARCH CONTEXT: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants were 439 registered nurses from the public health system. Perceived stress, professional quality of life, and professional values were evaluated by using measuring instruments adapted and validated in the geographic context of research. Data were collected online in December 2020 during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: This study was approved by the Ethics Committee on Clinical Research of the Principality of Asturias. FINDINGS: Within professional values, ethics obtained higher scores showing the primacy of ethical values among nurses. Moderate correlations between ethics, mastery, expertise, and compassion satisfaction were found. Frontline nurses informed high perceived stress. The correlations between professional values and compassion satisfaction were higher in non-frontline nurses. A moderate negative correlation between perceived stress and compassion satisfaction was found in both groups, which implies that the higher the stress, the lower the satisfaction in the helping relationship. CONCLUSION: Professional values positively influence compassion satisfaction during the COVID-19 pandemic. Compassion satisfaction presents a negative correlation with fatigue compassion and burnout in frontline and non-frontline nurses. Given the functionality of values both to guide clinical practice professionally and ethically, and prevent dissatisfaction with one's professional quality of life by reinforcing compassion satisfaction, it is necessary to reinforce them with an intensive and cross-sectional learning during the university training.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1841-1848, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369637

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In a previous study, we assessed burnout in geriatric healthcare workers during the first lockdown that lasted from March to May 2020 in France, in response to the COVID-19 crisis. OBJECTIVE: We carried out a follow-up study to assess burnout in the same population during the second lockdown that was implemented at the end of October 2020. METHODS: We used an online survey to assess burnout in terms of exhaustion and disengagement in a sample of 58 geriatric healthcare workers. RESULTS: We found higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement, and burnout among geriatric healthcare workers during the second than during the first lockdown. We also found high levels of exhaustion but moderate disengagement and burnout during the second lockdown. CONCLUSION: The increased exhaustion, disengagement, and burnout during the second lockdown can be attributed to the increased workload in geriatric facilities throughout this crisis and during the second lockdown due to shortage in staff and increased number of shifts and allocated duties. The high levels of exhaustion reported among geriatric healthcare workers during the second lockdown can reflect their physical fatigue, as well as their feelings of being emotionally overextended and exhausted by their workload.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Caregiver Burden , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Services for the Aged , Work Engagement , Adult , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Caregiver Burden/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Services for the Aged/organization & administration , Health Services for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(8): 2383-2391, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309784

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study examines the role of servant leadership through the mechanism of psychological safety in curbing nurses' burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, studies have shown an increased level of stress and burnout among health care workers, especially nurses. This study responds to the call for research to explore the mechanisms of servant leadership in predicting nurses' burnout by employing the perspective of conservation of resources theory. METHODS: Through a cross-sectional quantitative research design, data were collected in three waves from 443 nurses working in Pakistan's five public sector hospitals. Data were analysed by employing the partial least squares path modelling (PLS-PM) technique. RESULTS: Servant leadership (ß = -0.318; 95% CI = 0.225, 0.416) and psychological safety (ß = -0.342; CI = 0.143, 0.350) have an inverse relationship with nurses' burnout and explain 63.1% variance. CONCLUSIONS: Servant leadership significantly reduces nurses' burnout, and psychological safety mediates this relationship. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Human resource management policies in health care must emphasize training nursing leaders in servant leadership behaviour.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Fam Syst Health ; 39(1): 169-171, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236070

ABSTRACT

In this brief article, the author notes that discussion of work/life integration have become increasingly com mon at her institution, as school-age children regularly make appearances in Zoom meetings, and team mem bers have to shift between dynamic roles in their work and family lives throughout the day. Talk of burnout abounds-and she often find herself wondering if in fact they are only experiencing burnout as an occupational phenomenon, or whether it is a compounded experi ence of burnout and the emotional exhaustion of collective trauma and grief. Even when concerns dissipate about COVID's relentless spread and severe disease, there is no doubt that we will have lingering mental health hangovers from the psychologi cal impacts of the past year; we must be pre pared to leverage informatics and technology to stem the tide. We will navigate through these uncharted waters through thoughtful and effective leadership that culti vates community and a work environment that is with aligned with our organizational and personal values; and as the past year has demonstrated, it is evi dent that technology and informatics will play a piv otal role in the future of work. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Child , Female , Humans , Informatics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(7): 1974-1982, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219430

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To assess nurses' burnout and its association with their perceived quality of patient care and occurrence of adverse events (AEs) during COVID-19. BACKGROUND: Burnout is a serious problem among nursing staff internationally with negative impacts on the quality of care and patient safety. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online study among 1,004 Iranian nurses through the convenience sampling technique. Data were collected using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, five items of questions related to self-reported poor patient care quality and estimated occurrence of AEs. RESULTS: Prevalence of high burnout among nurses was 31.5%. The risk of AEs ranged from 26.1% to 71.7%. Self-reported quality of patient care was found to be poor. A positive correlation was found between emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores and patient care quality, whereas a negative correlation was found between personal accomplishment scores and all poor care item scores. Depersonalization was found to increase the risk of the onset of all AEs (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06-1.08). Also, Personal accomplishmentreduced the risk of occurrence of 'medication errors' (OR = 0.99) and the onset of 'patient and their family verbal abuse' (OR = 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirmed the hypothesis that a higher degree of burnout is correlated with a perceived higher number of AEs and reduced perceived patient care quality. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Reducing burnout among nurses through implementing interventions may be an effective strategy to enhance patient care quality and reduce the number of AEs in Iranian public hospitals. Therefore, in order to minimize work burnout, primary approaches include access to psychosocial support, including Web-based services, psychological first aid, mental support hotlines and self-care techniques during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Iran , Pandemics , Patient Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Respir Care ; 66(5): 881-883, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209292
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