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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 309, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785146

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are major shortfalls in the midwifery workforce which has been exacerbated by the COVID 19 pandemic. Midwives have high levels of burnout and many, often early career midwives, are planning to leave the profession. There are reports of a poor workplace culture in maternity units, including bullying. Support is essential for the welfare of the workforce to be able to cope with the demands of their jobs. Supportive strategies, such as Clinical Supervision, a recognised approach in healthcare, enable reflection in a facilitated, structured way, and can enhance professional standards. The purpose of this research is to study burnout levels in midwives, those exiting their workplace and perceptions of workplace culture in relation to access to, and attendance of, monthly Clinical Supervision. METHODS: This study will be a cluster randomised controlled trial of maternity sites within Sydney and the surrounding districts. Twelve sites will be recruited and half will receive monthly Clinical Supervision for up to two years. Midwives from all sites will be requested to complete 6-monthly surveys comprising validated measurement tools: the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI), the Australian Midwifery Workplace Culture (AMWoC) tool and the Clinical Supervision Evaluation Questionnaire (CSEQ) (the latter for intervention sites only). Primary outcomes are the levels of burnout in midwives (using the CBI). Secondary outcomes will be the quality of the intervention (using the CSEQ), perceptions of workplace culture (using the AMWoC tool) and midwives' intention to stay in their role/profession, as well as sick leave rates and numbers of exiting staff. We will also determine the dose effect - ie the impact in relation to how many Clinical Supervision sessions the midwives have attended, as well as other supportive workplace strategies such as mentoring/coaching on outcomes. DISCUSSION: Through attending monthly Clinical Supervision we hypothesise that midwives will report less burnout and more positive perceptions of workplace culture than those in the control sites. The potential implications of which are a productive workforce giving high quality care with the flow-on effect of having physically and psychologically well women and their babies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The ACTRN Registration number is ACTRN12621000545864p , dated 10/05/2021,.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Midwifery , Nurse Midwives , Australia , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Preceptorship , Pregnancy
2.
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl) ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774537

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Covid-19 cases are rising at a high rate in Thailand. Thailand's administration has formulated many initiatives to combat the spread of coronavirus. However, during a pandemic, health-care workers have a diverse range of tasks that make it more challenging to continue working in hospitals. Consequently, the authors modeled the turnover intentions of health-care personnel to capture relevant psychological aspects of employees during the pandemic. Specifically, this study aims to focused on the moderating role of Covid-19 burnout (CBO) in the relationship between transformational leadership (TL) and job turnover intentions (JTI) with job satisfaction (JS) and knowledge hiding (KH) as mediators. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: This research collected data using self-administered questionnaire. A two-stage partial least square-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) is carried out as an analysis technique to measure the linear relationship among constructs. The study tests hypotheses (direct and indirect effects) using 310 sample size of health-care personnel. FINDINGS: The findings indicated that CBO intensified the JTI of health-care personnel and strengthened the association of JS and KH with JTI during the Covid-19 pandemic. TL had a negative indirect effect on JTI. In addition, JS had a negative impact on JTI. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The study highlights the importance of TL and JS as ways to reduce or alleviate JTI in health-care personnel during the Covid-19 pandemic in Thailand. Furthermore, CBO and KH can enhance JTI in health-care personnel.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand/epidemiology
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e32800, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770906

ABSTRACT

The burden associated with using the electronic health record system continues to be a critical issue for physicians and is potentially contributing to physician burnout. At a large academic mental health hospital in Canada, we recently implemented a Physician Engagement Strategy focused on reducing the burden of electronic health record use through close collaboration with clinical leadership, information technology leadership, and physicians. Built on extensive stakeholder consultation, this strategy highlights initiatives that we have implemented (or will be implementing in the near future) under four components: engage, inspire, change, and measure. In this viewpoint paper, we share our process of developing and implementing the Physician Engagement Strategy and discuss the lessons learned and implications of this work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Leadership , Mental Health , Physicians/psychology
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 229, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical training program and hospital response to the COVID-19 pandemic has varied greatly and has impacted trainee well-being. Which factors have specifically related to trainee wellness, however, has not yet been examined in depth. The aim of the study was to understand trainee perspectives on the individual psychiatry trainee programs' hospitals' objective COVID-19 preparedness management. We also sought and to gauge how program changes, and general pandemic-related concerns, have been associated with trainee satisfaction and burnout. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey study of psychiatric trainees was distributed electronically throughout the country via various psychiatry residency program listservs in April 2020. Statistical analyses were performed utilizing simple linear regression. RESULTS: From 352 respondents (346 complete responses and 6 partial responses), the most frequent program changes were "decreased number of rotations requiring in-person patient care" and "increased call hours or duties." Of pandemic-related concerns surveyed, the two greatest were "spreading COVID-19 to family/friends" and "co-residents' burnout and anxiety." A positive relationship was found between trainee satisfaction with perceived COVID-19 departmental response and comfort level of residents/fellows in expressing concerns with attending clinicians and department leadership. CONCLUSIONS: Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, trainees have experienced a variety of changes to trainee program policies and guidelines. Overall, poor communication and trainee dissatisfaction with departmental response correlated with concern of infection and anxiety/burnout. Insights garnered from this study could provide scaffolding for the best practices to reduce trainee physician anxiety/burnout for the current and future pandemics of this variety and magnitude.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 115-130, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1696787

ABSTRACT

Donabedian's framework offers a model to evaluate the relationship between patient outcomes, influenced by clinical care delivery structures and processes. Applying this model proposes that adequate and appropriate structures and processes within organizations are necessary to realize optimal outcomes; it is imperative that leadership focuses on those structures and processes to reduce the risk of burnout. Current research cannot determine whether burnout causes decreased quality or working in a setting with decreased quality causes burnout. The follow-up question is whether curtailing burnout will improve quality or whether improving quality of care will reduce provider burnout?


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Leadership , Quality of Health Care
7.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264921, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify preferred burnout interventions within a resident physician population, utilizing the Nominal Group Technique. The results will be used to design a discrete choice experiment study to inform the development of resident burnout prevention programs. METHODS: Three resident focus groups met (10-14 participants/group) to prioritize a list of 23 factors for burnout prevention programs. The Nominal Group Technique consisted of three steps: an individual, confidential ranking of the 23 factors by importance from 1 to 23, a group discussion of each attribute, including a group review of the rankings, and an opportunity to alter the original ranking across participants. RESULTS: The total number of residents (36) were a representative sample of specialty, year of residency, and sex. There was strong agreement about the most highly rated attributes which grouped naturally into themes of autonomy, meaning, competency and relatedness. There was also disagreement on several of the attributes that is likely due to the differences in residency specialty and subsequently rotation requirements. CONCLUSION: This study identified the need to address multiple organizational factors that may lead to physician burnout. There is a clear need for complex interventions that target systemic and program level factors rather than focus on individual interventions. These results may help residency program directors understand the specific attributes of a burnout prevention program valued by residents. Aligning burnout interventions with resident preferences could improve the efficacy of burnout prevention programs by improving adoption of, and satisfaction with, these programs. Physician burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment [1]. Burnout is present in epidemic proportions and was estimated to occur in over 50 percent of practicing physicians and in up to 89 percent of resident physicians pre-COVID 19. The burnout epidemic is growing; a recent national survey of US physicians reported an 8.9 percent increase in burnout between 2011 and 2014 [2]. Rates of physician burnout have also increased [3] during the COVID-19 pandemic with a new classification of "pandemic burnout" experienced by over 52 percent of healthcare workers as early as June of 2020 [4]. Physician burnout can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, and relationship problems that may progress to substance abuse, increased interpersonal conflicts, broken relationships, low quality of life, major depression, and suicide [5-7]. The estimated rate of physician suicide is 300-400 annually [8-10].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Physicians/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mindfulness , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Social Support
8.
Pflege ; 35(2): 104-113, 2022 Apr.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751674

ABSTRACT

The situation of nurses in hospitals during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic: an online survey Abstract. Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has an impact on stress and wellbeing of nurses. Anxiety of infection, lack of protective equipment and insufficient expertise in care of these patients were described as reasons of burnout. Aim: The influence of work-related sense of coherence as well as perceived organizational support on the burnout level and the intention to leave the job will be explored. Method: In December 2020 and January 2021, staff of 81 hospitals in Hessia, Germany were invited to participate in an online survey using the BAT (Burnout-Assessment-Tool), work-SoC (work-related - Sence of Coherence), the POS-s (perceived organizational Support - short version) and items based on a literature review. Results: Of 595 nurses, 47.6% showed a moderate or high burnout level, 20.7% want to leave the job after the pandemic. The higher the work-SoC (ß = -0.467; p < 0.001) and the higher the POS-s (ß = -0.178; p < 0.001), the lower the burnout level. Trainings in the organization were mentioned by 24.7% of the nurses as a positive factor. They missed support in mindfulness and resilience training, in child care and health-related topics. 55.1% did not agree that the employer does everything to support them. Conclusions: Regardless of the pandemic, salutogenic leadership is required, which deals with "moral injuries" of employees as a result of implicit rationing and foster health-related support.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725586

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) will undoubtedly have psychological impacts for healthcare workers, which could be sustained; frontline workers will be particularly at risk. Actions are needed to mitigate the impacts of COVID-19 on mental health by protecting and promoting the psychological wellbeing of healthcare workers during and after the outbreak. We developed and evaluated a digital learning package using Agile methodology within the first three weeks of UK outbreak. This e-package includes evidence-based guidance, support and signposting relating to psychological wellbeing for all UK healthcare employees. A three-step rapid development process included public involvement activities (PPIs) (STEP 1), content and technical development with iterative peer review (STEP 2), and delivery and evaluation (STEP 3). The package outlines the actions that team leaders can take to provide psychologically safe spaces for staff, together with guidance on communication and reducing social stigma, peer and family support, signposting others through psychological first aid (PFA), self-care strategies (e.g., rest, work breaks, sleep, shift work, fatigue, healthy lifestyle behaviours), and managing emotions (e.g., moral injury, coping, guilt, grief, fear, anxiety, depression, preventing burnout and psychological trauma). The e-package includes advice from experts in mental wellbeing as well as those with direct pandemic experiences from the frontline, as well as signposting to public mental health guidance. Rapid delivery in STEP 3 was achieved via direct emails through professional networks and social media. Evaluation included assessment of fidelity and implementation qualities. Essential content was identified through PPIs (n = 97) and peer review (n = 10) in STEPS 1 and 2. The most important messages to convey were deemed to be normalisation of psychological responses during a crisis, and encouragement of self-care and help-seeking behaviour. Within 7 days of completion, the package had been accessed 17,633 times, and healthcare providers had confirmed immediate adoption within their health and wellbeing provisions. Evaluation (STEP 3, n = 55) indicated high user satisfaction with content, usability and utility. Assessment of implementation qualities indicated that the package was perceived to be usable, practical, low cost and low burden. Our digital support package on 'psychological wellbeing for healthcare workers' is free to use, has been positively evaluated and was highly accessed within one week of release. It is available here: Supplementary Materials. This package was deemed to be appropriate, meaningful and useful for the needs of UK healthcare workers. We recommend provision of this e-package to healthcare workers alongside wider strategies to support their psychological wellbeing during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus , Health Personnel/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Depression , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
11.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722823

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
12.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 67-78, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700799

ABSTRACT

Health professionals, including nurses, are vulnerable to burnout, which occurs when chronic stress is not managed. COVID-19 led to nurses working in stressful environments, and being required to work mandatory overtime. The result was an increase in burnout. Nurses exhibited physical, psychological, emotional, and behavioral signs of burnout. There are several ways that nurses can mitigate the situation and have more control over burnout. Nurses need to work together to support each other, including supporting the leader. There are several actions, such as mindfulness activities and maintaining a healthy lifestyle that can help prevent burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 35(2): 195-200, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684842

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: COVID-19 pandemic has created profound ethical challenges, not only for clinical decision-making but also for defining physician professional conduct. RECENT FINDINGS: Multiple ethical questions arose as the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged globally, including physician obligations in a pandemic, allotment of personal protective equipment, care of unvaccinated patients, discern between evidence-based and unreliable information, addressing end-of-life wishes, implications of involving medical students in a public health crisis, and finally physician burnout aggravated by a pandemic. SUMMARY: There is a need to redefine existing medical professionalism standards so that future healthcare professionals are well prepared to deal with similar public health crisis.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Nursing ; 52(2): 46-48, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684825

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This article discusses the impact of staffing shortage on nurses' mental health, and outlines ways, including a successful rounder initiative, for nurse leaders and facilities to address nurses' stress and burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Workforce
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686788

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and remote working challenge employees' possibilities to recover from work during their off-job time. We examined the relationship between off-job crafting and burnout across the COVID-19 crisis. We used a longitudinal research design, comprising one wave collected before the onset of the pandemic, in March 2019 (T1), and one wave collected during the first lockdown of the crisis in April 2020 (T2). We measured the six off-job crafting dimensions (Crafting for Detachment, Relaxation, Autonomy, Mastery, Meaning, and Affiliation) and burnout (fatigue/exhaustion) via a questionnaire among German and Swiss employees (N = 658; Age M = 47; 55% male). We found that both burnout levels and crafting for affiliation significantly decreased at T2 compared to T1. All off-job crafting dimensions and burnout correlated negatively cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Regression analyses showed that employees who crafted in their off-job time before and during the crisis experienced fewer burnout complaints during the crisis. Looking more closely at the subdimensions of off-job crafting, employees who crafted for detachment before and during, and for affiliation before the crisis, reported less burnout during the crisis. We conclude that off-job crafting may act as a buffer mechanism against burnout during the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 60-61, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672279

ABSTRACT

Updated several times a week with posts by a wide variety of authors, AJN's blog Off the Charts allows us to provide more timely-and often more personal-perspectives on professional, policy, and clinical issues. Best of the Blog is a regular column to draw the attention of AJN readers to posts we think deserve a wider audience. To read more, please visit: www.ajnoffthecharts.com.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Nurse's Role , Organizational Innovation , Work Schedule Tolerance , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans
18.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 131-141, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1668793

ABSTRACT

The levels of burnout nurses experience continue to increase with resultant negative impacts on the nursing work environment, patient outcomes, and the retention of qualified nurses. Nurse leaders are essential in developing and fostering positive work environments that retain an empowered and motivated workforce. Research indicates that positive and relational leadership styles can improve nurses' job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and retention while concurrently reducing emotional exhaustion and burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology
19.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 101-114, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1668792

ABSTRACT

Burnout syndrome has been defined as a state of chronic stress characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization with low levels of professional efficacy. The effects of nurse burnout include poor job satisfaction and turnover. Nurses' physical and mental well-being are both essential to sustaining a healthy nursing workforce with factors such as an empowering work environment showing positive effects on reducing burnout. Formal and informal individual and organizational approaches to supporting novice nurses' transition and experienced nurses' sustained practice fulfillment are key to addressing burnout and fostering retention.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Personnel Turnover , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 60(2): 4, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662734
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