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2.
Br J Nurs ; 32(11): 514-520, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235456

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses are experiencing increasing stress, burnout and mental health problems. The Advocating and Educating for Quality ImProvement (A-EQUIP) model of clinical supervision aims to support staff wellbeing, promote positive work cultures and improve patient care. Although a growing body of empirical evidence supports the positive impact of clinical supervision, several individual and organisational barriers may impede the implementation of A-EQUIP in practice. Organisational culture, staffing and workforce pressures all affect employees' ability to engage with supervision, and organisations and clinical leaders must consciously work to sustain lasting change.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Preceptorship , Organizational Culture , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology
3.
Phys Ther ; 103(5)2023 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242161

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Research on burnout among physical therapists and occupational therapists in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is limited. Resilience may be important for reducing burnout and promoting well-being among rehabilitation specialists, especially during periods of elevated occupational demand and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate experiences of burnout, COVID-19 pandemic-related distress, and resilience among physical therapists and occupational therapists during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Physical therapists and occupational therapists working in a university-affiliated health system were invited to complete an online survey assessing burnout, COVID-19 pandemic-related distress, state- and trait-like resilience, physical activity, sleep disturbance, and financial concerns. Multiple linear regressions were used to examine variables associated with burnout as well as the contribution of specific aspects of resilience to burnout. RESULTS: Greater COVID-19 pandemic-related distress was associated with greater emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, whereas state-like resilience at work was associated with lower emotional exhaustion, greater personal accomplishment, and lower depersonalization. Analyses examining the impact of specific components of resilience at work suggested that several components are associated with less burnout, with finding one's calling being particularly relevant for all 3 domains of burnout. CONCLUSION: Symptoms of burnout were reported by many physical therapists and occupational therapists. COVID-19-related distress and state-like resilience at work, particularly the perception of finding one's calling, emerged as consistently being associated with burnout in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPACT: These findings can inform the development of interventions to reduce burnout among physical therapists and occupational therapists amid the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Humans , Occupational Therapists , Physical Therapists/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 302, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout and depression among medical students is linked to serious problems that require appropriate solutions. Subthreshold autism traits or autistic-like traits (ALTs) may be possible factors associated with burnout and depression. The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for burnout and depression has been widely reported. The treatment aims to improve psychological flexibility, a concept indicating engagement in personal value-based behaviors without avoiding uncomfortable private experiences. This study examined whether ALTs were associated with burnout or depression among medical students during clinical clerkships in Japan, and then investigated what psychological flexibility processes might mediate these associations. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was administered to 284 medical students at Nagoya City University School of Medical Sciences who had been in clinical clerkships for 10 months or longer. Linear multiple regressions were performed with each burnout factor or depression as the outcome variable using validated tools measuring burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), ALT (Autism-Spectrum Quotient Japanese version-21), and psychological flexibility processes (Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire-7 and Valuing Questionnaire). Additionally, a mediation analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: A linear multiple regression analysis that controlled for age and gender found that ALTs were significantly associated with lower personal accomplishment, a factor of burnout, and depression. Lower personal accomplishment was also associated with males and lower progress toward values of the psychological flexibility process. Depression was also associated with males and higher cognitive fusion, lower progress towards values, and higher obstruction to values of the psychological flexibility process. Surprisingly, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were not significantly associated with ALTs. The mediation analysis revealed that the relationship between ALTs and personal accomplishment was partially mediated by a process of progress toward values, while the relationship between ALTs and depression was partially mediated by both processes of progress toward values and cognitive fusion. CONCLUSIONS: ALTs were significantly associated with lower personal accomplishment of burnout and depression among medical students in clinical clerkships. Consideration should be given to the psychological flexibility processes that focus on interventions targeting psychological flexibility for medical students with ALTs to reduce burnout and depression.


Subject(s)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , Autistic Disorder , Burnout, Professional , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , Male , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Universities , Students, Medical/psychology , Japan , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1169604, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325964

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of the pilot study conducted by the authors was to assess occupational risk in selected areas of psychosocial risk factors among health professions in a pilot study. Medical staff working in the healthcare sector experience stress, job burnout and bullying on a daily basis. Monitoring occupational risks in the above areas provides an opportunity to take appropriate preventive measures. Methods: The prospective online survey included 143 health care workers from various professional groups. Eighteen participants did not complete the survey, and the results of 125 participants were eventually included in the analysis. The study used health and safety questionnaires in the healthcare sector, which are not widely used as screening tools in Poland. Results: The following statistical methods were performed in the study: the Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Dunn's test. In addition, multivariate analysis was performed. The results obtained in the study indicate that the questionnaires used in the study can be widely used by employers or occupational medicine as screening tools. Conclusions: Our findings show that level of education attainment in healthcare is correlated with higher chance of experiencing stress and burnout. Among the surveyed professions, nurses reported a higher amount of stress and burnout. Paramedics reported the highest chance of being bullied at work. This can be explained by their nature of work which requires directly interacting with patients and their families. In addition, it should be noted that the tools used can be successfully applied in workplaces as elements of workplace ergonomics assessment in the context of cognitive ergonomics.


Subject(s)
Bullying , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Pilot Projects , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workplace , Ergonomics , Medical Staff
6.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285402, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315506

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a shift to virtual curriculum delivery at Canadian medical schools. At the NOSM University, some learners transitioned to entirely online learning, while others continued in-person, in-clinic learning. This study aimed to show that medical learners who transitioned to exclusively online learning exhibited higher levels of burnout compared to their peers who continued in-person, clinical learning. Analysis of factors that protect against burnout including resilience, mindfulness, and self-compassion exhibited by online and in-person learners at NOSM University during this curriculum shift were also explored. METHODS: As part of a pilot wellness initiative, a cross-sectional online survey-based study of learner wellness was conducted at NOSM University during the 2020-2021 academic year. Seventy-four learners responded. The survey utilized the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Brief Resilience Scale, Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale-Revised, and the Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form. T-tests were utilized to compare these parameters in those who studied exclusively online and those who continued learning in-person in a clinical setting. RESULTS: Medical learners who engaged in online learning exhibited significantly higher levels of burnout when compared with learners who continued in-person learning in a clinical setting, despite scoring equally on protective factors such as resilience, mindfulness, and self-compassion. CONCLUSION: The results discussed in this paper suggest that the increased time spent in a virtual learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic might be associated with burnout among exclusively online learners, as compared to learners who were educated in clinical, in-person settings. Further inquiry should investigate causality and any protective factors that could mitigate negative effects of the virtual learning environment.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Schools, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
7.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 313, 2023 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers who are exposed to coronavirus disease 2019 are psychologically distressed. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health outcomes of hospital workers 2 years after the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 and to identify changes in the stress of hospital workers and predicted risk factors. METHODS: This survey was conducted 2 years after the initial evaluation performed under the first emergency declaration of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic among hospital workers at the same hospital in an ordinance-designated city in Japan from June to July 2022. Sociodemographic data, 19 stress-related question responses, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Maslach burnout inventory-general survey were collected. Multiple regression models were used to identify factors associated with each of the mental health outcomes 2 years after the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak. RESULTS: We received 719 valid responses. Between 2020 and 2022, hospital workers' anxiety about infection decreased, whereas their exhaustion and workload increased. Multiple regression analysis revealed that 2 years after the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, nurses and young people were at a higher risk of experiencing stress and burnout due to emotional exhaustion, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to examine the long-term stress of hospital workers measured in Japan. Exhaustion and workload were worsened 2 years into the pandemic. Therefore, health and medical institutions should continuously monitor the physical and psychological health of staff members.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Personnel, Hospital , Health Personnel/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Hospitals
8.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 25(4): 298-303, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312983

ABSTRACT

Background: Research has not explicitly explored differences between male and female microvascular head and neck (MHN) surgeon burnout, which should be identified and addressed to ensure career satisfaction and longevity. Objective: To measure and compare the prevalence of burnout among male versus female MHN surgeons. Methods: A prospective questionnaire based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was distributed through a web-based survey to the American Association of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons and American Head and Neck Society in 2021 and 2022. Additional variables collected included demographics, relationship and parental status, academic rank, annual salary, and COVID-19-related questions. Results: One hundred thirteen surveys were collected. Twenty-nine (25.7%) were women and all completed MHN surgery fellowships. Women trended toward more emotional exhaustion than men (2.8 mean MBI vs. 2.3 mean MBI) but reported similar personal achievement (4.8 mean MBI vs. 4.9 mean MBI). Men experienced less workplace sexual harassment (p < 0.001). Women experienced more burnout (69% vs. 39%, p = 0.006) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: Female MHN surgeons reported in this survey to experience more workplace sexual harassment and higher COVID-19-related burnout than their male counterparts.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Surgeons , Humans , Male , Female , United States/epidemiology , Prevalence , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312233

ABSTRACT

Background: Teaching is recognized as a highly challenging profession. Experience of chronic stress is a risk factor for poor mental and physical well-being, and burnout. There is limited knowledge regarding optimal interventions to address stress and burnout among teachers. Objective: To undertake a scoping review of the literature in the last five years to determine various psychological interventions to address stress and burnout among teachers. Method: The PRISMA-ScR (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews was followed. Relevant search terms were used to determine different interventions adopted to reduce teachers' stress and burnout. Articles published between 2018 and 2022 were identified using five bibliographic databases. Relevant articles were extracted, reviewed, collated, and thematically analyzed, and findings s were summarized. Results: Forty studies conducted in Asia, North America, Oceania, Europe, and Africa, met the inclusion criteria. Sixteen kinds of burnout and stress-reduction interventions were identified. The most popularly studied intervention were Mindfulness-Based Interventions alone or in combination with yoga or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), followed by Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT). Mindfulness-Based Interventions led to decreased overall Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI) and emotional exhaustion subscale scores. REBT, primarily used with special education teachers, especially in Africa, has also shown positive results. Other interventions reporting positive outcomes include Inquiry-Based Stress Reduction (IBSR), the Stress Management and Resiliency Training Program (SMART), Cyclic Meditation, Group Sandplay, Progressive Muscle Relaxation, Autogenic Training, Sport-Based Physical Activity, Emotional Intelligence Ability Models and Christian Prayer and Prayer-Reflection. Conclusions: Stress and burnout can have a negative impact on teachers and, very often, on the students they teach. Implementing suitable school-based interventions is necessary to improve teachers' stress-coping ability, reduce the likelihood of burnout and improve general well-being. Policymakers, governments, school boards and administrators should prioritize the implementation of school-based awareness and intervention programs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Educational Personnel , Humans , Adaptation, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Emotions , School Teachers/psychology
10.
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs ; 20(2): 133-141, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a global concern for the healthcare community, especially following a disaster response. It is a major obstacle to providing safe and quality health care. Avoiding burnout is essential to ensuring adequate healthcare delivery and preventing psychological and physical health problems and errors among healthcare staff. AIMS: This study aimed to determine the impact of burnout on healthcare staff working on the frontline in a disaster context, including pandemics, epidemics, natural disasters, and man-made disasters; and to identify interventions used to mitigate burnout among those healthcare professionals before, during, or after the disaster. METHOD: A mixed methods systematic review was used and included a joint analysis and synthesis of data from qualitative and quantitative studies. The was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analyses (PRISMA) of qualitative and quantitative evidence. Several databases were searched, for example, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus, and CINAHL. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool (MMAT), version 2018. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies addressed the impact of burnout in relation to disasters and highlighted the association between burnout and the physical or mental well-being of healthcare workers, work performance, and workplace attitude and behavior. Fourteen studies focused on different burnout interventions including psychoeducational interventions, reflection and self-care activities, and administering a pharmacological product. LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: Stakeholders should consider reducing risk of burnout among healthcare staff as an approach to improving quality and optimizing patient care. The evidence points to reflective and self-care interventions having a more positive effect on reducing burnout than other interventions. However, most of these interventions did not report on long-term effects. Further research needs to be undertaken to assess not only the feasibility and effectiveness but also the sustainability of interventions targeted to mitigate burnout in healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Disasters , Humans , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health
11.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1408: 83-99, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295683

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus-disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a devastating physical and psychological impact on society, especially on students. In this study, we describe the levels of physical activity (Physical-Activity-Questionnaire-Short-Form (IPAQ-SF)), Burnout (School-Burnout-Inventory for students (SBI-U)) and engagement (Utrecht-Work-Engagement-Scale-9 items (UWES-9S)) in a cohort of Latin American higher education students during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. We also determined whether physical activity, Burnout, and engagement are related according to gender and area of study. Self-reported data from 571 Latin American students (64.79% women, 34.15% men; average age 25.24 ± 5.52 years) were collected via an online survey questionnaire. Spearman correlation analyses evaluated the associations between physical activity, Burnout, and engagement. Comparative analyses by gender and field of study were also performed. The results showed no correlation or association in the linear regression between the IPAQ-SF and SBI-U scores or between the IPAQ-SF and the UWES-9S scores. By gender, men had higher IPAQ-SF scores (p < 0.05) and reported higher intensity physical activity than women, but women had higher SBI-U scores (p < 0.05). No difference was found between men and women according to the UWES-9S scores (p = 0.28). There was also no difference in IPAQ-SF scores (p = 0.29) regarding the field of study. Our results suggest that women perform less physical activity than men, which is consistent with higher Burnout. However, physical activity was not associated with Burnout or engagement overall, which indicates that it was insufficient to prevent emotional stress in Latin American higher education students during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Pandemics , Latin America , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294912

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Globally, the high prevalence of burnout in healthcare workers (HCWs) is of the utmost concern. Burnout is a state of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and a decreased sense of personal accomplishment. While the 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) exacerbated the burnout prevalence among HCWs, limited studies have explored this phenomenon using qualitative methodologies in the Eastern Cape Province and South Africa generally. This study explored how frontline healthcare workers experienced burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mthatha Regional Hospital. METHODS: Ten face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with non-specialized medical doctors and nurses who directly cared for COVID-19-infected patients during the pandemic in Mthatha Regional Hospital (MRH). In-depth interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were managed through NVIVO 12 software before being thematically analyzed using Colaizzi's analysis method. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged from the analysis. These themes were burnout manifestation (emotional strain, detachment and irritability, uncertainty-induced fear, and anxiety, physical exhaustion, yet, low job accomplishment, dread and professional responsibility), precursors of burnout (occupational exposure to high mortality, staff shortages, elongated high patient volume and workload, disease uncertainties and consistent feeling of grief), alleviating factors of burnout (time off work, psychologist intervention, periods of low infection rate and additional staff), and the last theme was every cloud has a silver lining (improved infection prevention and control (IPC) measures, learning to be more empathetic, the passion remains and confidence grows). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic brought about a rapid change in the work environment of healthcare workers who are the backbone of efficient healthcare services, thereby rendering them vulnerable to increased burnout risks. This study provides strategic information for policymakers and managers on developing and strengthening welfare policies to promote and protect frontline health workers' well-being and work functioning.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , South Africa/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Delivery of Health Care
13.
Med Lav ; 114(2): e2023012, 2023 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic created an extremely difficult situation for healthcare workers (HCWs) worldwide. We aimed to compare the mental health and professional quality of life of residents and specialist physicians in a cohort of Italian HCWs caring for patients with COVID-19 about two years after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In November 2021, an online survey investigating the emotional states of depression, anxiety, stress, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue was administered to HCWs (N= 78) at the Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that from 5 to 20% of our cohort of HCWs still showed the effects of the adverse psychological impact of the pandemic and more than half of them experienced medium levels of compassion fatigue as well as a medium level of compassion satisfaction. Our results also show that those with fewer years of clinical practice might be at greater risk of burnout (p= 0.021), anxiety and stress symptoms (both ps= 0.027) and might develop a lower level of compassion satisfaction (p=0.018). Moreover, the factors that potentially contribute to poor mental health, compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction seem to differ between residents and specialist physicians. CONCLUSIONS: This overview presents one of the first pictures of the long-term effects of the pandemic on the mental health and professional quality of life of an Italian sample of HCWs. Moreover, it also helps identify professionals who are most in need of support and emphasises the importance of improving the psychological and professional wellbeing of these individuals especially during a pandemic-like crisis with long lasting effects.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Physicians , Humans , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292083

ABSTRACT

We examined the relationship between age, coping, and burnout during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic with nurses in Texas (N = 376). Nurses were recruited through a professional association and snowball sampling methodology for the cross-sectional survey study. Framed in lifespan development theories, we expected that nurse age and experience would be positively correlated with positive coping strategies (e.g., getting emotional support from others) and negatively correlated with negative coping strategies (e.g., drinking and drug use). We also expected age to be negatively related to the emotional exhaustion and depersonalization facets of burnout and positively related to the personal accomplishment facet of burnout. Findings were largely supported in that age was positively associated with positive coping and personal accomplishment and age and experience were negatively correlated with negative coping and depersonalization. Age was not, however, associated with emotional exhaustion. Mediation models further suggest that coping explains some of the effect of age on burnout. A theoretical extension of lifespan development models into an extreme environment and practical implications for coping in these environments are discussed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Aging
15.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1084259, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304601

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aimed to assess the extent of alcohol use and misuse among clinical therapists working in psychiatric hospitals in China during the early COVID-19 Pandemic, and to identify associated factors. Methods: An anonymous nationwide survey was conducted in 41 tertiary psychiatric hospitals. We collected demographic data as well as alcohol use using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) and burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 396 clinical therapists completed the survey, representing 89.0% of all potential participants we targeted. The mean age of participants was 33.8 years old, and more than three-quarters (77.5%) were female. Nearly two-fifths (39.1%) self-reported as current alcohol users. The overall prevalence of alcohol misuse was 6.6%. Nearly one-fifth (19.9%) reported symptoms of burnout with high emotional exhaustion in 46 (11.6%), and high depersonalization in 61 (15.4%). Multiple logistic regression showed alcohol use was associated with male gender (OR = 4.392; 95% CI =2.443-7.894), single marital status (OR = 1.652; 95% CI =0.970-2.814), smoking habit (OR = 3.847; 95%CI =1.160-12.758) and regular exercise (OR = 2.719; 95%CI =1.490-4.963). Alcohol misuse was associated with male gender (OR = 3.367; 95% CI =1.174-9.655), a lower education level (OR = 3.788; 95%CI =1.009-14.224), smoking habit (OR = 4.626; 95%CI =1.277-16.754) and high burnout (depersonalization, OR = 4.848; 95%CI =1.433-16.406). Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, clinical therapists' alcohol consumption did not increase significantly. Male gender, cigarette smoking, and burnout are associated with an increased risk of alcohol misuse among clinical therapists. Targeted intervention is needed when developing strategies to reduce alcohol misuse and improve clinical therapists' wellness and mental health.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Health Behavior
16.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 111, 2023 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of burnout and anxiety is constantly increasing among health profession students worldwide. This study evaluates the prevalence of burnout and its relationship to anxiety and empathy during the COVID-19 pandemic among health profession students in the main governmental institution in Doha, Qatar using validated instruments. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of health profession students using validated instruments was employed. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Students Survey (MBI-GS(S)) to measure burnout; The Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) to measure anxiety; and Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) to measure empathy were utilized. Descriptive statistics and multivariable linear regression were used. RESULTS: Of the 1268 eligible students, 272 (21.5%) completed the online survey. Burnout was found to be prevalent amongst the students. The mean scores for the MBI-GS(S) subscales of emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy were 4.07, 2.63, and 3.97, respectively. Anxiety was found to be a strong predictor for burnout and burnout was positively associated with empathy. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study demonstrated relationships between health profession students' burnout, anxiety, and empathy. These findings might have an impact on the development of curriculum interventions to enhance student well-being. More burnout awareness and management programs that cater to the specific needs of health profession students are needed. Furthermore, findings of this study may have implications for future educational interventions during times of crisis or how this can be used to improve student experiences in normal times.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Pandemics , Qatar/epidemiology , Universities , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Health Occupations
17.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 20(1)2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304260

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The psychosocial needs of nursing students are a pressing matter as mental health disorders may affect nursing students' journeys as professional nurses. LITERATURE REVIEW: Psychological distress and burnout in nurses are threats to worldwide health care, as the stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to an unstable future global nurse workforce. DISCUSSION: Resiliency training can positively impact nurse stress, mindfulness, and resilience, as resilient nurses are better able to manage their response to stress and adversity which will contribute to positive patient outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR AN INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCE: Educating faculty on resilience will aid nurse educators to create new student instructional approaches to improve mental health wellness. CONCLUSIONS: Supportive faculty behaviors, self-care techniques, and resilience-building infused throughout the nursing curriculum may promote the effective transitioning of students into practice, providing the necessary foundation for improving workplace stress management and increasing longevity and satisfaction in the profession.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workforce
18.
J Occup Environ Med ; 65(7): 605-609, 2023 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the impacts of workload, resources, organizational satisfaction, and psychological safety on changes in physician burnout and moral distress among physicians during the early pandemic. METHODS: We obtained national administrative and survey data on burnout, moral distress, organizational satisfaction, psychological safety, COVID-19 burden, and state-level restrictions for 11,877-14,246 Veterans Health Administration (VA) physicians from 2019 and 2020. We regressed the changes in burnout and moral distress on the changes in reasonable workload, appropriate job resources, organizational satisfaction, and psychological safety, controlling for COVID-19 burden and restrictions, and individual and medical center characteristics. RESULTS: Burnout and moral distress were not related to COVID-19 cases or restrictions but were reduced by improvements in workload, organizational satisfaction, and psychological safety. CONCLUSIONS: Health systems should be conscious of factors that can harm or improve physician well-being, especially in the context of external stressors.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Veterans Health , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction , Morals
19.
Med J Aust ; 218(8): 361-367, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299844

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the mental health and wellbeing of health and aged care workers in Australia during the second and third years of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, overall and by occupation group. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Longitudinal cohort study of health and aged care workers (ambulance, hospitals, primary care, residential aged care) in Victoria: May-July 2021 (survey 1), October-December 2021 (survey 2), and May-June 2022 (survey 3). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of respondents (adjusted for age, gender, socio-economic status) reporting moderate to severe symptoms of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, GAD-7), or post-traumatic stress (Impact of Event Scale-6, IES-6), burnout (abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, aMBI), or high optimism (10-point visual analogue scale); mean scores (adjusted for age, gender, socio-economic status) for wellbeing (Personal Wellbeing Index-Adult, PWI-A) and resilience (Connor Davidson Resilience Scale 2, CD-RISC-2). RESULTS: A total of 1667 people responded to at least one survey (survey 1, 989; survey 2, 1153; survey 3, 993; response rate, 3.3%). Overall, 1211 survey responses were from women (72.6%); most respondents were hospital workers (1289, 77.3%) or ambulance staff (315, 18.9%). The adjusted proportions of respondents who reported moderate to severe symptoms of depression (survey 1, 16.4%; survey 2, 22.6%; survey 3, 19.2%), anxiety (survey 1, 8.8%; survey 2, 16.0%; survey 3, 11.0%), or post-traumatic stress (survey 1, 14.6%; survey 2, 35.1%; survey 3, 14.9%) were each largest for survey 2. The adjusted proportions of participants who reported moderate to severe symptoms of burnout were higher in surveys 2 and 3 than in survey 1, and the proportions who reported high optimism were smaller in surveys 2 and 3 than in survey 1. Adjusted mean scores for wellbeing and resilience were similar at surveys 2 and 3 and lower than at survey 1. The magnitude but not the patterns of change differed by occupation group. CONCLUSION: Burnout was more frequently reported and mean wellbeing and resilience scores were lower in mid-2022 than in mid-2021 for Victorian health and aged care workers who participated in our study. Evidence-based mental health and wellbeing programs for workers in health care organisations are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12621000533897 (observational study; retrospective).


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Female , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Longitudinal Studies , Retrospective Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Anxiety , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Victoria/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
20.
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs ; 20(2): 126-132, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurse managers have experienced tremendous stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, contributing to negative psychological outcomes. Positive professional well-being is a construct that can be promoted to mitigate poor psychological outcomes and burnout in nurses. Little is known about the health, healthy behaviors, effects of stress on homelife, and well-being of nurse managers in the United States (U.S.). AIMS: The aims of the study were to explore nurse managers' well-being related to self-reported stress and health perceptions and habits. METHODS: A sample of 80 (41% response rate) nurse managers responded to a cross-sectional web-based survey sent via email in a southwestern U.S. 13-hospital system. Nurses answered 39 quantitative questions about demographics, well-being (9-item Well-Being Index [WBI]), perceptions of stress affecting homelife, and perceptions of health and health-related behaviors. RESULTS: Mean WBI (2.9 [2.7]) indicated risk for poor psychological outcomes. Managers (75%) reported stress from work affected their personal lives and a decline in overall health during the pandemic. Most (80%) reported burnout and emotional problems. Nurse managers had 8.1 times increased risk of poor WBI scores if stress from work affected their personal life than if they reported no spillover stress into their personal life (OR = 8.1, 95% CI [2.6, 25.0]). LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: Findings from this study add a nuanced understanding of nurse managers' well-being. The strongest risk factor for poor WBI scores was stress levels affecting personal life. Interventions to improve well-being in nurse managers are needed. Limitations are the convenience sampling, limited geographic location, and response rate of <50%. Further research is needed to support nurse managers in stress reduction and development of boundaries that prohibit the spillover effect of workplace stress. Organizations may consider a combination of administrative support and changes as well as provision of on-the-job training of interventions that support individual well-being.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Humans , Mental Health , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Job Satisfaction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Risk Assessment
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