Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 367
Filter
1.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 152: w30229, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202464

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: To estimate the prevalence of occupational burnout among the Swiss working population. METHODS: We interrogated three international databases (Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, and PsycINFO) and the databases of 15 Swiss universities to identify studies reporting the prevalence of occupational burnout in Swiss workers over the last 10 years, before the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were summarised descriptively and quantitatively using random-effects meta-analysis. We investigated between-study heterogeneity by stratifying results according to the type of burnout measurement tool, by occupation and by cut-off values. Three outcomes were considered: clinical/severe burnout, overall burnout and emotional exhaustion. RESULTS: We identified 23 studies about workers in Switzerland and estimated the prevalence of clinical or severe burnout at 4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2-6%). The average prevalence estimates for overall burnout and emotional exhaustion were similar at 18% (95% CI 12-25%) and 18% (95% CI 15-22%), respectively. When stratified by occupation, the clinical or severe burnout rates were higher among the healthcare workers than the general working population. CONCLUSIONS: These estimates of prepandemic (baseline) prevalence of occupational burnout are comparable with those available in the other countries where it is recognised and treated as a disease. They may prove useful in planning and assessing the effectiveness of interventions for prevention of occupational burnout and in minimising its negative consequences on individuals and on societies during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Switzerland/epidemiology
2.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(6): 385-401A, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198270

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of burnout among primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries and to identify factors associated with burnout. Methods: We systematically searched nine databases up to February 2022 to identify studies investigating burnout in primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries. There were no language limitations and we included observational studies. Two independent reviewers completed screening, study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate overall burnout prevalence as assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. We narratively report factors associated with burnout. Findings: The search returned 1568 articles. After selection, 60 studies from 20 countries were included in the narrative review and 31 were included in the meta-analysis. Three studies collected data during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic but provided limited evidence on the impact of the disease on burnout. The overall single-point prevalence of burnout ranged from 2.5% to 87.9% (43 studies). In the meta-analysis (31 studies), the pooled prevalence of a high level of emotional exhaustion was 28.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 21.5-33.5), a high level of depersonalization was 16.4% (95% CI: 10.1-22.9) and a high level of reduced personal accomplishment was 31.9% (95% CI: 21.7-39.1). Conclusion: The substantial prevalence of burnout among primary health-care professionals in low- and middle-income countries has implications for patient safety, care quality and workforce planning. Further cross-sectional studies are needed to help identify evidence-based solutions, particularly in Africa and South-East Asia.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Developing Countries , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Prevalence
3.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 686-694, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152243

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We aim to describe the extent of psychological trauma and moral distress in healthcare workers (HCW) working in the intensive care unit (ICU) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, we review reports on prevalence of mental health symptoms, highlight vulnerable populations and summarize modifiable risk factors associated with mental health symptoms in ICU HCW. RECENT FINDINGS: The pandemic has resulted in a multitude of closely intertwined professional and personal challenges for ICU HCW. High rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (14-47%), burnout (45-85%), anxiety (31-60%), and depression (16-65%) have been reported, and these mental health symptoms are often interrelated. Most studies suggest that nurses and female HCW are at highest risk for developing mental health symptoms. The main personal concerns associated with reporting mental health symptoms among ICU HCW were worries about transmitting COVID-19 to their families, worries about their own health, witnessing colleagues contract the disease, and experiencing stigma from their communities. Major modifiable work-related risk factors were experiencing poor communication from supervisors, perceived lack of support from administrative leadership, and concerns about insufficient access to personal protective equipment, inability to rest, witnessing hasty end-of-life decisions, and restriction of family visitation policies. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted ICU HCW worldwide. The psychological trauma, manifesting as posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout, anxiety, and depression, is substantial and concerning. Urgent action by lawmakers and healthcare administrators is required to protect ICU HCW and sustain a healthy workforce.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Intensive Care Units , Psychological Trauma/epidemiology
4.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 380, 2022 06 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Demand for mental health services in New Zealand and internationally is growing. Little is known about how psychiatrists are faring in this environment. This study aimed to investigate wellbeing of psychiatrists working in the public health system in New Zealand, identify the main risk factors for work-related stress, gauge perceptions of how workload has changed over time, assess job satisfaction and whether individuals intend or desire to leave their work. METHODS: Psychiatrists working in New Zealand who were also members of the Association of Salaried Medical Specialists were invited to participate in an online survey. Main outcome measures were degree of burnout and stress experienced at work. Supplementary measures included perceived workplace demands and levels of support. Predictor variables included perceptions of changes to workloads over time, degree of job satisfaction and intentions to leave work. Logistic regression assessed characteristics associated with burnout and job satisfaction as well as intentions to leave work. Free text comments were analysed thematically alongside quantitative trends. RESULTS: 368/526 responded (70% response rate). 34.6% met the criteria for burnout and 35.3% scored with high work stress. There were no significant patterns of association with demographic variables but significant correlation with all but one predictor variable; having experienced a change to the demands of the on-call workload. 45% agreed they would leave their current job if able and 87% disagreed that they are working in a well-resourced mental health service. Respondents emphasised the impact of growing workloads and expressed concerns about their ability to provide optimal care in these circumstances. CONCLUSIONS: High burnout appears to affect one in three psychiatrists in New Zealand. Many attribute their feelings of burnout to demand for their services. These findings may assist with better workforce planning for psychiatry and emphasises potential consequences of demand for and poor resourcing of mental health services for the retention and wellbeing of doctors in psychiatry worldwide.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Occupational Stress , Psychiatry , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , New Zealand , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143130

ABSTRACT

Stress research has widely documented how uncertainty represents a strong stressor that, in general, is negatively associated with well-being. While the literature on job insecurity about this topic is extensive and exhaustive, empirical research on the outcomes of life uncertainty, namely the perception and feeling of precariousness regarding the present and future of one's own life, is yet to be fully explored. In the present paper, we aimed to investigate the relationships among job insecurity, life uncertainty, and psychosocial well-being outcomes, specifically, with a focus on job satisfaction and burnout. The participants were 357 workers (M = 146 and F = 211), with an average age of 41.78 y.o. (SD = 13.49), who completed an online questionnaire containing, in addition to sociodemographics information, measures of the study variables, namely job insecurity, life uncertainty, job satisfaction, and burnout. The results pointed out negative relationships of both job insecurity and life uncertainty with individual well-being, as they were negatively associated with job satisfaction and positively related to burnout. In a path analysis with latent variables, life uncertainty proved to fully mediate the relationship between job insecurity and psychosocial well-being.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Employment , Humans , Adult , Uncertainty , Employment/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277875, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140667

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers had a high workload and were exposed to multiple psychosocial stressors. However, a knowledge gap exists about the levels of burnout among Bangladeshi frontline doctors during this COVID-19 pandemic. The study investigated burnout syndrome (BOS) among frontline doctors in two public secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Chattogram, Bangladesh. MATERIALS & METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved frontline doctors working at two hospitals treating COVID-19 and non-COVID patients from June to August 2020. A self-administered questionnaire that included Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) was used to capture demographic and workplace environment information. ANOVA and t-test were used to determine the statistical differences in the mean values of the three dimensions of MBI-HSS. Scores for three domains of burnout: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA) were calculated. Post-hoc analysis was done to identify the significant pair-wise differences when the ANOVA test result was significant. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of factors associated with BOS. RESULTS: A total of 185 frontline doctors were invited to participate by convenience sampling, and 168 responded. The response rate was 90.81%. The overall prevalence of BOS was 55.4% (93/168) (95% CI: 47.5% to 63.0%). Moderate to high levels of EE was found in 95.8% of the participants. High DP and reduced PA were observed in 98.2% and 97% of participants. Younger age (25-29 years), being female, and working as a medical officer were independently associated with high levels of burnout in all three domains. EE was significantly higher in females (P = 0.011). DP was significantly higher in medical officers, those at earlier job periods, and those working more than 8 hours per day. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak, BOS was common among Bangladeshi frontline doctors. Females, medical officers, and younger doctors tended to be more susceptible to BOS. Less BOS was experienced when working in the non-COVID ward than in the mixed ward.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
7.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 79, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses are frequently exposed to chronic stress in the workplace generating harmful effects such as job strain and burnout. On the contrary, resilience has been shown to be a beneficial variable. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between dimensions of the Job Demand Control-Support model, resilience and burnout in nurses, and examine the mediating role of resilience between job strain and burnout. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional study reported in line with the STROBE guidelines. Active nurses were invited to complete an online questionnaire in September, 2020. With snowball sampling, 1013 nurses, with a mean age of 34.71, filled out the Job Content Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Resilience Scale. RESULTS: The results showed the existence of four groups of professionals based on job strain. The nurses in the "High Strain" group (high demands and low control) showed higher scores in emotional exhaustion and cynicism, while those in the "Active Job" group scored higher in personal realization and resilience. The findings showed that job strain affects burnout in nurses, and this effect is mediated by resilience. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that a high level of resilience could exert a fundamental role in ensuring well-being and proper job performance by nurses. Nursing managers should see to the personable variables or competencies that provide and favor an opportunity for nurses to widen and improve their practice, in pursuance of satisfying and responding better to people's needs and the systems they work for.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Protective Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology
8.
Br J Nurs ; 31(20): 1058-1062, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115612

ABSTRACT

The mental health and wellbeing of healthcare staff have been significantly affected by the demands resulting from the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Restorative supervision is a type of clinical supervision that supports reflective practice that can help build practitioners' resilience by focusing on the individual's experience, aiming to sustain their wellbeing and their motivation at work. This model has been shown to reduce stress and burnout and increase compassion satisfaction. This article discusses the implementation of a restorative clinical supervision programme used to support staff wellbeing in nursing, midwifery and allied health professional teams in a large London-based NHS trust.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Midwifery , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Preceptorship , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Allied Health Personnel
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099528

ABSTRACT

While the COVID-19 pandemic has created psychological distress in the general population and increased the need for psychological care, little research has been done on how mental health practitioners (MHP) have been affected by the pandemic, and these health professionals have received little attention from public authorities. In this article, we focus on psychologists and the impact that the pandemic has had on their mental health and practices by exploring the adaptive and innovative responses generated. This study is based on an online survey (including multiple choice questions, several validated scales, and eight free text items) completed by 187 psychologists (86% female) one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium (February-April 2021). Most participants considered that the crisis had an impact on their well-being and mental health. However, the prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety was relatively low (17%; 12%). On the other hand, the majority of psychologists (72%) suffered from a medium level of burnout (BO), 7% suffered from a high level of BO, and only 21% had low levels of BO. Psychologists working in face-to-face settings had the highest scores on the "exhaustion" subscale of the BO, and those working primarily with patients in precarious situations had significantly higher scores of BO and exhaustion. Qualitative analysis of free text items showed that MHP were resilience and developed new frameworks and modes for proactive interventions in order to reach their patients, meet the psychological and social population's needs, and maintain their relationships with the network. In a crisis or pandemic context, public policies should take into account the psychological and social needs of the most socially precarious populations in reinforcing and supporting mental health professionals working in this sector.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Belgium/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
10.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276455, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are highly vulnerable to compassion fatigue (CF), which not only leads to decreased mental and physical health, but also to deterioration in the safety of care delivered. Our study aims to measure compassion satisfaction (CS), CF levels and their predictors among Tunisian HCWs. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study among HCWs caring for confirmed and suspected Covid-19 patients, staff at two university hospitals in Sousse, Tunisia during the 4thwave of coronavirus through a self-administrated Questionnaire, using the French version of the Professional Quality of Life scale ProQol, version 5. RESULTS: A total of 274 professionals were recruited with a mean age of 32.87±8.35 years. HCWs tend to have an overall moderate levels of compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress and burnout with mean scores 35.09±7.08, 29.72±7.62, 28.54±5.44 respectively. Self-reported resilience (ß = 0.14, p = 10-3), work engagement (ß = 0.39, p = 10-3) and burnout (ß = -0.32, p = 10-3) were the predictors of compassion satisfaction in the linear regression analysis (adjusted r2 = 0.45). Similarly, limited work experience, compassion satisfaction and secondary traumatic sub-scores were the determinants of burnout (ß = -0.1, p = 0.04; ß = -0.54, p = 10-3; ß = 0.35, p = 10-3 respectively); (adjusted r2 = 0.48). Regarding STS, female professionals (ß = 0.20, p = 10-3), being married (ß = 0.19, p = 10-3), the fear of transmitting the infection (ß = 0.11, p = 0.03) and burnout (ß = 0.39, p = 10-3) were the predictors for the occurrence of secondary traumatic stress (adjusted r2 = 0.48). CONCLUSION: More resilience promoting interventions and more coping skills programs must be implemented to fulfill HCWs' psychological well-being needs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quality of Life , Tunisia/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Empathy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
11.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 3007-3016, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087518

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) are essential health care workers (HCWs). Although they play an extraordinary role during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are mostly exposed to various occupational health and safety risks that have significantly impacted their mental health, giving rise to symptoms, such as stress and burnout. AIM: This study aimed to assess the perceived levels of stress and burnout amongst EMTs in relation to their socio-demographic characteristics and to explore the associations between their stress and burnout levels during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This work is an observational cross-sectional design study conducted between 29 March and 30 April 2021, with a convenience sample of 280 Spanish EMTs yielding a response rate of 28%. The online survey had 42 items that aimed to determine participants' socio-demographic characteristics, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). RESULTS: The results showed that more than half of the EMTs (53%) perceived a moderate stress level, 37% perceived moderate levels of emotional exhaustion (EE) and 40% had moderate levels of depersonalization (DP). Furthermore, 48% had low levels of personal accomplishment (PA). Gender, age, having personal protective equipment (PPE) and experiencing fear of infection were statistically significant areas where participants experienced greater stress (p < 0.05). A positive correlation between stress, EE and DP and a negative correlation between stress and the PA subdimension of burnout were found. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a tremendous impact on the mental health of ambulance EMTs. Further studies building on this study and others on the psychological status of EMTs before the pandemic and follow-up during the pandemic, as well as deeper investigations on their work conditions, are needed to facilitate the implementation of various interventions. Such efforts can mitigate the negative impacts of the pandemic on their mental health, and prepare them for future disasters.KEY MESSAGEThe COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of the majority of the world's population. In particular, it has impacted the mental health of various communities, including HCWs. Highly stressful and insecure work conditions have placed frontline HCWs at a high risk of psychological distress, making them victims and service providers simultaneously.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Technicians , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Emergency Medical Technicians/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082301

ABSTRACT

There is scant evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on burnout in front-line military personnel and how working time may influence on this condition. We aimed to determine the association between working time and Burnout syndrome in military personnel. A cross-sectional study was conducted using secondary data among 576 military personnel from Lambayeque, Peru during the second wave of COVID-19 in 2021. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory instrument to measure Burnout Syndrome. We evaluated its association with work time, measured as the number of months that the military member worked during the pandemic. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 9%. Of the total sample, 39.1% and 10.3% presented depersonalization and emotional exhaustion, respectively. Military personnel working for more than 18 months had a 104% higher prevalence of Burnout syndrome (PR: 2.04, 95%CI: 1.02-4.10). Exposure to a prolonged work time during the pandemic increased the prevalence of Burnout syndrome in military personnel. This information helps to understand the potential effects of the pandemic on this population and provides insight into the time the military members would need rest to prevent Burnout syndrome.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Military Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082257

ABSTRACT

Occupational burnout is particularly common among nurses due to their work being associated with stress, showing understanding, compassion, and commitment, along with the simultaneous need to maintain the necessary emotional distance. The aim of this review was to assess the occurrence and characterization of burnout among nurses working within neurology, geriatric care, intensive care units and with patients infected with the novel COVID-19 virus. PRISMA guidelines were used to conduct the review. The search for literature was limited to articles meeting the inclusion criteria and published from 2017 to 2022 in PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Google Scholar, and Wiley. A total of 768 articles from this category have been found. Ultimately, after in-depth analysis, 20 articles were included in the study. The group of respondents ranged from 49 to 3100 participants. According to the data, the percentages of nurses suffering from burnout in the presented research ranged from 14.3% to 84.7%, with the highest value of burnout among nurses who worked in the ICU during the COVID-19 pandemic. There are certain factors among nurses that significantly affect the occurrence of burnout. These include, among others, working time, age, exposure to infection and contact with infected patients, lack of training on COVID-19 prevention, providing care to an increased number of COVID-19 patients per shift, lack of personal protective equipment, lack of support of administration, lack of pay satisfaction, intrinsic motivation and turnover intention.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personnel Turnover , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Front Public Health ; 10: 984691, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080293

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced mental health professionals to adapt quickly. The pandemic has created multiple new tasks for the psychologist. In addition to the various stressors closely linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, psychologists were forced to make their services more flexible. Teleworking was a way of continuing to work. Objective: This study aimed to identify the impact of working pattern on the levels of burnout, depression, anxiety, and stress. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on an online questionnaire applied to eighty-three Portuguese psychologists. Data were collected from May 9 to June 8, 2020, a period comprising the declaration of a national calamity and then state of emergency, and the subsequent ease of lockdown measures. The Copenhagen Burnout Inventory Scale and Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale were used. Univariate multiple linear regression models were estimated for each mental health outcome. Results: Significant differences were found between psychologists working in the workplace and in teleworking at the personal burnout, work-related burnout, client-related burnout, depression, and stress. In multiple linear regression, teleworking, not working, and being unmarried was significantly associated with higher levels of depression. Teleworking was significantly associated with higher stress scores and client-related and work burnout. Conclusions: This exceptional time of sudden, mandatory, and high-intensity teleworking, required rapid adaptation, giving rise to new stressors that might have been responsible for burnout levels in psychologists.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Teleworking , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071478

ABSTRACT

The continued development of digital technology and its overuse in teaching and learning in the post-epidemic era have brought about digital health risks, which are associated with academic burnout among college students. This study focused on the relationship between classroom digital teaching and students' academic burnout and designed the Classroom Burnout Inventory (CBI) and the Classroom Burnout Causes Inventory (CBCI) to conduct a cross-sectional survey of 206 Chinese university students. Correlations and regression analyses were conducted between key factors and burnout values through a path model of "Digital teaching-Teaching & learning process-Causes subjects-Burnout". The results of the study show that an inappropriate and excessive use of unintegrated digital teaching and learning technologies in the classroom was positively correlated with academic burnout among college students. Burnout levels and the three manifestations were not correlated with students' gender, grade, and major. In terms of causes, the academic burnout of college students was more correlated with their own personal reasons than with external factors such as teachers, universities, and environments. Integrating digital technology platforms, enhancing teacher leadership in the digital classroom, and strengthening peer support and students' psychological resilience are all meaningful explorations of academic burnout prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071415

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes the relationship between burnout and quality of work life among municipal workers subjected to higher levels of stress and emotional exhaustion, impacting their occupational health in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. With a sample of 459 municipal workers, the relationship between burnout and quality of work life is tested by considering the isolated mediating effect of the feeling of contributing to productivity and the combined effects of two mediators representing the feeling of contributing to productivity and receiving an appropriate salary. The main findings include a negative association between the three dimensions of burnout: emotional exhaustion, feelings of cynicism, and a sense of being less effective, and the mediators: contribution to productivity and appropriate salary. Also detected was an important mediating role associated with the effects of not feeling contributive at work, as well as not being well paid, on the relation between the burnout syndrome dimension of low effectiveness and quality of work life. For future action by public authorities and public managers, the need is highlighted to create innovative human resource management frameworks and flexible work organization, with remuneration plans based on productivity goals and aimed at an improved balance between personal life and work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Economic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has strained hospitals and healthcare workers engaged in combating the virus with limited knowledge and resources. Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are among the healthcare workers most affected by the pandemic and are at risk for developing burnout syndrome. OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to explore burnout symptoms prevalence among ICU nurses and to identify the individual, organizational, and contextual risk, and protective factors of burnout in ICU nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A scoping review was conducted by searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. Only papers with empirical data and referred to ICU nurses were included. A total of 350 initial results were yielded, and 40 full texts were screened. Twelve papers constituted the final sample in the analysis. RESULTS: High levels of symptoms of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) were registered among ICU nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Increased workload, lack of equipment, social stigma, and fear of contagion emerged as key risk factors. Social support from leaders and colleagues, professional recognition, use of personal protective tools, and witnessing patients' successful recovery emerged as major protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: The results may inform the development of timely actions to counter burnout in ICU nurses during this COVID-19 pandemic and in a post-COVID-19 scenario.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Protective Factors
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066035

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic brings many challenges to the daily work of nurses. While carrying out professional tasks for patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, nurses experience tremendous psychological pressure due to their workload in a high-risk environment. This causes severe stress and leads to occupational burnout. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of stress and occupational burnout among surveyed nurses working with patients with COVID-19. A total of 118 nurses working with patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus participated in the study. Among the respondents, there were 94.9% women and 5.1% men. The average age of the respondents was 38.1 +/- 2.1. The survey was conducted between April and May 2022. The research tool was a survey questionnaire, consisting of three parts: sociodemographic data and self-administered survey questionnaire containing questions about the specifics of working with COVID-19 patients. The third part was a standardized tool: the MBI Burnout Questionnaire by Christina Maslach. Participation in the study was anonymous and voluntary. Statistical analysis for independence of variables used the Chi-square test. On the other hand, coefficients based on the Phi test and Kramer's V test, as well as non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test (for 2 samples) and Kruskal-Wallis test (for more than 2 samples) were used to determine the strength of the relationship. During these analyses, in addition to standard statistical significance, the corresponding "p" values were calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained allow us to conclude that surveyed nurses working with COVID-19 patients are exposed to various stressors leading to occupational burnout. The vast majority of respondents, i.e., 90.7%, believe that stress is an integral part of the nursing profession and the average of MBI burnout among respondents was 55.67 +/- 9.77 pts., emotional exhaustion 24.74 +/- 6.11, depersonalization 12.42 +/- 2.99 and a sense of personal achievement 18.52 +/- 4.50 which means that only slightly more than half of the nurses surveyed noticed symptoms of occupational burnout themselves. The research has revealed that working with a patient who is positive for COVID-19 is a cause of stress and is related to experiencing symptoms of burnout in the group of surveyed nurses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066028

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and associated risk factors of burnout syndrome among healthcare workers (HCWs), especially among nurses during the pandemic of COVID-19. The sample of the cross-sectional study consists of 201 employees of University Hospital. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel (MBI-HSS MP) was used. An anonymous questionnaire was administered between 15 January and 1 February 2022. The majority of HCWs were female (79.4%). Overall, 69.2% displayed high levels of emotional exhaustion (EE), 35.3% high levels of depersonalization (DP), and 35.5% low levels of personal accomplishment (PA). Burnout was frequent among staff working in COVID units (EE 76.1%; DP 47.8%; and PA 46.7%). Burnout in EE and DP (70.7% and 36.6%, respectively) significantly prevailed in nurses working in COVID-19 units compared to non-frontline nurses (59.6 and 21.1%, respectively). Prevalence of burnout in PA was significantly higher in nurses working in non-COVID-19 units (47.4% vs. 29.3%). It is crucial to pay attention to the high prevalence of burnout syndrome in HCWs, especially in nurses, and not only in the frontline.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL