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1.
BMJ ; 377: o945, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784806
4.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 60(4): 6, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771305
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 679834, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771114

ABSTRACT

Background: Workplace burnout is a state of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization of others (DP), and low personal accomplishment (PA) owing to workplace stressors. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of burnout and its associated factors among surgical specialists in Kuwait. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of burnout among 489 surgeons in practice at Kuwait Ministry of Health (MOH). Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, which defines burnout as having a high score of EE or DP, or a low score of PA; with severe burnout involving all. The associations between burnout or severe burnout with sociodemographic and occupational characteristics were assessed using multivariate binary logistic regression to adjust for potential confounders. Results: Prevalence estimates for burnout and severe burnout were 76.9% (95% Confidence Interval = 72.9-80.7%) and 14.0% (11.0-17.5%), respectively. The prevalence estimates for high EE, high DP, and low PA scores were 44.7, 43.1, and 47.2%, respectively. The prevalence of burnout and severe burnout was highest among neurosurgeons. Burnout was lowest among otolaryngology surgeons and severe burnout was lowest among cardiothoracic surgeons. After adjustment, burnout was associated with younger age, lower income, and more on-calls per month. The four most common sources of stress included less family time, verbal assault, case overload, and highly complicated cases. Conclusion: The prevalence of burnout among surgeons in Kuwait MOH hospitals is high. Occupational health programs should use these findings to design and implement interventions that can treat and prevent burnout in this population.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Kuwait/epidemiology , Prevalence
6.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(4): 512-513, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767474
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760618

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The medical staff who work in specialized healthcare are among the professionals with a greater risk of presenting negative indicators of mental health. These professionals are exposed to numerous sources of stress that can have a negative influence on their personal life. Currently, SARS-CoV-2 poses an additional and relevant source of stress. The aim of this study was to identify the interactions between the work and family environments, as well as to analyze self-perceived mental health and burnout in physicians who, during the COVID-19 pandemic, carried out their jobs in public health in Huelva (Spain), also considering a series of sociodemographic variables. METHODS: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Information from 128 participants was collected using the SWING, MBI-HSS and GHQ-12 questionnaires, along with sociodemographic data and possible situations of contact with SARS-CoV-2. The data were analyzed, and correlations were established. RESULTS: Most of the sample obtained a positive interaction result of work over family. Those who had been in contact with SARS-CoV-2 represented higher percentages of a positive result in GHQ-12, negative work-family interaction, burnout, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. In general, the men showed a worse mental health state than women. CONCLUSIONS: The medical staff of Huelva who had been in contact with situations of SARS-CoV-2 in their work environment presented worse indicators of mental health and greater negative interaction of work over family than those who had not been in contact with these situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
9.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265659, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759957

ABSTRACT

The current worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has elicited widespread concerns and stress. Arguably, healthcare workers are especially vulnerable to experience burnout during these times due to the nature of their work. Indeed, high prevalence of burnout was found among healthcare workers during the outbreak. However, the individual differences predicting burnout among healthcare workers during the pandemic have been understudied. The aim of the current study was, therefore, to identify risk and protective factors contributing to the severity of burnout among healthcare workers, above and beyond levels of current psychological distress. The survey was distributed online during the period April 13-28, 2020, approximately two months after the first COVID-19 case was identified in Israel. Ninety-eight healthcare workers completed an online survey administered cross-sectionally via the Qualtrics platform that included questionnaires assessing habitual emotion regulation strategies (i.e., trait worry, reappraisal, and suppression), psychological distress, COVID-19 related concerns, and burnout. A hierarchical linear regression analysis revealed that only trait worry and psychological distress were significant predictors of job burnout among healthcare workers. These findings highlight the role of maladaptive emotion regulation tendencies, specifically trait worry, in job burnout among healthcare workers. These findings have implications for both the assessment and treatment of healthcare workers. We discuss potential mechanisms and implications for practice.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Psychological Distress , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736905

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have documented the high prevalence of burnout among medicine and dentistry students, with potentially catastrophic consequences for both students and patients. Both environmental and personality factors play a part in burnout; perfectionism, a common trait in medicine students' personalities, has been linked to psychological distress and increasing students' vulnerability to burnout. Self-compassion, i.e., treating oneself kindly through hardship, has recently emerged as a buffer between perfectionism and psychological distress. While using a novel three-factor conceptualization of perfectionism (BIG3), this study aims to analyze if self-compassion has a protective role in the relationship between perfectionism and burnout, in a sample of medicine and dentistry students, through mediation analysis. We found that self-compassion significantly mediated the relationship between all three forms of perfectionism and burnout: as a partial mediator in self-critical and rigid perfectionism, as well as a full mediator in narcissistic perfectionism. Our findings underline self-compassion's relevance in burnout prevention and management, supporting its use as an intervention target in burnout reduction programs and strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Perfectionism , Students, Medical , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Dentistry , Humans , Portugal/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology
13.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264956, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has inundated the entire world disrupting the lives of millions of people. The pandemic has stressed the healthcare system of India impacting the psychological status and functioning of health care workers. The aim of this study is to determine the burnout levels and factors associated with the risk of psychological distress among healthcare workers (HCW) engaged in the management of COVID 19 in India. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 September 2020 to 30 November 2020 by telephonic interviews using a web-based Google form. Health facilities and community centres from 12 cities located in 10 states were selected for data collection. Data on socio-demographic and occupation-related variables like age, sex, type of family, income, type of occupation, hours of work and income were obtained was obtained from 967 participants, including doctors, nurses, ambulance drivers, emergency response teams, lab personnel, and others directly involved in COVID 19 patient care. Levels of psychological distress was assessed by the General health Questionnaire -GHQ-5 and levels of burnout was assessed using the ICMR-NIOH Burnout questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with the risk of psychological distress. The third quartile values of the three subscales of burnout viz EE, DP and PA were used to identify burnout profiles of the healthcare workers. RESULTS: Overall, 52.9% of the participants had the risk of psychological distress that needed further evaluation. Risk of psychological distress was significantly associated with longer hours of work (≥ 8 hours a day) (AOR = 2.38, 95% CI(1.66-3.41), income≥20000(AOR = 1.74, 95% CI, (1.16-2.6); screening of COVID-19 patients (AOR = 1.63 95% CI (1.09-2.46), contact tracing (AOR = 2.05, 95% CI (1.1-3.81), High Emotional exhaustion score (EE ≥16) (AOR = 4.41 95% CI (3.14-6.28) and High Depersonalisation score (DP≥7) (AOR = 1.79, 95% CI (1.28-2.51)). About 4.7% of the HCWs were overextended (EE>18); 6.5% were disengaged (DP>8) and 9.7% HCWs were showing signs of burnout (high on all three dimensions). CONCLUSION: The study has identified key factors that could have been likely triggers for psychological distress among healthcare workers who were engaged in management of COVID cases in India. The study also demonstrates the use of GHQ-5 and ICMR-NIOH Burnout questionnaire as important tools to identify persons at risk of psychological distress and occurrence of burnout symptoms respectively. The findings provide useful guide to planning interventions to mitigate mental health problems among HCW in future epidemic/pandemic scenarios in the country.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Interviews as Topic , Male , Mental Health/trends , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Fam Med ; 54(3): 193-199, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732593

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, academic family physicians had to change their clinical, teaching, research, and administrative efforts, while simultaneously balancing their home environment demands. It is unclear how the changes in effort affected physicians' personal well-being, particularly burnout. This study sought to identify changes in faculty's clinical, teaching, research, and administrative efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic and how effort shifts were associated with burnout. We also examined associations with important demographics and burnout. METHODS: We took data from the 2020 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of family medicine educators and practicing physicians during November 2020 through December 2020. We analyzed self-report measures of demographics, effort (clinical, teaching, research, and administrative) before and during the pandemic, COVID-19 exposure level, and rates of burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) using logistic regressions. RESULTS: Most participants reported no change in efforts. If changes were reported, clinical (21.6%) and administrative (24.8%) efforts tended to increase from before to during the pandemic, while teaching tended to decrease (27.7%). Increases in teaching and clinical efforts were associated with higher rates of emotional exhaustion. Higher depersonalization was associated with increased clinical efforts. Being older and working in a rural setting was associated with lower burnout, while being female was associated with higher burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Shifts in effort across academic family physicians' multiple roles were associated with emotional exhaustion and, to a lesser degree, depersonalization. The high rates of burnout demand additional attention from directors and administrators, especially among female physicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty , Family Practice , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Physicians, Family
15.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): e114-e123, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730748

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine whether there are differences in symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, levels of burnout and resilience in Spanish healthcare staff between the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and after it, depending on several demographic and work-related variables. METHODS: A longitudinal study was conducted in April 2020 (T0), and July 2020 (T1). Symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, burnout, levels of resilience, along with demographic and work-related variables in 443 workers were assessed. RESULTS: Symptoms and burnout were more pronounced at T0, whereas the levels of resilience were higher at T1. Being women, being young, holding a lower-level job, less years of experience, lower educational level, and/or working rotating shifts are associated with having more posttraumatic stress symptoms and burnout. CONCLUSION: These variables would be considered in similar situations.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
16.
Nursing ; 52(3): 60-61, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730725
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 284, 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724482

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The present study aimed 1) to examine the effects of epidemic-related job stressors, perceived social support and organizational support on the burnout and well-being of Chinese healthcare workers in the period of COVID-19 regular epidemic prevention and control and 2) to investigate the moderating effects of social support and organizational support on the relationship between job stressors and burnout and well-being within the theoretical framework of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model. METHODS: A sample of healthcare workers (N = 3477) from 22 hospitals in Beijing, China participated in the cross-sectional investigation in October 2020 and reported epidemic-related job stressors, perceived social support, organizational support, burnout, anxiety and depression symptoms. RESULTS: 1) Medical doctors, females, people aged from 30 to 50, and those who worked in the second line during the pandemic reported higher scores of psychological symptoms and burnout in the period of regular epidemic prevention and control; 2) Epidemic-related job stressors positively predicted burnout, anxiety, and depression among healthcare workers; 3) Perceived social support and organizational support were negatively related to reported burnout, anxiety and depression symptoms; 4) Social support reduced the adverse effects of epidemic-related job stressors on anxiety and depression but enhanced the association between stressors and burnout; 5) Organizational support mitigated the adverse effects of epidemic-related job stressors on depression. CONCLUSION: The results shed light on preventing burnout and enhancing the psychological well-being of healthcare workers under epidemic prevention and control measures by reducing epidemic-related job stressors and strengthening personal and organizational support systems.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715365

ABSTRACT

Following the WHO's declaration of a public health emergency due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the subsequent quarantine and confinement measures that were adopted, including distance learning measures, were shown to have caused a significant deterioration in the mental health of medical students. The goal of this study was to explore the mediating role of resilience and life satisfaction in the relationship between perceived stress and burnout among medical students in the context of COVID-19. A transversal assessment was performed using an online questionnaire, to which 462 students responded. The instruments applied were the Perceived Stress Scale-10, the Resilience Scale-25 items, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and the Burnout Scale (Oldenburg Inventory). A regression model was estimated for each dimension of burnout. The results revealed that resilience and life satisfaction play a mediating role in the association between stress and the dimensions of burnout. This suggests that measures of promoting mental health based on resilience and improving perceptions of life should be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology
19.
Intern Med ; 61(5): 647-651, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714855

ABSTRACT

Objective To evaluate the change in the prevalence of burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic among internists and primary care physicians in Japan, and to identify factors associated with the exacerbation of burnout among these populations during this period. Methods This was a cross-sectional study based on two web-based surveys conducted in January 2020 (before the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic) and June 2020 (during the pandemic). The participants were internists and primary care physicians of the Japanese Chapter of the American College of Physicians. The main outcome was the change in the prevalence of burnout between before and during the "first wave" of the pandemic. We also examined factors associated with the exacerbation of burnout during this period. Results Among the 283 respondents in the first survey and 322 in the second survey, 98 (34.6%) and 111 (34.5%) reported symptoms of burnout, respectively. In June 2020, 82 respondents (25.5%) reported that their level of burnout exacerbated compared to January 2020. Only the experience of self-quarantine was associated with the exacerbation of burnout [odds ratio (OR) 3.12; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.49-6.50; p=0.002], while being a woman, being a resident physician, and an experience of having worked in a prefecture under a state of emergency were not. Conclusions No marked change in the prevalence of burnout among internists and primary care physicians in Japan was observed during the COVID-19 pandemic as a whole. However, self-quarantine was associated with the exacerbation of the burnout level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Primary Care , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708011

ABSTRACT

A spike in COVID-19 cases in Taiwan's communities caused a significant increase in workload and infection concerns among prehospital personnel working in Taiwan fire departments. The present study was aimed at investigating their health status during this period. The target population was prehospital personnel who are from Taiwan fire departments, and who responded to COVID-19 patients during the community outbreak period. A questionnaire was employed to assess their physical and mental health status. The results showed that prehospital personnel suffered from moderate to severe degrees of burnout. Workload, body burden, and perceived pressure increased significantly during this period. Participants received more support from friends, family, and colleagues than they did from authorities. The paramedics reported higher scores for personal burnout than the emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Compared to non-COVID-19 response units, special COVID-19 response units reported higher scores for workload, body burden, and supportive environment. The results suggested that personal and work-related burnout were associated with higher perceived pressure. This study is the first investigation of physical and mental health burdens among prehospital personnel in Taiwan fire departments during the COVID-19 pandemic. The physical and mental health status of these personnel should be continuously monitored, and intervention provided as necessary.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Taiwan/epidemiology
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