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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071478

ABSTRACT

The continued development of digital technology and its overuse in teaching and learning in the post-epidemic era have brought about digital health risks, which are associated with academic burnout among college students. This study focused on the relationship between classroom digital teaching and students' academic burnout and designed the Classroom Burnout Inventory (CBI) and the Classroom Burnout Causes Inventory (CBCI) to conduct a cross-sectional survey of 206 Chinese university students. Correlations and regression analyses were conducted between key factors and burnout values through a path model of "Digital teaching-Teaching & learning process-Causes subjects-Burnout". The results of the study show that an inappropriate and excessive use of unintegrated digital teaching and learning technologies in the classroom was positively correlated with academic burnout among college students. Burnout levels and the three manifestations were not correlated with students' gender, grade, and major. In terms of causes, the academic burnout of college students was more correlated with their own personal reasons than with external factors such as teachers, universities, and environments. Integrating digital technology platforms, enhancing teacher leadership in the digital classroom, and strengthening peer support and students' psychological resilience are all meaningful explorations of academic burnout prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071410

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety and burnout, and the coping mechanisms among clinical year undergraduate medical students in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In total, 378 clinical year undergraduate medical students in UKM participated in this cross-sectional study from May to July 2021. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of questions on the participant's sociodemographic data and items from the DASS-21, CBI, and Brief-COPE was distributed. Chi-square and Spearman's correlation tests were used to calculate the correlation coefficient between both anxiety and burnout, and coping mechanisms. The prevalence of anxiety and burnout were 44.2% and 22.2%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the percentage of students with extremely severe anxiety in the presence and absence of burnout, 23.8% vs. 4.8% (p < 0.001). Among the three coping mechanisms, avoidant coping had a significant positive moderate correlation with both the presence of anxiety (r = 0.3966, p < 0.001) and the presence of burnout (r = 0.341, p < 0.001). Meanwhile, coping that was neither approach nor avoidant had a positive weak correlation with the presence of burnout (r = 0.176, p = 0.001). The prevalence of anxiety and burnout was concerning. Increased anxiety and burnout among students may negatively impact aspects of their personal, professional, and academic lives. Early recognition and preventive measures should be emphasised to prevent negative ramifications.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Malaysia/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043694

ABSTRACT

The present study examined organizational, situational (i.e., COVID-19-related), and psychological factors associated with burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic among 268 health care professionals in Norway. A total burnout score based on the Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT), the four core BAT subscales (i.e., Exhaustion, Mental Distance, Cognitive Impairment, and Emotional Impairment), and the COVID-19 Burnout Scale served as the dependent variable. Among the results, organizational factors such as work-home conflict, workload, and role conflict were positively related to burnout. Although autonomy and colleague support were negatively related to burnout, support from leaders was positively related to it, which might suggest a suppressive effect. Organizational factors explained most of the variance in general burnout (i.e., BAT Total), whereas situational (i.e., COVID-19-related) factors (e.g., involvement with COVID-19, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19-induced stress) seemed to better explain COVID-19 burnout. COVID-19-oriented actions were related only to Mental Distance. Psychological factors such as meaning were negatively related to BAT Total, Exhaustion, and Mental Distance, whereas a breach of the psychological contract was related to all subscales. Such results suggest that organizational and situational factors contribute differently to general and COVID-19 burnout and that administering pandemic-specific assessment tools can clarify how the pandemic has affected mental health.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics
4.
Int J Soc Psychiatry ; 68(6): 1232-1237, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical students are under high pressure to perform academically and also face the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, putting them at risk of developing burnout. AIMS: This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and degree of burnout among medical students in Indonesia during 1 month of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: From April to May 2021, we conducted an online survey of Indonesian medical students to assess burnout (using Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, MBI-SS). RESULTS: A total of 1,947 students from 27 universities participated in the study. About 35.5% had burnout, 41.7% with a moderate to high level of emotional exhaustion, 45% had moderate to high level of depersonalization and 66.7% had a low level of personal accomplishment. CONCLUSION: A total of 35.5% of medical students in our sample experienced burnout. We suggest further research to explore and identify factors related to these findings and the need for potential interventions at global and national level to enhance the well-being of medical students.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0271434, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951554

ABSTRACT

This study was designed as a cross-sectional study to find out the prevalence and associated risk factors of burnout among veterinary students at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Kumasi-Ghana. A total of 74 veterinary students served as the respondents and were given online questionnaires which comprised questions on emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (RPA). Data obtained were analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test and regression analysis. Results indicated that on average, the EE and RPA were low with mean score of 12.72 ± 4.46 and 27.96 ± 7.94 whilst DP was high with a mean score of 20.72 ± 6.5 among veterinary students. The year of study had a significant effect (p = 0.000) on burnout with levels of high RPA (80%) and DP (70%) being more in the preclinical students as compared to the clinical students (RPA = 20%, DP = 30%). There was also a significant effect (p = 0.028) of the year of study and type of residence of the students on the high level of DP and RPA. Daily sleep hours of students had Daily sleep hours of the veterinary students were also indicated as a significant associated risk factor of burnout among veterinary students in this study as more less sleep hours (<6hours), causes high levels of DP and RPA. Age, gender and marital status, working status, exercise hours and weekly study hours of students did not count as significant predictive factors (p>0.05) of burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Burnout, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(6): 1922-1930, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1949647

ABSTRACT

AIM: To identify groups of nurses engaging in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) care who are most in need of organizational support. BACKGROUND: Overwhelming stress and susceptibility to burnout have been reported in nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Nurses working at five hospitals that accepted COVID-19 patients answered the questionnaire. The Tokyo Metropolitan Distress Scale for Pandemic, Self-Diagnosis Check List for Assessment of Workers' Accumulated Fatigue and Japanese Burnout Scale were evaluated. Multiple regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between engaging in COVID-19 care and psychosocial/physical burden. RESULTS: In total, 895 questionnaires were analysed. With experience in caring for COVID-19 patients as the independent variable, nurses caring for suspected cases had significantly higher standardized Tokyo Metropolitan Distress Scale for Pandemic scores for 'concerns for infection' (standardized partial regression coefficient ß = .921, P = .004), Assessment of Workers' Accumulated Fatigue (ß = .445, P = .022) and Japanese Burnout Scale 'emotional exhaustion' (ß = .136, P = .021) than those caring for confirmed cases. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses caring for suspected COVID-19 patients have the highest psychological/physical burden and propensity for burnout. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Extensive support systems are required for nurses caring for confirmed and suspected COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Nurse's Role , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Can J Dent Hyg ; 56(2): 63-71, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1929322

ABSTRACT

Background: Burnout syndrome is the result of prolonged occupational stress. The syndrome has 3 dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). This study aimed to examine the prevalence of the 3 dimensions of burnout in dental hygienists in Nova Scotia, Canada, (N = 745) as they returned to work during the COVID-19 pandemic following a furlough; to explore the effect of burnout during COVID-19 on dental hygienists' professional lives; and to determine the tools and methods that dental hygienists use to overcome burnout. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey inclusive of demographic information, employment characteristics, the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel (MBI-HSS [MP]), and 2 open-ended questions. Results: The response rate was 34.9% (n = 260). Approximately one-third (36.2%) of respondents met the criteria for burnout. Contributors to burnout were time, providing dental hygiene care, expectations of dentists, physical and mental health, lack of autonomy, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Reported mechanisms to overcome occupational stress centred on work-life balance, social support networks, working in a positive environment, and physical activity. Discussion: This study took place during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which may have influenced the rate of burnout among dental hygienists, particularly within the EE domain where scores were twice as high as those reported in pre-COVID-19 studies. Conclusion: Dental hygienists may be at risk for burnout. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of burnout and implementing healthy behaviours may reduce its detrimental effects.


Contexte : La prolongation du stress professionnel entraîne le syndrome de l'épuisement professionnel. Le syndrome comporte 3 volets : l'épuisement émotionnel (ÉÉ), la dépersonnalisation (DP) et la diminution de l'épanouissement personnel (ÉP). La présente étude visait à examiner la prévalence des 3 volets de l'épuisement professionnel chez les hygiénistes dentaires en Nouvelle-Écosse, Canada, (N = 745) à leur retour au travail après avoir eu un congé pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19; à explorer l'effet de l'épuisement professionnel sur la vie professionnelle des hygiénistes dentaires pendant la COVID-19; et à établir quels outils et méthodes les hygiénistes dentaires utilisent pour remédier à l'épuisement professionnel. Méthodologie : Les participants ont été invités à répondre à un sondage anonyme pour cette étude transversale, comprenant les données démographiques, les caractéristiques d'emploi, le sondage Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services pour le personnel médical (MBI-HSS [PM]) et 2 questions ouvertes. Résultats : Le taux de réponse était de 34,9 % (n = 260). Environ le tiers (36,9 %) des répondants a satisfait aux critères de l'épuisement professionnel. Les facteurs qui y ont contribué étaient le temps, la prestation de soins d'hygiène dentaire, les attentes des dentistes, la santé physique et mentale, le manque d'autonomie et la pandémie de la COVID-19. La conciliation travail­vie personnelle, les réseaux de soutien social, travailler dans un environnement positif et l'activité physique étaient cités comme mécanismes qui permettent de surmonter le stress professionnel. Discussion: Cette étude a été effectuée pendant la première vague de la pandémie de la COVID-19, ce qui peut avoir influencé le taux d'épuisement professionnel chez les hygiénistes dentaires, particulièrement en matière d'ÉÉ où les cotes étaient 2 fois plus élevées que celles signalées dans les études d'avant la COVID-19. Conclusion : Les hygiénistes dentaires peuvent être à risque d'épuisement professionnel. Reconnaître les signes et les symptômes de l'épuisement professionnel et mettre en œuvre des comportements sains peuvent réduire ses effets adverses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Hygienists , Humans , Nova Scotia/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics
8.
Soc Sci Med ; 306: 115157, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: Job burnout is an essential topic for researchers and a pressing issue for employers and employees. However, the most popular tool has become widely critiqued, and a new measure of burnout - the Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT) - is used here. The BAT is helpful because it provides a cut-off threshold score representing high burnout risk. This study provides one of the first BAT studies post Covid-19 pandemic and focuses on comparing high burnout risk rates between essential and non-essential workers after the first lockdown in New Zealand (May 2020). METHODS AND RESULTS: Using representative data from 955 employees across a wide range of occupations, sectors, and industries, we calculate an overall burnout risk of 11.1%, with essential workers higher (14%) than non-essential workers (9%). The odds ratios of burnout risk and having high levels of mental health complaints were 10-20 times higher for burnout risk workers. For essential workers, they were significantly higher for high job depression risk (35 times). Building on these results, to develop a deeper understanding of the factors contributing to burnout risk, we report on a qualitative analysis of comments (n = 213) provided by essential workers on their lockdown work experiences. CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide evidence that while a range of (1) health-related concerns (i.e., increased risk of getting and spreading covid) and (2) employee- and employer-specific pressures related to challenging lockdown work practices contribute to essential worker burnout risk, an unwavering sense of pride and purpose in the value of their essential work serves to reduce this risk. We discuss the implications, highlighting the unique issues facing essential workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics
9.
Prim Care Diabetes ; 16(4): 515-518, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Presence of either emotional exhaustion, depersonalization or lack of personal accomplishment define Burnout Syndrome which may lead to decreased workforce productivity, increased absenteeism, depression and medical errors as well as decreased patient satisfaction. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of burnout syndrome among Diabetes Specialist Registrars across England, Scotland and Wales and to identify any self-reported factors which may be contributory to burnout. METHODS: Over 430 Diabetes Specialist Registrars were invited to anonymously participate in an electronic survey which used Maslach Burnout Inventory and selfreporting questionnaire to identify burnout and contributory factors. RESULTS: In this pre-pandemic times study, Burnout was identified in 61 (57.5%; n = 106) respondents using Maslach burnout cut-off scores. 45.2% (48/106) participants had scored high in Emotional Exhaustion, while lack of personal accomplishment and depersonalization was seen in 24.5% (26/106) and 21.6% (23/106) of the respondents respectively. The commonest self-reported stressors by participants were "General Internal Medicine workload" 60.4% (64/106) followed by "Lack of specialty training" 36.8% (39/106) and "Lack of audit/research/Continuing Professional Development time" 10.8% (11/106) CONCLUSION: Burnout syndrome is frequent among the participating Diabetes Specialist Registrars and urgent steps may be required address this problem nationally to ensure that these physicians remain physically and mentally healthy, especially after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/diagnosis , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires , Wales/epidemiology
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869598

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to examine whether the capacity for mentalizing and resilience among healthcare workers (HCWs) explains the degree of burnout syndrome during the COVID-19 pandemic in Serbia. The research was conducted on a sample of 406 healthcare workers (141 doctors and 265 nurses), aged 19 to 65 years (M = 40.11, SD = 9.41)-203 worked on the COVID-19 frontline, and 203 in regular clinical conditions. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to measure the burnout syndrome. Capacity for mentalizing was examined using the Reflective Functioning Questionnaire. The Brief Resilience Scale was used to measure resilience. The results indicated that there were negative correlations between resilience and the dimensions of burnout-emotional exhaustion (r = -0.38; p < 0.01) and depersonalization (r = -0.11; p < 0.05), and a positive correlation between resilience and personal accomplishment (r = 0.27; p < 0.01), as was expected. The analyses of hierarchical linear regression showed that hypomentalizing was a significant positive predictor of emotional exhaustion (ß = 0.12; p < 005) and depersonalization (ß = 0.15; p < 0.05), resilience was a significant negative predictor of emotional exhaustion (ß = -0.28, p < 0.01) and positive predictor of personal accomplishment (ß = 0.20; p < 0.01), and that the degree of explained variance of burnout dimensions was higher when resilience and hypomentalizing were included in regression models, in addition to sociodemographic variables. The findings suggest that being a woman and working on the COVID-19 frontline implies a higher burnout, while the level of burnout decreases with better socioeconomic status and more children. Resilience, capacity for mentalizing, and burnout syndrome among HCWs are interrelated phenomena, which have important professional implications.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mentalization , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Serbia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834794

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is an emerging critical issue facing specialists and trainees in all disciplines and not particularly studied among physiatry specialists and trainees in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To assess physiatrist burnout, depression, anxiety, and stress during the current COVID-19 pandemic crisis in Saudi Arabia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: By distributing an electronic survey, the researcher assessed burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) Human Services Survey (HSS) in the midst of the curfew that Saudi authorities imposed. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred one participating trainees, specialists, and consultants. RESULTS: Of the 101 study participants, the majority (73.3%) were between the ages of 24 and 34 years old, with the rest distributed within the age group ranging from 35 to 65 years old. Junior residents represented 34.7%, senior residents 22.8%, physiatrist specialists 26.7%, and consultants 15.8%. The sample included 55.4% males and 44.6% females; 64.4% of the participants were married, 29.7% were still single, and 5.9% were divorced. Among the total group participating, 25.7% were handling COVID-19 patients. In the total participant sample, 80.2% reported experiencing burnout, 10.9% experienced stress, and 22.8% and 6.9% experienced anxiety and depression, respectively. CONCLUSION: Burnout in Saudi Arabia exists among more than two-thirds of practicing physiatrists in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R), and that did not appear to have a statistically significant influence on stress, anxiety, or depression (p > 0.05). The current COVID-19 global pandemic might escalate burnout and influence mental health outcomes. The healthcare authority and administration should take the lead in identifying the challenges, overcoming the obstacles, and optimizing clinician well-being, delivering up-to-date solutions, and promptly checking their effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physiatrists , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Radiologia (Engl Ed) ; 64(2): 119-127, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1829489

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic spread throughout the world from the beginning of 2020, increasing healthcare professionals' workloads and levels of physical and emotional stress. AIMS: To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome in Spanish radiologists during the COVID-19 pandemic and the factors associated with the development of this syndrome, and to compare these findings with those obtained before the pandemic. METHODS: This observation study took place between April 2020 and August 2020 (during the pandemic) through an online survey. A total of 150 responses were obtained. Demographic and work-related information was compiled. Burnout syndrome was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). The prevalence and characteristics of burnout syndrome obtained in this survey were compared with those of the same survey done in 2019. We performed a statistical analysis to identify possible risk factors and protective factors associated with this syndrome and to determine the homogeneity of the two samples. RESULTS: The prevalence of burnout syndrome increased during the COVID-19 pandemic (49.3% vs. 33.6%, p = 0.002). No risk factors or protective factors that were valid both before and after the pandemic were identified. No correlations were identified between sociodemographic or work-related characteristics and burnout syndrome. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that burnout syndrome increased significantly in radiologists during the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting nearly half of all those who responded to the survey. These results underline the need to assess support for professional wellbeing of radiologists in Spain. No correlations were identified between burnout and gender, age, number of calls, years in the job, annual income, teaching, marital status, number of children, or type of contract.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Syndrome
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820254

ABSTRACT

The primary aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of burnout in Romanian medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey for Students (MBI-GS(S)). The presence of burnout was assessed based on Exhaustion (EX), Cynicism (CY) and Professional Efficacy (PE) subscales. The secondary aim of the study was to identify the presence of intentional shift in medical specialty compared to their initial pursued choice within the population investigated. Data was collected online at the end of 2020 and beginning of 2021 through a licensed, customized MBI-GS(S) questionnaire from a sample of 126 Romanian medical students at the two leading medical schools in the country, Iasi (N = 56) and Cluj Napoca (N = 70). Descriptive statistics and bivariate correlations were also applied to describe the data set (age and gender of participants) and the relationship between variables (EX, CY, PE). Subsequently, the MBI-GS(S) group report revealed that 36.5% of the medical students in the sample (46) experienced burnout, with problematic results both in Exhaustion and Cynicism. Exhaustion and Cynicism, which contribute to burnout, showed high scores compared to the average scale (EX = 3.5/2.4; CY = 2.8/1.8), while the Professional Efficacy score was relatively high (PE = 3.8/4.4), showing a protective effect and burnout reduction. One of the main conclusions is that the consequences of burnout in medical students plays a significant role in shaping the future healthcare practitioners' perception of the medical profession and of patients' wellbeing. Exhaustion and Cynicism are mainly associated with depersonalization and disconnection from the patient. Another conclusion of the study is that about one third of the respondents (30% Cluj students and 37.5% Iasi students) considered changing residency options. The pandemic has also revealed the limitations of and challenges facing current medical education, and that further research is required to assess the trends in prevalence of burnout in medical students.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Romania/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e057272, 2022 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807411

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of burnout syndrome among intensive care physicians working in a tertiary private hospital as well as their perceived impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their life. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: Intensive care units dedicated to the care of COVID-19 in Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, Southeastern part of Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Intensive care physicians. INTERVENTIONS: Each participant received an envelope with a questionnaire composed of demographic and occupational variables, information related to their personal and professional experiences facing the COVID-19 pandemic and the Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES MEASURES: The primary outcome was to assess the prevalence of burnout syndrome among physicians working in an intensive care unit dedicated to the care of COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 51 from the universe of 63 (82%) intensive care physicians participated in the study. Nineteen (37.2%) met the criteria for burnout syndrome. In the three domains that characterise burnout syndrome, we found a low level of personal achievement in 96.1% of physicians interviewed, a high level of depersonalisation in 51.0% and 51.0% with a high level of emotional exhaustion. Decision-making conflicts between the intensive care unit team and other attending physicians were frequent (50% of all conflicts). A third of the participants had been diagnosed with COVID-19, 22 (43.1%) reported having a family member infected and 8 (15.7%) lost someone close to the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants felt that fear of infecting their loved ones was the aspect of their lives that changed most as compared with the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: Burnout syndrome was frequent among intensive care unit physicians treating patients with COVID-19 in a large tertiary private hospital. Future studies should expand our results to other private and public hospitals and test strategies to promote intensive care unit physicians' mental health.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Brazil/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Nurs Open ; 9(4): 2013-2023, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797782

ABSTRACT

AIM: To examine the demographic and work characteristics of mental health workers associated with burnout during the COVID-19 epidemic and to examine the relationship between burnout and humanistic care ability. DESIGN: Online cross-sectional design. METHODS: 270 mental health workers in Chongqing, China, were recruited via WeChat from 1 to 31 December 2020. Online self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed by t-tests and one-way analyses of variance, Pearson's correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health workers had a high prevalence of burnout and a low level of humanistic care ability. Work factors including profession, work shift, work pressure, work-family conflict, practice environment satisfaction, salary satisfaction, and humanistic care ability were significantly associated with burnout and its subdimension.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
16.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1125-1135, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784701

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To estimate the prevalence of burnout risk among nurses during the peak of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium and to identify risk groups and protective and risk factors. BACKGROUND: Nurses are at high risk of burnout, and this can have negative consequences for them, patients and health care systems. The pandemic may have changed their working conditions and increased their risk of burnout. METHODS: The risk of burnout was assessed through the Maslach Burnout Inventory Scale. Information on socio-demographic and working conditions during the pandemic was also collected. We obtained 4552 respondents through convenience sampling. RESULTS: A high risk of burnout was found in 70% of respondents. The main risk factors of burnout were the lack of personal protective equipment, changes in perceived workload and working with COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: An uneven workload for nurses is an underlying problem during the COVID-19 pandemic and a significant risk factor for their burnout. The decreased workload is a risk factor for burnout as important as increased workload and repeated exposure to COVID-19. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Burnout prevention and treatment interventions must target the correct risk factors and identify nurses at risk to be cost-effective.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Belgium/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264956, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has inundated the entire world disrupting the lives of millions of people. The pandemic has stressed the healthcare system of India impacting the psychological status and functioning of health care workers. The aim of this study is to determine the burnout levels and factors associated with the risk of psychological distress among healthcare workers (HCW) engaged in the management of COVID 19 in India. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 September 2020 to 30 November 2020 by telephonic interviews using a web-based Google form. Health facilities and community centres from 12 cities located in 10 states were selected for data collection. Data on socio-demographic and occupation-related variables like age, sex, type of family, income, type of occupation, hours of work and income were obtained was obtained from 967 participants, including doctors, nurses, ambulance drivers, emergency response teams, lab personnel, and others directly involved in COVID 19 patient care. Levels of psychological distress was assessed by the General health Questionnaire -GHQ-5 and levels of burnout was assessed using the ICMR-NIOH Burnout questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with the risk of psychological distress. The third quartile values of the three subscales of burnout viz EE, DP and PA were used to identify burnout profiles of the healthcare workers. RESULTS: Overall, 52.9% of the participants had the risk of psychological distress that needed further evaluation. Risk of psychological distress was significantly associated with longer hours of work (≥ 8 hours a day) (AOR = 2.38, 95% CI(1.66-3.41), income≥20000(AOR = 1.74, 95% CI, (1.16-2.6); screening of COVID-19 patients (AOR = 1.63 95% CI (1.09-2.46), contact tracing (AOR = 2.05, 95% CI (1.1-3.81), High Emotional exhaustion score (EE ≥16) (AOR = 4.41 95% CI (3.14-6.28) and High Depersonalisation score (DP≥7) (AOR = 1.79, 95% CI (1.28-2.51)). About 4.7% of the HCWs were overextended (EE>18); 6.5% were disengaged (DP>8) and 9.7% HCWs were showing signs of burnout (high on all three dimensions). CONCLUSION: The study has identified key factors that could have been likely triggers for psychological distress among healthcare workers who were engaged in management of COVID cases in India. The study also demonstrates the use of GHQ-5 and ICMR-NIOH Burnout questionnaire as important tools to identify persons at risk of psychological distress and occurrence of burnout symptoms respectively. The findings provide useful guide to planning interventions to mitigate mental health problems among HCW in future epidemic/pandemic scenarios in the country.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Interviews as Topic , Male , Mental Health/trends , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Intern Med ; 61(5): 647-651, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714855

ABSTRACT

Objective To evaluate the change in the prevalence of burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic among internists and primary care physicians in Japan, and to identify factors associated with the exacerbation of burnout among these populations during this period. Methods This was a cross-sectional study based on two web-based surveys conducted in January 2020 (before the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic) and June 2020 (during the pandemic). The participants were internists and primary care physicians of the Japanese Chapter of the American College of Physicians. The main outcome was the change in the prevalence of burnout between before and during the "first wave" of the pandemic. We also examined factors associated with the exacerbation of burnout during this period. Results Among the 283 respondents in the first survey and 322 in the second survey, 98 (34.6%) and 111 (34.5%) reported symptoms of burnout, respectively. In June 2020, 82 respondents (25.5%) reported that their level of burnout exacerbated compared to January 2020. Only the experience of self-quarantine was associated with the exacerbation of burnout [odds ratio (OR) 3.12; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.49-6.50; p=0.002], while being a woman, being a resident physician, and an experience of having worked in a prefecture under a state of emergency were not. Conclusions No marked change in the prevalence of burnout among internists and primary care physicians in Japan was observed during the COVID-19 pandemic as a whole. However, self-quarantine was associated with the exacerbation of the burnout level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Primary Care , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674622

ABSTRACT

A growing body of empirical evidence shows that occupational health is now more relevant than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This review focuses on burnout, an occupational phenomenon that results from chronic stress in the workplace. After analyzing how burnout occurs and its different dimensions, the following aspects are discussed: (1) Description of the factors that can trigger burnout and the individual factors that have been proposed to modulate it, (2) identification of the effects that burnout generates at both individual and organizational levels, (3) presentation of the main actions that can be used to prevent and/or reduce burnout, and (4) recapitulation of the main tools that have been developed so far to measure burnout, both from a generic perspective or applied to specific occupations. Furthermore, this review summarizes the main contributions of the papers that comprise the Special Issue on "Occupational Stress and Health: Psychological Burden and Burnout", which represent an advance in the theoretical and practical understanding of burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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