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1.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 1267-1276, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484979

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to investigate how the psychological health of health care professionals (HCP) on COVID duty was different from those who were not directly in contact. Methodology: Of 473 (76%) randomly selected respondents (doctors and nurses) to a WhatsApp request message, 450 subjects' data were finally analyzed. Result: The prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression among HCP was 33.8, 38.9 and 43.6%, respectively. Compared with nonexposed professionals, COVID-19-exposed professionals had roughly double the score of these morbidities (t = 6.3, p < 0.001; t = 6.9, p < 0.001; t = 6.0, p < 0.001). Most worry (71.11%) was about the health of their family, followed by themselves (35.55%). Conclusion: The level of exposure, feelings of uncertainty and fear of infection emerged in our study as possible risk factors for psychological morbidities among HCP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Online Systems , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is an emerging critical issue facing specialists and trainees in all disciplines and not particularly studied among physiatry specialists and trainees in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To assess physiatrist burnout, depression, anxiety, and stress during the current COVID-19 pandemic crisis in Saudi Arabia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: By distributing an electronic survey, the researcher assessed burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) Human Services Survey (HSS) in the midst of the curfew that Saudi authorities imposed. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred one participating trainees, specialists, and consultants. RESULTS: Of the 101 study participants, the majority (73.3%) were between the ages of 24 and 34 years old, with the rest distributed within the age group ranging from 35 to 65 years old. Junior residents represented 34.7%, senior residents 22.8%, physiatrist specialists 26.7%, and consultants 15.8%. The sample included 55.4% males and 44.6% females; 64.4% of the participants were married, 29.7% were still single, and 5.9% were divorced. Among the total group participating, 25.7% were handling COVID-19 patients. In the total participant sample, 80.2% reported experiencing burnout, 10.9% experienced stress, and 22.8% and 6.9% experienced anxiety and depression, respectively. CONCLUSION: Burnout in Saudi Arabia exists among more than two-thirds of practicing physiatrists in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R), and that did not appear to have a statistically significant influence on stress, anxiety, or depression (p > 0.05). The current COVID-19 global pandemic might escalate burnout and influence mental health outcomes. The healthcare authority and administration should take the lead in identifying the challenges, overcoming the obstacles, and optimizing clinician well-being, delivering up-to-date solutions, and promptly checking their effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physiatrists , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
Med Lav ; 112(4): 306-319, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377150

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Several studies described burnout levels of healthcare workers (HCWs) during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, sex-related differences remain poorly investigated. OBJECTIVE: To describe sex-related differences in burnout and its determinants among HCWs during the first pandemic wave of the COVID-19 in Italy. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed between April and May 2020. The framework given by the Job Demands Resources (JD-R) model was used to assess burnout determinants (risk and protective factors). RESULTS: Male HCWs (n=133) had higher levels of depersonalization than female HCWs (P=0,017) and female HCWs (n=399) reported greater emotional exhaustion rates (P=0,005). Female nurses were the most exposed to burnout (OR=2,47; 95%CI=1,33-4,60; P=0,004), emotional exhaustion (OR=1,89; 95% CI=1,03-3,48; P=0,041), and depersonalization (OR=1,91; 95% CI=1,03-3,53; P=0,039). Determinants of burnout differed between sexes, and some paradoxical associations were detected: the score of job demands was a protective factor in females for burnout, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization, resilience was a risk factor for males. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that the stressors in male and female HCWs tended to be associated with burnout differently. Both sexes showed alarming burnout levels, even if the weights of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization acted in different ways between the sexes. The revealed paradoxical effects in this study could reflect the study's cross-sectional nature, highlighting that more resilient and empathic individuals were more consciously overwhelmed by the challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic, thus reporting higher scores of emotional exhaustion and burnout. Future in-depth and longitudinal analyses are recommended to further explore sex-related differences in burnout among HCWs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(11): e14755, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic represents a source of stress and potential burnout for many physicians. This single-site survey aimed at assessing perceived stress and risk to develop burnout syndrome among physicians operating in COVID wards. METHODS: This longitudinal survey evaluated stress and burnout in 51 physicians operating in the COVID team of Gemelli Hospital, Italy. Participants were asked to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire on a short run (PSQs) (referring to the past 7 days) at baseline (T0) and then for four weeks (T1-T4). Perceived Stress Questionnaire on a long run (PSQl) (referring to the past 2 years) was completed only at T0. RESULTS: Compared with physicians board-certified in internal medicine, those board-certified in other disciplines showed higher scores for the Emotional Exhaustion (EE) score of the MBI scale (P < .001). Depersonalisation (DP) score showed a reduction over time (P = .002). Attending physicians scored lower than the resident physicians on the DP scale (P = .048) and higher than resident physicians on the Personal Accomplishment (PA) scale (P = .04). PSQl predicted higher scores on the EE scale (P = .003), DP scale (P = .003) and lower scores on the PA scale (P < .001). PSQs showed a reduction over time (P = .03). Attending physicians had a lower PSQs score compared with the resident physicians (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Medical specialty and clinical position could represent risk factors for the development of burnout in a COVID team. In these preliminary results, physicians board-certified in internal medicine showed lower risk of developing EE during the entire course of the study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 46(10): 1162-1171, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361779

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study investigates associations between parents' perceived coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) psychological impacts and experiences of parental burnout, children's behaviors, and income. METHODS: Data were collected during an online survey of parents' (N = 1000) pandemic experiences in April 2020. Parents (M = 36.5 years old, SD = 6.0; 82.1% White) with at least one child 12 years or younger reported on measures of mental health, perceived COVID-19 impacts, parental burnout, and perceived increases in children's stress and positive behaviors. RESULTS: Path model analyses revealed that parents who perceived increased psychological impacts from COVID-19 reported higher levels of parental burnout, greater increases in children's stress behaviors, and less positive behavior in children. Additionally, there were significant indirect effects of parental burnout on the link between COVID-19 psychological impacts and children's behaviors. Finally, family income moderated associations between psychological impacts and children's stress behaviors, such that the association was stronger for families with lower income. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest parents' perceptions of how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted their mental health has implications for parent and child well-being, with stronger associations for low-income families. Given the potential for spillover effects between parents and children, promoting family well-being through practice and policy initiatives is crucial, including providing financial and caregiving relief for parents, and mental and behavioral health support for families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Child , Child Behavior , Humans , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
6.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12247, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347383

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of burnout according to job category after the first wave of COVID-19 in Japan and to explore its association with certain factors. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey of health care workers (HCWs) from June 15 to July 6, 2020, was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Demographic characteristics, results of the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, types of anxiety and stress, changes in life and work after the peak of the pandemic, and types of support aimed at reducing the physical or mental burden, were determined. RESULTS: Of 672 HCWs, 149 (22.6%) met the overall burnout criteria. Burnout was more prevalent in women (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.45-6.67, P = .003), anxiety due to unfamiliarity with personal protective equipment (PPE) (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.20-3.27, P = .007), and decreased sleep duration (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.20-3.20, P = .008). Conversely, participants who felt that the delivery of COVID-19-related information (OR, .608; 95% CI, .371-.996, P = .048) and PPE education opportunities (OR, .484; 95% CI, .236-.993, P = .048) and messages of encouragement at the workplace (OR, .584; 95% CI, .352-.969; p = .037) was helpful experienced less burnout. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to focus on the above factors to maintain the mental health of HCWs. The delivery of COVID-19-related information and educational interventions for PPE and messages of encouragement at the workplace may be needed to reduce the mental burden.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Workload/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tokyo/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
ESMO Open ; 6(4): 100215, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young oncologists are at particular risk of professional burnout, and this could have a significant impact on their health and care of their patients. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has forced rapid changes in professionals' jobs and training, with the consequent physical and psychological effects. We aimed to characterize burnout levels and determinants in young oncologists, and the effects of the pandemic on their training and health. METHODS: Two online surveys were conducted among oncology residents and young oncology specialists in Spain. The first addressed professional burnout and its determinants before the COVID-19 pandemic, while the second analyzed the impact of the pandemic on health care organization, training, and physical and psychological health in the same population. RESULTS: In total, 243 respondents completed the first survey, and 263 the second; 25.1% reported significant levels of professional burnout. Burnout was more common among medical oncology residents (28.2%), mainly in their second year of training. It was significantly associated with a poor work-life balance, inadequate vacation time, and the burnout score. Nearly three-quarters of respondents (72%) were reassigned to COVID-19 care and 84.3% of residents missed part of their training rotations. Overall, 17.2% of this population reported that they had contracted COVID-19, 37.3% had scores indicating anxiety, and 30.4% moderate to severe depression. Almost a quarter of young oncologists (23.3%) had doubts about their medical vocation. CONCLUSIONS: Burnout affects a considerable number of young oncologists. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on causes of burnout, making it even more necessary to periodically monitor it to define appropriate detection and prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Oncologists , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Humans , Medical Oncology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Indian J Med Ethics ; V(4): 1-6, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239246

ABSTRACT

Burnout is a major occupational problem among healthcare providers, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic. The frontline health workforce is experiencing a high workload and multiple psychosocial stressors which may affect their mental and emotional health, leading to burnout symptoms. Moreover, sleep deprivation and a critical lack of psychosocial support may aggravate such symptoms amidst Covid-19. From an ethical viewpoint, healthcare providers may experience moral distress while safeguarding patient welfare and autonomy. Moreover, social injustice and structural inequities may affect their emotional health while tackling a high volume of new cases and mortality. Global evidence indicates the need for adopting multipronged evidence-based approaches to address burnout during this pandemic, which may include increasing the awareness of work-related stress and burnout, promoting mindfulness and self-care practices for promoting mental wellbeing, ensuring optimal mental health services, using digital technologies to address workplace stress and deliver mental health interventions, and improving organisational policies and practices focusing on burnout among healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(10)2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: burnout syndrome is a serious and growing problem among medical staff. Its adverse outcomes not only affect health-care providers' health, but also extend to their patients, resulting in bad-quality care. The COVID-19 pandemic puts frontline health-care providers at greater risk of psychological stress and burnout syndrome. OBJECTIVES: this study aimed to identify the levels of burnout among health-care professionals currently working at Assiut University hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: the current study adopted an online cross-sectional design using the SurveyMonkey® website for data collection. A total of 201 physicians were included and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) scale was used to assess the three burnout syndrome dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. RESULTS: about one-third, two-thirds, and one-quarter of the respondents had high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment, respectively. Younger, resident, and single physicians reported higher burnout scores. The personal accomplishment score was significantly higher among males. Those working more than eight hours/day and dealing with COVID-19 patients had significantly higher scores. CONCLUSION: during the COVID-19 pandemic, a high prevalence of burnout was recorded among physicians. Age, job title, working duration, and working hours/day were significant predictors for burnout syndrome subscale results. Preventive and interventive programs should be applied in health-care organizations during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 47(1): 100873, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225186

ABSTRACT

Burnout syndrome (BO) may be increased during periods of high work and emotional stress, as occurred in the 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic (COVID-19). Resident physicians appear to be more exposed due to the higher workload, prolonged exposure and the first contact with patients. To compare the incidence of burnout syndrome before and during the COVID 19 pandemic in cardiology residents. A prospective study was carried out. The Maslach questionnaire was implemented in cardiology residents of an institution of the City of Buenos Aires, in the month of September 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic and the results were compared with those prospectively collected in the same population during September of 2019. The survey was anonymous. The questionnaire was responded by 39 residents (2019: 16; 2020: 23). Burnout was observed in 30% (n = 7) in 2019, and in 39% (9%) residents during the COVID-19 pandemic (P= 0.77). The median score for emotional exhaustion was 38 (IQR 29-43) for the 2020s group, and 34 (IQR 27-42) for the 2019 (P = 0.32). The median score for depersonalization was 12 (IQR 5-19) and 15 (IQR 11-18) for 2020 and 2019 respectively (P = 0.50). The median score for personal accomplishment in the 2020s group was 30 (IQR 23-37) and 31 (IQR 26-35) in the 2019s (P = 0.28). The COVID-19 pandemic was not associated with an increase in the incidence of burnout in cardiology residents, who already report a significant prevalence of this syndrome in pre pandemic period. We emphasize the importance of creating prevention strategies aimed at improving resident's working conditions and quality of life, especially in periods of high stress and workload such as a global health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 61(5): e71-e77, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted pharmacy practice. Little research has been done to assess how COVID-19 has affected pharmacists' employment, workload, and feelings of burnout. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to characterize the impact of COVID-19 on pharmacists' employment status, workload, and feelings of burnout, as well as to examine emotional health concerns related to COVID-19. METHODS: Wisconsin pharmacists were surveyed using an online instrument between August 25, 2020, and September 22, 2020. The data analysis, performed in December 2020, examined employment status, 3 common burnout risk factors (workload, rewards, and social depersonalization), and emotional health concerns related to COVID-19. RESULTS: Of the 1300 pharmacists, 439 completed the survey (33.8%). The study analysis included pharmacists in community (n = 127) and hospital or health system (n = 107) settings. With regard to employment changes and workload, hospital pharmacists (36%) were more likely to have their hours reduced than community pharmacists (13%) (P < 0.01), and, conversely, community pharmacists (19%) were more likely to have their hours increased than hospital pharmacists (8%) (P = 0.01). For the burnout domain of workload, 45% of the pharmacists reported increased feelings of physical exhaustion at work, and 53% reported increased feelings of emotional exhaustion at work, with no difference between settings. Regarding the burnout domain of rewards, 6% of the hospital pharmacists and 1% of the community pharmacists experienced a reduction in hourly wages or salaries as a result of COVID-19. For the burnout domain of depersonalization, 25% of the pharmacists reported that their ability to connect with colleagues and patients decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional emotional health concerns reported by the pharmacists included 40% experiencing more anxiety and 25% experiencing more sadness or depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, with no difference between settings. CONCLUSION: This study found that the burnout domains related to workload, rewards, and depersonalization were negatively affected by COVID-19. Pharmacy managers need to proactively combat burnout as well as be reactive when employees show signs of burnout to maintain their workforce and meet the COVID-19-associated challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Nurse Educ Today ; 102: 104938, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Almost all universities have been forced to close and change to online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has been a big challenge for students. There is little knowledge about the academic burnout among nursing students in these difficult circumstances, especially in traditional Chinese medicine universities, and the relationship between the burnout and their psychological capital and academic engagement. OBJECTIVE: The aim is to describe academic burnout and clarify the relationships between academic burnout, academic engagement, and psychological capital among nursing students in traditional Chinese medicine universities. DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study. SETTING: The study sampled a four-year undergraduate traditional Chinese medicine university in Jian, Shandong Province, China. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sampling method was used to select 733 nursing students from April to June 2020. METHODS: The Academic Burnout Scale, the Positive Psychological Capital Scale, and the Academic Engagement Scale were used for data collection, in addition to social-demographic data. Path analysis was used to clarify the relationships among academic burnout, academic engagement and psychological capital. RESULTS: Of all the study participants, 39.29% had a certain degree of academic burnout. Academic engagement and psychological capital were negatively correlated with academic burnout among nursing students in traditional Chinese medicine university. Psychological capital was positively correlated with academic engagement. CONCLUSION: Nursing students had a certain degree of academic burnout. Academic engagement played a partial mediated role in the relationship between psychological capital and academic burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Adolescent , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Students, Nursing/psychology , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Universities , Young Adult
17.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211008437, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Primary care physicians have been present on the frontline during the ongoing pandemic, adding new tasks to already high workloads. Our aim was to evaluate burnout in primary care physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as associated contributing factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with an online questionnaire disseminated through social media, applying the snowball technique. The target population was primary care physicians working in Portugal during the first outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to sociodemographic data, the questionnaire collected responses to the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI), the Resilience Scale and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21). Data were collected from May 9 to June 8, 2020, a period comprising the declaration of a national calamity and then state of emergency, and the subsequent ease of lockdown measures. Levels of burnout in 3 different dimensions (personal, work, and patient-related), resilience, stress, depression, and anxiety were assessed. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with burnout levels. RESULTS: Among the 214 physician respondents, burnout levels were high in the 3 dimensions. A strong association was found between gender, years of professional experience, depression and anxiety, and burnout levels. CONCLUSIONS: Physician burnout in primary care is high and has increased during the pandemic. More studies are needed in the long term to provide a comprehensive assessment of COVID-19'simpact on burnout levels and how to best approach and mitigate it during such unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Primary Health Care , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Portugal/epidemiology , Psychometrics/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Leg Med (Tokyo) ; 51: 101881, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172047

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate burnout among physicians during the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. This research was conducted in a pandemic hospital which is among the largest hospital complexes in Turkey. Internal medicine physicians actively working in many departments under the severe conditions in the diagnosis and treatment processes were included. Among the physicians constituting the study population, residents, attendings, and subspecialists from different fields were included. These physicians were working in the quarantine services, inpatient services, intensive care units, and polyclinics. A short and easy face-to-face survey, in which included questions on demographic information, medicolegal subjects, and questions from the Maslach Burnout Inventory, was used to collect data. While 58.2% of the physicians stated that they were extremely worried about malpractice in the pandemic period, 82.1% stated they needed training on medicolegal subjects, and 25.4% stated they were exposed to violence during work. Three sub-dimensions within the burnout inventory were compared with other parameters. The Cronbach alpha value was found highly reliable in the evaluation of the answers' internal consistency. The notable significance of burnout was interesting regarding physicians' anxiety on medicolegal issues and exposure to violence (p < 0.05). The findings obtained in this study suggest that healthcare workers' motivations will increase if they feel valued, their working conditions have been improved, and if they are in mentally well. This mental wellness may contribute to fighting public health crises such as a pandemic more efficiently with the lowest number of casualties.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Internal Medicine , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depersonalization/psychology , Exposure to Violence , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Malpractice/legislation & jurisprudence , Middle Aged , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
19.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 46, 2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169966

ABSTRACT

Very few studies have been concerned with assessing the prevalence of burnout and depressive symptoms, especially during an infectious outbreak on non-frontline health care workers, such as a psychiatrist. In such instances, the role of psychiatrists and other mental health providers as a source of psychological support to the public and frontline workers is indispensable and valuable. This study aims to assess the prevalence of burnout and depressive symptoms, and their correlation, during the COVID-19 pandemic among psychiatry residents in Saudi Arabia. A total of 121 out of 150 psychiatry residents in Saudi Arabia completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Patient's Health Questionnaire for the assessment of burnout and depressive symptoms. Burnout symptoms were found in 27.3%, and another 27.3% reported having depression symptoms. In addition, 16.5% reported having both burnout and depressive symptoms, with a significant relationship between them. Participants in the first 2 years of training and having a history of receiving mental health treatment in the past 2 years were at higher risk. The need is urgent to increase investment in mental health services and to construct a plan to reduce this risk of burnout and depression among psychiatrists by developing preventative strategies to prevent burnout and promote wellness is more important than ever.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Psychiatry , Adult , Burnout, Professional , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Young Adult
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