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3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480777

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Physician's burnout has been recognized as an increasing and significant work-related syndrome, described by the combination of emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (D), together with low personal accomplishment (PA). It has many negative consequences on personal, organizational, and patient care levels. This systematic review aimed to analyze research articles where psychological interventions with elements of mindfulness (PIMs) were used to support physicians in order to reduce burnout and foster empathy and well-being. Methods: Systematic searches were conducted in May 2019, within six electronic databases PubMed, EBSCOhost MEDLINE, PsycArticles, Cochrane Library, JSTOR, and Slovenian national library information system. Different combinations of boolean operators were used-mindfulness, empathy, medicine/family medicine/general practice/primary care, burnout, doctors/physicians, intervention, and support group. Additional articles were manually searched from the reference list of the included articles. Studies with other healthcare professionals (not physicians and residents) and/or medical students, and those where PIMs were applied for educational or patient's treatment purposes were excluded. Results: Of 1194 studies identified, 786 screened and 139 assessed for eligibility, there were 18 studies included in this review. Regardless of a specific type of PIMs applied, results, in general, demonstrate a positive impact on empathy, well-being, and reduction in burnout in participating physicians. Compared with other recent systematic reviews, this is unique due to a broader selection of psychological interventions and emphasis on a sustained effect measurement. Conclusions: Given the pandemic of COVID-19, it is of utmost importance that this review includes also interventions based on modern information technologies (mobile apps) and can be used as an awareness-raising material for physicians providing information about feasible and easily accessible interventions for effective burnout prevention and/or reduction. Future research should upgrade self-reported data with objective psychological measures and address the question of which intervention offers more benefits to physicians.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Empathy , Humans , Psychosocial Intervention , SARS-CoV-2
5.
ESMO Open ; 6(4): 100215, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young oncologists are at particular risk of professional burnout, and this could have a significant impact on their health and care of their patients. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has forced rapid changes in professionals' jobs and training, with the consequent physical and psychological effects. We aimed to characterize burnout levels and determinants in young oncologists, and the effects of the pandemic on their training and health. METHODS: Two online surveys were conducted among oncology residents and young oncology specialists in Spain. The first addressed professional burnout and its determinants before the COVID-19 pandemic, while the second analyzed the impact of the pandemic on health care organization, training, and physical and psychological health in the same population. RESULTS: In total, 243 respondents completed the first survey, and 263 the second; 25.1% reported significant levels of professional burnout. Burnout was more common among medical oncology residents (28.2%), mainly in their second year of training. It was significantly associated with a poor work-life balance, inadequate vacation time, and the burnout score. Nearly three-quarters of respondents (72%) were reassigned to COVID-19 care and 84.3% of residents missed part of their training rotations. Overall, 17.2% of this population reported that they had contracted COVID-19, 37.3% had scores indicating anxiety, and 30.4% moderate to severe depression. Almost a quarter of young oncologists (23.3%) had doubts about their medical vocation. CONCLUSIONS: Burnout affects a considerable number of young oncologists. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on causes of burnout, making it even more necessary to periodically monitor it to define appropriate detection and prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Oncologists , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Humans , Medical Oncology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e339-e353, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249568

ABSTRACT

Optimizing the well-being of the oncology clinician has never been more important. Well-being is a critical priority for the cancer organization because burnout adversely impacts the quality of care, patient satisfaction, the workforce, and overall practice success. To date, 45% of U.S. ASCO member medical oncologists report experiencing burnout symptoms of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. As the COVID-19 pandemic remains widespread with periods of outbreaks, recovery, and response with substantial personal and professional consequences for the clinician, it is imperative that the oncologist, team, and organization gain direct access to resources addressing burnout. In response, the Clinician Well-Being Task Force was created to improve the quality, safety, and value of cancer care by enhancing oncology clinician well-being and practice sustainability. Well-being is an integrative concept that characterizes quality of life and encompasses an individual's work- and personal health-related environmental, organizational, and psychosocial factors. These resources can be useful for the cancer organization to develop a well-being blueprint: a detailed start plan with recognized strategies and interventions targeting all oncology stakeholders to support a culture of community in oncology.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists/psychology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Internet , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support , United States
8.
Indian J Med Ethics ; V(4): 1-6, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239246

ABSTRACT

Burnout is a major occupational problem among healthcare providers, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic. The frontline health workforce is experiencing a high workload and multiple psychosocial stressors which may affect their mental and emotional health, leading to burnout symptoms. Moreover, sleep deprivation and a critical lack of psychosocial support may aggravate such symptoms amidst Covid-19. From an ethical viewpoint, healthcare providers may experience moral distress while safeguarding patient welfare and autonomy. Moreover, social injustice and structural inequities may affect their emotional health while tackling a high volume of new cases and mortality. Global evidence indicates the need for adopting multipronged evidence-based approaches to address burnout during this pandemic, which may include increasing the awareness of work-related stress and burnout, promoting mindfulness and self-care practices for promoting mental wellbeing, ensuring optimal mental health services, using digital technologies to address workplace stress and deliver mental health interventions, and improving organisational policies and practices focusing on burnout among healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 16(5): 829-837, 2021 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1016033

ABSTRACT

Mass disasters result in extensive health problems and make health care delivery problematic, as has been the case during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although COVID-19 was initially considered a pulmonary problem, it soon became clear that various other organs were involved. Thus, many care providers, including kidney health personnel, were overwhelmed or developed burnout. This review aims to describe the spectrum of burnout in mass disasters and suggests solutions specifically for nephrology personnel by extending previous experience to the COVID-19 pandemic. Burnout (a psychologic response to work-related stress) is already a frequent part of routine nephrology practice and, not surprisingly, is even more common during mass disasters due to increased workload and specific conditions, in addition to individual factors. Avoiding burnout is essential to prevent psychologic and somatic health problems in personnel as well as malpractice, understaffing, and inadequate health care delivery, all of which increase the health care burden of disasters. Burnout may be prevented by predisaster organizational measures, which include developing an overarching plan and optimizing health care infrastructure, and ad hoc disaster-specific measures that encompass both organizational and individual measures. Organizational measures include increasing safety, decreasing workload and fear of malpractice, optimizing medical staffing and material supplies, motivating personnel, providing mental health support, and enabling flexibility in working circumstances. Individual measures include training on coping with stress and problematic conditions, minimizing the stigma of emotional distress, and maintaining physical health. If these measures fall short, asking for external help is mandatory to avoid an inefficient disaster health care response. Minimizing burnout by applying these measures will improve health care provision, thus saving as many lives as possible.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cyclonic Storms , Earthquakes , Health Personnel , Nephrology , SARS-CoV-2 , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Disaster Planning , Humans
12.
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev ; 51(5): 671-682, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694603

ABSTRACT

Research confirms that the mental health burdens following community-wide disasters are extensive, with pervasive impacts noted in individuals and families. It is clear that child disaster outcomes are worst among children of highly distressed caregivers, or those caregivers who experience their own negative mental health outcomes from the disaster. The current study used path analysis to examine concurrent patterns of parents' (n = 420) experience from a national sample during the early months of the U.S. COVID-19 pandemic. The results of a multi-group path analysis, organized by parent gender, indicate good fit to the data [X2(10) = 159.04, p < .01]. Results indicate significant linkages between parents' caregiver burden, mental health, and perceptions of children's stress; these in turn are significantly linked to child-parent closeness and conflict, indicating possible spillover effects for depressed parents and compensatory effects for anxious parents. The impact of millions of families sheltering in place during the COVID-19 pandemic for an undefined period of time may lead to unprecedented impacts on individuals' mental health with unknown impacts on child-parent relationships. These impacts may be heightened for families whose caregivers experience increased mental health symptoms, as was the case for fathers in the current sample.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , Caregivers/psychology , Child Welfare/psychology , Coronavirus Infections , Mental Health/trends , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parenting/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Psychological/etiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology
13.
Dig Dis Sci ; 65(8): 2161-2163, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591929

ABSTRACT

Many GI training programs have needed to adjust to the serious disruption to the training and education of fellows worldwide due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A silent problem that has arisen within programs is the issue of burnout among their trainees. Burnout is common among gastroenterologists, especially in fellows (Keswani et al. in Gastroenterology 147(1):11-14, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2014.05.023 , Am J Gastroenterol 106(10):1734-1740, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.148 ), with negative consequences to patient care and the safety of the trainees if not effectively dealt with. In this article, the author describes several additional factors potentially contributing to the intensifying burnout of the fellows in their home institution during this pandemic. Moreover, he describes specific practical interventions that the hospital and program have taken in order to address these factors.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education , Gastroenterology/education , Internship and Residency , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Psychological/etiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Education/ethics , Education/organization & administration , Education/trends , Ethics, Institutional , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Gastroenterologists/psychology , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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