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1.
Arch Razi Inst ; 78(2): 737-742, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231701

ABSTRACT

Following the epidemics caused by the transmission of the common virus between humans and animals (COVID-19), coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the third and most deadly strain of RNA virus that can cause respiratory, digestive, and nervous system problems, and there are many unknown complications. This study included 170 clinical samples of nasopharyngeal swaps (100 patients and 70 controls for both males and females). RT-PCR was performed, and blood samples were taken for biochemical analyses. They were obtained from Iraqi patients aged 25 to 92 years old. Between November 2021 and March 2022, COVID-19 patients were admitted to Dar al-salam Hospital, Alyarmok Teaching Hospital, and Alshefaa Hospital. AFIAS D-Dimer, AFIAS ferritin, and NycoCard CRP tests were performed on the patients and were classified depending on the severity of their infection (mild or moderate, severe and critical). The results showed a significant increase in ferritin in critically ill patients (545.58 ± 57.71). A significant increase of D-dimer was found with different severity with highly significant in the critical group (3.93 ± 0.79). With varying degrees of severity, a substantial rise in CRP was discovered with highly significant in the critical group (96.27 ± 14.55) between the severity group (p-value <0.001). Also, COVID-19 individuals in the age range (50 - 60) tended to be more severe than younger people, whereas the effect of gender is not significant in any patient group. The biochemical factors, including D-Dimer, ferritin, and CRP, are effective in the disease's occurrence of symptoms and severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Ferritins , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(10)2023 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243950

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to analyze the serum concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), ferritin, and procalcitonin in COVID-19 patients with different forms of the disease. We performed a prospective cohort study on 137 COVID-19 consecutive patients, divided into four groups according to the severity of the disease as follows: 30 patients in the mild form group, 49 in the moderate form group, 28 in the severe form group, and 30 in the critical form group. The tested parameters were correlated with COVID-19 severity. Significant differences were registered between the form of COVID-19 depending on the vaccination status, between LDH concentrations depending on the virus variant, and in IL-6, CRP, and ferritin concentrations and vaccination status depending on the gender. ROC analysis revealed that D-dimer best predicted COVID-19 severe forms and LDH predicted the virus variant. Our findings confirmed the interdependence relationships observed between inflammation markers in relation to the clinical severity of COVID-19, with all the tested biomarkers increasing in severe and critical COVID-19. IL-6, CRP, ferritin, LDH, and D-dimer were increased in all COVID-19 forms. These inflammatory markers were lower in Omicron-infected patients. The unvaccinated patients developed more severe forms compared to the vaccinated ones, and a higher proportion of them needed hospitalization. D-dimer could predict a severe form of COVID-19, while LDH could predict the virus variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Prospective Studies , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Biomarkers , Ferritins , Vaccination , Retrospective Studies
3.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1182544, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231008

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC) is marked by persistent or newly developing symptoms beyond 4 weeks of infection. Investigating gut integrity, oxidized lipids and inflammatory markers is important for understanding PASC pathogenesis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including COVID+ with PASC, COVID+ without PASC, and COVID-negative (COVID-) participants. We measured plasma markers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to assess intestinal permeability (ZONULIN), microbial translocation (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein or LBP), systemic inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or hs-CRP), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL). Results: 415 participants were enrolled in this study; 37.83% (n=157) had prior COVID diagnosis and among COVID+, 54% (n=85) had PASC. The median zonulin among COVID- was 3.37 (IQR: 2.13, 4.91) mg/mL, 3.43 (IQR: 1.65, 5.25) mg/mL among COVID+ no PASC, and highest [4.76 (IQR: 3.2, 7.35) mg/mL] among COVID+ PASC+ (p<.0001). The median ox-LDL among COVID- was 47.02 (IQR: 35.52, 62.77) U/L, 57.24 (IQR: 40.7, 75.37) U/L among COVID+ No PASC, and the highest [76.75 (IQR: 59.95, 103.28) U/L] among COVID+ PASC+ (p<.0001). COVID+ PASC+ was positively associated with zonulin (p=0.0002) and ox-LDL (p<.0001), and COVID- was negatively associated with ox-LDL (p=0.01), compared to COVID+ No PASC. Every unit increase in zonulin was associated with 44% higher predicted odds of having PASC [aOR: 1.44 (95%CI: 1.1, 1.9)] and every one-unit increase in ox-LDL was associated with more than four-fold increased odds of having PASC [aOR: 2.44 (95%CI: 1.67, 3.55)]. Conclusions: PASC is associated with increased gut permeability and oxidized lipids. Further studies are needed to clarify whether these relationships are causal which could lead to targeted therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Cross-Sectional Studies , Lipoproteins, LDL/metabolism , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Disease Progression
4.
Complement Ther Med ; 75: 102958, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20230624

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pomegranate juice intake on the inflammatory status and complete blood count in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. METHODS: This randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled trial included 48 patients with two parallel arms. In addition to the standard care provided at the hospital, the patients consumed 500 mL of whole pomegranate juice (PJ) daily or a placebo for 14 days. Inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)) and complete blood count were determined at baseline and after the 14 days of intervention. RESULTS: At the end of the intervention, a significant decreased was observed in primary outcomes [mean difference (95 %CI)] including IL-6 [5.24(0.87-9.61)], CRP [23.19(11.93-34.44)] and ESR [10.52(1.54-19.50)] in the PJ group vs. before the intervention. In addition, significant changes were also observed in the some of the secondary outcomes, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, platelets, platelets-to-lymphocyte(PLR) and neutrophils-to-lymphocyte (NLR) ratios (p < 0.05) in the PJ group compared to before the intervention. At the end of the intervention period, the mean change of IL-6 [- 7.09(-12.21 to - 1.96)], white blood cells [- 3.09(- 6.14 to - 0.05)], neutrophils [- 9.12(-18.08 to -0.15)], lymphocyte [7.05(0.17-13.92)], platelets [- 94.54(- 139.33 to - 49.75)], PLR [- 15.99(- 29.31 to - 2.67)], blood oxygen saturation [1.75(0.13-3.37)] and MCV [0.31(- 0.25 to 0.88)] levels were significantly different between groups while no difference was observed between the two groups in other blood indices. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that pomegranate juice intake might slightly improve the inflammatory status and CBC outcomes of COVID-19 patients and it may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pomegranate , Humans , Pomegranate/metabolism , Interleukin-6 , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Adjuvants, Immunologic
5.
Chem Biol Interact ; 381: 110557, 2023 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324750

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic represents an excessive burden on health care systems worldwide and the number of patients who require special care in the clinical setting is often hard to predict. Consequently, there is an unmet need for a reliable biomarker that could predict clinical outcomes of high-risk patients. Lower serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity was recently linked with poor outcomes of COVID-19 patients. In line with this, our monocentric observational study on hospitalized COVID-19 patients focused on changes in serum BChE activity in relation to disease progression. Blood samples from 148 adult patients of both sexes were collected during their hospital stay at the Clinics of Infectiology and Clinics of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Trnava University Hospital in alignment with routine blood tests. Sera were analyzed using modified Ellman's method. Patient data with information about the health status, comorbidities and other blood parameters were collected in pseudonymized form. Our results show a lower serum BChE activity together with progressive decline of BChE activity in non-survivors, while higher stable values were present in discharged or transferred patients requiring further care. Lower BChE activity was associated with higher age and lower BMI. Moreover, we observed a negative correlation of serum BChE activity with the routinely used inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Serum BChE activity mirrored clinical outcomes of COVID-19 patients and thus serves as a novel prognostic marker in high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
Butyrylcholinesterase , COVID-19 , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Biomarkers , Butyrylcholinesterase/metabolism , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Pandemics
6.
Hypertens Res ; 45(5): 846-855, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2311278

ABSTRACT

To fight the COVID-19 pandemic, messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines were the first to be adopted by vaccination programs worldwide. We sought to investigate the short-term effect of mRNA vaccine administration on endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Thirty-two participants (mean age 37 ± 8 years, 20 men) who received the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine were studied in three sessions in a sequence-randomized, sham-controlled, assessor-blinded, crossover design. The primary outcome was endothelial function (assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD)), and the secondary outcomes were aortic stiffness (evaluated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV)) and inflammation (measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in blood samples). The outcomes were assessed prior to and at 8 h and 24 h after the 1st dose of vaccine and at 8 h, 24 h, and 48 h after the 2nd dose. There was an increase in hsCRP that was apparent at 24 h after both the 1st dose (-0.60 [95% confidence intervals [CI]: -1.60 to -0.20], p = 0.013) and the 2nd dose (maximum median difference at 48 h -6.60 [95% CI: -9.80 to -3.40], p < 0.001) compared to placebo. The vaccine did not change PWV. FMD remained unchanged during the 1st dose but decreased significantly by 1.5% (95% CI: 0.1% to 2.9%, p = 0.037) at 24 h after the 2nd dose. FMD values returned to baseline at 48 h. Our study shows that the mRNA vaccine causes a prominent increase in inflammatory markers, especially after the 2nd dose, and a transient deterioration of endothelial function at 24 h that returns to baseline at 48 h. These results confirm the short-term cardiovascular safety of the vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vascular Stiffness , Adult , BNT162 Vaccine , Brachial Artery , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Over Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pulse Wave Analysis , RNA, Messenger , Vaccines, Synthetic , mRNA Vaccines
7.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 61(9): 1546-1551, 2023 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291079

ABSTRACT

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a cytokine-mediated acute phase reactant with a recognized role in inflammatory conditions and infectious disease. In coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), elevated CRP concentrations in serum were frequently detected and significantly associated with poor outcome in terms of disease severity, need for intensive care, and in-hospital death. For these reasons, the marker was proposed as a powerful test for prognostic classification of COVID-19 patients. In most of available publications, there was however confounding information about how interpretative criteria for CRP in COVID-19 should be derived, including quality of employed assays and optimal cut-off definition. Assuring result harmonization and controlling measurement uncertainty in terms of performance specifications are fundamental to allow worldwide application of clinical information according to specific CRP thresholds and to avoid risk of patient misclassification.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Hospital Mortality , Prognosis , Biomarkers
8.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 6993, 2023 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303753

ABSTRACT

This large-scale study aimed to investigate the trend of laboratory tests of patients with COVID-19. Hospitalized confirmed and probable COVID-19 patients in three general hospitals were examined from March 20, 2020, to June 18, 2021. The confirmed and probable COVID-19 patients with known outcomes and valid laboratory results were included. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and Cox regression were used to select admittance prognostic features. Parallel Pairwise Comparison of mortality versus survival was used to examine the trend of markers. In the final cohort, 11,944 patients were enrolled, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 21.8%, mean age of 59.4 ± 18.0, and a male-to-female ratio of 1.3. Abnormal admittance level of white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, mean cellular volume, urea, creatinine, bilirubin, creatine kinase-myoglobin binding, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Troponin, c-reactive protein (CRP), potassium, and creatinine phosphokinase reduced the survival of COVID-19 inpatients. Moreover, the trend analysis showed lymphocytes, platelet, urea, CRP, alanine transaminase (ALT), and LDH have a dissimilar trend in non-survivors compared to survived patients. This study proposed a novel approach to find serial laboratory markers. Serial examination of platelet count, creatinine, CRP, LDH, and ALT can guide healthcare professionals in finding patients at risk of deterioration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Prognosis , Inpatients , Creatinine , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Biomarkers , Urea , Retrospective Studies
9.
Cell Biochem Funct ; 40(7): 694-705, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276800

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the systemic redox state and inflammatory markers in intensive care unit (ICU) or non-ICU severe COVID-19 patients during the hospitalization period. Blood samples were collected at hospital admission (T1) (Controls and COVID-19 patients), 5-7 days after admission (T2: 5-7 days after hospital admission), and at the discharge time from the hospital (T3: 0-72 h before leaving hospital or death) to analyze systemic oxidative stress markers and inflammatory variables. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were analyzed in peripheral granulocytes and monocytes. THP-1 human monocytic cell line was incubated with plasma from non-ICU and ICU COVID-19 patients and cell viability and apoptosis rate were analyzed. Higher total antioxidant capacity, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and IL-6 at hospital admission were identified in both non-ICU and ICU COVID-19 patients. ICU COVID-19 patients presented increased C-reactive protein, ROS levels, and protein oxidation over hospitalization period compared to non-ICU patients, despite increased antioxidant status. Granulocytes and monocytes of non-ICU and ICU COVID-19 patients presented lower MMP and higher ROS production compared to the healthy controls, with the highest values found in ICU COVID-19 group. Finally, the incubation of THP-1 cells with plasma acquired from ICU COVID-19 patients at T3 hospitalization period decreased cell viability and apoptosis rate. In conclusion, disturbance in redox state is a hallmark of severe COVID-19 and is associated with cell damage and death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antioxidants/metabolism , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Hosp Pediatr ; 10(10): 902-905, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2248197

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has affected children differently from adults worldwide. Data on the clinical presentation of the infection in children are limited. We present a detailed account of pediatric inpatients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus at our institution during widespread local transmission, aiming to understand disease presentation and outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of children, ages 0 to 18 years, with a positive polymerase chain reaction test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 on nasopharyngeal specimens admitted to our hospital over a 4-week period. We present clinical data from 22 patients and highlight the variability of the presentation. In our study, most children presented without respiratory illness or symptoms suggestive of COVID-19; many were identified only because of universal testing. Because children may have variable signs and symptoms of COVID-19 infection, targeted testing may miss some cases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Seizures/physiopathology , Adolescent , Age Distribution , Alanine Transaminase/metabolism , Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Chronic Disease , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Lung Diseases/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Male , Mass Screening , Neoplasms/epidemiology , New York City/epidemiology , Noninvasive Ventilation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Procalcitonin/metabolism , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Distribution , United States
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(6)2023 Mar 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284924

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic. COVID-19 patients need immediate diagnosis and rehabilitation, which makes it urgent to identify new protein markers for a prognosis of the severity and outcome of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and secretory phospholipase (sPLA2) in the blood of patients regarding the severity and outcome of COVID-19 infection. The study included clinical and biochemical data obtained from 158 patients with COVID-19 treated at St. Petersburg City Hospital No. 40. A detailed clinical blood test was performed on all patients, as well as an assessment of IL-6, sPLA2, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), APTT, fibrinogen, procalcitonin, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRB), ferritin, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) levels. It was found that the levels of PLA2, IL-6, APTV, AST, CRP, LDH, IL-6, D-dimer, and ferritin, as well as the number of neutrophils, significantly increased in patients with mild to severe COVID-19 infections. The levels of IL-6 were positively correlated with APTT; the levels of AST, LDH, CRP, D-dimer, and ferritin; and the number of neutrophils. The increase in the level of sPLA2 was positively correlated with the levels of CRP, LDH, D-dimer, and ferritin, the number of neutrophils, and APTT, and negatively correlated with the levels of GFR and lymphocytes. High levels of IL-6 and PLA2 significantly increase the risk of a severe course by 13.7 and 2.24 times, and increase the risk of death from COVID-19 infection by 14.82 and 5.32 times, respectively. We have shown that the blood levels of sPLA2 and IL-6 increase in cases which eventually result in death and when patients are transferred to the ICU (as the severity of COVID-19 infection increases), showing that IL-6 and sPLA2 can be considered as early predictors of aggravation of COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phospholipases A2, Secretory , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Ferritins , Phospholipases A2, Secretory/metabolism , Biomarkers
12.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad ; 34(Suppl 1)(4): S919-S922, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281078

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to compare lymphocyte count, C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) and D-dimer among survivors and non-survivors of severe COVID-19. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional analytical study included 69 patients for whom a record of the biomarkers and survival status was available. Baseline and peak values were selected for serum CRP, ferritin, LDH and D-Dimer. Baseline and trough lymphocyte counts were selected. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Mean and standard deviation were used to compare the biomarkers with paired t-test. p-value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: The mean age of the study population was 55.5±9.1 years and 50 (72.5%) were male. Among survivors, the increase in CRP level was not significant (from 15.80±9.8 mg/dl to 17.87±8.4 mg/dl, p=0.45) while it was significant in non-survivors (from 16.68±10.90 mg/dl to 20.77±12.69 mg/dl, p=0.04). There was no significant rise in LDH levels in survivors (from 829.59±499 U/L to 1018.6±468 U/L, p=0.20) while it increased significantly in non-survivors (from 816.2±443.08 U/L to 1056.61±480.54 U/L, p=0.003). The decrease in lymphocyte count and increase in D-Dimers in both the groups was significant (p=0.001). There was no significant elevation in ferritin in both the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: In severe COVID-19 patients, serum CRP and LDH can be used for risk stratification and predicting survival. Lymphopenia, increase in serum ferritin and D-dimers may not predict survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Ferritins
13.
J Affect Disord ; 330: 216-226, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although many studies have pointed out a possible relationship between COVID-19 and the presence of psychiatric disorders, the majority of the studies have significant limitations. This study investigates the influence of COVID-19 infection on mental health. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included an age- and sex-matched sample of adult individuals positive (cases) or negative (controls) for COVID-19. We evaluated the presence of psychiatric conditions and C-reactive protein (CRP). RESULTS: Findings showed greater severity of depressive symptoms, higher levels of stress, and greater CRP in cases. The severity of depressive and insomnia symptoms, as well as the CRP were more remarkable in individuals with moderate/severe COVID-19. We found a positive correlation between stress and severity of anxiety, depression, and insomnia in individuals with or without COVID-19. There was a positive correlation between CRP levels and severity of depressive symptoms in cases and controls, and a positive correlation between CRP levels and the severity of anxiety symptoms and stress levels only in individuals with COVID-19. Individuals with COVID-19 and depression had greater CRP than those with COVID-19 without current major depressive disorder. LIMITATIONS: We cannot infer causality because this is a cross-sectional study, and the majority of COVID-19 sample was asymptomatic or had mild symptoms, which may limit the generalizability of our findings for moderate/severe cases. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with COVID-19 showed greater severity of psychological symptoms, which may impact on the development of psychiatric disorders in the future. CPR seem to be a promising biomarker for earlier detection of post-COVID depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adult , Humans , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(4)2023 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276265

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC), are multifactorial disorders characterized by a chronic inflammatory status with the secretion of cytokines and immune mediators. Biologic drugs targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as infliximab, are broadly used in the treatment of IBD patients, but some patients lose responsiveness after an initial success. The research into new biomarkers is crucial for advancing personalized therapies and monitoring the response to biologics. The aim of this single center, observational study is to analyze the relationship between serum levels of 90K/Mac-2 BP and the response to infliximab, in a cohort of 48 IBD patients (30 CD and 18 UC), enrolled from February 2017 to December 2018. In our IBD cohort, high 90K serum levels were found at baseline in patients who then developed anti-infliximab antibodies at the fifth infusion (22 weeks after the first), becoming non-responders (9.76 ± 4.65 µg/mL compared to 6.53 ± 3.29 µg/mL in responder patients, p = 0.005). This difference was significant in the total cohort and in CD, but not significant in UC. We then analyzed the relationship between serum levels of 90K, C-reactive protein (CRP), and Fecal calprotectin. A significant positive correlation was found at baseline between 90K and CRP, the most common serum inflammation marker (R = 0.42, p = 0.0032). We concluded that circulating 90K could be considered a new non-invasive biomarker for monitoring the response to infliximab. Furthermore, 90K serum level determination, before the first infliximab infusion, in association with other inflammatory markers such as CRP, could assist in the choice of biologics for the treatment of IBD patients, thereby obviating the need for a drug switch due to loss of response, and so improving clinical practice and patient care.


Subject(s)
Biological Products , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Infliximab , Humans , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Crohn Disease/drug therapy , Cytokines/therapeutic use , Infliximab/therapeutic use
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(6)2023 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247885

ABSTRACT

Health care systems worldwide have been battling the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Lymphocytes and CRP have been reported as markers of interest. We chose to investigate the prognostic value of the LCR ratio as a marker of severity and mortality in COVID-19 infection. Between 1 March and 30 April 2020, we conducted a multicenter, retrospective cohort study of patients with moderate and severe coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), all of whom were hospitalized after being admitted to the Emergency Department (ED). We conducted our study in six major hospitals of northeast France, one of the outbreak's epicenters in Europe. A total of 1035 patients with COVID-19 were included in our study. Around three-quarters of them (76.2%) presented a moderate form of the disease, while the remaining quarter (23.8%) presented a severe form requiring admission to the ICU. At ED admission, the median LCR was significantly lower in the group presenting severe disease compared to that with moderate disease (versus 6.24 (3.24-12) versus 12.63 ((6.05-31.67)), p < 0.001). However, LCR was neither associated with disease severity (OR: 0.99, CI 95% (0.99-1)), p = 0.476) nor mortality (OR: 0.99, CI 95% (0.99-1)). In the ED, LCR, although modest, with a threshold of 12.63, was a predictive marker for severe forms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Emergency Service, Hospital
17.
Ir J Med Sci ; 191(4): 1725-1733, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2249091

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate hematological parameters in children with COVID-19 and determine the effects of inflammatory biomarkers on the assessment of hospitalization. METHODS: This retrospective single-center study was performed on 633 children with COVID-19 between March 2020 and January 2021. The study population was separated into two groups: inpatients (n = 83) and outpatients (n = 550). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was applied to identify risk factors for hospitalization. RESULTS: Lymphopenia (n = 228, 36%) was found mainly to be a hematological abnormality in all cases. Compared with outpatients, inpatients had significantly higher white blood cell (WBC) (p = 0.005), lymphocyte (p < 0.001), and platelet counts (p = 0.036), and significantly higher red cell distribution width (p = 0.001), C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.003), procalcitonin (p = 0.001), D-dimer (p < 0.001), and lymphocyte to monocyte ratio values (p = 0.004). On the other hand, they had significantly lower values of hemoglobin (p < 0.001), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (p = 0.024), platelet lymphocyte ratio (p = 0.001), derivated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (p = 0.037), and mean platelet volume to lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.001). ROC analysis showed that WBC, CRP, and procalcitonin cutoff values were the best discriminated between inpatients and outpatients. The results for the areas under the curve of WBC, CRP, and procalcitonin used to assess patients' hospitalization were 0.595 (95% CI 0.519-0.670, p = 0.005), 0.599 (95% CI 0.527-0.672, p = 0.003), and 0.599 (95% CI 0.525-0.673, p = 0.004), respectively. CONCLUSION: We suggest that high WBC and procalcitonin levels can be used as independent predictors of hospitalization in children with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Child , Humans , Procalcitonin , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies
18.
Afr J Paediatr Surg ; 20(2): 130-137, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261700

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In this study, we prospectively investigated changes in serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and full white blood cell (WBC) counts during the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric patients with appendicitis. We also investigated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the diagnosis and treatment processes of paediatric appendicitis patients. Materials and Methods: A non-perforated appendicitis group (n = 110), a perforated appendicitis group (n = 35) and an appendicitis + COVID-19 group (n = 8) were formed. Blood samples were taken upon admission and every day until the three studied parameters returned to normal values. To investigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on paediatric appendicitis patients, the perforated appendicitis rates and the times from the onset of the first symptoms to the operation before and during the pandemic were compared. Results: WBC, IL-6, and hsCRP dropped below the upper limits on the second postoperative day in the non-perforated appendicitis group, four to six days postoperatively in the perforated appendicitis group, and three to six days postoperatively in the appendicitis + COVID-19 group. These parameters were not within normal range in patients who developed complications during follow-up. The time from the onset of abdominal pain to the surgery was significantly longer during than before the pandemic in both the non-perforated appendicitis group and the perforated appendicitis group. Conclusions: Our results show that WBC, IL-6, and hsCRP are useful laboratory parameters that can complete clinical examinations in the diagnosis of appendicitis in paediatric patients and the identification of complications that may develop postoperatively.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , COVID-19 , Humans , Child , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Interleukin-6 , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/surgery , Pandemics , Leukocytes/chemistry , Leukocytes/metabolism , Appendectomy , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19 Testing
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258594

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is one of the world's most disruptive health crises. The presence of diabetes plays an important role in the severity of the infection, and a rise in newly diagnosed diabetes cases has been identified. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of new-onset diabetes (NOD) and predictive factors with their cut-off values for patients hospitalized with COVID-19. All patients (n = 219) hospitalized for COVID-19 during three consecutive months were included. NOD was diagnosed in 26.48% of patients. The severity of the infection, hospital admission values for fasting plasma glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), PaO2/FiO2 ratio, the peak values for leucocytes, neutrophils, C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and the need for care in the intensive care unit were predictors for the occurrence of NOD in univariate analysis, while only LDH level remained a significant predictor in the multivariable analysis. In conclusion, the results of the study showed a high incidence of NOD in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and identified LDH levels at hospital admission as a significant predictor of NOD during SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the persistence of NOD after the COVID-19 infection is not known, therefore, the results must be interpreted with caution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Blood Glucose , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase , Triglycerides
20.
Front Immunol ; 13: 1105343, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243432

ABSTRACT

C-reactive protein (CRP), an active regulator of the innate immune system, has been related to COVID-19 severity. CRP is a dynamic protein undergoing conformational changes upon activation in inflammatory microenvironments between pentameric and monomeric isoforms. Although pentameric CRP is the circulating isoform routinely tested for clinical purposes, monomeric CRP shows more proinflammatory properties. Therefore, we aimed to determine the potential of monomeric CRP in serum as a biomarker of disease severity in COVID-19 patients (admission to intensive care unit [ICU] and/or in-hospital mortality). We retrospectively determined clinical and biological features as well as pentameric and monomeric CRP levels in a cohort of 97 COVID-19 patients within 72h of hospital admission. Patients with severe disease had higher levels of both pentameric and monomeric CRP. However, multivariate analysis showed increased mCRP but not pCRP to be independently associated to disease severity. Notably, mCRP levels higher than 4000 ng/mL (OR: 4.551, 95% CI: 1.329-15.58), together with number of co-morbidities, low lymphocyte count, and procalcitonin levels were independent predictors of disease severity in the multivariate model. Our results show the potential of mCRP levels as a marker of clinical severity in COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19 , Humans , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Protein Isoforms/metabolism
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