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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 782731, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581325

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 and its variants are still hitting the world. Ever since the outbreak, neurological involvements as headache, ageusia, and anosmia in COVID-19 patients have been emphasized and reported. But the pathogenesis of these new-onset neurological manifestations in COVID-19 patients is still obscure and controversial. As difficulty always lay in the diagnosis of neurological infection, current reports to validate the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost relied on the basic methods and warranted improvement. Here we reported a case series of 8 patients with prominent new-onset neurological manifestations, who were screened out from a patch of 304 COVID-19 confirmed patients. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and proteomics were conducted in the simultaneously obtained CSF and serum samples of the selected patients, with three non-COVID-19 patients with matched demographic features used as the controls for proteomic analysis. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in the CSF of four COVID-19 patients and was suspicious in the rest four remaining patients by NGS, but was negative in all serum samples. Proteomic analysis revealed that 185 and 59 proteins were differentially expressed in CSF and serum samples, respectively, and that only 20 proteins were shared, indicating that the proteomic changes in CSF were highly specific. Further proteomic annotation highlighted the involvement of complement system, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, enhanced cellular interaction, and macrophages in the CSF proteomic alterations. This study, equipped with NGS and proteomics, reported a high detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of COVID-19 patients and the proteomic alteration of CSF, which would provide insights into understanding the pathological mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 CNS infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/metabolism , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Analysis, RNA
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477958

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2/Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is responsible for the pandemic, which started in December 2019. In addition to the typical respiratory symptoms, this virus also causes other severe complications, including neurological ones. In diagnostics, serological and polymerase chain reaction tests are useful not only in detecting past infections but can also predict the response to vaccination. It is now believed that an immune mechanism rather than direct viral neuroinvasion is responsible for neurological symptoms. For this reason, it is important to assess the presence of antibodies not only in the serum but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), especially in the case of neuro-COVID. A particular group of patients are people with multiple sclerosis (MS) whose disease-modifying drugs weaken the immune system and lead to an unpredictable serological response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Based on available data, the article summarizes the current serological information concerning COVID-19 in CSF in patients with severe neurological complications and in those with MS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/blood , Multiple Sclerosis/cerebrospinal fluid , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/virology
3.
Cell Rep ; 37(5): 109942, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471904

ABSTRACT

Anti-viral monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments may provide immediate but short-term immunity from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in high-risk populations, such as people with diabetes and the elderly; however, data on their efficacy in these populations are limited. We demonstrate that prophylactic mAb treatment blocks viral replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts in aged, type 2 diabetic rhesus macaques. mAb infusion dramatically curtails severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-mediated stimulation of interferon-induced chemokines and T cell activation, significantly reducing development of interstitial pneumonia. Furthermore, mAb infusion significantly dampens the greater than 3-fold increase in SARS-CoV-2-induced effector CD4 T cell influx into the cerebrospinal fluid. Our data show that neutralizing mAbs administered preventatively to high-risk populations may mitigate the adverse inflammatory consequences of SARS-CoV-2 exposure.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aging/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Complications/immunology , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Macaca mulatta , Male , Neuritis/immunology , Neuritis/prevention & control , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 6045-6049, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432431

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to be associated with a lot of neurological complications, of whom Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an important post-infectious consequentiality. More than 220 patients with GBS have been reported thus far. We intend to share our experience with five patients of GBS where one of them had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This is the first-ever report demonstrating the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of an adult patient; a similar occurrence has recently been described in a pediatric patient. We wish to emphasize the fact that commonly GBS occurs as a result of a post-infectious process but in a few cases where the symptoms of COVID-19 and GBS occur concurrently, corresponding to the viremic phase, separate pathogenesis needs to be thought of. This para-infectious nature is exemplified by the presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of one of our patients. We review the neuroinvasive potential of SARS-Cov-2 in this regard and draw parallels with Cytomegalovirus, Zika virus, and Human Immunodeficiency virus-associated occurrences of GBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5432-5437, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363681

ABSTRACT

This case series describes three patients affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, who developed polyradiculoneuritis as a probable neurological complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In all of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 gr/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases, a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential cMAP. Due to the potential role of inflammation on symptoms development and prognosis, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 levels were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid during the acute phase, while only serum was tested after recovery. Both IL-6 and IL-8 were found increased during the acute phase, both in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid, whereas 4 months after admission (at complete recovery), only IL-8 remained elevated in the serum. These results confirm the inflammatory response that might be linked to peripheral nervous system complications and encourage the use of IL-6 and IL-8 as prognostic biomarkers in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Interleukin-6/cerebrospinal fluid , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Action Potentials/drug effects , Acute Disease , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Neural Conduction/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/pathology , Peripheral Nervous System/virology , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
7.
J Neurochem ; 159(1): 61-77, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282005

ABSTRACT

Neurological symptoms are frequently reported in patients suffering from COVID-19. Common CNS-related symptoms include anosmia, caused by viral interaction with either neurons or supporting cells in nasal olfactory tissues. Diffuse encephalopathy is the most common sign of CNS dysfunction, which likely results from the CNS consequences of the systemic inflammatory syndrome associated with severe COVID-19. Additionally, microvascular injuries and thromboembolic events likely contribute to the neurologic impact of acute COVID-19. These observations are supported by evidence of CNS immune activation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in autopsy tissue, along with the detection of microvascular injuries in both pathological and neuroimaging studies. The frequent occurrence of thromboembolic events in patients with COVID-19 has generated different hypotheses, among which viral interaction with perivascular cells is particularly attractive, yet unproven. A distinguishing feature of CSF findings in SARS-CoV-2 infection is that clinical signs characteristic of neurotropic viral infections (CSF pleocytosis and blood-brain barrier injury) are mild or absent. Moreover, virus detection in CSF is rare and often of uncertain significance. In this review, we provide an overview of the neurological impact that occurs in the acute phase of COVID-19, and the role of CSF biomarkers in the clinical management and research to better treat and understand the disease. In addition to aiding as diagnostic and prognostic tools during acute infection, the use of comprehensive and well-characterized CSF and blood biomarkers will be vital in understanding the potential impact on the CNS in the rapidly increasing number of individuals recovering from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , Blood-Brain Barrier , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis
8.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 6045-6049, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281226

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to be associated with a lot of neurological complications, of whom Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an important post-infectious consequentiality. More than 220 patients with GBS have been reported thus far. We intend to share our experience with five patients of GBS where one of them had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This is the first-ever report demonstrating the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of an adult patient; a similar occurrence has recently been described in a pediatric patient. We wish to emphasize the fact that commonly GBS occurs as a result of a post-infectious process but in a few cases where the symptoms of COVID-19 and GBS occur concurrently, corresponding to the viremic phase, separate pathogenesis needs to be thought of. This para-infectious nature is exemplified by the presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid of one of our patients. We review the neuroinvasive potential of SARS-Cov-2 in this regard and draw parallels with Cytomegalovirus, Zika virus, and Human Immunodeficiency virus-associated occurrences of GBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
9.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(5)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278138

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been associated with a large variety of neurologic disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying these neurologic complications remain elusive. In this study, we aimed at determining whether neurologic symptoms were caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) direct infection or by either systemic or local proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we checked for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by quantitative reverse transcription PCR, SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies, and 49 cytokines/chemokines/growth factors (by Luminex) in the CSF +/- sera of a cohort of 22 COVID-19 patients with neurologic presentation and 55 neurologic control patients (inflammatory neurologic disorder [IND], noninflammatory neurologic disorder, and MS). RESULTS: We detected anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G in patients with severe COVID-19 with signs of intrathecal synthesis for some of them. Of the 4 categories of tested patients, the CSF of IND exhibited the highest level of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. By contrast, patients with COVID-19 did not present overall upregulation of inflammatory mediators in the CSF. However, patients with severe COVID-19 (intensive care unit patients) exhibited higher concentrations of CCL2, CXCL8, and vascular endothelium growth factor A (VEGF-A) in the CSF than patients with a milder form of COVID-19. In addition, we could show that intrathecal CXCL8 synthesis was linked to an elevated albumin ratio and correlated with the increase of peripheral inflammation (serum hepatocyte growth factor [HGF] and CXCL10). CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not indicate active replication of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF or signs of massive inflammation in the CSF compartment but highlight a specific impairment of the neurovascular unit linked to intrathecal production of CXCL8.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokines/cerebrospinal fluid , Inflammation/etiology , Neurovascular Coupling , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain Diseases/immunology , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/immunology , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cytokines/blood , Electroencephalography , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/cerebrospinal fluid , Inflammation/cerebrospinal fluid , Inflammation/immunology , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Male , Middle Aged , Neurovascular Coupling/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
10.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106760, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267627

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the literature on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) testing in patients with altered olfactory/gustatory function due to COVID-19 for evidence of viral neuroinvasion. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of Medline and Embase to identify publications that described at least one patient with COVID-19 who had altered olfactory/gustatory function and had CSF testing performed. The search ranged from December 1, 2019 to November 18, 2020. RESULTS: We identified 51 publications that described 70 patients who met inclusion criteria. Of 51 patients who had CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing, 3 (6%) patients had positive results and 1 (2%) patient had indeterminate results. Cycle threshold (Ct; the number of amplification cycles required for the target gene to exceed the threshold, which is inversely related to viral load) was not provided for the patients with a positive PCR. The patient with indeterminate results had a Ct of 37 initially, then no evidence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on repeat testing. Of 6 patients who had CSF SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing, 3 (50%) were positive. Testing to distinguish intrathecal antibody synthesis from transudation of antibodies to the CSF via breakdown of the blood-brain barrier was performed in 1/3 (33%) patients; this demonstrated antibody transmission to the CSF via transudation. CONCLUSION: Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in CSF via PCR or evaluation for intrathecal antibody synthesis appears to be rare in patients with altered olfactory/gustatory function. While pathology studies are needed, our review suggests it is unlikely that these symptoms are related to viral neuroinvasion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/epidemiology , Olfaction Disorders/cerebrospinal fluid , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Taste Disorders/cerebrospinal fluid , Taste Disorders/epidemiology , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Olfaction Disorders/diagnosis , Taste Disorders/diagnosis
11.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5432-5437, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258081

ABSTRACT

This case series describes three patients affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, who developed polyradiculoneuritis as a probable neurological complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In all of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 gr/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases, a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential cMAP. Due to the potential role of inflammation on symptoms development and prognosis, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 levels were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid during the acute phase, while only serum was tested after recovery. Both IL-6 and IL-8 were found increased during the acute phase, both in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid, whereas 4 months after admission (at complete recovery), only IL-8 remained elevated in the serum. These results confirm the inflammatory response that might be linked to peripheral nervous system complications and encourage the use of IL-6 and IL-8 as prognostic biomarkers in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Interleukin-6/cerebrospinal fluid , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Action Potentials/drug effects , Acute Disease , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Neural Conduction/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/pathology , Peripheral Nervous System/virology , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 515, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 can affect the human brain and other neurological structures. An increasing number of publications report neurological manifestations in patients with COVID-19. However, no studies have comprehensively reviewed the clinical and paraclinical characteristics of the central and peripheral nervous system's involvement in these patients. This study aimed to describe the features of the central and peripheral nervous system involvement by COVID-19 in terms of pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, neuropathology, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and cerebrospinal fluid findings. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive systematic review of all the original studies reporting patients with neurological involvement by COVID-19, from December 2019 to June 2020, without language restriction. We excluded studies with animal subjects, studies not related to the nervous system, and opinion articles. Data analysis combined descriptive measures, frequency measures, central tendency measures, and dispersion measures for all studies reporting neurological conditions and abnormal ancillary tests in patients with confirmed COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 143 observational and descriptive studies reported central and peripheral nervous system involvement by COVID-19 in 10,723 patients. Fifty-one studies described pathophysiologic mechanisms of neurological involvement by COVID-19, 119 focused on clinical manifestations, 4 described neuropathology findings, 62 described neuroimaging findings, 28 electrophysiology findings, and 60 studies reported cerebrospinal fluid results. The reviewed studies reflect a significant prevalence of the nervous system's involvement in patients with COVID-19, ranging from 22.5 to 36.4% among different studies, without mortality rates explicitly associated with neurological involvement by SARS-CoV-2. We thoroughly describe the clinical and paraclinical characteristics of neurological involvement in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our evidence synthesis led to a categorical analysis of the central and peripheral neurological involvement by COVID-19 and provided a comprehensive explanation of the reported pathophysiological mechanisms by which SARS-CoV-2 infection may cause neurological impairment. International collaborative efforts and exhaustive neurological registries will enhance the translational knowledge of COVID-19's central and peripheral neurological involvement and generate therapeutic decision-making strategies. REGISTRATION: This review was registered in PROSPERO 2020 CRD42020193140 Available from: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42020193140.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Peripheral Nervous System/physiopathology , Peripheral Nervous System/virology , Brain , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , Electrophysiological Phenomena , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Neuroimaging
13.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(9): 105915, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253282

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a 35-year-old male with COVID-19 encephalitis presenting as a stroke mimic with sudden-onset expressive and receptive dysphasia, mild confusion and right arm incoordination. The patient received thrombolysis for a suspected ischaemic stroke, but later became febrile and SARS-CoV-2 was detected in cerebrospinal fluid. Electroencephalography demonstrated excess in slow waves, but neuroimaging was reported as normal. Respiratory symptoms were absent throughout and nasopharyngeal swab was negative for SARS-CoV-2. At the most recent follow-up, the patient had made a full neurological recovery. Clinicians should therefore consider testing for SARS-CoV-2 in CSF in patients who present with acute focal neurology, confusion and fever during the pandemic, even when there is no evidence of respiratory infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Encephalitis, Viral/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Electroencephalography , Encephalitis, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Encephalitis, Viral/virology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Predictive Value of Tests , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
J Neurol ; 268(12): 4448-4478, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233263

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The literature on neurological manifestations in COVID-19 patients has been rapidly increasing with the pandemic. However, data on CNS inflammatory disorders in COVID-19 are still evolving. We performed a literature review of CNS inflammatory disorders associated with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We screened all articles resulting from a search of PubMed, Google Scholar and Scopus, using the keywords; "SARS-CoV-2 and neurological complication", "SARS-CoV-2 and CNS Complication" looking for reports of transverse myelitis, longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, neuromyelitis optica, myelitis, Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Antibody Disorder (MOGAD), Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM), Acute Hemorrhagic Necrotizing Encephalitis/Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis (AHNE/AHLE), Cytotoxic lesion of the Corpus Callosum/Mild Encephalopathy Reversible Splenium Lesion(CLOCC/MERS) and Optic neuritis published between December 01, 2019 and March 15, 2021. RESULTS: Our literature search revealed 43 patients meeting the diagnosis of myelitis, including Transverse Myelitis, ADEM, AHNE/AHLE or CLOCC/MERS and Optic neuritis. Acute myelitis was most commonly associated with non-severe COVID-19 and all reported cases of AHNE/AHLE had severe COVID-19 infection. Based on IDSA/ATS criteria of either requiring vasopressor for septic shock or mechanical ventilation, 49% (n = 18) patients were considered to have a severe COVID infection. There were 7 (n = 19%) fatalities. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is among the first reviews that includes the clinical features, neuroimaging, CSF findings and outcomes in COVID-19-associated CNS inflammatory disorders. Our observational review study reveals that although rare, myelitis, ADEM, AHNE and CLOCC can be associated with COVID-19 infection. Further studies using MRI imaging and CSF analysis in early diagnosis and intervention of these disorders are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Myelitis, Transverse , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Central Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Humans , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein , Myelitis, Transverse/diagnostic imaging , Myelitis, Transverse/virology , Neuroimaging , Observational Studies as Topic
15.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(7): e274-e276, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228550

ABSTRACT

Underlying mechanisms on the association between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and neurologic complications are still poorly understood. Cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) have been linked to the SARS-CoV-2 infection as the result of dysregulated immune response with damage in neuronal tissues. In the current report, we present the first pediatric case of GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CFS). This unique case of COVID-19-associated GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the CSF indicates direct viral involvement inducing peripheral nerve inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Cauda Equina/diagnostic imaging , Cauda Equina/pathology , Cauda Equina/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 766-774, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196399

ABSTRACT

We report a case series of five patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 who developed neurological symptoms, mainly expressing as polyradiculoneuritis and cranial polyneuritis in the 2 months of COVID-19 pandemic in a city in the northeast of Italy. A diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical presentation, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In four of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 g/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential compound muscle action potential (cMAP). Four patients presented a mild facial nerve involvement limited to the muscles of the lower face, with sparing of the forehead muscles associated to ageusia. In one patient, taste assessment showed right-sided ageusia of the tongue, ipsilateral to the mild facial palsy. In three patients we observed albuminocytological dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid, and notably, we found an increase of inflammatory mediators such as the interleukin-8. Peripheral nervous system involvement after infection with COVID-19 is possible and may include several signs that may be successfully treated with immunoglobulin therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Nervous System Physiological Phenomena , Neuritis/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/virology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Facial Paralysis/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Neuritis/therapy , Neuritis/virology , Polyradiculoneuropathy/diagnosis , Polyradiculoneuropathy/virology
18.
J Infect Dis ; 223(4): 600-609, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological manifestations are common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but little is known about pathophysiological mechanisms. In this single-center study, we examined neurological manifestations in 58 patients, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and neuroimaging findings. METHODS: The study included 58 patients with COVID-19 and neurological manifestations in whom severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction screening and on CSF analysis were performed. Clinical, laboratory, and brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Patients were mostly men (66%), with a median age of 62 years. Encephalopathy was frequent (81%), followed by pyramidal dysfunction (16%), seizures (10%), and headaches (5%). CSF protein and albumin levels were increased in 38% and 23%, respectively. A total of 40% of patients displayed an elevated albumin quotient, suggesting impaired blood-brain barrier integrity. CSF-specific immunoglobulin G oligoclonal band was found in 5 patients (11%), suggesting an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin G, and 26 patients (55%) presented identical oligoclonal bands in serum and CSF. Four patients (7%) had a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Leptomeningeal enhancement was present on brain MR images in 20 patients (38%). CONCLUSIONS: Brain MR imaging abnormalities, especially leptomeningeal enhancement, and increased inflammatory markers in CSF are frequent in patients with neurological manifestations related to COVID-19, whereas SARS-CoV-2 detection in CSF remained scanty.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , Blood-Brain Barrier/diagnostic imaging , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , France , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
19.
Ann Neurol ; 89(5): 1041-1045, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100843

ABSTRACT

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can present with distinct neurological manifestations. This study shows that inflammatory neurological diseases were associated with increased levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8), and CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conversely, encephalopathy was associated with high serum levels of IL-6, CXCL8, and active tumor growth factor ß1. Inflammatory syndromes of the central nervous system in COVID-19 can appear early, as a parainfectious process without significant systemic involvement, or without direct evidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 neuroinvasion. At the same time, encephalopathy is mainly influenced by peripheral events, including inflammatory cytokines. ANN NEUROL 2021;89:1041-1045.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Inflammation Mediators/cerebrospinal fluid , Nervous System Diseases/blood , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/cerebrospinal fluid , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology
20.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(1): e58-e60, 2021 02.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067890

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus, responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, is an emerging infectious agent. The knowledge of both its infectivity mechanisms and the possible complications and specific treatments is the subject of constant research. To understand the involvement of the central nervous system in children, the behavior of this germ is studied based on the neuroinvasive properties of certain respiratory viruses, the neurological damage caused by other coronaviruses, and the clinical manifestations in adults with COVID-19. We describe the clinical case of a 2-month-old patient who consulted for fever without a focus with detection of SARSCoV- 2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in nasopharyngeal secretions and cerebrospinal fluid. The infant presented good evolution, with resolution of the fever and without compromise or neurological manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Infant , Male
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