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1.
Braz. J. Pharm. Sci. (Online) ; 59: e21425, 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2328188

ABSTRACT

Abstract The University Pharmacy Program (FU), from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), was created based on the need to offer a curricular internship to students of the Undergraduate Course at the Faculty of Pharmacy. Currently, it is responsible for the care of about 200 patients/day, offering vacancies for curricular internships for students in the Pharmacy course, it has become a reference in the manipulation of many drugs neglected by the pharmaceutical industry and provides access to medicines for low-income users playing an important social function. Research is one of the pillars of FU-UFRJ and several master and doctoral students use the FU research laboratory in the development of dissertations and theses. As of 2002, the Pharmaceutical Care extension projects started to guarantee a rational and safe pharmacotherapy for the medicine users. From its beginning in 1982 until the current quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic, FU-UFRJ has been adapting to the new reality and continued to provide patient care services, maintaining its teaching, research, and extension activities. The FU plays a relevant social role in guaranteeing the low-income population access to special and neglected medicines, and to pharmaceutical and education services in health promotion.


Subject(s)
Pharmacy/classification , Education, Pharmacy , COVID-19/classification , Patients/classification , Pharmaceutical Services/history , Teaching/ethics , Pharmaceutical Preparations/supply & distribution , Patient Care/ethics
3.
Am J Prev Med ; 64(4): 492-502, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287982

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Physical activity before COVID-19 infection is associated with less severe outcomes. The study determined whether a dose‒response association was observed and whether the associations were consistent across demographic subgroups and chronic conditions. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of Kaiser Permanente Southern California adult patients who had a positive COVID-19 diagnosis between January 1, 2020 and May 31, 2021 was created. The exposure was the median of at least 3 physical activity self-reports before diagnosis. Patients were categorized as follows: always inactive, all assessments at 10 minutes/week or less; mostly inactive, median of 0-60 minutes per week; some activity, median of 60-150 minutes per week; consistently active, median>150 minutes per week; and always active, all assessments>150 minutes per week. Outcomes were hospitalization, deterioration event, or death 90 days after a COVID-19 diagnosis. Data were analyzed in 2022. RESULTS: Of 194,191 adults with COVID-19 infection, 6.3% were hospitalized, 3.1% experienced a deterioration event, and 2.8% died within 90 days. Dose‒response effects were strong; for example, patients in the some activity category had higher odds of hospitalization (OR=1.43; 95% CI=1.26, 1.63), deterioration (OR=1.83; 95% CI=1.49, 2.25), and death (OR=1.92; 95% CI=1.48, 2.49) than those in the always active category. Results were generally consistent across sex, race and ethnicity, age, and BMI categories and for patients with cardiovascular disease or hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: There were protective associations of physical activity for adverse COVID-19 outcomes across demographic and clinical characteristics. Public health leaders should add physical activity to pandemic control strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Exercise/physiology , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , California , Retrospective Studies , Disease Progression , Sedentary Behavior , Time Factors , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data , Ethnicity/statistics & numerical data , Body Mass Index , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology
4.
Contrast Media Mol Imaging ; 2022: 8549707, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2248150

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a deadly virus that initially starts with flu-like symptoms. COVID-19 emerged in China and quickly spread around the globe, resulting in the coronavirus epidemic of 2019-22. As this virus is very similar to influenza in its early stages, its accurate detection is challenging. Several techniques for detecting the virus in its early stages are being developed. Deep learning techniques are a handy tool for detecting various diseases. For the classification of COVID-19 and influenza, we proposed tailored deep learning models. A publicly available dataset of X-ray images was used to develop proposed models. According to test results, deep learning models can accurately diagnose normal, influenza, and COVID-19 cases. Our proposed long short-term memory (LSTM) technique outperformed the CNN model in the evaluation phase on chest X-ray images, achieving 98% accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Influenza, Human , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/classification , Influenza, Human/diagnostic imaging , Male
6.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 1220, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735246

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 shares the feature of autoantibody production with systemic autoimmune diseases. In order to understand the role of these immune globulins in the pathogenesis of the disease, it is important to explore the autoantibody spectra. Here we show, by a cross-sectional study of 246 individuals, that autoantibodies targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and RAS-related molecules associate with the clinical severity of COVID-19. Patients with moderate and severe disease are characterized by higher autoantibody levels than healthy controls and those with mild COVID-19 disease. Among the anti-GPCR autoantibodies, machine learning classification identifies the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and the RAS-related molecule AGTR1 as targets for antibodies with the strongest association to disease severity. Besides antibody levels, autoantibody network signatures are also changing in patients with intermediate or high disease severity. Although our current and previous studies identify anti-GPCR antibodies as natural components of human biology, their production is deregulated in COVID-19 and their level and pattern alterations might predict COVID-19 disease severity.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/immunology , Renin-Angiotensin System/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , Autoimmunity , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/classification , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Machine Learning , Male , Multivariate Analysis , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/immunology , Receptors, CXCR3/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715406

ABSTRACT

To better understand the molecular basis of respiratory diseases of viral origin, high-throughput gene-expression data are frequently taken by means of DNA microarray or RNA-seq technology. Such data can also be useful to classify infected individuals by molecular signatures in the form of machine-learning models with genes as predictor variables. Early diagnosis of patients by molecular signatures could also contribute to better treatments. An approach that has rarely been considered for machine-learning models in the context of transcriptomics is data augmentation. For other data types it has been shown that augmentation can improve classification accuracy and prevent overfitting. Here, we compare three strategies for data augmentation of DNA microarray and RNA-seq data from two selected studies on respiratory diseases of viral origin. The first study involves samples of patients with either viral or bacterial origin of the respiratory disease, the second study involves patients with either SARS-CoV-2 or another respiratory virus as disease origin. Specifically, we reanalyze these public datasets to study whether patient classification by transcriptomic signatures can be improved when adding artificial data for training of the machine-learning models. Our comparison reveals that augmentation of transcriptomic data can improve the classification accuracy and that fewer genes are necessary as explanatory variables in the final models. We also report genes from our signatures that overlap with signatures presented in the original publications of our example data. Due to strict selection criteria, the molecular role of these genes in the context of respiratory infectious diseases is underlined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Machine Learning , Neural Networks, Computer , RNA-Seq/methods , Transcriptome/genetics , Algorithms , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/virology , Gene Ontology , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 1, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Quantitative evaluation of radiographic images has been developed and suggested for the diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, there are limited opportunities to use these image-based diagnostic indices in clinical practice. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the utility of a novel visually-based classification of pulmonary findings from computed tomography (CT) images of COVID-19 patients with the following three patterns defined: peripheral, multifocal, and diffuse findings of pneumonia. We also evaluated the prognostic value of this classification to predict the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: This was a single-center retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between January 1st and September 30th, 2020, who presented with suspicious findings on CT lung images at admission (n = 69). We compared the association between the three predefined patterns (peripheral, multifocal, and diffuse), admission to the intensive care unit, tracheal intubation, and death. We tested quantitative CT analysis as an outcome predictor for COVID-19. Quantitative CT analysis was performed using a semi-automated method (Thoracic Volume Computer-Assisted Reading software, GE Health care, United States). Lungs were divided by Hounsfield unit intervals. Compromised lung (%CL) volume was the sum of poorly and non-aerated volumes (- 500, 100 HU). We collected patient clinical data, including demographic and clinical variables at the time of admission. RESULTS: Patients with a diffuse pattern were intubated more frequently and for a longer duration than patients with a peripheral or multifocal pattern. The following clinical variables were significantly different between the diffuse pattern and peripheral and multifocal groups: body temperature (p = 0.04), lymphocyte count (p = 0.01), neutrophil count (p = 0.02), c-reactive protein (p < 0.01), lactate dehydrogenase (p < 0.01), Krebs von den Lungen-6 antigen (p < 0.01), D-dimer (p < 0.01), and steroid (p = 0.01) and favipiravir (p = 0.03) administration. CONCLUSIONS: Our simple visual assessment of CT images can predict the severity of illness, a resulting decrease in respiratory function, and the need for supplemental respiratory ventilation among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Aged , Amides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Body Temperature , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Mucin-1/blood , Neutrophils , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Steroids/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
9.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 61(2): 188-193, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551124

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has a wide pediatric clinical spectrum. Initial reports suggested that children had milder symptoms compared with adults; then diagnosis of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) emerged. We performed a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized patients at a children's hospital over 1 year. Our objectives were to study the demographic and clinical profile of pediatric SARS-CoV-2-associated diagnoses. Based on the clinical syndrome, patients were classified into coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19; non-MIS-C) and MIS-C cohorts. Among those who tested positive, 67% were symptomatic. MIS-C was diagnosed in 24 patients. Both diagnoses were more frequent in Caucasians. Both cohorts had different symptom profiles. Inflammatory markers were several-fold higher in MIS-C patients. These patients had critical care needs and longer hospital stays. More COVID-19 patients had respiratory complications, while MIS-C cohort saw cardiovascular involvement. Health care awareness of both syndromes is important for early recognition, diagnosis, and prompt treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Syndrome , Adolescent , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/classification , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology
10.
JAMA ; 326(20): 2043-2054, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544165

ABSTRACT

Importance: A comprehensive understanding of the benefits of COVID-19 vaccination requires consideration of disease attenuation, determined as whether people who develop COVID-19 despite vaccination have lower disease severity than unvaccinated people. Objective: To evaluate the association between vaccination with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines-mRNA-1273 (Moderna) and BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech)-and COVID-19 hospitalization, and, among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, the association with progression to critical disease. Design, Setting, and Participants: A US 21-site case-control analysis of 4513 adults hospitalized between March 11 and August 15, 2021, with 28-day outcome data on death and mechanical ventilation available for patients enrolled through July 14, 2021. Date of final follow-up was August 8, 2021. Exposures: COVID-19 vaccination. Main Outcomes and Measures: Associations were evaluated between prior vaccination and (1) hospitalization for COVID-19, in which case patients were those hospitalized for COVID-19 and control patients were those hospitalized for an alternative diagnosis; and (2) disease progression among patients hospitalized for COVID-19, in which cases and controls were COVID-19 patients with and without progression to death or mechanical ventilation, respectively. Associations were measured with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Among 4513 patients (median age, 59 years [IQR, 45-69]; 2202 [48.8%] women; 23.0% non-Hispanic Black individuals, 15.9% Hispanic individuals, and 20.1% with an immunocompromising condition), 1983 were case patients with COVID-19 and 2530 were controls without COVID-19. Unvaccinated patients accounted for 84.2% (1669/1983) of COVID-19 hospitalizations. Hospitalization for COVID-19 was significantly associated with decreased likelihood of vaccination (cases, 15.8%; controls, 54.8%; adjusted OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.13-0.18), including for sequenced SARS-CoV-2 Alpha (8.7% vs 51.7%; aOR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.06-0.16) and Delta variants (21.9% vs 61.8%; aOR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.10-0.21). This association was stronger for immunocompetent patients (11.2% vs 53.5%; aOR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.09-0.13) than immunocompromised patients (40.1% vs 58.8%; aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.35-0.69) (P < .001) and weaker at more than 120 days since vaccination with BNT162b2 (5.8% vs 11.5%; aOR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.27-0.49) than with mRNA-1273 (1.9% vs 8.3%; aOR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.09-0.23) (P < .001). Among 1197 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, death or invasive mechanical ventilation by day 28 was associated with decreased likelihood of vaccination (12.0% vs 24.7%; aOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.19-0.58). Conclusions and Relevance: Vaccination with an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine was significantly less likely among patients with COVID-19 hospitalization and disease progression to death or mechanical ventilation. These findings are consistent with risk reduction among vaccine breakthrough infections compared with absence of vaccination.


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/classification , Case-Control Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vaccination
11.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 357-365, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544349

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a serious respiratory disease. The ever-increasing number of cases is causing heavier loads on the health service system. Using 38 blood test indicators on the first day of admission for the 422 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (from January 2020 to June 2021) to construct different machine learning (ML) models to classify patients into either mild or severe cases of COVID-19. All models show good performance in the classification between COVID-19 patients into mild and severe disease. The area under the curve (AUC) of the random forest model is 0.89, the AUC of the naive Bayes model is 0.90, the AUC of the support vector machine model is 0.86, and the AUC of the KNN model is 0.78, the AUC of the Logistic regression model is 0.84, and the AUC of the artificial neural network model is 0.87, among which the naive Bayes model has the best performance. Different ML models can classify patients into mild and severe cases based on 38 blood test indicators taken on the first day of admission for patients diagnosed with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Chemical Analysis , COVID-19/classification , Neural Networks, Computer , Severity of Illness Index , Support Vector Machine , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hematologic Tests , Humans , Logistic Models , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Viral Immunol ; 34(9): 639-645, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517820

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection may produce a systemic disease, the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), with high morbidity and mortality. Even though we do not fully understand the interaction of innate and adaptive immunity in the control and complications of the viral infection, it is well recognized that SARS-CoV-2 induces an immunodepression that impairs the elimination of the virus and favors its rapid dissemination in the organism. Even less is known about the possible participation of inhibitory cells of the innate immune system, such as the myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), or the adaptive immune system, such as the T regulatory cells (Tregs). That is why we aimed to study blood levels of MDSCs, as well as lymphocyte subpopulations, including Tregs, and activated (OX-40+) and inhibited (PD-1) T lymphocytes in patients with mild COVID-19 in comparison with data obtained from control donors. We have found that 20 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and no health history of immunosuppression had a significant increase in the number of peripheral monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSC), but a decrease in Tregs, as well as an increase in the number of inhibited or exhausted T cells, whereas the number of activated T cells was significantly decreased compared with that from 20 healthy controls. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation (r = 0.496) between the number of M-MDSC and the number of activated T cells. Therefore, M-MDSC rather than Tregs may contribute to the immunosuppression observed in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/classification , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Lymphocyte Count/methods , Lymphocyte Subsets , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 697622, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518482

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The longitudinal and systematic evaluation of immunity in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients is rarely reported. Methods: Parameters involved in innate, adaptive, and humoral immunity were continuously monitored in COVID-19 patients from onset of illness until 45 days after symptom onset. Results: This study enrolled 27 mild, 47 severe, and 46 deceased COVID-19 patients. Generally, deceased patients demonstrated a gradual increase of neutrophils and IL-6 but a decrease of lymphocytes and platelets after the onset of illness. Specifically, sustained low numbers of CD8+ T cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells were noted in deceased patients, while these cells gradually restored in mild and severe patients. Furthermore, deceased patients displayed a rapid increase of HLA-DR expression on CD4+ T cells in the early phase, but with a low level of overall CD45RO and HLA-DR expressions on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. Notably, in the early phase, deceased patients showed a lower level of plasma cells and antigen-specific IgG, but higher expansion of CD16+CD14+ proinflammatory monocytes and HLA-DR-CD14+ monocytic-myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) than mild or severe patients. Among these immunological parameters, M-MDSCs showed the best performance in predicting COVID-19 mortality, when using a cutoff value of ≥10%. Cluster analysis found a typical immunological pattern in deceased patients on day 9 after onset, which was characterized as the increase of inflammatory markers (M-MDSCs, neutrophils, CD16+CD14+ monocytes, and IL-6) but a decrease of host immunity markers. Conclusions: This study systemically characterizes the kinetics of immunity of COVID-19, highlighting the importance of immunity in patient prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adaptive Immunity , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/blood , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokines/blood , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
15.
Comput Math Methods Med ; 2021: 9269173, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511543

ABSTRACT

Early diagnosis of the harmful severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), along with clinical expertise, allows governments to break the transition chain and flatten the epidemic curve. Although reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) offers quick results, chest X-ray (CXR) imaging is a more reliable method for disease classification and assessment. The rapid spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has triggered extensive research towards developing a COVID-19 detection toolkit. Recent studies have confirmed that the deep learning-based approach, such as convolutional neural networks (CNNs), provides an optimized solution for COVID-19 classification; however, they require substantial training data for learning features. Gathering this training data in a short period has been challenging during the pandemic. Therefore, this study proposes a new model of CNN and deep convolutional generative adversarial networks (DCGANs) that classify CXR images into normal, pneumonia, and COVID-19. The proposed model contains eight convolutional layers, four max-pooling layers, and two fully connected layers, which provide better results than the existing pretrained methods (AlexNet and GoogLeNet). DCGAN performs two tasks: (1) generating synthetic/fake images to overcome the challenges of an imbalanced dataset and (2) extracting deep features of all images in the dataset. In addition, it enlarges the dataset and represents the characteristics of diversity to provide a good generalization effect. In the experimental analysis, we used four distinct publicly accessible datasets of chest X-ray images (COVID-19 X-ray, COVID Chest X-ray, COVID-19 Radiography, and CoronaHack-Chest X-Ray) to train and test the proposed CNN and the existing pretrained methods. Thereafter, the proposed CNN method was trained with the four datasets based on the DCGAN synthetic images, resulting in higher accuracy (94.8%, 96.6%, 98.5%, and 98.6%) than the existing pretrained models. The overall results suggest that the proposed DCGAN-CNN approach is a promising solution for efficient COVID-19 diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Deep Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Factual , Early Diagnosis , False Positive Reactions , Humans , Neural Networks, Computer , Pandemics , ROC Curve , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , Software Design , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data
16.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259179, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496531

ABSTRACT

This paper focuses on the application of deep learning (DL) in the diagnosis of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The novelty of this work is in the introduction of optimized InceptionResNetV2 for COVID-19 (CO-IRv2) method. A part of the CO-IRv2 scheme is derived from the concepts of InceptionNet and ResNet with hyperparameter tuning, while the remaining part is a new architecture consisting of a global average pooling layer, batch normalization, dense layers, and dropout layers. The proposed CO-IRv2 is applied to a new dataset of 2481 computed tomography (CT) images formed by collecting two independent datasets. Data resizing and normalization are performed, and the evaluation is run up to 25 epochs. Various performance metrics, including precision, recall, accuracy, F1-score, area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUC) curve are used as performance metrics. The effectiveness of three optimizers known as Adam, Nadam and RMSProp are evaluated in classifying suspected COVID-19 patients and normal people. Results show that for CO-IRv2 and for CT images, the obtained accuracies of Adam, Nadam and RMSProp optimizers are 94.97%, 96.18% and 96.18%, respectively. Furthermore, it is shown here that for the case of CT images, CO-IRv2 with Nadam optimizer has better performance than existing DL algorithms in the diagnosis of COVID-19 patients. Finally, CO-IRv2 is applied to an X-ray dataset of 1662 images resulting in a classification accuracy of 99.40%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Algorithms , COVID-19/metabolism , Data Accuracy , Deep Learning , Humans , Neural Networks, Computer , ROC Curve , Radiography/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
17.
Emerg Med J ; 38(12): 901-905, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495501

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Validated clinical risk scores are needed to identify patients with COVID-19 at risk of severe disease and to guide triage decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the performance of early warning scores (EWS) in the ED when identifying patients with COVID-19 who will require intensive care unit (ICU) admission for high-flow-oxygen usage or mechanical ventilation. METHODS: Patients with a proven SARS-CoV-2 infection with complete resuscitate orders treated in nine hospitals between 27 February and 30 July 2020 needing hospital admission were included. Primary outcome was the performance of EWS in identifying patients needing ICU admission within 24 hours after ED presentation. RESULTS: In total, 1501 patients were included. Median age was 71 (range 19-99) years and 60.3% were male. Of all patients, 86.9% were admitted to the general ward and 13.1% to the ICU within 24 hours after ED admission. ICU patients had lower peripheral oxygen saturation (86.7% vs 93.7, p≤0.001) and had a higher body mass index (29.2 vs 27.9 p=0.043) compared with non-ICU patients. National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2) ≥ 6 and q-COVID Score were superior to all other studied clinical risk scores in predicting ICU admission with a fair area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.740 (95% CI 0.696 to 0.783) and 0.760 (95% CI 0.712 to 0.800), respectively. NEWS2 ≥6 and q-COVID Score ≥3 discriminated patients admitted to the ICU with a sensitivity of 78.1% and 75.9%, and specificity of 56.3% and 61.8%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In this multicentre study, the best performing models to predict ICU admittance were the NEWS2 and the Quick COVID-19 Severity Index Score, with fair diagnostic performance. However, due to the moderate performance, these models cannot be clinically used to adequately predict the need for ICU admission within 24 hours in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection presenting at the ED.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Critical Illness , Early Warning Score , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/classification , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Predictive Value of Tests , ROC Curve , Triage
18.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(4): 171-179, 2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449126

ABSTRACT

In the face of the ongoing pandemic, the primary care physicians in India are dealing not only with an increased number of patients but are also facing difficulties in the management of complex critically ill patients. To guide the management plans of primary care physicians, several guidelines have been published by the central and state health bodies. In such a situation, an updated and unifying state, national and international guidelines based on critical analysis and appraisal of evolving data is the need of the hour. In this review, we critically analysed the current existing guidelines that have been formulated within India in light of recent evidence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/mortality , Clinical Trials as Topic , Disease Management , Humans , India , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 723585, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399140

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our objective was to determine the antibody and cytokine profiles in different COVID-19 patients. Methods: COVID-19 patients with different clinical classifications were enrolled in this study. The level of IgG antibodies, IgA, IgM, IgE, and IgG subclasses targeting N and S proteins were tested using ELISA. Neutralizing antibody titers were determined by using a toxin neutralization assay (TNA) with live SARS-CoV-2. The concentrations of 8 cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, CCL2, CXCL10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, were measured using the Protein Sample Ella-Simple ELISA system. The differences in antibodies and cytokines between severe and moderate patients were compared by t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Results: A total of 79 COVID-19 patients, including 49 moderate patients and 30 severe patients, were enrolled. Compared with those in moderate patients, neutralizing antibody and IgG-S antibody titers in severe patients were significantly higher. The concentration of IgG-N antibody was significantly higher than that of IgG-S antibody in COVID-19 patients. There was a significant difference in the distribution of IgG subclass antibodies between moderate patients and severe patients. The positive ratio of anti-S protein IgG3 is significantly more than anti-N protein IgG3, while the anti-S protein IgG4 positive rate is significantly less than the anti-N protein IgG4 positive rate. IL-2 was lower in COVID-19 patients than in healthy individuals, while IL-4, IL-6, CCL2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were higher in COVID-19 patients than in healthy individuals. IL-6 was significantly higher in severe patients than in moderate patients. The antibody level of anti-S protein was positively correlated with the titer of neutralizing antibody, but there was no relationship between cytokines and neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Our findings show the severe COVID-19 patients' antibody levels were stronger than those of moderate patients, and a cytokine storm is associated with COVID-19 severity. There was a difference in immunoglobulin type between anti-S protein antibodies and anti-N protein antibodies in COVID-19 patients. And clarified the value of the profile in critical prevention.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/classification , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin E/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
20.
Andes Pediatr ; 92(3): 382-388, 2021 Jun.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395742

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with SARS-CoV-2 (MIS-C) is cha racterized by a hyperinflammatory state resulting from a cytokine storm, evidenced by alterations in laboratory blood testing and acute-phase proteins. OBJECTIVE: to describe the clinical and labora tory characteristics of patients hospitalized due to MIS-C and identify predictive markers of severity. PATIENTS AND METHOD: Retrospective study of 32 patients. The group was divided into critical and non-critical according to clinical presentation and therapy used. Clinical and laboratory aspects were studied, including complete blood count, coagulation tests, and biomarkers. RESULTS: 18/32 were males, with a median age of 6.8 years. The most frequent manifestations were cardiovascular (84.3%), digestive (84%), and mucocutaneous (59%). The group of critical patients included 15 patients, 12 were males with a median age of 8.9 years, and the non-critical group included 17 patients, 6 were males with a median age of 5.4 years. The laboratory parameters at the admission in the global group showed increased C-reactive protein, D-dimer, leukocytes, neutrophils, ferritin, and fibrinogen. In contrast, albumin and blood sodium levels were decreased. At admission, the critical group was cha racterized by presenting thrombocytopenia, hypoalbuminemia, prolonged prothrombin time, and elevated ferritin. At the time of deterioration, there was an intensification of thrombocytopenia, in creased C-reactive protein together with increased neutrophils level. CONCLUSION: The blood count, C-reactive protein, and albuminemia at admission proved to be significantly important in the identi fication of patients at risk of clinical deterioration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/classification , Child , Clinical Deterioration , Critical Illness , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Leukocytes , Male , Neutrophils , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/classification , Thrombocytopenia/blood
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