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1.
Cancer Discov ; 12(4): 958-983, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108398

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) relies on the in-depth understanding of protective immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). We characterized the polarity and specificity of memory T cells directed against SARS-CoV-2 viral lysates and peptides to determine correlates with spontaneous, virus-elicited, or vaccine-induced protection against COVID-19 in disease-free and cancer-bearing individuals. A disbalance between type 1 and 2 cytokine release was associated with high susceptibility to COVID-19. Individuals susceptible to infection exhibited a specific deficit in the T helper 1/T cytotoxic 1 (Th1/Tc1) peptide repertoire affecting the receptor binding domain of the spike protein (S1-RBD), a hotspot of viral mutations. Current vaccines triggered Th1/Tc1 responses in only a fraction of all subject categories, more effectively against the original sequence of S1-RBD than that from viral variants. We speculate that the next generation of vaccines should elicit Th1/Tc1 T-cell responses against the S1-RBD domain of emerging viral variants. SIGNIFICANCE: This study prospectively analyzed virus-specific T-cell correlates of protection against COVID-19 in healthy and cancer-bearing individuals. A disbalance between Th1/Th2 recall responses conferred susceptibility to COVID-19 in both populations, coinciding with selective defects in Th1 recognition of the receptor binding domain of spike. See related commentary by McGary and Vardhana, p. 892. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 873.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , T-Lymphocytes , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
2.
Viruses ; 14(11)2022 Nov 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099866

ABSTRACT

New variants of SARS-CoV-2 continue to evolve. The novel SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern (VOC) B.1.1.529 (Omicron) was particularly menacing due to the presence of numerous consequential mutations. In this study, we reviewed about 12 million SARS-CoV-2 genomic and associated metadata using extensive bioinformatic approaches to understand how evolutionary and mutational changes affect Omicron variant properties. Subsampled global data based analysis of molecular clock in the phylogenetic tree showed 29.56 substitutions per year as the evolutionary rate of five VOCs. We observed extensive mutational changes in the spike structural protein of the Omicron variant. A total of 20% of 7230 amino acid and structural changes exclusive to Omicron's spike protein were detected in the receptor binding domain (RBD), suggesting differential selection pressures exerted during evolution. Analyzing key drug targets revealed mutation-derived differential binding affinities between Delta and Omicron variants. Nine single-RBD substitutions were detected within the binding site of approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. T-cell epitope prediction revealed eight immunologically important functional hotspots in three conserved non-structural proteins. A universal vaccine based on these regions may likely protect against all these SARS-CoV-2 variants. We observed key structural changes in the spike protein, which decreased binding affinities, indicating that these changes may help the virus escape host cellular immunity. These findings emphasize the need for continuous genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 to better understand how novel mutations may impact viral spread and disease outcome.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Mutation , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics
4.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(1): 81-91, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe immunopathology may drive the deleterious manifestations that are observed in the advanced stages of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) but are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to phenotype leukocyte subpopulations and the cytokine milieu in the lungs and blood of critically ill patients with COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: We consecutively included patients less than 72 hours after intubation following informed consent from their next of kin. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was evaluated by microscopy; bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood were assessed by 10-color flow cytometry and a multiplex cytokine panel. RESULTS: Four mechanically ventilated patients (aged 40-75 years) with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 ARDS were included. Immature neutrophils dominated in both blood and lungs, whereas CD4 and CD8 T-cell lymphopenia was observed in the 2 compartments. However, regulatory T cells and TH17 cells were found in higher fractions in the lung. Lung CD4 and CD8 T cells and macrophages expressed an even higher upregulation of activation markers than in blood. A wide range of cytokines were expressed at high levels both in the blood and in the lungs, most notably, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and monocyte chemoattactant protein-1, consistent with hyperinflammation. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 ARDS exhibits a distinct immunologic profile in the lungs, with a depleted and exhausted CD4 and CD8 T-cell population that resides within a heavily hyperinflammatory milieu.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Lung/pathology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Th17 Cells/pathology
5.
Cell Syst ; 13(11): 924-931.e4, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095148

ABSTRACT

Male sex is a major risk factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection severity. To understand the basis for this sex difference, we studied SARS-CoV-2 infection in a young adult cohort of United States Marine recruits. Among 2,641 male and 244 female unvaccinated and seronegative recruits studied longitudinally, SARS-CoV-2 infections occurred in 1,033 males and 137 females. We identified sex differences in symptoms, viral load, blood transcriptome, RNA splicing, and proteomic signatures. Females had higher pre-infection expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) programs. Causal mediation analysis implicated ISG differences in number of symptoms, levels of ISGs, and differential splicing of CD45 lymphocyte phosphatase during infection. Our results indicate that the antiviral innate immunity set point causally contributes to sex differences in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. A record of this paper's transparent peer review process is included in the supplemental information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunity, Innate , Sex Characteristics , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , COVID-19/immunology , Interferons , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Iran J Immunol ; 18(1): 47-53, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Incidence and severity of SARS-CoV2 infection are significantly lower in children and teenagers proposing that certain vaccines, routinely administered to neonates and children may provide cross-protection against this emerging infection. OBJECTIVE: To assess the cross-protection induced by prior measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccinations against COVID-19. METHODS: The antibody responses to MMR and tetanus vaccines were determined in 53 patients affected with SARS-CoV2 infection and 52 age-matched healthy subjects. Serum levels of antibodies specific for NP and RBD of SARS-CoV2 were also determined in both groups of subjects with ELISA. RESULTS: Our results revealed significant differences in anti-NP (P<0.0001) and anti-RBD (P<0.0001) IgG levels between patients and healthy controls. While the levels of rubella- and mumps specific IgG were not different in the two groups of subjects, measles-specific IgG was significantly higher in patients (P<0.01). The serum titer of anti-tetanus antibody, however, was significantly lower in patients compared to healthy individuals (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that measles vaccination triggers those B cells cross-reactive with SARS-CoV2 antigens leading to the production of increased levels of measles-specific antibody.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunization , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Age Factors , Aged , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cross Protection , Cross Reactions , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine/immunology , Middle Aged , Tetanus Toxoid/immunology , Tetanus Toxoid/therapeutic use
8.
Cell Rep ; 41(7): 111650, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086004

ABSTRACT

As severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concerns (VOCs) continue to emerge, cross-neutralizing antibody responses become key toward next-generation design of a more universal COVID-19 vaccine. By analyzing published data from the literature, we report here that the combination of germline genes IGHV2-5/IGLV2-14 represents a public antibody response to the receptor-binding domain (RBD) that potently cross-neutralizes a broad range of VOCs, including Omicron and its sub-lineages. Detailed molecular analysis shows that the complementarity-determining region H3 sequences of IGHV2-5/IGLV2-14-encoded RBD antibodies have a preferred length of 11 amino acids and a conserved HxIxxI motif. In addition, these antibodies have a strong allelic preference due to an allelic polymorphism at amino acid residue 54 of IGHV2-5, which is located at the paratope. These findings have important implications for understanding cross-neutralizing antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 and its heterogenicity at the population level as well as the development of a universal COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies , COVID-19 , Humans , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Viruses ; 14(10)2022 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081879

ABSTRACT

Solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) show higher rates of COVID-19 breakthrough infection than the general population, and nowadays, vaccination is the key preventative strategy. Nonetheless, SOTRs show lower vaccine efficacy for the prevention of severe COVID-19. Moreover, the emergence of new SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern has highlighted the need to improve vaccine-induced immune responses by the administration of repeated booster doses. In this study, we analyzed the humoral and cellular responses in a cohort of 25 SOTRs, including 15 never-infected SOTRs who received the fourth dose of the mRNA vaccine and 10 SOTRs who contracted SARS-CoV-2 infection after the third dose. We analyzed the serum IgG and IgA levels through CLIA or ELISA, respectively, and the Spike-specific T cells by ELISpot assay. We report a significant increase in anti-Spike IgG and no differences in IgA secretion in both groups of patients before and after the booster dose or the natural infection. Still, we show higher IgA levels in recovered SOTRs compared to the fourth dose recipients. Conversely, we show the maintenance of a positive Spike-specific T-cell response in SOTRs who received the fourth dose, which, instead, was significantly increased in SOTRs who contracted the infection. Our results suggest that the booster, either through the fourth dose or natural infection, in vulnerable poor responder SOTRs, improves both humoral and cellular-specific immune responses against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Transplant Recipients , Humans , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunity , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Intern Med ; 61(20): 3053-3062, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079926

ABSTRACT

Objective To examine the continuation of antibody prevalence status after 12 months and background factors in antibody-positive subjects following asymptomatic infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Methods We initially determined the SARS-CoV-2 anti-nucleocapsid protein immunoglobulin G (anti-N IgG) antibody prevalence in 1,603 patients, doctors, and nurses at 65 medical institutions in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. We then obtained consent from 33 of the 39 subjects who tested positive and performed follow-up for 12 months. Results Follow-up for up to 12 months showed that a long-term response of the anti-N IgG antibody could be detected in 6 of the 33 participants (18.2%). The proportions with hypertension, using an angiotensin-receptor blocker, and without a drinking habit were higher among the participants with a long-term anti-N IgG antibody response for up to 12 months than among those without a long-term antibody response. Conclusions The proportion of individuals with subclinical COVID-19 who continuously had a positive result for the anti-N IgG antibody at 12 months was low.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunoglobulin G , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Science ; 378(6620): 619-627, 2022 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078696

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron sublineages carry distinct spike mutations resulting in escape from antibodies induced by previous infection or vaccination. We show that hybrid immunity or vaccine boosters elicit plasma-neutralizing antibodies against Omicron BA.1, BA.2, BA.2.12.1, and BA.4/5, and that breakthrough infections, but not vaccination alone, induce neutralizing antibodies in the nasal mucosa. Consistent with immunological imprinting, most antibodies derived from memory B cells or plasma cells of Omicron breakthrough cases cross-react with the Wuhan-Hu-1, BA.1, BA.2, and BA.4/5 receptor-binding domains, whereas Omicron primary infections elicit B cells of narrow specificity up to 6 months after infection. Although most clinical antibodies have reduced neutralization of Omicron, we identified an ultrapotent pan-variant-neutralizing antibody that is a strong candidate for clinical development.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , COVID-19 , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Humans , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Memory B Cells/immunology
13.
J Infect Dis ; 226(8): 1396-1400, 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077785

ABSTRACT

After >2 years of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, immunoglobulins (IGs) contain highly potent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) neutralizing antibodies, based on the large proportion of United States (US) plasma donors who have gone through COVID-19 or vaccination against the virus. Neutralization of Omicron SARS-CoV-2 by antibodies generated after non-Omicron infection or vaccination has been lower though, raising concerns about the potency of IG against this new virus variant. Also, as plasma collected in the US remains the main source of IG, the neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 for plasma collected elsewhere has been less well studied. Here, we confirm Omicron neutralization by US as well as European Union plasma-derived IG lots.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/immunology , Europe , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , United States
14.
N Engl J Med ; 387(18): 1673-1687, 2022 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the mRNA-1273 coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) vaccine in young children are unknown. METHODS: Part 1 of this ongoing phase 2-3 trial was open label for dose selection; part 2 was an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled evaluation of the selected dose. In part 2, we randomly assigned young children (6 months to 5 years of age) in a 3:1 ratio to receive two 25-µg injections of mRNA-1273 or placebo, administered 28 days apart. The primary objectives were to evaluate the safety and reactogenicity of the vaccine and to determine whether the immune response in these children was noninferior to that in young adults (18 to 25 years of age) in a related phase 3 trial. Secondary objectives were to determine the incidences of Covid-19 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection after administration of mRNA-1273 or placebo. RESULTS: On the basis of safety and immunogenicity results in part 1 of the trial, the 25-µg dose was evaluated in part 2. In part 2, 3040 children 2 to 5 years of age and 1762 children 6 to 23 months of age were randomly assigned to receive two 25-µg injections of mRNA-1273; 1008 children 2 to 5 years of age and 593 children 6 to 23 months of age were randomly assigned to receive placebo. The median duration of follow-up after the second injection was 71 days in the 2-to-5-year-old cohort and 68 days in the 6-to-23-month-old cohort. Adverse events were mainly low-grade and transient, and no new safety concerns were identified. At day 57, neutralizing antibody geometric mean concentrations were 1410 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1272 to 1563) among 2-to-5-year-olds and 1781 (95% CI, 1616 to 1962) among 6-to-23-month-olds, as compared with 1391 (95% CI, 1263 to 1531) among young adults, who had received 100-µg injections of mRNA-1273, findings that met the noninferiority criteria for immune responses for both age cohorts. The estimated vaccine efficacy against Covid-19 was 36.8% (95% CI, 12.5 to 54.0) among 2-to-5-year-olds and 50.6% (95% CI, 21.4 to 68.6) among 6-to-23-month-olds, at a time when B.1.1.529 (omicron) was the predominant circulating variant. CONCLUSIONS: Two 25-µg doses of the mRNA-1273 vaccine were found to be safe in children 6 months to 5 years of age and elicited immune responses that were noninferior to those in young adults. (Funded by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; KidCOVE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04796896.).


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , COVID-19 , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Young Adult , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Vaccine Efficacy , Treatment Outcome , Adolescent , Adult
16.
J Leukoc Biol ; 112(1): 201-212, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075041

ABSTRACT

T cells are thought to be an important correlates of protection against SARS-CoV2 infection. However, the composition of T cell subsets in convalescent individuals of SARS-CoV2 infection has not been well studied. The authors determined the lymphocyte absolute counts, the frequency of memory T cell subsets, and the plasma levels of common γ-chain in 7 groups of COVID-19 individuals, based on days since RT-PCR confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The data show that both absolute counts and frequencies of lymphocytes as well as, the frequencies of CD4+ central and effector memory cells increased, and the frequencies of CD4+ naïve T cells, transitional memory, stem cell memory T cells, and regulatory cells decreased from Days 15-30 to Days 61-90 and plateaued thereafter. In addition, the frequencies of CD8+ central memory, effector, and terminal effector memory T cells increased, and the frequencies of CD8+ naïve cells, transitional memory, and stem cell memory T cells decreased from Days 15-30 to Days 61-90 and plateaued thereafter. The plasma levels of IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21-common γc cytokines started decreasing from Days 15-30 till Days 151-180. Severe COVID-19 patients exhibit decreased levels of lymphocyte counts and frequencies, higher frequencies of naïve cells, regulatory T cells, lower frequencies of central memory, effector memory, and stem cell memory, and elevated plasma levels of IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21. Finally, there was a significant correlation between memory T cell subsets and common γc cytokines. Thus, the study provides evidence of alterations in lymphocyte counts, memory T cell subset frequencies, and common γ-chain cytokines in convalescent COVID-19 individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines , Memory T Cells , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Interleukin-15/blood , Interleukin-2/blood , Interleukin-7/blood , Memory T Cells/immunology , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology
17.
Iran J Immunol ; 18(1): 82-92, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) rapidly transmits in general population, mainly between health-care workers (HCWs) who are in close contact with patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the seropositivity of HCWs as a high-risk group compared to general population. METHODS: 72 samples were obtained from HCWs working in Masih Daneshvari hospital as one of the main COVID-19 admission centers in Tehran, during April 4 to 6, 2020. Also we collected 2021 blood samples from general population. The SARS-CoV-2 specific IgM, and IgG antibodies in the collected serum specimens were measured by commercial ELISA kits. RESULTS: Based on the clinical manifestations, 25.0%, 47.2%, and 27.8% of HCWs were categorized as symptomatic with typical symptoms, symptomatic with atypical symptoms, and asymptomatic, respectively. Symptomatic individuals with typical and atypical symptoms were 63.2% and 36.8% positive in RT-PCR test, respectively. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in 15.3% and 27.8% of HCWs samples, respectively. Antibody testing in the general population indicated that SARS-CoV-2 specific IgM and IgG were found in (162/2021) 8%, and (290/2021) 14.4%, respectively. The frequency of positive cases of IgM and IgG were significantly increased in HCWs compared to general population (p= 0.028 for IgM and p= 0.002 for IgG). CONCLUSION: The frequency of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies in HCWs was higher than general population indicating a higher viral transmission via close exposure with COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Occupational Health , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Time Factors , Young Adult
18.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(9): 1805-1809, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067715

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 spike protein antibodies against coronavirus disease-2019 in post-infection and post-vaccinated individuals. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted from June, 1 to July 31, 2021 at the Rehman Medical Institute, Peshawar, Pakistan, and comprised subjects of either gender in whom immunogenicity was checked 35 days post-vaccination and 90 days post-infection. Correlation with age and gender was checked. Specimens were collected and investigated for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 spike protein antibodies by consuming electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay. Data was analysed using SPSS 23. RESULTS: Of the total 256 patients enrolled, 70(27.34%) were included; 49(69%) males and 21(29.6%) females. The overall mean age was 44±7.75 years. Among 30(42.8%) patients with positive polymerase chain reaction test, the mean time between the positive test and antibody screening was 90±30 days. Among the 40(57.2%) vaccinated individuals, the time between vaccination and antibody screening was 35±9.74 days. Overall, 68(97%) patients revealed robust positive findings to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 spike proteins antibodies >50IU/mL. Male subjects had significantly higher immunogenic response compared to females (p=0.001), and immunogenicity decreased with advancing age (p<0.001). Also, post-vaccinated patients' antibody response was significant compared to post-infection patients' response (p=0.001). Conclusion: Majority of the patients had significantly higher antibody titers against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 post-infection and post-vaccination. Males and younger individuals developed a significant humoral immunity compared to females and the elderly.


Subject(s)
Antibody Formation , COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination , Age Factors , Sex Factors
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(19)2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066141

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to evaluate the dynamic changes of the total Natural Killer (NK) cells and different NK subpopulations according to their differentiated expression of CD16/CD56 in COVID-19 patients. Blood samples with EDTA were analyzed on day 1 (admission moment), day 5, and day 10 for the NK subtypes. At least 30,000 singlets were collected for each sample and white blood cells were gated in CD45/SSC and CD16/CD56 dot plots of fresh human blood. From the lymphocyte singlets, the NK cells subpopulations were analyzed based on the differentiated expression of surface markers and classified as follows: CD16-CD56+/++/CD16+CD56++/CD16+CD56+/CD16++CD56-. By examining the CD56 versus CD16 flow cytometry dot plots, we found four distinct NK sub-populations. These NK subtypes correspond to different NK phenotypes from secretory to cytolytic ones. There was no difference between total NK percentage of different disease forms. However, the total numbers decreased significantly both in survivors and non-survivors. Additionally, for the CD16-CD56+/++ phenotype, we observed different patterns, gradually decreasing in survivors and gradually increasing in those with fatal outcomes. Despite no difference in the proportion of the CD16-CD56++ NK cells in survivors vs. non-survivors, the main cytokine producers gradually decline during the study period in the survival group, underling the importance of adequate IFN production during the early stage of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Persistency in the circulation of CD56++ NK cells may have prognostic value in patients, with a fatal outcome. Total NK cells and the CD16+CD56+ NK subtypes exhibit significant decreasing trends across the moments for both survivors and non-survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Killer Cells, Natural , CD56 Antigen/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/classification , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Science ; 378(6616): 128-131, 2022 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063972

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 wields versatile proteins to foil our immune system's counterattack.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Proteins , Humans , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology
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