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1.
J Genet Genomics ; 48(9): 792-802, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720311

ABSTRACT

Gut microbial dysbiosis has been linked to many noncommunicable diseases. However, little is known about specific gut microbiota composition and its correlated metabolites associated with molecular signatures underlying host response to infection. Here, we describe the construction of a proteomic risk score based on 20 blood proteomic biomarkers, which have recently been identified as molecular signatures predicting the progression of the COVID-19. We demonstrate that in our cohort of 990 healthy individuals without infection, this proteomic risk score is positively associated with proinflammatory cytokines mainly among older, but not younger, individuals. We further discover that a core set of gut microbiota can accurately predict the above proteomic biomarkers among 301 individuals using a machine learning model and that these gut microbiota features are highly correlated with proinflammatory cytokines in another independent set of 366 individuals. Fecal metabolomics analysis suggests potential amino acid-related pathways linking gut microbiota to host metabolism and inflammation. Overall, our multi-omics analyses suggest that gut microbiota composition and function are closely related to inflammation and molecular signatures of host response to infection among healthy individuals. These results may provide novel insights into the cross-talk between gut microbiota and host immune system.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , Inflammation/metabolism , COVID-19/microbiology , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Proteomics/methods
2.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1670-1688, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718413

ABSTRACT

Bangladesh is experiencing a second wave of COVID-19 since March 2021, despite the nationwide vaccination drive with ChAdOx1 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) vaccine from early February 2021. Here, we characterized 19 nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) samples from COVID-19 suspect patients using genomic and metagenomic approaches. Screening for SARS-CoV-2 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and metagenomic sequencing revealed 17 samples of COVID-19 positive (vaccinated = 10, nonvaccinated = 7) and 2 samples of COVID-19 negative. We did not find any significant correlation between associated factors including vaccination status, age or sex of the patients, diversity or abundance of the coinfected organisms/pathogens, and the abundance of SARS-CoV-2. Though the first wave of the pandemic was dominated by clade 20B, Beta, V2 (South African variant) dominated the second wave (January 2021 to May 2021), while the third wave (May 2021 to September 2021) was responsible for Delta variants of the epidemic in Bangladesh including both vaccinated and unvaccinated infections. Noteworthily, the receptor binding domain (RBD) region of S protein of all the isolates harbored similar substitutions including K417N, E484K, and N501Y that signify the Beta, while D614G, D215G, D80A, A67V, L18F, and A701V substitutions were commonly found in the non-RBD region of Spike proteins. ORF7b and ORF3a genes underwent a positive selection (dN/dS ratio 1.77 and 1.24, respectively), while the overall S protein of the Bangladeshi SARS-CoV-2 isolates underwent negative selection pressure (dN/dS = 0.621). Furthermore, we found different bacterial coinfections like Streptococcus agalactiae, Neisseria meningitidis, Elizabethkingia anophelis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, expressing a number of antibiotic resistance genes such as tetA and tetM. Overall, this approach provides valuable insights on the SARS-CoV-2 genomes and microbiome composition from both vaccinated and nonvaccinated patients in Bangladesh.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Metagenomics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/virology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/genetics , Female , Genome, Bacterial/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Male , Microbiota/genetics , Middle Aged , Mutation , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Selection, Genetic , Vaccination , Viral Proteins/genetics , Young Adult
3.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705332

ABSTRACT

Coinfection rates with other pathogens in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) varied during the pandemic. We assessed the latest prevalence of coinfection with viruses, bacteria, and fungi in COVID-19 patients for more than one year and its impact on mortality. A total of 436 samples were collected between August 2020 and October 2021. Multiplex real-time PCR, culture, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed to detect pathogens. The coinfection rate of respiratory viruses in COVID-19 patients was 1.4%. Meanwhile, the rates of bacteria and fungi were 52.6% and 10.5% in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, respectively. Respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans were the most commonly detected pathogens. Ninety percent of isolated A. baumannii was non-susceptible to carbapenem. Based on a multivariate analysis, coinfection (odds ratio [OR] = 6.095), older age (OR = 1.089), and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (OR = 1.006) were risk factors for mortality as a critical outcome. In particular, coinfection with bacteria (OR = 11.250), resistant pathogens (OR = 11.667), and infection with multiple pathogens (OR = 10.667) were significantly related to death. Screening and monitoring of coinfection in COVID-19 patients, especially for hospitalized patients during the pandemic, are beneficial for better management and survival.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Mycoses/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/pathogenicity , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/mortality , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/microbiology , Cross Infection/virology , Female , Fungi/classification , Fungi/pathogenicity , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/pathogenicity , Young Adult
4.
Gut Microbes ; 14(1): 2031840, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692369

ABSTRACT

There is a growing debate about the involvement of the gut microbiome in COVID-19, although it is not conclusively understood whether the microbiome has an impact on COVID-19, or vice versa, especially as analysis of amplicon data in hospitalized patients requires sophisticated cohort recruitment and integration of clinical parameters. Here, we analyzed fecal and saliva samples from SARS-CoV-2 infected and post COVID-19 patients and controls considering multiple influencing factors during hospitalization. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed on fecal and saliva samples from 108 COVID-19 and 22 post COVID-19 patients, 20 pneumonia controls and 26 asymptomatic controls. Patients were recruited over the first and second corona wave in Germany and detailed clinical parameters were considered. Serial samples per individual allowed intra-individual analysis. We found the gut and oral microbiota to be altered depending on number and type of COVID-19-associated complications and disease severity. The occurrence of individual complications was correlated with low-risk (e.g., Faecalibacterium prausznitzii) and high-risk bacteria (e.g., Parabacteroides ssp.). We demonstrated that a stable gut bacterial composition was associated with a favorable disease progression. Based on gut microbial profiles, we identified a model to estimate mortality in COVID-19. Gut microbiota are associated with the occurrence of complications in COVID-19 and may thereby influencing disease severity. A stable gut microbial composition may contribute to a favorable disease progression and using bacterial signatures to estimate mortality could contribute to diagnostic approaches. Importantly, we highlight challenges in the analysis of microbial data in the context of hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Disease Progression , Dysbiosis/etiology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Humans , Male , Microbiota , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Saliva/microbiology , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Mycoses ; 65(4): 449-457, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 patients on mechanical ventilation are at risk to develop invasive aspergillosis. To provide additional data regarding this intriguing entity, we conducted a retrospective study describing risk factors, radiology and prognosis of this emerging entity in a Brazilian referral centre. METHODS: This retrospective study included intubated (≥18 years) patients with COVID-19 admitted from April 2020 until July 2021 that had bronchoscopy to investigate pulmonary co-infections. COVID-19-associated aspergillosis (CAPA) was defined according to the 2020 European Confederation of Medical Mycology/International Society of Human and Animal Mycosis consensus criteria. The performance of tracheal aspirate (TA) cultures to diagnose CAPA were described, as well as the radiological findings, risk factors and outcomes. RESULTS: Fourteen patients (14/87, 16%) had probable CAPA (0.9 cases per 100 ICU admissions). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of TA for the diagnosis of CAPA were 85.7%, 73.1%, 46.2% and 95% respectively. Most of the radiological findings of CAPA were classified as typical of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (64.3%). The overall mortality rate of probable CAPA was 71.4%. Age was the only independent risk factor for CAPA [p = .03; odds ratio (OR) 1.072]. CAPA patients under renal replacement therapy (RRT) may have a higher risk for a fatal outcome (p = .053, hazard ratio 8.047). CONCLUSIONS: CAPA was a prevalent co-infection in our cohort of patients under mechanical ventilation. Older patients had a higher risk to develop CAPA, and a poor prognosis may be associated with RRT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Animals , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Intubation , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/therapy , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/virology , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Mol Biol Rep ; 49(4): 3349-3356, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640943

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 patients, both infected and recovered are rapidly contracting mucormycetes infections due to the 'Mucorales' order, under Zygomycetes class of fungi. The mucorales fungi commonly known to exist in our natural surroundings including soil, but the frequency of incidences was never rampant. This sudden spike in infections, is locally known as 'black fungus,' and is affecting various organs, including- eyes, sinuses, nose, brain, skin, intestine, lungs, etc. The severity of situation is ascertainable from the fact that, in certain cases surgical eye/jaws removal persists as the only viable option to avert mortality, as therapeutic interventions are limited. This epidemic situation intrigued experts to investigate the probable reason behind this unpredicted escalation in reported cases, including in recuperated COVID-19 patients, as person-to-person spread of infection is not common. The comparison of physiological parameters in healthy and COVID-19 afflicted patients highlights that the underlying conditions including diabetes mellitus, steroidal therapy, lymphopenia (decreased CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes), deregulated cytokine release storm, elevated free iron levels (hemosiderosis) in blood and insulin insensitivity are playing major roles in deteriorating conditions in rarely pathogenic fungal infections. This review is an attempt to explain the rationalities that makes people vulnerable to mucormycetes infection.


Subject(s)
Mucorales/immunology , Mucormycosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Humans , Mucormycosis/etiology , Mucormycosis/immunology , Mucormycosis/mortality , Mucormycosis/therapy
7.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(5): 442-447, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637623

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the possible association between invasive fungal sinusitis (mucormycosis) and coronavirus disease. METHODS: A prospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary care centre over four months, involving all patients with mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses suffering from or having a history of coronavirus disease infection. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients presented with mucormycosis, all had an association with coronavirus disease 2019. The ethmoids (100 per cent) were the most common sinuses affected. Intra-orbital extension was seen in 43.47 per cent of cases, while intracranial extension was only seen in 8.69 per cent. Diabetes mellitus was present in 21 of 23 cases, and was uncontrolled in 12 cases. All patients had a history of steroid use during their coronavirus treatment. CONCLUSION: New manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 are appearing over time. The association between coronavirus and mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses must be given serious consideration. Uncontrolled diabetes and over-zealous use of steroids are two main factors aggravating the illness, and both of these must be properly checked.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Mucorales/isolation & purification , Mucormycosis/microbiology , Paranasal Sinuses/microbiology , Administration, Intravenous , Antifungal Agents/administration & dosage , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Invasive Fungal Infections/diagnosis , Invasive Fungal Infections/epidemiology , Invasive Fungal Infections/microbiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Mucorales/drug effects , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/etiology , Pandemics , Paranasal Sinuses/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinusitis/diagnosis , Sinusitis/microbiology , Steroids/adverse effects , Steroids/therapeutic use
8.
Nutrients ; 14(2)2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625311

ABSTRACT

The numerous consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in healthy young people and the lack of clarity as to the long-term disease outcomes have spurred the search for risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection. We aimed to evaluate the associations of nutritional behaviors, gut microbiota, and physical activity with the risk of COVID-19 in healthy young nonobese people. Data on body composition, anthropometric measurements, physical activity, dietary intake, and gut microbiota were obtained from 95 adults (mean age, 34.66 ± 5.76 years). A balanced diet rich in vegetables and fruit, including nuts, wholegrain cereal products, and legumes, covers the need for vitamins and minerals. Such a diet can be an effective measure to reduce the risk of COVID-19 in nonobese healthy physically active young people with normal immune function. People with balanced diet and an average daily consumption of >500 g of vegetables and fruit and >10 g of nuts had an 86% lower risk of COVID-19 compared with those whose diet was not balanced and who consumed lower amounts of these products. It is well documented that proper nutrition, physical activity, and maintenance of normal weight facilitate good health by ensuring optimal immune function. The beneficial effects of these interventions should be strongly emphasized during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Exercise/statistics & numerical data , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Adult , Diet/adverse effects , Feeding Behavior/physiology , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Male , Poland , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 106(2): 571-573, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614118

ABSTRACT

Between April and July 2020, and, therefore, prior to the broad recommendation of corticosteroids for severe COVID-19, a total of 50 full autopsies were performed in Manaus. We confirmed two invasive cases of aspergillosis through histopathology and gene sequencing (4%) in our autopsy series. The confirmed invasive aspergillosis incidence seems much lower than expected based on the "probable and possible" definitions, and an individualized approach should be considered for each country scenario. Interestingly, a prolonged length of stay in the intensive care unit was not observed in any of the cases. Timely diagnosis and treatment of fungal infection can reduce mortality rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Autopsy , Brazil/epidemiology , Confidence Intervals , Humans , Incidence , Male
11.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 2347872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582891

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at risk for superadded infections, especially infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the prevalence of MDR infections, including infections caused by MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), was very high in Iran. This study is aimed at assessing the genetic diversity, antimicrobial resistance pattern, and biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, seventy K. pneumoniae isolates were obtained from seventy patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in the ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran, from May to September, 2020. K. pneumoniae was detected through the ureD gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, and biofilm was detected using the microtiter plate assay method. Genetic diversity was also analyzed through polymerase chain reaction based on enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR). The BioNumerics software (v. 8.0, Applied Maths, Belgium) was used for analyzing the data and drawing dendrogram and minimum spanning tree. Findings. K. pneumoniae isolates had varying levels of resistance to antibiotics meropenem (80.4%), cefepime-aztreonam-piperacillin/tazobactam (70%), tobramycin (61.4%), ciprofloxacin (57.7%), gentamicin (55.7%), and imipenem (50%). Around 77.14% of isolates were MDR, and 42.8% of them formed biofilm. Genetic diversity analysis revealed 28 genotypes (E1-E28) and 74.28% of isolates were grouped into ten clusters (i.e., clusters A-J). Clusters were further categorized into three major clusters, i.e., clusters E, H, and J. Antimicrobial resistance to meropenem, tobramycin, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin in cluster J was significantly higher than cluster H, denoting significant relationship between ERIC clusters and antimicrobial resistance. However, there was no significant difference among major clusters E, H, and J respecting biofilm formation. Conclusion: K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 have high antimicrobial resistance, and 44.2% of them have genetic similarity and can be clustered in three major clusters. There is a significant difference among clusters respecting antimicrobial resistance.


Subject(s)
Biofilms/growth & development , COVID-19/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Biofilms/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iran , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/virology
12.
Gut Microbes ; 14(1): 2018900, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585291

ABSTRACT

Mounting evidence suggests that the gut-to-lung axis is critical during respiratory viral infections. We herein hypothesized that disruption of gut homeostasis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection may associate with early disease outcomes. To address this question, we took advantage of the Syrian hamster model. Our data confirmed that this model recapitulates some hallmark features of the human disease in the lungs. We further showed that SARS-CoV-2 infection associated with mild intestinal inflammation, relative alteration in intestinal barrier property and liver inflammation and altered lipid metabolism. These changes occurred concomitantly with an alteration of the gut microbiota composition over the course of infection, notably characterized by a higher relative abundance of deleterious bacterial taxa such as Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae. Conversely, several members of the Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae families, including bacteria known to produce the fermentative products short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), had a reduced relative proportion compared to non-infected controls. Accordingly, infection led to a transient decrease in systemic SCFA amounts. SCFA supplementation during infection had no effect on clinical and inflammatory parameters. Lastly, a strong correlation between some gut microbiota taxa and clinical and inflammation indices of SARS-CoV-2 infection severity was evidenced. Collectively, alteration of the gut microbiota correlates with disease severity in hamsters making this experimental model valuable for the design of interventional, gut microbiota-targeted, approaches for the control of COVID-19.Abbreviations: SARS-CoV-2, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; COVID-19, coronavirus disease 2019; SCFAs, short-chain fatty acids; dpi, day post-infection; RT-PCR, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; IL, interleukin. ACE2, angiotensin converting enzyme 2; TMPRSS2, transmembrane serine protease 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Mesocricetus , Animals , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cricetinae , Fatty Acids, Volatile/administration & dosage , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24042, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574556

ABSTRACT

The microbiota of the nasopharyngeal tract (NT) play a role in host immunity against respiratory infectious diseases. However, scant information is available on interactions of SARS-CoV-2 with the nasopharyngeal microbiome. This study characterizes the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on human nasopharyngeal microbiomes and their relevant metabolic functions. Twenty-two (n = 22) nasopharyngeal swab samples (including COVID-19 patients = 8, recovered humans = 7, and healthy people = 7) were collected, and underwent to RNAseq-based metagenomic investigation. Our RNAseq data mapped to 2281 bacterial species (including 1477, 919 and 676 in healthy, COVID-19 and recovered metagenomes, respectively) indicating a distinct microbiome dysbiosis. The COVID-19 and recovered samples included 67% and 77% opportunistic bacterial species, respectively compared to healthy controls. Notably, 79% commensal bacterial species found in healthy controls were not detected in COVID-19 and recovered people. Similar dysbiosis was also found in viral and archaeal fraction of the nasopharyngeal microbiomes. We also detected several altered metabolic pathways and functional genes in the progression and pathophysiology of COVID-19. The nasopharyngeal microbiome dysbiosis and their genomic features determined by our RNAseq analyses shed light on early interactions of SARS-CoV-2 with the nasopharyngeal resident microbiota that might be helpful for developing microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for this novel pandemic disease.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/classification , COVID-19/microbiology , Nasopharynx/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/pathogenicity , Case-Control Studies , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Metagenomics , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Symbiosis , Young Adult
14.
Virchows Arch ; 479(1): 97-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574264

ABSTRACT

Between April and June 2020, i.e., during the first wave of pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), 55 patients underwent long-term treatment in the intensive care unit at the University Hospital of Regensburg. Most of them were transferred from smaller hospitals, often due to the need for an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system. Autopsy was performed in 8/17 COVID-19-proven patients after long-term treatment (mean: 33.6 days). Autopsy revealed that the typical pathological changes occurring during the early stages of the disease (e.g., thrombosis, endothelitis, capillaritis) are less prevalent at this stage, while severe diffuse alveolar damage and especially coinfection with different fungal species were the most conspicuous finding. In addition, signs of macrophage activation syndrome was detected in 7 of 8 patients. Thus, fungal infections were a leading cause of death in our cohort of severely ill patients and may alter clinical management of patients, particularly in long-term periods of treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection , Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , Multiple Organ Failure/microbiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cause of Death , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/mortality , Lung Diseases, Fungal/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/microbiology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
15.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-13, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574011

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, is now pandemic. While most Covid-19 patients will experience mild symptoms, a small proportion will develop severe disease, which could be fatal. Clinically, Covid-19 patients manifest fever with dry cough, fatigue and dyspnoea, and in severe cases develop into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), sepsis and multi-organ failure. These severe patients are characterized by hyperinflammation with highly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-alpha as well as C-reactive protein, which are accompanied by decreased lymphocyte counts. Clinical evidence supports that gut microbiota dysregulation is common in Covid-19 and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Covid-19. In this narrative review, we summarize the roles of intestinal dysbiosis in Covid-19 pathogenesis and posit that the associated mechanisms are being mediated by gut bacterial metabolites. Based on this premise, we propose possible clinical implications. Various risk factors could be causal for severe Covid-19, and these include advanced age, concomitant chronic disease, SARS-CoV-2 infection of enterocytes, use of antibiotics and psychological distress. Gut dysbiosis is associated with risk factors and severe Covid-19 due to decreased commensal microbial metabolites, which cause reduced anti-inflammatory mechanisms and chronic low-grade inflammation. The preconditioned immune dysregulation enables SARS-CoV-2 infection to progress to an uncontrolled hyperinflammatory response. Thus, a pre-existing gut microbiota that is diverse and abundant could be beneficial for the prevention of severe Covid-19, and supplementation with commensal microbial metabolites may facilitate and augment the treatment of severe Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/metabolism , COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Animals , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Dysbiosis/genetics , Dysbiosis/immunology , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Dysbiosis/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
16.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(11): 942-946, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been a recent deluge of coronavirus disease 2019 associated mucormycosis in our country. It affects the paranasal sinuses; however, it has a rapid extrasinus progression (the orbit being most common), which can be fatal if not detected early. It may meander into the orbit through various foramina without frank bone destruction. METHODS: This paper reviews the various gateways of the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 associated mucormycosis to the orbit, even before advent of bone destruction or ocular symptoms. Plausible pathways of invasion and subtle imaging findings are depicted, to enable an early diagnosis. RESULTS: Relevant anatomy and imaging examples have been illustrated to familiarise the surgeons with various routes of coronavirus disease 2019 associated mucormycosis spread to the orbit. Emphasis is laid on searching for subtle imaging findings for the detection of early orbital invasion. CONCLUSION: Early detection and extension of coronavirus disease 2019 associated mucormycosis is facilitated by knowledge of its gateways of spread, which aids the surgeon in prognostication and planning of the surgical approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Eye Infections, Fungal/virology , Mucorales , Mucormycosis/virology , Orbital Diseases/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Medical Illustration
17.
Acta Biochim Pol ; 68(3): 393-398, 2021 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547880

ABSTRACT

The time of COVID-19 pandemic focused the attention of scientist to recognise the complex medical symptoms of the disease, modes of infection and possible therapies. The organisms' response towards SARS-CoV-2 infection depends on many individual factors and the course of disease is described as unprecedented and complex. Numerous symptoms from the respiratory system, abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract, stroke, liver damage and coagulopathy, among others, are accompanied by negative side effects of the pandemic lifestyle, including immunity depletion, overall fitness impairment, skin condition worsening, psychological and psychiatric consequences. There is an urgent need to seek all possible routes for assuring favouring conditions to build and support the organisms' microbiological barriers and enhance immunity, which will also help during the ongoing vaccination action. Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and environmental Bacillus species are microorganisms typically found in food products or dietary supplements, but also applied on body surfaces or technological surfaces at home and in the industry. Since the contemporary definition of probiotics points to positive health effects, it is of highest importance to follow strict regulations and standards of product manufacturing, especially in the times of biohazard risks and rising public distrust of therapies. There is an urgent need to seek all possible routes for assuring the favouring conditions to build and support the organisms' microbiological barriers and enhance the immunity, that will serve also during the ongoing vaccination action. Probiotic LAB and environmental Bacillus species are microorganisms typically found in food products or dietary supplements, but also applied on body surface or technological surfaces in household and industry. Since the contemporary definition of probiotics points out the positive health effects, it is of highest importance to follow strict regulations and standards of product manufacturing, especially in the times of biohazard and rising public distrust of therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Probiotics/therapeutic use , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Dietary Supplements , Gastrointestinal Tract/microbiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
18.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(6): 1087-1095, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540258

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is often accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms, which are related to gut microbiota dysbiosis (GMD). Whether washed microbiota transplantation (WMT) is an effective treatment for COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD by restoring the gut microbiota is unknown. This study is designed to explore the efficacy and safety of WMT in COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD. METHODS: This is a randomized, multicenter, single-blind prospective study. COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD will be randomly divided to receive routine treatment only or to receive routine treatment and WMT. The frequency of WMT will be once a day for three consecutive days. Laboratory and imaging examinations will be performed at admission, 1 and 2 weeks after treatment, and on the day of discharge. Then a telephone follow-up will be conducted at 1st week, 2nd week, and 6th month after discharge. The clinical efficacy and safety of WMT in COVD-19 patients suspected of having GMD and the effects of WMT on the organ function, homeostasis, inflammatory response, intestinal mucosal barrier function, and immunity of the patients will be evaluated. RESULTS: By following the proposed protocol, WMT is expected to be efficacious and safe for the treatment of COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD, and the therapeutic effect is expected to be associated with improvement of the intestinal mucosal barrier function, inflammatory response, and immunity. CONCLUSION: The findings from this study may offer a new approach for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/therapy , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Dysbiosis/therapy , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation/methods , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , China , Clinical Protocols , Dysbiosis/etiology , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Living Donors , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Safety , Single-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
19.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 36(1): e24151, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To provide information about pathogens' coinfection prevalence with SARS-CoV-2 could be a real help to save patients' lives. This study aims to evaluate the pathogens' coinfection prevalence among COVID-19 patients. METHOD: In order to find all of the relevant articles, we used systematic search approach. Research-based databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Scopus, without language restrictions, were searched to identify the relevant bacterial, fungal, and viral coinfections among COVID-19 cases from December 1, 2019, to August 23, 2021. In order to dig deeper, other scientific repositories such as Medrxiv were probed. RESULTS: A total of 13,023 studies were found through systematic search. After thorough analysis, only 64 studies with 61,547 patients were included in the study. The most common causative agents of coinfection among COVID-19 patients were bacteria (pooled prevalence: 20.97%; 95% CI: 15.95-26.46; I2 : 99.9%) and less frequent were virus coinfections (pooled prevalence: 12.58%; 95% CI: 7.31-18.96; I2 : 98.7%). The pooled prevalence of fungal coinfections was also 12.60% (95% CI: 7.84-17.36; I2 : 98.3%). Meta-regression analysis showed that the age sample size and WHO geographic region did not influenced heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: We identified a high prevalence of pathogenic microorganism coinfection among COVID-19 patients. Because of this rate of coinfection empirical use of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral treatment are advisable specifically at the early stage of COVID-19 infection. We also suggest running simultaneously diagnostic tests to identify other microbiological agents' coinfection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Mycoses/epidemiology , COVID-19/microbiology , Humans , Prevalence
20.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(11): e0009921, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523404

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), during the second wave in early 2021, has caused devastating chaos in India. As daily infection rates rise alarmingly, the number of severe cases has increased dramatically. The country has encountered health infrastructure inadequacy and excessive demand for hospital beds, drugs, vaccines, and oxygen. Adding more burden to such a challenging situation, mucormycosis, an invasive fungal infection, has seen a sudden surge in patients with COVID-19. The rhino-orbital-cerebral form is the most common type observed. In particular, approximately three-fourths of them had diabetes as predisposing comorbidity and received corticosteroids to treat COVID-19. Possible mechanisms may involve immune and inflammatory processes. Diabetes, when coupled with COVID-19-induced systemic immune change, tends to cause decreased immunity and an increased risk of secondary infections. Since comprehensive data on this fatal opportunistic infection are evolving against the backdrop of a major pandemic, prevention strategies primarily involve managing comorbid conditions in high-risk groups. The recommended treatment strategies primarily included surgical debridement and antifungal therapy using Amphotericin B and selected azoles. Several India-centric clinical guidelines have emerged to rightly diagnose the infection, characterise the clinical presentation, understand the pathogenesis involved, and track the disease course. Code Mucor is the most comprehensive one, which proposes a simple but reliable staging system for the rhino-orbital-cerebral form. A staging system has recently been proposed, and a dedicated registry has been started. In this critical review, we extensively analyse recent evidence and guidance on COVID-19-associated mucormycosis in India.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , Mucormycosis/virology , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/microbiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/microbiology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Risk Factors
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