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1.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 13, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612688

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has brought new public awareness of nursing's role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nursing/trends , Humans , Nursing/methods
2.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 22-30, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the perceptions and experiences of nurses caring for patients and families under the COVID-19 pandemic's socially restrictive practices and policies. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic has affected the delivery of health care to patients and their families, with many aspects altered because of the need for social distancing, social isolation, and visitation restriction policies. These policies have created communication challenges for interdisciplinary health care teams, patients, and families. As frontline caregivers, nurses have felt strongly the impact of these challenges. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted among 17 RNs who were caring for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and were recruited via social media posts on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Watson's theory of human caring served as the conceptual framework for the study. RESULTS: Several themes emerged regarding nurses' experiences of communication with patients and families. These include communication challenges and barriers, prioritization, integration of group communication, nurse self-reflection, and acceptance of gratitude. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings underscore the importance of nurses' communication with patients and families under the pandemic's restricted conditions. They demonstrate the value of nurses' ability to innovate in fostering all parties' participation in the plan of care, and highlight the comfort nurses provide to patients who are isolated from loved ones. Strategies that fostered communication were identified, as were areas for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Empathy , Nurses/psychology , Professional-Family Relations , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Nurses/trends , Qualitative Research
3.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(12): 537-540, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598060

ABSTRACT

When we look back on 2020, it is hard not to focus on the COVID-19 pandemic that has affected everything from nursing practice to world politics. Along with those challenges, there has been tremendous opportunity for nursing professional development change and growth. 2020 brought several key issues into play related to nursing continuing professional development. This article highlights many of these important issues. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(12):537-540.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Staff Development/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
4.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 12-18, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570150

ABSTRACT

A COVID19RNStories website allowed RNs in this integrated health system to "tell their stories" during the recent pandemic. From April to August 2020, approximately 100 items were posted with 4 themes emerging. COVID19RNStories had no preconceived hypotheses or specific questions to answer: RNs shared whatever they felt was relevant to their experiences. This approach provided real-time information on issues and concerns of RNs during the 1st wave of COVID-19. This article discusses the identified themes with recommendations for nursing leaders to support staff during the pandemic and future unexpected emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet , Nurse's Role/psychology , Workload/psychology , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , Quality of Health Care
5.
Nursing ; 51(7): 52-56, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561264

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Little is known about the psychological impact of trauma from pandemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores a descriptive study on the impact of COVID-19 and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder among RNs caring for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Self Report
6.
J Christ Nurs ; 38(3): E28-E31, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532593

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses who provided care to patients with coronavirus (COVID-19) and supported patients in their transition from life to death in the absence of patients' families have been especially needful of spiritual self-care. A spiritual first aid kit can help nurses cope with these difficult times. Spiritual self-care is vital for all nurses to renew and preserve the psychological, spiritual, and physical self.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Self Efficacy , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care/psychology , First Aid , Humans , Spirituality
7.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 39-44, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522339

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many health care facilities closed their doors to nursing students, depriving them of the experience of caring for patients, a foundation of nursing education. The purpose of this article is to report on how the National Council of State Boards of Nursing convened nurse leaders from around the country to explore this problem and develop possible solutions.Coming together virtually, these leaders recommended a national model, the practice-academic partnership, to provide nursing students with in-person clinical experiences during the pandemic. This model is unique in its recognition of the important role of nursing regulatory bodies in these partnerships. The practice-academic partnership model creates clinical education opportunities for students during a public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the model could be applied to meet the chronic challenges nursing education programs have often faced in securing clinical sites, even in the absence of a global or national public health emergency. We provide the context in which the practice-academic partnership model was developed, along with keys to its successful implementation and suggestions for its evaluation. We also discuss the implications of using this model once the pandemic ends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Health Facilities , Interinstitutional Relations , Schools, Nursing , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Organizational , Students, Nursing
8.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(7): 344, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522332
9.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 18-28, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506930

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: For nurses, the challenges posed by demanding work environments and schedules often lead to fatigue, and this can be exacerbated during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, the authors discuss causes and challenges of nurse fatigue and consider several evidence-based strategies and solutions for individual nurses and organizations. Barriers to implementation, including a negative workplace culture and inadequate staffing, are also described, and several resources are presented.


Subject(s)
Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/prevention & control , Nurses/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology
15.
Am J Nurs ; 121(11): 61-65, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475855

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the spring of 1918, a virus swept across the world, killing approximately 50 million people by the summer of 1919. My grandmother, Kathryn ("Katie") Ann Darmody-an Irish immigrant who settled in New York State in 1904-was among the nurses who responded to this pandemic, which became known as the 1918 influenza pandemic (or, erroneously, the Spanish flu). Today, as the world contends with the COVID-19 pandemic, my grandmother's experiences resonate with new meaning-a reminder of how, then as now, nurses have been at the forefront of public health. Her story, transmitted across generations, is one I now share with a new generation of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919/history , Nurse's Role/history , Nursing Staff, Hospital/history , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , History, 20th Century , Humans , New York
16.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(10): 474-480, 2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464047

ABSTRACT

Despite its many devastating effects, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a positive impact in the ways in which society, scientific institutions, governing bodies, businesses, educational organisations, and communication have functioned unchallenged over the years. Rapid advancement in science enabled identification and characterisation of the virus and in developing vaccines to combat the disease. The mysterious ways in which the virus attacks the vital organs that lead on to multiorgan failure and thrombosis of the arterial and venous system have also been revealed. The ability to study the microcirculatory changes at the bedside and predict prognosis is a way forward. All the evidence suggests that the outcome of COVID-19 infection is related to the severity of the disease seen in the intensive care unit setting. This article discusses microcirculatory changes and immune coagulopathy caused by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Microcirculation , Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Thrombosis/virology
17.
J Emerg Nurs ; 47(6): 879-891, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461326

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess (1) the prevalence of burnout risk among nurses working in intensive care units and emergency department before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and (2) the individual and work-related associated factors. METHODS: Data were collected as part of a cross-sectional study on intensive care unit and emergency nurses in Belgium using 2 self-administered online questionnaires distributed just before the pandemic (January 2020, N = 422) and during the first peak of the pandemic (April 2020, N = 1616). Burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory scale. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of burnout risk was higher among emergency nurses than intensive care unit nurses but was not significantly different after the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (from 69.8% to 70.7%, χ²â€¯= 0.15, P = .68), whereas it increased significantly among intensive care unit nurses (from 51.2% to 66.7%, χ²â€¯= 23.64, P < .003). During the pandemic, changes in workload and the lack of personal protective equipment were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of burnout risk, whereas social support from colleagues and from superiors and management were associated with a lower likelihood of burnout risk. Several determinants of burnout risk were different between intensive care unit and emergency nurses. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that nurses in intensive care unit and emergency department were at risk of burnout but their experience during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic was quite different. Therefore, it is important to implement specific measures for these 2 groups of nurses to prevent and manage their risk of burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Pandemics , Belgium/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Clin Nurse Spec ; 35(6): 291-299, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450480

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Emergence of the COVID-19 crisis into the healthcare system challenged existing roles and shifted organizational priorities and staff responsibilities. Operating within the spheres of impact, clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) adapted to the needs of the organization and expanded their responsibilities to provide crisis leadership. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT: The CNSs used advanced practice nursing skills and leadership to implement hospital rounds, identify issues, make decisions, collaborate with stakeholders, disseminate new and emerging information, and evaluate processes in an ongoing pandemic. Using the health crisis management framework, the CNSs demonstrated authentic leadership throughout the prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and rehabilitation phases. OUTCOME: Data analysis of CNS handoff and meeting communications generated these areas of focus involving the CNSs: (1) clinical practice, (2) supplies, (3) workflows, and (4) people. CONCLUSION: The CNS played a vital role in the planning, training, and evaluation of crisis preparation. New and emerging infectious diseases may continue to confront the healthcare system. Thus, healthcare systems need to remain prepared for public health threats. In the crisis leadership role, the CNS helped the transition to learn and relearn practices. As authentic leaders, CNSs instilled calmness, confidence, trust, and resiliency to the staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse Clinicians , Nurse's Role , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Leadership
19.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 177-178, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450476
20.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 175-176, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450475
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