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1.
Sud Med Ekspert ; 65(3): 10-14, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865669

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the work is to study the dynamics of the volume and structure of forensic medical research on cases of non-violent death in the Russian Federation for the period from 2016 to 2020 using the example of two regions of the Federation that differ in socio-economic terms. The material for the study was the annual reports of the «St. Medical Examination¼ and «Novgorod Bureau of Forensic Medical Examination¼. It was established that during the study period in St. Petersburg and the Novgorod region, non-violent death was dominant in the structure of forensic medical examinations of corpses, accounting for about 80%. The leading place was occupied by diseases of the circulatory system and neoplasms, they were more common among residents of the Novgorod region. A positive fact was that since 2016, the residents of the Novgorod region, in contrast to the residents of St. Petersburg, there has been a trend towards a decrease in the number of deaths from diseases of the cardiovascular system. Mortality from oncological diseases increased from year to year in both subjects of the Federation. The most rare causes of death were infectious diseases and diseases of the nervous system. For both groups of diseases, higher mortality was also among residents of the Novgorod region. Both in St. Petersburg and in the Novgorod region there was a gradual decrease in the total number of cases of stillbirths and deaths of children under the age of 1 year. For the entire study period, this indicator, as for most diseases, was higher in the Novgorod region. In the year of the spread of a new coronavirus infection, mortality from most non-communicable diseases increased.


Subject(s)
Forensic Medicine , Neoplasms , Cadaver , Cause of Death , Child , Humans , Russia
2.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 44(4): 599-608, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787804

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Iliocapsularis (IC) overlies the anteromedial hip capsule and is an important landmark in anterior approaches to hip arthroplasty. Previously believed to be part of iliacus, few publications describe the prevalence, attachments, fibre direction, blood supply, innervation, and size of IC. This study was aimed to determine these anatomical features using embalmed bodies and whether they vary between sides, sex, and age. METHODS: Thirty-eight formalin-fixed adult bodies were dissected and the prevalence, presence of a connective tissue raphe, attachments, fibre direction, blood supply, and innervation, were documented. Length and width were measured, and significant differences were investigated with t tests. RESULTS: Iliocapsularis was present in all bodies examined, originating from the inferior border of the anterior inferior iliac spine, and inserting 20 mm distal to the lesser trochanter in 54 muscles (71%). Iliocapsularis was supplied by a thin branch from the femoral nerve and by branches of the lateral circumflex femoral and deep femoral arteries and veins. Muscle fibre direction was from superolateral to inferomedial. Mean length was 116.8 ± 11.2 mm and width was 12.8 ± 3.1 mm, with no significant differences between sides, sex, and age. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to document the venous drainage and compare the dimensions with sides, sex, and age, using adult bodies. However, the true function of IC is still unknown. Iliocapsularis is a constant muscle, distinct from iliacus, which is relevant to orthopaedic surgeons and physical rehabilitation specialists, particularly for postoperative patient care.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Hip Joint , Adult , Cadaver , Femur/surgery , Hip , Hip Joint/surgery , Humans , Muscle, Skeletal/surgery
3.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266426, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785195

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic substantially undermined medical education and healthcare systems. Owing to the pandemic in South Korea, most medical schools needed to be flexible when conducting online and offline classes, but the guidelines did not reflect the specificity of medical schools. This study described the impact of modified anatomy education schedules at the Seoul National University College of Medicine (SNUCM) on students' academic performance and satisfaction. METHODS: Anatomy education in SNUCM is divided into three regional units (the upper and lower limbs, trunk, and head and neck). Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, the schedule was mixed with simultaneous and rotating schedules. The authors conducted exceptions for online lectures, cadaver dissections, and written and practical examinations in three classes of approximately 50 students each. Furthermore, the authors assessed students' performance using three sets of written and practical examinations, and students completed a questionnaire regarding modified anatomy laboratory schedules. RESULTS: Despite the pandemic events in Seoul and South Korea during the laboratory sessions, all sessions were completed without any confirmed COVID-19 cases among the students, faculty, and staff. Most of the scores on the written and practical examinations significantly decreased in 2020 compared to those in 2019. However, in the trunk session that used the virtual anatomy application, the score on the practical examination in 2020 was significantly higher than that in 2019. Over 70% (79 and 77 out of 105 respondents on the upper and lower limbs and trunk, respectively) and 53% (55/105) students reported that there were no significant difficulties in studying anatomy in a face-to-face laboratory. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, an adequate education program for cadaver dissection should be developed and provided to overcome the pandemic restrictions. The study findings could serve as a reference for anatomy education during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Medical , Anatomy/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
4.
Cells ; 11(7)2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776141

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, a recently emerged disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection, can present with different degrees of severity and a large variety of signs and symptoms. The oral manifestations of COVID-19 often involve the tongue, with loss of taste being one of the most common symptoms of the disease. This study aimed to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA and assess possible morphological and immunopathological alterations in the lingual tissue of patients who died with a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Sixteen cadavers from 8 SARS-CoV-2 positive (COVID-19+) and 8 negative (COVID-19-) subjects provided 16 tongues, that were biopsied. Samples underwent molecular analysis through Real-Time RT-PCR for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Lingual papillae were harvested and processed for histological analysis and for immunohistochemical evaluation for ACE2, IFN-γ and factor VIII. Real-Time RT-PCR revealed the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in filiform, foliate, and circumvallate papillae in 6 out of 8 COVID-19+ subjects while all COVID-19- samples resulted negative. Histology showed a severe inflammation of COVID-19+ papillae with destruction of the taste buds. ACE2 and IFN-γ resulted downregulated in COVID-19+ and no differences were evidenced for factor VIII between the two groups. The virus was detectable in most COVID-19+ tongues. An inflammatory damage to the lingual papillae, putatively mediated by ACE2 and IFN-γ in tongues from COVID-19+ cadavers, was observed. Further investigations are needed to confirm these findings and deepen the association between taste disorders and inflammation in SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tongue , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cadaver , Factor VIII , Humans , Inflammation , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Tongue/pathology , Tongue/virology
5.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(6S): S350-S354, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020, there has been a marked rise in the use of telemedicine to evaluate patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of our study was to assess a novel stem with an embedded sensor that can remotely and objectively monitor a patient's mobility after TKA. METHODS: A single anatomically designed knee system was implanted in concert with an interconnected tibial stem extension containing 3D accelerometers, 3D gyroscopes, a power source, and a telemetry transmission capability in 3 cadaveric pelvis to toe specimens. The legs were moved by hand to preset tibial positions at full knee extension, midflexion, flexion, and back to midflexion and extension for a total of 16 trials across 6 knees. RESULTS: Sensor data were successfully transmitted with good quality of signal to an external base station. Good correlation to the range of motion of the tibia was found (mean error 0.1 degrees; root mean square error 3.8 degrees). The signal from the heel drop tests suggests the sensor could detect heel strike during activities of daily living in vivo and the potential for additional signal processing to analyze vibratory and motion patterns detected by the sensors. A frequency domain analysis of a properly cemented and poorly cemented implant during the heel drop test suggests a difference in accelerometer signal in these implant states. CONCLUSION: The results confirm signals generated from an embedded TKA sensor can transmit through bone and cement, providing accurate range of motion data and may be capable of detecting changes in prosthesis fixation remotely.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Knee Prosthesis , Activities of Daily Living , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Biomechanical Phenomena , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cadaver , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Knee Joint/surgery , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pandemics , Range of Motion, Articular , Tibia/surgery
6.
Anat Sci Educ ; 15(3): 476-492, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739122

ABSTRACT

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, National Taiwan University anatomy teachers adopted asynchronous online video teaching and reduced the size of anatomy laboratory groups in April 2020. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of these changes on medical students' learning. Before Covid-19, the performance of the 2019-2020 cohort was significantly better than that of the 2018-2019 cohort. However, the implementation of modified teaching strategies significantly lowered the laboratory midterm score of the 2019-2020 cohort in the second semester. Conversely, the final laboratory examination score of the 2019-2020 cohort was significantly higher than that of the 2018-2019 cohort. Through correlation analysis, lecture and laboratory examination scores were highly correlated. Additionally, the difference in lecture and laboratory z-scores between two cohorts, the Likert scale survey and free-text feedback of the 2019-2020 cohort, were conducted to show the impact of modified teaching strategies. There were several important findings in this study. First, the change in teaching strategies may temporarily negatively influence medical students to learn anatomy. Besides, analyzing the performance of laboratory assessments could be a complementary strategy to evaluate online assessments. Applying lecture examination scores to predict laboratory performance was a feasible way to identify students who may have difficulty in learning practical dissection. Finally, reducing group size together with reduced peer discussion may have a negative effect on learning cadaver dissection for students with low academic performance. These findings should be taken into consideration when anatomy teachers apply new teaching strategies in anatomy courses.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Anatomy/education , Cadaver , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , Teaching
7.
J Med Case Rep ; 16(1): 72, 2022 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690879

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the worldwide spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 to date, important knowledge has been obtained about the virus behavior in living subjects and on inanimate surfaces; however, there is still a lack of data on virus persistency on dead bodies and the risk of contagion from cadavers. CASE PRESENTATION: The present case shows the persistency of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 viral genome in nasopharyngeal swabs performed on a drowned Caucasian man, aged 41 years old, who was completely asymptomatic when he was alive, up to 41 days after death. Specific real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan 2019-nCoV Assay Kit v2; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Italy and Realquality RQ-SARS-CoV-2, AB Analytical) was used to evaluate the swabs. CONCLUSIONS: This data reflect the importance of postmortem swabs in all autopsy cases, and not only in potential severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related death, and also highlight the necessity to evaluate virus positivity a long time after the moment of death, even if a low initial viral load was assessed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Cadaver , Humans , Male , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Specimen Handling
8.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1356: 281-297, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680591

ABSTRACT

The rise of Information and Communication Technologies and Computer Assisted Instruction have led to the adoption of digital visual learning aids to improve anatomy instruction. Creation of cadaveric video resources surged during 2020-2021 as they provided one option to continue teaching anatomy using cadaveric specimens in a time when all in-person practical teaching was prohibited to maintain safety during the Covid-19 pandemic. Cadaveric videos are relatively inexpensive to create and with the correct set up can be filmed independently by one anatomist. This makes cadaveric videos a feasible option for anatomists to create using their own specimens and tailored to their own curriculum. The use of cadaveric videos is not limited to instances where practical teaching is not an option and can provide an excellent supplementary exercise. Using cadaveric videos in conjunction with in-person dissection sessions could enhance student's self-efficacy, promote autonomous learning and reduce the likelihood of students experiencing cognitive overload while learning in the dissection room environment. However, sharing resources that contain cadaveric material online should be approached with caution and anatomists should ensure they have a secure method of distributing cadaveric video content to the intended audience only.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Forensic Sci Int ; 331: 111168, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616494

ABSTRACT

Rapid and accurate detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in dead bodies is essential to prevent infection among those working with dead bodies. This study focused on the Smart Amplification (SmartAmp) method, which has a short examination time (approximately an hour), is simple to perform, and demonstrates high specificity and sensitivity. This method has already been used for clinical specimens; however, its effectiveness in dead bodies has not been reported. This study examined the SmartAmp method using 11 autopsies or postmortem needle biopsies performed from January to May, 2021 (of these, five cases tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and six cases tested negative). Swab samples were collected from the nasopharynx, oropharynx, or anus and the SmartAmp and qRT-PCR results were compared. For the nasopharynx and oropharynx samples, the same results were obtained for both methods in all cases; however, for the anal swabs, there was one case that was positive according to qRT-PCR but negative according to the SmartAmp method. The SmartAmp method may therefore be less sensitive than qRT-PCR and results may differ in specimens with a low viral load, such as anal swabs. However, in the nasopharynx and oropharynx specimens, which are normally used for testing, the results were the same using each method, suggesting that the SmartAmp method is useful in dead bodies. In the future, the SmartAmp method may be applied not only during autopsies, but also in various situations where dead bodies are handled.


Subject(s)
Cadaver , SARS-CoV-2 , Anal Canal/virology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Humans , Nasopharynx/virology , Oropharynx/virology , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
10.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 44(1): 1-2, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1602847
11.
BMC Surg ; 21(1): 422, 2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV2 virus has been identified in abdominal cavity of the COVID-19 patients. Therefore, the potential viral transmission from any surgical created smoke in these patients is of concern especially in laparoscopic surgery. This study aimed to compare the amount of surgical smoke and surgical field contamination between laparoscopic and open surgery in fresh cadavers. METHODS: Cholecystectomy in 12 cadavers was performed and they were divided into 4 groups: laparoscopic approach with or without smoke evacuator, and open approach with or without smoke evacuator. The increased particle counts in surgical smoke of each group were analyzed. In the model of appendectomy, surgical field contamination under ultraviolet light and visual contamination scale between laparoscopic and open approach were compared. RESULTS: Open cholecystectomy significantly produced a greater amount of overall particle sizes, particle sizes < 5 µm and particle sizes ≥ 5 µm than laparoscopic cholecystectomy (10,307 × 103 vs 3738 × 103, 10,226 × 103 vs 3685 × 103 and 81 × 103 vs 53 × 103 count/m3, respectively at p < 0.05). The use of smoke evacuator led to decrease in the amount of overall particle sizes of 58% and 32.4% in the open and laparoscopic chelecystectomy respectively. Median (interquatile range) visual contamination scale of surgical field in open appendectomy [3.50 (2.33, 4.67)] was significantly greater than laparoscopic appendectomy [1.50 (0.67, 2.33)] at p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy yielded less smoke-related particles than open cholecystectomy. The use of smoke evacuator, abeit non-significantly, reduced the particles in both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Laparoscopic appendectomy had a lower degree of surgical field contamination than the open approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1842661, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573887

ABSTRACT

Methods of anatomical education have, as with many facets of normal life, been forced to evolve rapidly due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Whilst some authors claim that cadaver dissection is now under threat, we believe the centuries-old practice can and must be upheld.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dissection/education , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical
14.
Anat Sci Educ ; 15(1): 5-26, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508618

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (Covid-19) disrupted the in-person teaching format of anatomy. To study changes in gross anatomy education that occurred during August-December, 2020 compared to before the pandemic, an online survey was distributed to anatomy educators. The 191 responses received were analyzed in total and by academic program, geographic region, and institution type. Cadaver use decreased overall (before: 74.1 ± 34.1%, during: 50.3 ± 43.0%, P < 0.0001), as well as across allopathic and osteopathic medicine, therapy, undergraduate, and veterinary programs (P < 0.05), but remained unchanged for other programs (P > 0.05). Cadaver use decreased internationally and in the US (P < 0.0001), at public and private (P < 0.0001) institutions, and among allopathic medical programs in Northeastern, Central, and Southern (P < 0.05), but not Western, US geographical regions. Laboratories during Covid-19 were delivered through synchronous (59%), asynchronous (4%), or mixed (37%) formats (P < 0.0001) and utilized digital resources (47%), dissection (32%), and/or prosection (21%) (P < 0.0001). The practical laboratory examination persisted during Covid-19 (P = 0.419); however, the setting and materials shifted to computer-based (P < 0.0001) and image-based (P < 0.0001), respectively. In-person lecture decreased during Covid-19 (before: 88%, during: 24%, P = 0.003). When anatomy digital resources were categorized, dissection media, interactive software, and open-access content increased (P ≤ 0.008), with specific increases in BlueLink, Acland's Videos, and Complete Anatomy (P < 0.05). This study provided evidence of how gross anatomy educators continued to adapt their courses past the early stages of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Anatomy/education , Cadaver , Educational Status , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Legal Med ; 135(6): 2637-2651, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491119

ABSTRACT

This study highlights the importance of insect evidence by evaluating 949 insect-associated cases, including 139 entomological reports, from 2001 to 2019 at the Institute of Legal Medicine Frankfurt/Germany. With a high number of cases in the summer months and a low number in the colder season, 78.5% of the bodies were found indoors, regardless of year or month. In more than 80% of the cases, where PMI information was available (n = 704), the presumed PMI ranged from 1 to 21 days, a period during which entomological evidence can provide a day-specific estimate of PMImin. In cases where insects have been identified to species level (n = 279), most bodies were infested by one or two species with a maximum of 10 different species. Overall, a total of 55 insect species were found. Information on biology, activity and distribution of the most abundant taxa is given and applied for 5 case histories estimating different PMImins of up to over 6 months. Despite proved importance and scientific development of forensic entomology, insects are still rarely considered as a tool in forensic case work. The main reasons are a lack of awareness and (too) late involvement of a forensic entomologist. Our work shows that forensic entomology is an independent discipline that requires specialist expertise.


Subject(s)
Forensic Entomology , Insecta , Animals , Cadaver , Humans , Retrospective Studies
16.
J Anat ; 239(5): 1221-1225, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462840

ABSTRACT

Teaching and learning anatomy by using human cadaveric specimens has been a foundation of medical and biomedical teaching for hundreds of years. Therefore, the majority of institutions that teach topographical anatomy rely on body donation programmes to provide specimens for both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching of gross anatomy. The COVID-19 pandemic has posed an unprecedented challenge to anatomy teaching because of the suspension of donor acceptance at most institutions. This was largely due to concerns about the potential transmissibility of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the absence of data about the ability of embalming solutions to neutralise the virus. Twenty embalming solutions commonly used in institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland were tested for their ability to neutralise SARS-CoV-2, using an established cytotoxicity assay. All embalming solutions tested neutralised SARS-CoV-2, with the majority of solutions being effective at high-working dilutions. These results suggest that successful embalming with the tested solutions can neutralise the SARS-CoV-2 virus, thereby facilitating the safe resumption of body donation programmes and cadaveric anatomy teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Embalming/methods , Formaldehyde/pharmacology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tissue Fixation/methods , COVID-19/transmission , Cadaver , Cells, Cultured , Fixatives/pharmacology , Humans
17.
Arthroscopy ; 38(3): 1003-1018, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454007

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate variability in biomechanical testing protocols for laboratory-based studies using suture anchors for glenohumeral shoulder instability and SLAP lesion repair. METHODS: A systematic review of Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar using Covidence software was performed for all biomechanical studies investigating labral-based suture anchor repair for shoulder instability and SLAP lesions. Clinical studies, technical notes or surgical technique descriptions, or studies treating glenoid bone loss or capsulorrhaphy were excluded. Risk of bias (ROB) was assessed with the ROBINS-I tool. Study quality was assessed with the Quality Appraisal for Cadaveric Studies. Heterogeneity was assessed with the I2 statistic. RESULTS: A total of 41 studies were included. ROB was serious and critical in 27 studies, moderate in 13, and low in 1; 6 studies had high quality, 21 good quality, 10 moderate quality, 2 low quality, and 2 very low quality. Thirty-one studies used and 22 studies included cyclic loading. Angle of anchor insertion was reported by 33 studies. The force vector for displacement varied. The most common directions were perpendicular to the glenoid (n = 9), and anteroinferior or anterior (n = 8). The most common outcome measures were load to failure (n = 35), failure mode (n = 23), and stiffness (n = 21). Other outcome measures included load at displacement, displacement at failure, tensile load at displacement, translation, energy absorbed, cycles to failure, contact pressure, and elongation. CONCLUSION: This systematic review demonstrated a clear lack of consistency in those cadaver studies that investigated biomechanical properties after surgical repair with suture anchors for shoulder instability and SLAP lesions. Testing methods between studies varied substantially with no universally applied standard for preloading, load to failure and cyclic loading protocols, insertion angles of suture anchors, or direction of loading. To allow comparability between studies standardization of testing protocols is strongly recommended.


Subject(s)
Joint Instability , Shoulder Joint , Biomechanical Phenomena , Cadaver , Humans , Joint Instability/diagnosis , Joint Instability/surgery , Shoulder Joint/surgery , Suture Anchors , Suture Techniques
18.
Morphologie ; 105(350): 196-203, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401723

ABSTRACT

The culture of cadaver dissection remains the most commonly used method of practical teaching and learning of human anatomy. Anatomist and medical professionals considered cadaver dissection as the gold standard for teaching and learning anatomy in detail. The increase seen in the establishment of new medical training institutions globally has consequently led to a proportionate increase in the sourcing for cadavers. Moreover, the surge in mortality rates following the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic with no cure or approved vaccine has been a source of concern for academia, especially on the safety in the usage of cadavers for dissection. Notwithstanding, several countries continue to depend on unclaimed bodies as the primary source for cadavers, regardless of the cause of death. Besides, body donation is also usually reported to be strained during disease outbreaks thereby putting countries that depend solely on it in a dilemma. This study highlighted the recommended standard operating procedures (SOPs) to be imbibed in gross anatomy dissection halls during and post-COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Anatomy/education , Cadaver , Curriculum , Humans , Laboratories , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
19.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 1-2, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385711

ABSTRACT

We report the finding of the SARS-CoV-2 genome in the corpse of an exhumed infected person, one month after her death. The viral gene targets were still present in her lungs and heart, however, the virus was no longer alive. Infectious risks from human corpses should be considered.


Subject(s)
Cadaver , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Autopsy , Female , Humans , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Time Factors
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