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1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 741188, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518572

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The first year of the COVID-19 pandemic has been highly disruptive for people with cancer. Furthermore, it has been shown that accrual to cancer trials dropped substantially in 2020. Building on findings from a previous pilot survey, the present study used qualitative methods to gain insights into attitudes towards participation in research studies amongst people who have experienced cancer, in the context of the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: We interviewed 13 participants from the UK, who were purposively sampled, including a broad sample of cancer types, and a mixture of individuals who have and have not taken part in research previously. Participants underwent semi-structured interviews (median interview duration: 47 min) and were asked open-ended questions about their attitude towards and experiences with COVID-19, and their attitude towards research participation. In addition to this, prompts were used to ask participants about concerns that were highlighted by our previous quantitative work on this topic, such as concerns about being older or having to travel to participate. Interview transcripts were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Results: Our findings suggest that cancer patient decision-making about research participation during an infectious disease pandemic may be a function of a basic cost-benefit analysis, which considers the benefit of taking part, either personally to themselves or to wider society. The benefit may then be weighed by the patient against the risk of being infected, which may be influenced by trust in the relevant clinicians/researchers; familiarity with the study location; provision of detailed information on safety protocols for infectious disease; and, in particular, the availability of safe transport to and from the study location. Discussion: Some cancer patients say that they would be less likely to participate in a research study in the middle of an infectious disease pandemic due to an increased risk to themselves. Patients' perceived risk to themselves from participating may be ameliorated via the provision of certain practical solutions that can be considered at the study protocol design stage, such as safe travel, information, and the use of staff and study sites familiar to the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Attitude , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMC Womens Health ; 21(1): 387, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501998

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the abundance of clinical data available for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), little research on the psychological well-being of breast cancer survivors has been published. We investigate the extent to which self-compassion accounted for the association between psychological well-being (depression, anxiety) and death anxiety in breast cancer survivors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was applied. Participants were recruited from three departments of oncology in Zanjan, Iran. Data were collected from 210 breast cancer patients. Participants completed self-report measures. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship among the study variables. Bootstrapping analyses were used to test the significance of indirect effects. RESULTS: Correlational analyses revealed that depression and anxiety were significantly and positively related to death anxiety (r = 0.77, p < 0.01; r = 0.85, p < 0.01, respectively) and negatively to self-compassion (r = - 0.48, p < 0.01; r = - 0.53, p < 0.01, respectively). Bootstrapping analyses revealed significant indirect effects of depression (ß = 0.065, SE = 0.35, p < 0.03, 95% CI [LL = - 0.0083, UL: - 0.1654]) and anxiety (ß = 0.089, SE = 0.09, p < 0.04, 95% CI [LL = - 0.0247, UL: - 0.1987]) on death anxiety through self-compassion. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study indicate that self-compassion may be considered as one treatment strategy to improve psychological well-being of cancer patients in the new context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Empathy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Cancer Nurs ; 44(6): E636-E651, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A cancer diagnosis as an adolescent and young adult (AYA) poses exceptional challenges, including potential greater financial toxicity than older survivors experience who have had more time for career establishment and to build financial assets. Costs to patients have increased more than the past decade; prospects for AYA long-term survival have also increased. A better understanding of what financial toxicity is, how it presents, and the immediate and longer-term implications for AYAs is needed. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the concept financial toxicity in AYAs diagnosed with cancer. METHODS: We used Rodgers' evolutionary method and articles published between January 2013 and December 2020. RESULTS: We identified key antecedents, attributes, and consequences of financial toxicity in AYAs and review its related terms that have often been used as surrogate terms. Attributes were financial burden, financial distress, and competing financial pressures. Consequences were mostly adverse and persistent and included engaging in various financial problem-solving behaviors, material hardship and poor financial well-being, and deteriorated quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this analysis clarify financial toxicity and provide guidance for a conceptual framework in the context of AYA cancer survivorship. Its consequences in AYAs with cancer are profound and will continue to evolve over time with changes in health systems and the economy. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Oncology nurses should understand the attributes and consequences of financial toxicity for AYAs throughout the cancer trajectory. Future research on financial toxicity should extend across AYAs living with other chronic illnesses and cancer survivors in other age groups.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adolescent , Humans , Quality of Life , Survivors , Young Adult
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470864

ABSTRACT

Adult cancer survivors have an increased prevalence of mental health comorbidities and other adverse late-effects interdependent with mental illness outcomes compared with the general population. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) heralds an era of renewed call for actions to identify sustainable modalities to facilitate the constructs of cancer survivorship care and health care delivery through physiological supportive domestic spaces. Building on the concept of therapeutic architecture, psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) indicators-with the central role in low-grade systemic inflammation-are associated with major psychiatric disorders and late effects of post-cancer treatment. Immune disturbances might mediate the effects of environmental determinants on behaviour and mental disorders. Whilst attention is paid to the non-objective measurements for examining the home environmental domains and mental health outcomes, little is gathered about the multidimensional effects on physiological responses. This exploratory review presents a first analysis of how addressing the PNI outcomes serves as a catalyst for therapeutic housing research. We argue the crucial component of housing in supporting the sustainable primary care and public health-based cancer survivorship care model, particularly in the psychopathology context. Ultimately, we illustrate a series of interventions aiming at how housing environmental attributes can trigger PNI profile changes and discuss the potential implications in the non-pharmacological treatment of cancer survivors and patients with mental morbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , Housing , Humans , Mental Health , Morbidity , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Psychoneuroimmunology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(3): 791-805, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on sexual quality of life (SQoL) is a well-established survivorship issue for gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS), yet little is known on how to intervene. PURPOSE: The aim of this systematic review was to identify the factors explaining the variability in SQoL for GCS. METHODS: We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework and the software Covidence. Electronic databases Scopus, Web of Science, PUBMED and CINAHL were searched for original research on GCS published between 2002 and 2018. We performed a two-stage screening process against selection criteria and quality assessment of individual studies. The Salutogenic Theory and the PRECEDE-PROCEED model were used as theoretical frameworks to identify and categorise factors. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 3,505 articles resulting in a total of 46 studies used to examine the association between factors of SQoL and gynaecological cancers. Our findings suggested that SQoL varies across subgroups based on age, menopausal status, relationship status, and treatment modality. Protective factors included clinicians' knowledge and confidence, preventive medical approach, risk and needs assessment, patient-clinician communication, relationship quality, psychosocial support, symptom management, accessibility of psychosexual care, and self-efficacy in the rediscovery of sexuality. CONCLUSION: Despite the high incidence and long-term impact of sexual health issues on quality of life, supportive care needs are not being met. A better understanding of the evidence base around the factors of SQoL can help health professionals take steps to protect and improve SQoL in GCS.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors/psychology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/psychology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology , Australia , Female , Humans , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/etiology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology
6.
Psychooncology ; 30(2): 147-158, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453645

ABSTRACT

Objective: Spiritual well-being (SpWb) is an important dimension of health-related quality of life for many cancer patients. Accordingly, an increasing number of psychosocial intervention studies have included SpWb as a study endpoint, and may improve SpWb even if not designed explicitly to do so. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated effects of psychosocial interventions on SpWb in adults with cancer and tested potential moderators of intervention effects. Methods: Six literature databases were systematically searched to identify RCTs of psychosocial interventions in which SpWb was an outcome. Doctoral-level rater pairs extracted data using Covidence following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Standard meta-analytic techniques were applied, including meta-regression with robust variance estimation and risk-of-bias sensitivity analysis. Results: Forty-one RCTs were identified, encompassing 88 treatment effects among 3883 survivors. Interventions were associated with significant improvements in SpWb (g = 0.22, 95% CI [0.14, 0.29], p < 0.0001). Studies assessing the FACIT-Sp demonstrated larger effect sizes than did those using other measures of SpWb (g = 0.25, 95% CI [0.17, 0.34], vs. g = 0.10, 95% CI [-0.02, 0.23], p = 0.03]. No other intervention, clinical, or demographic characteristics significantly moderated effect size. Conclusions: Psychosocial interventions are associated with small-to-medium-sized effects on SpWb among cancer survivors. Future research should focus on conceptually coherent interventions explicitly targeting SpWb and evaluate interventions in samples that are diverse with respect to race and ethnicity, sex and cancer type.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Psychosocial Intervention , Quality of Life , Survivors
7.
Support Care Cancer ; 28(8): 3517-3531, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453749

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Rural breast cancer survivors (BCS) in the United States face unique challenges during survivorship, related to knowledge and accessibility of resources. Survivorship care plans should address five key areas that include surveillance and screening for new/reoccurring cancer; management of long-term effects of cancer treatment; health promotion; and care coordination/practice implications. To maximize the benefit of survivorship care for rural BCS, it is necessary to better understand their experiences and preferences. METHODS: A systematic review of the extant literature addressing the survivorship needs and interventions for rural BCS was conducted. The following databases were searched for reports published between January, 2007, and December, 2018: PubMed, CINAHL, SCOPUS, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CAB Direct, and Sociological Abstracts. Reports published after 2007 with samples including and comprised of rural BCS in the United States were included. Screening of the search results followed PRISMA guidelines using Covidence systematic review software. RESULTS: Findings were extracted from 30 reports disseminating findings of 14 research studies. The five areas of a survivorship care were counted/accounted for during data extraction. The included reports concentrated on health promotion (e.g., weight loss and exercise) and the management of long-term effects of cancer treatment as key outcomes. There is a gap in the literature addressing care coordination, surveillance, and screening. CONCLUSION: Additional research including interventions for rural BCS that address more survivorship care areas would benefit this population and improve survivorship quality of life for rural BCS.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/mortality , Cancer Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Needs Assessment , Quality of Life , Rural Population , Survival Rate , Survivorship , United States/epidemiology
8.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444285

ABSTRACT

Scalable, effective interventions are needed to address poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and obesity amongst rising numbers of cancer survivors. Interventions targeting survivors and their friends and family may promote both tertiary and primary prevention. The design, rationale, and enrollment of an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) (NCT04132219) to test a web-based lifestyle intervention for cancer survivors and their supportive partners are described, along with the characteristics of the sample recruited. This two-arm, single-blinded RCT randomly assigns 56 dyads (cancer survivor and partner, both with obesity, poor diets, and physical inactivity) to the six-month DUET intervention vs. wait-list control. Intervention delivery and assessment are remotely performed with 0-6 month, between-arm tests comparing body weight status (primary outcome), and secondary outcomes (waist circumference, health indices, and biomarkers of glucose homeostasis, lipid regulation and inflammation). Despite COVID-19, targeted accrual was achieved within 9 months. Not having Internet access was a rare exclusion (<2%). Inability to identify a support partner precluded enrollment of 42% of interested/eligible survivors. The enrolled sample is diverse: ages 23-81 and 38% racial/ethnic minorities. Results support the accessibility and appeal of web-based lifestyle interventions for cancer survivors, though some cancer survivors struggled to enlist support partners and may require alternative strategies.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Internet-Based Intervention , Spouses , Weight Reduction Programs/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Diet, Reducing/methods , Exercise , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Single-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
9.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 190(2): 287-293, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404658

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Older cancer survivors required medical care during the COVID-19 pandemic, but there are limited data on medical care in this age group. METHODS: We evaluated care disruptions in a longitudinal cohort of non-metastatic breast cancer survivors aged 60-98 from five US regions (n = 321). Survivors completed a web-based or telephone survey from May 27, 2020 to September 11, 2020. Care disruptions included interruptions in seeing or speaking to doctors, receiving medical treatment or supportive therapies, or filling prescriptions since the pandemic began. Logistic regression models evaluated associations between care disruptions and education, medical, psychosocial, and COVID-19-related factors. Multivariate models included age, county COVID-19 death rates, comorbidity, and post-diagnosis time. RESULTS: There was a high response rate (n = 262, 81.6%). Survivors were 32.2 months post-diagnosis (SD 17.5, range 4-73). Nearly half (48%) reported a medical disruption. The unadjusted odds of care disruptions were higher with each year of education (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.08-1.37, p = < 0.001) and increased depression by CES-D score (OR 1.04, CI 1.003-1.08, p = 0.033) while increased tangible support decreased the odds of disruptions (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.97-0.99, p = 0.012). There was a trend between disruptions and comorbidities (unadjusted OR 1.13 per comorbidity, 95% CI 0.99-1.29, p = 0.07). Adjusting for covariates, higher education years (OR1.23, 95% CI 1.09-1.39, p = 0.001) and tangible social support (OR 0.98 95% CI 0.97-1.00, p = 0.006) remained significantly associated with having care disruptions. CONCLUSION: Older breast cancer survivors reported high rates of medical care disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic and psychosocial factors were associated with care disruptions. CLINICALTRIALS. GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT03451383.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E87, 2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404026

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Understanding trends and associated factors in internet-based health care communication (IBHC) among cancer survivors is important for meeting patient needs because their reliance on telehealth is growing. We aimed to examine IBHC use among cancer survivors in the US. METHODS: We identified adult cancer survivors aged 18 to 64 (n = 8,029) and 65 or older (n = 11,087) from the National Health Interview Survey in 2011-2018. We calculated temporal trends of self-reported IBHC in the previous year (filled a prescription, scheduled a medical appointment, or communicated with a health care provider) and used multivariable logistic models to identify associated factors. RESULTS: Approximately 84% of survivors had been diagnosed 2 years or more before the survey. IBHC prevalence increased among cancer survivors aged 18 to 64, from 19.3% to 40.2%, and among those aged 65 or older, from 11.4% to 22.6%, from 2011 to 2018 (P for trend <.001). Among both age groups, lower educational attainment, lack of usual source of care, and current smoking were associated with less IBHC, whereas residing in the South or West, having 1 or more chronic conditions, and drinking any alcohol were associated with higher IBHC (all P < .05). Factors associated with less IBHC also included being non-Hispanic Black or Hispanic, lacking private insurance, and being 11 or more years postdiagnosis among survivors aged 18 to 64; among survivors aged 65 or older, factors were being an older age, not married, and non-US born (all P < .05). CONCLUSION: IBHC among cancer survivors is common and increasing, with differences across sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics. As health care delivery continues adopting IBHC and other advanced telehealth techniques, disparities need to be addressed to ensure equitable access to care for all cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Communication , Humans , Internet , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Survivors
11.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(11): e29324, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380406

ABSTRACT

Childhood cancersurvivors may be differentially impacted by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). From April to June of 2020, we examined psychosocial/health concerns in 4148 adult survivors and 571 siblings. Although more survivors reported concerns about getting sick (p = .002) and needing hospitalization (p = .003) in general, survivors and siblings were comparably concerned about being infected with and the consequences of COVID-19. Cranial radiation was associated with social isolation (relative risk [RR] = 1.3, CI = 1.1-1.7), and central nervous system (CNS) tumors were associated with unemployment due to COVID-19 (RR = 1.7, CI = 1.2-2.2). Some survivors appear more vulnerable and may require more support to meet health care and vocational needs during COVID-19, though siblings also perceive substantial risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Siblings , Social Isolation , Unemployment
13.
Breast ; 59: 301-307, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340566

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine clinicodemographic determinants associated with breast cancer survivorship follow-up during COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, population-based cohort study including early stage (Stage I-II) breast cancer patients who underwent resection between 2006 and 2018 in a New York City hospital system. The primary outcome was oncologic follow-up prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Secondary analyses compared differences in follow-up by COVID-19 case rates stratified by ZIP code. RESULTS: A total of 2942 patients with early-stage breast cancer were available for analysis. 1588 (54%) of patients had attended follow-up in the year prior to the COVID-19 period but failed to continue to follow-up during the pandemic, either in-person or via telemedicine. 1242 (42%) patients attended a follow-up appointment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Compared with patients who did not present for follow-up during COVID-19, patients who continued their oncologic follow-up during the pandemic were younger (p = 0.049) more likely to have received adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.025), and have lower household income (p = 0.031) on multivariate modeling. When patients who live in Bronx, New York, were stratified by ZIP code, there was a modest negative association (r = -0.56) between COVID-19 cases and proportion of patients who continued to follow-up during the COVID-19 period. CONCLUSION: We observed a dramatic disruption in routine breast cancer follow-up during the COVID-19 pandemic. Providers and health systems should emphasize reintegrating patients who missed appointments during COVID-19 back into regular surveillance programs to avoid significant morbidity and mortality from missed breast cancer recurrences.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/mortality , COVID-19/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Survivorship , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Male , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
14.
Cancer ; 127(23): 4481-4491, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young adult (YA) cancer survivors are at risk for financial toxicity during and after cancer treatment. Financial toxicity has been associated with medical-related cost-coping behaviors such as skipping or delaying treatment. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in dire economic consequences that may worsen financial hardship among young survivors. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey; data collection occurred online. A convenience sample was recruited through YA cancer advocacy groups and social media. Negative economic events associated with the COVID-19 pandemic (eg, income loss, increased debt, and decreased job security) and medical-related cost-coping were documented. A validated measure assessed cancer-related financial toxicity. RESULTS: Participants (N = 212) had a mean age of 35.3 years at survey completion and a mean age of 27.4 years at diagnosis. Financial toxicity (mean, 14.0; SD, 9.33) was high. Two-thirds of the sample experienced at least 1 negative economic event during COVID-19, and 71% engaged in at least 1 medical cost-coping behavior. Cost-coping and pandemic-related negative economic events were significantly correlated with cancer-related financial toxicity. In multivariable analyses, pandemic-related negative economic events and financial toxicity were associated with cost-coping. CONCLUSIONS: Acute negative economic events associated with the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate cancer-related financial toxicity and overall financial hardship among YAs and lead to cost-coping behaviors that can compromise survivorship care and health outcomes. Multilevel, systematic interventions are needed to address the financial needs of YA survivors after the global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Health Expenditures , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Neoplasms/economics , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics
15.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 113(8): 955-961, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338719

ABSTRACT

The growing number of cancer survivors and the high prevalence of cancer-related physical and psychosocial effects pose important and pressing challenges to health systems. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to further stressors on cancer survivors and health care systems. As the pandemic continues to have substantial impact on the world, it is critical to focus attention on the health care needs of cancer survivors. In this commentary, we propose an adoption of essential steps that should be part of a continuous adaptive approach to promote effective cancer survivorship care during ongoing COVID-19 waves and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
16.
Curr Sports Med Rep ; 20(5): 271-276, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322966

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the spring of 2020, we faced a global pandemic that resulted in social distancing limitations not previously experienced, forcing practitioners to adapt exercise programming to a virtual model. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effectiveness of a virtual exercise oncology program in 491 participants undergoing antineoplastic therapy between March and June 2020. Each session was completed virtually with a certified exercise oncology trainer. Fitness and psychological parameters were measured preexercise and postexercise intervention. Overall, participants completed 4949 of 5892 prescribed exercise sessions. Patients saw increases in cardiovascular endurance (15.2%, P < 0.05), muscular endurance (18.2%, P < 0.05), flexibility (31.9%, P < 0.05), feelings of support (58.7%, P < 0.05), and quality of life (32.2%, P < 0.05), as well as decreases in loneliness (54%, P < 0.05) and fatigue (48.7%, P < 0.05). In light of our findings, we assert that virtual exercise training is a viable option in circumstances where in-person, individualized exercise training is not possible.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Exercise Therapy/methods , Internet-Based Intervention , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Checklist , Exercise Therapy/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Physical Endurance/physiology , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Social Support , Symptom Assessment , Treatment Outcome
17.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302428

ABSTRACT

Harvest for Health is a home-based vegetable gardening intervention that pairs cancer survivors with Master Gardeners from the Cooperative Extension System. Initially developed and tested in Alabama, the program was adapted for the different climate, growing conditions, and population in New Mexico. This paper chronicles the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of "Southwest Harvest for Health". During the nine-month single-arm trial, 30 cancer survivor-Master Gardener dyads worked together to establish and maintain three seasonal gardens. Primary outcomes were accrual, retention, and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes were vegetable and fruit (V and F) intake, physical activity, and quality of life. Recruitment was diverse and robust, with 30 survivors of various cancers, aged 50-83, roughly one-third minority, and two-thirds females enrolled in just 60 days. Despite challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic, retention to the nine-month study was 100%, 93% reported "good-to-excellent" satisfaction, and 87% "would do it again." A median increase of 1.2 servings of V and F/day was documented. The adapted home-based vegetable gardening program was feasible, well-received, and resulted in increased V and F consumption among adult cancer survivors. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this program and to inform strategies to increase the successful implementation and further dissemination of this intervention.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors/education , Gardening/education , Horticultural Therapy/methods , Mentors , Vegetables , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Female , Healthy Lifestyle , Horticultural Therapy/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Mexico , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life
18.
Cancer ; 127(19): 3671-3679, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had wide-ranging health effects and increased isolation. Older with cancer patients might be especially vulnerable to loneliness and poor mental health during the pandemic. METHODS: The authors included active participants enrolled in the longitudinal Thinking and Living With Cancer study of nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors aged 60 to 89 years (n = 262) and matched controls (n = 165) from 5 US regions. Participants completed questionnaires at parent study enrollment and then annually, including a web-based or telephone COVID-19 survey, between May 27 and September 11, 2020. Mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in loneliness (a single item on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression [CES-D] scale) from before to during the pandemic in survivors versus controls and to test survivor-control differences in the associations between changes in loneliness and changes in mental health, including depression (CES-D, excluding the loneliness item), anxiety (the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and perceived stress (the Perceived Stress Scale). Models were adjusted for age, race, county COVID-19 death rates, and time between assessments. RESULTS: Loneliness increased from before to during the pandemic (0.211; P = .001), with no survivor-control differences. Increased loneliness was associated with worsening depression (3.958; P < .001) and anxiety (3.242; P < .001) symptoms and higher stress (1.172; P < .001) during the pandemic, also with no survivor-control differences. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer survivors reported changes in loneliness and mental health similar to those reported by women without cancer. However, both groups reported increased loneliness from before to during the pandemic that was related to worsening mental health, suggesting that screening for loneliness during medical care interactions will be important for identifying all older women at risk for adverse mental health effects of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
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