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1.
Curr Oncol ; 29(11): 8431-8441, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099385

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study begins to explore cancer survivors' evolving perceptions of "Focus on the Future," a 6-week supportive virtual program led by trained volunteers and health care professionals. Through purposive sampling, participants (n = 10) enrolled in the program were individually interviewed shortly before attending, mid-way through, and at program completion. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to develop key elements of program expectations and users' perceptions over time. Three themes transpired from the data: (1) Trustworthiness and timeliness of survivorship information and expert guidance, (2) Normalization of survivors' experiences, and (3) Virtual program delivery issues. Some participants' perceptions remained unchanged from pre-program expectations to post-program completion such as appreciating the efficiency of virtual delivery and "health safe" exchanges given the COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast, other perceptions became more polarized including drawbacks related to "more superficial" virtual connections and uneven topic relevance as the program evolved. Program participants appreciated timely information and support from volunteers and experts through virtual means and consecutive weekly sessions. Gauging participants' perceptions across time also offer opportunities to adjust program content and delivery features. Future research should explore key program development strategies to ensure that cancer supportive programs are optimally person-centered, co-designed, and situation-responsive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Survivors , Qualitative Research , Neoplasms/therapy
2.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 49: 101688, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity has been a great public health concern among breast cancer survivors (BCS), especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, as it is closely related to a higher risk of cancer recurrence and mortality. The positive impacts of psychosocial beliefs in promoting physical activity (PA) have been well acknowledged. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the effects of psychosocial beliefs on PA in BCS to prevent physical inactivity. Furthermore, we examined the relationships between daily activities, trip behaviors, and associated subjective well-being. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive study design. Female BCS who were able to exercise regularly completed the battery of assessments in March 2021. Specifically, the international PA questionnaires and the adapted PA-related psychosocial beliefs questionnaires were used to assess BCS's PA and psychosocial beliefs, respectively. In addition, the smartphone-based Day Reconstruction Method was utilized to measure subjective well-being. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-squared test, analyses of variance, and correlation analysis. RESULTS: In the context of investigations during the COVID-19 pandemic, our study showed that 77.8% of BCS reported meeting PA guidelines. As the components of psychosocial beliefs, the change strategies, social support, and confidence were significantly associated with higher PA levels. Additionally, the protective effect of leisure/recreation activities among BCS on their emotional well-being was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study demonstrated the importance of understanding the relationship between BCS's psychosocial beliefs and PA during the pandemic. Notably, this study is unique because it used an application-based method to assess BCS' subjective well-being objectively.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Female , Humans , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Exercise/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 952739, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080287

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has triggered multiple global healthcare system crises. Apart from the pandemic itself, the travel restriction and social distance policy for the purpose of epidemic control has cast a shadow on the management of cancer survivors. Cancer survivors suffered a double blow from both the epidemic and cancer. To deal with the challenge, we explored a new Internet-based patient management model. This model has overcome the limitation of time and space and thus can help oncologists to provide remote multidisciplinary healthcare services for cancer survivors. These patients can get high-quality cancer management from multidisciplinary experts without too much transportation. This model has been applied in patients with genitourinary cancers and proved to be effective and efficient. Our study demonstrated that more patients benefited from this model during the pandemic of COVID-19, especially in those affected heavily by COVID-19. These results suggested that it can also give insight into the management of other cancer survivors in China. Given the long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we would like to introduce our new model of healthcare service and the application of Internet-based multidisciplinary management to our global peers and medical industries to help their cancer survivors who are delayed in treatment due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Urogenital Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Urogenital Neoplasms/therapy , Urogenital Neoplasms/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , China/epidemiology , Internet
4.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272740, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079725

ABSTRACT

Uninsured or underinsured individuals with cancer are likely to experience financial hardship, including forgoing healthcare or non-healthcare needs such as food, housing, or utilities. This study evaluates the association between health insurance coverage and financial hardship among cancer survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This cross-sectional analysis used Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF) survey data from May to July 2020. Cancer survivors who previously received case management or financial aid from PAF self-reported challenges paying for healthcare and non-healthcare needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associations between insurance coverage and payment challenges were estimated using Poisson regression with robust standard errors, which allowed for estimation of adjusted relative risks (aRR). Of 1,437 respondents, 74% had annual household incomes <$48,000. Most respondents were enrolled in Medicare (48%), 22% in employer-sponsored insurance, 13% in Medicaid, 6% in an Affordable Care Act (ACA) plan, and 3% were uninsured. Approximately 31% of respondents reported trouble paying for healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. Respondents who were uninsured (aRR 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-3.64), enrolled in an ACA plan (aRR 1.86, 95% CI 1.28-2.72), employer-sponsored insurance (aRR 1.70, 95% CI 1.23-2.34), or Medicare (aRR 1.49, 95% CI 1.09-2.03) had higher risk of trouble paying for healthcare compared to Medicaid enrollees. Challenges paying for non-healthcare needs were reported by 57% of respondents, with 40% reporting trouble paying for food, 31% housing, 28% transportation, and 20% internet. In adjusted models, Medicare and employer-sponsored insurance enrollees were less likely to have difficulties paying for non-healthcare needs compared to Medicaid beneficiaries. Despite 97% of our cancer survivor sample being insured, 31% and 57% reported trouble paying for healthcare and non-healthcare needs during the COVID-19 pandemic, respectively. Greater attention to both medical and non-medical financial burden is needed given the economic pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Financial Stress/epidemiology , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Medically Uninsured , Medicare , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act , United States/epidemiology
5.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 21: 15347354221123525, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053756

ABSTRACT

The year 2022 could represent a significant juncture in the incorporation of mHealth solutions in routine cancer care. With the recent global COVID-19 pandemic leading a surge in both observation- and intervention-based studies predominantly aimed at remote monitoring there has been huge intellectual investment in developing platforms able to provide real time analytics that are readily usable. Another fallout from the pandemic has seen record waiting times and delayed access to cancer therapies leading to exhausting pressures on global healthcare providers. It seems an opportune time to utilize this boom in platforms to offer more efficient "at home" clinical assessments and less "in department" time for patients. Here, we will focus specifically on the role of digital tools around cancer survivorship, a relevant aspect of the cancer journey, particularly benefiting from integrative approaches. Within that context a further concept will be introduced and that is of the likely upsurge in circadian-based interpretation of continuous monitoring and the engendered therapeutic modifications. Chronobiology across the 24-hour span has long been understood to control key bodily aspects and circadian dysregulation plays a significant role in the risk of cancer and also the response to therapy and therefore progressive outcome. The rapid improvement in minimally invasive monitoring devices is, in the opinion of the authors, likely to advance introducing chronobiological amendments to routine clinical practices with positive impact on cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , Needs Assessment , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods
6.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(6): e13712, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052399

ABSTRACT

As of 2022, close to 90 million persons in the United States, 243 million persons in Europe and 585 million worldwide have been infected with the novel SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus and survived. Estimates vary but suggest that up to 50% may experience long-term sequelae, termed 'Long-COVID'. While Long-COVID is a new condition, the phenomenon of disabling long-term effects following an illness requiring ongoing surveillance and management is not. In this commentary, we discuss how Long-COVID parallels the experiences of long-term cancer survivors, highlight shared challenges and offer opportunities to improve research and clinical care for both growing populations of patients as well as other long-term chronic, disabling conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , United States , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Europe
7.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273576, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevention and treatment of chronic pain problems in breast cancer follow-up care require an adequate response from healthcare providers. Generally, this involves the uptake of evidence-based principles regarding pain management in everyday practice. However, despite the extensive literature on effective pain interventions, systematic and coordinated follow-up care is lacking for breast cancer survivors with pain problems in Flanders, Belgium. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to gather insight into healthcare providers' perceptions of pain prevention and treatment in breast cancer follow-up care, particularly with attention to the multilevel influences on pain follow-up. METHODS: We conducted four online focus groups with twenty-two healthcare providers from different disciplines such as oncologists, pharmacists, nurses, physiotherapists, and psychologists. Data analysis was guided by the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. This guide is inspired by the constant comparison method, based on Grounded Theory. RESULTS: The identified influencing factors were thematically grouped into four levels: at the level of the individual healthcare provider, in interaction with the patient, in interaction with colleagues, and at the context level. At each level, we distinguished factors related to healthcare providers' perceptions such as awareness, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, experiences, and intentions. For example, because of a lack of knowledge and certain beliefs among healthcare providers, referral to other disciplines often does not happen in the context of pain. CONCLUSION: This study points out the need to explore the prevention and treatment of chronic pain after breast cancer from a multidimensional point of view. This involves not only the characteristics of individual healthcare providers but is also inherently interactional and system-like in nature. This analysis provides opportunities for the development of interventions that target the influencing factors of prevention and treatment of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Chronic Pain , Attitude of Health Personnel , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Chronic Pain/prevention & control , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Qualitative Research
8.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(11): 9255-9266, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007149

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe changes in physical performance and patient-reported outcomes in cancer survivors who participated in an exercise program as part of usual-care multidisciplinary rehabilitation and the influence of training adaptations during the coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: In an observational cohort study, cancer survivors underwent usual-care multidisciplinary rehabilitation including a 10-week exercise program. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the exercise program was adapted with reduced training time and frequency. Mean changes and 95% confidence intervals in physical performance (peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), peak work rate during a steep ramp test (SRT-WRpeak), 6-min walking distance, muscle strength) and patient-reported outcomes (health-related quality of life, fatigue, anxiety, and depression) were assessed between the start and the end of the exercise program. Linear regression analysis, adjusting for baseline levels of outcomes, was used to investigate differences in changes in outcomes between participants who underwent the original and the adapted program. RESULTS: All outcomes statistically significantly improved over time, regardless of adaptations in the exercise program. VO2peak increased with 9.6% and 7.7% in the original and adapted program, respectively. Significant smaller improvements were observed in SRT-WRpeak (- 3.9%) and upper body muscle strength (- 10.8%) after participation in the adapted compared to the original program. No significant between-group differences were observed for other outcomes. CONCLUSION: Physical performance and patient-reported outcomes statistically and clinically significantly improved in cancer survivors who participated in an exercise program as part of usual-care multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Improvements of performance outcomes were smaller since the training adaptations, though only significant for SRT-WRpeak and upper body strength.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Quality of Life , Pandemics , Exercise , Physical Functional Performance , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Exercise Therapy , Neoplasms/rehabilitation
9.
Cancer ; 128(20): 3727-3733, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1999841

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors represent a population with high health care needs. If and how cancer survivors were affected by the first year of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are largely unknown. METHODS: Using data from the nationwide, population-based Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2017-2020), the authors investigated changes in health-related measures during the COVID-19 pandemic among cancer survivors and compared them with changes among adults without a cancer history in the United States. Sociodemographic and health-related measures such as insurance coverage, employment status, health behaviors, and health status were self-reported. Adjusted prevalence ratios of health-related measures in 2020 versus 2017-2019 were calculated with multivariable logistic regressions and stratified by age group (18-64 vs. ≥65 years). RESULTS: Among adults aged 18-64 years, the uninsured rate did not change significantly in 2020 despite increases in unemployment. The prevalence of unhealthy behaviors, such as insufficient sleep and smoking, decreased in 2020, and self-rated health improved, regardless of cancer history. Notably, declines in smoking were larger among cancer survivors than nonelderly adults without a cancer history. Few changes were observed for adults aged ≥65 years. CONCLUSIONS: Further research is needed to confirm the observed positive health behavior and health changes and to investigate the role of potential mechanisms, such as the national and regional policy responses to the pandemic regarding insurance coverage, unemployment benefits, and financial assistance. As polices related to the public health emergency expire, ongoing monitoring of longer term effects of the pandemic on cancer survivorship is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Self Report , United States/epidemiology
10.
J Transl Med ; 20(1): 376, 2022 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adopting healthy lifestyles and staying mentally health are two cost-effective modifiable strategies that cancer survivors can implement in self-management. We aimed to evaluate the independent, mediation, interaction, and joint associations of combined lifestyle and mental health with mortality in cancer survivors. METHODS: We performed a cohort study including 3145 cancer survivors from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2018). A healthy lifestyle score was constructed based on post-diagnosis body mass index, physical activity, diet, smoking, and drinking. Post-diagnosis mental health was assessed by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all-cause, cancer, and non-cancer mortality were computed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: After 20,900 person-years of follow-up (median, 6.3 years), cancer survivors with higher lifestyle score had decreased mortality, independent of mental health. Compared to participants with lower lifestyle score (0-1), HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause and non-cancer mortality among those with higher lifestyle score (3-5) were 0.68 (0.52-0.89) and 0.69 (0.56-0.85), respectively. 6.2-10.3% of the associations were mediated by mental health. Similar trends were observed among participants categorized by mental health, those with better mental health had lower mortality, independent of lifestyle. Participants with better mental health benefited more from adopting healthy lifestyles, and vice versa. Combinations of higher healthy lifestyle score and better mental health were associated with significant decreased mortality, the lowest mortality was seen in participants with highest healthy lifestyle score and concurrently with best mental health. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, in this cohort study with a nationally representative sample of US cancer survivors, we comprehensively explored the complex associations of lifestyle, mental health, and mortality. Evidence derived from this study may give much confidence to cancer survivors and healthcare providers that, changing one's lifestyle and/or staying mentally healthy after cancer diagnosis can improve survival.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Cohort Studies , Humans , Life Style , Mental Health , Neoplasms/complications , Nutrition Surveys , Risk Factors
11.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(9): 7053-7056, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990643

ABSTRACT

Prostate cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death among men. Due to related societal limitations, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic increases physical inactivity, which decreases cancer survivors' functional capacity. As a result, golf might be a good way for prostate cancer survivors who have been fully vaccinated against coronavirus disease to improve their musculoskeletal function, cardiorespiratory fitness, psychological function, and general quality of life. Aerobic activity's ability to adjust hormone levels, prevent obesity, increase immunological function, and lower oxidative stress have all been identified as reasons for its benefit for prostate cancer survivors. Prostate cancer survivors must first complete a fitness evaluation supervised and recommended by a certified clinical exercise physiologist after consultations with a urologic oncologist before enrolling in a cancer-specific community golf program. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is currently the gold standard technique for the evaluation of cardiopulmonary fitness. Prostate cancer survivors should be placed in a group with regard to their fitness level if they pass this fitness test. Prostate cancer survivors can be grouped into four to five groups at a time. Golfing activities should include warm-up, driving range, and course activities (on-course golf play twice a week for a duration of 90 min per day or 180 min per week at moderate-intensity). From the uro-oncologists' point of view, prostate cancer survivors can benefit from group-based community golf programs that can be recommended and designed for them through the collaboration of their physician and a certified exercise professional.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Golf , Oncologists , Prostatic Neoplasms , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Male , Physical Fitness , Prostate , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Quality of Life
12.
Comput Inform Nurs ; 40(9): 641-647, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985136

ABSTRACT

With the rise in telehealth due to the COVID-19 pandemic, further research is needed to determine how to optimize virtual delivery of existing integrative oncology interventions for cancer treatment-related symptoms. The purpose of this qualitative analysis was to explore cancer survivors' perspectives of the acceptability and satisfaction of an 8-week, virtual yoga intervention for cancer survivors with chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy pain. Fourteen participants with chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy pain who completed the virtual yoga intervention were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Themes were derived from the data using inductive content analysis methods. Main findings from the interviews included the following: (1) participants were willing to try new nonpharmacological treatments for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to the high symptom burden and prior lack of success with medications; (2) participants highly rated the flexibility offered by the virtual format, but desired the social support potentially offered by practicing in-person yoga; and (3) the impact of virtual yoga on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy severity was unclear. There were several barriers to participants' use of virtual yoga for chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy pain (eg, technology, lack of space/equipment). The results may be used to improve the design and delivery of future trials testing virtual yoga for chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy pain.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Chronic Pain , Neoplasms , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases , Yoga , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/chemically induced , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/therapy
13.
J Geriatr Oncol ; 13(8): 1223-1229, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983434

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has resulted in reliance on telecommunication technologies for the provision of supportive cancer care. However, research on the use of these resources among older adults, who are the majority of cancer survivors, is limited. The objective of this study was to gather information on older cancer survivors' perspectives and use of telehealth their cancer survivorship care in the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Potential participants were recruited through ResearchMatch® from December 2020-January 2021. Online semi-structured interviews were conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the participants' demographic and health characteristics. Content analysis were conducted by two independent coders for identification of common themes. Coding agreement was reached through consensus, and count comparisons of participant responses were made. RESULTS: The majority of respondents (n = 21; mean age = 73.5 ± 4.9) were female (57%), White (90%), and had a variety of cancer diagnoses. Participants reported using a variety of technology devices and telehealth products. Older cancer survivors (n = 10) endorsed telehealth video use for physical health concerns and basic check-ups, but some (n = 4) preferred in-person visits for major concerns and sensitive issues (e.g., mental health). Half of participants reported mobile health app use; however, ten participants did not use these apps as they felt the technology was not useful. Barriers to health technology use included missing face-to-face connections with providers, lack of familiarity with the technology, and perceived lack of utility and personalized telehealth platforms. Lastly, video-based conferencing and social media site use among seventeen participants was reported for social interaction during the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: These findings suggest that older cancer survivors utilize online platforms for their general health; however, they prefer in-person visits for serious issues and value personalization with telehealth. Despite from a highly educated sample of ResearchMatch® participants, these results can be used to inform clinicians and researchers about the appropriateness and provision of telehealth-based supportive care among older cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , Female , Male , United States , Aged , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Pandemics , Survivorship , Neoplasms/therapy
14.
Front Public Health ; 10: 931102, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963646

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Our objective is to pilot an advertisement-driven sampling procedure among African American (AA) breast cancer survivors living in Maryland. These pilot study methods will inform a future population-based study of AA breast cancer survivors at high risk of poor outcomes due to biological differences and social inequities. Methods: This cross-sectional study utilizes an innovative, social media-based advertisement campaign with an associated social media study page to recruit 100 AA breast cancer survivors. Participants are biologically female, aged 18 and older, identify as AA/Black, have a diagnosis of breast cancer, and reside in Maryland. A preset "Audience" was created via Meta (formerly Facebook) to automatically target potential interest in the online study via geolocation and public social media interests (estimated range = 101,000 women). Eligible participants complete an online survey including demographic and clinical characteristics, cancer screening, healthcare access, and utilization, COVID-19 impact, quality of doctor-patient communication, and preferences for future study participation. Results: Recruitment began on 5 January 2022 and remains ongoing. As of 7 June 2002: 124 completed the screener, 110/124 (88.7%) consented passively, 24/110 (21.8%) started but did not complete survey, 86/110 (78.1%) completed the survey. Conclusions: Results from this study will inform a statewide multilevel prospective population-based study to improve health behaviors, disease management, and self-efficacy of chronic disease management among AA breast cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Social Media , Advertising/methods , African Americans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Social Networking
15.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 35(4): 649-651, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963340

ABSTRACT

As usual, this issue of the JABFM contains research as broad as the specialty of family medicine itself. The social determinants of health are again a prominent topic. COVID-19 topics in this issue include over-the-counter supplements as adjunct treatments and the influence of public health safety measures on influenza rates during the pandemic. Two separate reports look at the way cancer survivors interact with primary care and the difficulties encountered. A CERA study describes how departments of family medicine are tackling the challenge of training tomorrow's family physicians in point-of care-ultrasound. Physician workforce studies examine pay inequities and burnout. An impressive number other commonly encountered issues in family medicine are addressed using a wide variety of methods and data sources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family Practice , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Physicians, Family , Social Determinants of Health
16.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(9): 7575-7586, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941712

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer accounts for 25% of all cancers among Canadian females. Despite successes of decreased mortality, adverse treatment effects, such as cardiotoxicity, contribute to a sedentary lifestyle and decreased quality of life. Physical activity (PA) is a possible therapy for the late effects; however, COVID-19 restricted access to in-person cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) programs. The purposes are as follows: (1) compare PA of breast cancer survivors' in-person CR to virtual CR following a transition during COVID-19 and (2) compare the PA of the pandemic cohort to a matched cohort who had completed the program in 2018/2019; (3) explore survivors' experiences of transitioning to and engaging in virtual CR. Mixed methods included analysis of CR PA data from a pandemic cohort (n = 18) and a 2018/2019 cohort (n = 18) and semi-structured focus group interviews with the pandemic cohort (n = 9) in the context of the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. After the transition, there were no significant differences in mean activity duration, frequency, and cumulative activity (expressed as MET-minutes) (p > 0.05). However, variation of PA duration doubled following the transition from in-person to virtual (p = 0.029), while for the 2018/2019 cohort, variation remained unchanged. Focus groups revealed that women valued their CR experiences pre-COVID-19 and had feelings of anxiety during the transition. Perceived factors affecting participation were environmental, personal, and behavioural. Recommendations for virtual programs were to increase comradery, technology, and professional guidance. PA experiences during a transition to virtual care prompted by a pandemic vary among breast cancer survivors. Targeting individualised strategies and exercise prescriptions are important for improving PA programs and patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Canada , Exercise , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life , Survivors
17.
Cancer ; 128(15): 2994, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1929779
19.
Cancer ; 128 Suppl 13: 2610-2622, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885387

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of COVID-19 on cancer care during the first 6 months of the pandemic has been significant. The National Navigation Roundtable Workforce Development Task Group conducted a national survey to highlight the role of patient navigators (PNs). METHODS: An anonymous online survey captured how cancer care navigation changed during 2 phases: 1) March 13 to May 31, 2020; and 2) June 1 to September 4, 2020. Differences between the 2 time periods for categorical variables were assessed using χ2 tests, and 1-way analyses of variance were used for ordinal variables. RESULTS: Almost one-half of PNs expected changes in duties (49%) during phase 1. By phase 2, PNs showed greater confidence in retaining PN work (P < .001) and reduced changes to duties (P < .01). PNs reported new training on COVID-19 and telehealth during phase 1 (64% and 27%, respectively) and phase 2 (54% and 19%, respectively). Significant decreases in service delays were identified by phase 2 for cancer screening (P < .001), preventive care (P < .001), medical treatment (P < .01), cancer treatment (P < .001), and cancer survivorship services (P < .01). PNs reported that the top patient issues were COVID-19 concerns, medical care disruptions, and finances, and there were decreases in medical care disruptions (P < .01) during phase 2. PNs addressed myths related to mask use, COVID-19 spread, disbelief, risk, clinical changes, transmission prevention, and finances/politics. CONCLUSIONS: The PN role demonstrated resiliency and adaptability. Both clinical and nonclinical oncology PNs identified key patient needs and can provide connections with patient populations that have been economically and socially marginalized, which is necessary to build trust throughout the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Patient Navigation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Medical Oncology
20.
Cancer Invest ; 40(7): 629-641, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864824

ABSTRACT

Cancer survivors face numerous therapeutic and health challenges during the COVID-19 epidemic. These patients experience high levels of anxiety and stress due to illness, external stresses, and crises, such as the COVID-19 epidemic. The present study showed a positive relationship between FCR and COVID-19 anxiety as well as moderate levels of FCR (according to the midpoint score of the questionnaire) and COVID-19 anxiety among cancer survivors. Factors affecting the mental condition of cancer survivors can play an important role in completing treatment and preventing disease exacerbation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology
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