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1.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(7): 374, 2023 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232993

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed additional barriers to physical activity (PA) in cancer survivors. Adaptations to PA programmes are needed during the pandemic. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate (1) the PA preferences of cancer survivors prior to and during the pandemic and (2) the available resources to engage in PA during the pandemic. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional study design, cancer survivors were recruited globally to participate in a self-administered survey assessing their PA preferences and available PA resources during the pandemic. Descriptive statistics were used to determine trends in PA preferences and resources. A sub-group analysis was conducted for age, gender, education, and PA levels. RESULTS: Cancer survivors (N = 493) were mainly women (70.4%) diagnosed with breast cancer (29.0%), with a mean age of 48.7 ± 15.8 years, and 87.1 ± 81.9 months since diagnosis. Since the start of the pandemic, cancer survivors were primarily walking (82.6%), and performing PA alone (62.7%) and at home (46.6%). Sub-group analysis revealed education level, PA levels, and age to be associated with significant differences in PA preferences. The most common equipment available to survivors in their homes were exercise mats (40.6%) and free weights (39.8%). Few survivors were made aware of at-home PA resources (19.1%), and approximately half indicated wanting to receive these resources (49.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Understanding cancer survivors' preferences and resources for PA during the pandemic is critical to designing effective home-based interventions. Interventions and recommendations should be tailored based on the level of education and PA participation, as well as age.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Male , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise
2.
J Laryngol Otol ; 137(6): 691-696, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: UK head and neck cancer incidence and prevalence in working-age people are increasing. Work is important for individuals and society. Head and neck cancer survivors return to work less than other cancer survivors. Treatment affects physical and psychological functioning long-term. Evidence is limited, with no UK qualitative studies. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted, underpinned by a critical realism approach, involving semi-structured interviews with working head and neck cancer survivors. Interviews were conducted using the Microsoft Teams communication platform and interpreted using reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thirteen head and neck cancer survivors participated. Three themes were drawn from the data: changed meaning of work and identity, return-to-work experiences, and the impact of healthcare professionals on returning to work. Physical, speech and psychosocial changes affected workplace interactions, including stigmatising responses by work colleagues. CONCLUSION: Participants were challenged by returning to work. Work interactions and context influenced return-to-work success. Head and neck cancer survivors want return-to-work conversations within healthcare consultations, but perceived these as absent.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Humans , Survivors/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Return to Work/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Workplace
3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1119163, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320572

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, vaccination data of this population are limited. Methods: A cross-sectional study of COVID-19 vaccination was conducted in China. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination status. Results: Of 2,904 participants, 50.2% were vaccinated with acceptable side effects. Most of the participants received inactivated virus vaccines. The most common reason for vaccination was "fear of infection" (56.2%) and "workplace/government requirement" (33.1%). While the most common reason for nonvaccination was "worry that vaccines cause breast cancer progression or interfere with treatment" (72.9%) and "have concerns about side effects or safety" (39.6%). Patients who were employed (odds ratio, OR = 1.783, p = 0.015), had stage I disease at diagnosis (OR = 2.008, p = 0.019), thought vaccines could provide protection (OR = 1.774, p = 0.007), thought COVID-19 vaccines were safe, very safe, not safe, and very unsafe (OR = 2.074, p < 0.001; OR = 4.251, p < 0.001; OR = 2.075, p = 0.011; OR = 5.609, p = 0.003, respectively) were more likely to receive vaccination. Patients who were 1-3 years, 3-5 years, and more than 5 years after surgery (OR = 0.277, p < 0.001; OR = 0.277, p < 0.001, OR = 0.282, p < 0.001, respectively), had a history of food or drug allergies (OR = 0.579, p = 0.001), had recently undergone endocrine therapy (OR = 0.531, p < 0.001) were less likely to receive vaccination. Conclusion: COVID-19 vaccination gap exists in breast cancer survivors, which could be filled by raising awareness and increasing confidence in vaccine safety during cancer treatment, particularly for the unemployed individuals.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Humans , Female , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology
4.
Nutrients ; 15(7)2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317797

ABSTRACT

Advancements in cancer treatments over the past several decades have led to improved cancer survival in adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15-39 years). However, AYA cancer survivors are at an increased risk for "late effects", including cardiovascular, pulmonary and bone diseases as well as fatigue, infertility and secondary cancers. The treatments for cancer may also alter taste, lead to nutritional deficiencies and increase financial burdens that, when taken together, may increase the risk of food and nutrition security in AYA cancer survivors. Furthermore, although AYAs are often merged together in cancer survivorship studies, adolescents and young adults have distinct developmental, psychosocial and pathophysiological differences that may modify their risk of nutritional challenges. In this narrative review and "Call to Action", rationale is provided for why there is a need to better understand nutritional challenges and food insecurity in AYA cancer survivors as a special population. Then, recommendations for next steps to advance knowledge and policy in this field are provided. In particular, integrating screening for food and nutrition insecurity and enhancing awareness of existing resources (e.g., the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, SNAP) might help AYA cancer survivors combat nutritional deficiencies and reduce late effects while improving their overall survival and quality of life.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Malnutrition , Neoplasms , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Malnutrition/etiology , Food Insecurity
5.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 31 Suppl 1: 150-160, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297924

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of telephone-based delivery of weekday-only time-restricted eating (TRE), its preliminary efficacy for metabolic outcomes, and concurrent lifestyle changes. METHODS: Twenty-two breast cancer survivors aged 60+ years with overweight/obesity completed an 8-week feasibility study of 12 to 8 p.m. weekday-only ad libitum TRE. The intervention was delivered by one registered dietitian call, twice-daily automated text messages asking about eating start and stop times, and three support phone calls. Magnetic resonance imaging, venipuncture, and 3 days of diet records and accelerometry were performed at baseline and after intervention. RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 66 (SD 5) years with BMI of 31.8 (4.8) kg/m2 . Intervention implementation was successful, including excellent adherence (98%), participant acceptability, and a low symptom profile and cost ($63/participant). There were no significant changes in individual components of metabolic syndrome, lipid profile, or hemoglobin A1c , despite clinically relevant changes occurring within individual participants. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived hepatic steatosis and thigh myosteatosis did not change. Dietary intake changes included reduced energy (-22%) and protein (-0.2 g/kg). Physical activity and sleep did not change. CONCLUSIONS: Eight weeks of telephone-delivered weekday TRE is a feasible, acceptable, low-symptom, and low-cost intervention. Future studies may consider a longer intervention length for more consistent metabolic improvements and counseling to enhance protein intake.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Humans , Aged , Female , Overweight/therapy , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Obesity/therapy , Exercise
6.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284427, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breast (BCa) and prostate (PCa) cancer are two of the most common but survivable cancers. One important component of survivorship that is impacted by treatment long term is diminished quality of life (QoL). Supervised exercise improves QoL and subsequent outcomes but is not accessible for all survivors. Additionally, many factors influence QoL including physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical function, and fatigue. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to increase access to exercise beyond supervised exercise facilities. Home-based exercise may provide a feasible alternative for cancer survivors especially for those living in rural communities. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim is to investigate the effects of home-based exercise training (Pre-training vs. Post-training) on QoL in BCa/PCa. A secondary aim is to investigate PA, CRF, physical function, and fatigue and potential moderators (age, cancer-type, intervention duration and type). Home-based exercise trials (randomized crossover or quasi-experimental design) with adults (aged 18 years and over) breast or prostate cancer survivors (not currently undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment) were eligible for inclusion. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases were searched (inception-December 2022) for studies which included adult BCa or PCa survivors (not currently on chemotherapy/radiation), at least measured QoL, and undergoing unsupervised, home-based exercise training. APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: Initially, 819 studies were identified, from which 17 studies (20 effects) involving 692 participants were extracted. Effect sizes were calculated as standardized mean differences (SMD). Data were pooled using a 3-level model with restricted maximum likelihood estimation. Pooled SMD was used to assess the magnitude of effect, where <0.2, 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as trivial, small, moderate, and large respectively. RESULTS: Home-based exercise resulted in small improvements in QoL (SMD = 0.30, 95% CI 0.01, 0.60, p = 0.042), PA (SMD = 0.49, 95% CI 0.26, 0.75, p<0.001) and CRF (SMD = 0.45, 95% CI -0.01, 0.91, p = 0.056). Physical function (SMD = 0.00, 95% CI -0.21, 0.21, p = 1.000) and fatigue (SMD = -0.61, 95%CI -1.53, 0.32, p = 0.198) did not change. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based exercise results in small improves QoL in BCa/PCa survivors, independent of cancer type, intervention duration and type, or age. Home-based exercise also improves PA and CRF enhancing survivorship. Therefore, home-based exercise is an efficacious alternative option to improve QoL for BCa and PCa survivors especially for those who live in rural communities or lack access to exercise facilities.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Fatigue , Physical Fitness , Prostatic Neoplasms , Self Care , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Male , Exercise/physiology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fatigue/therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/physiopathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Quality of Life , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/physiopathology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Physical Fitness/physiology , Cardiorespiratory Fitness/physiology , Functional Status , Self Care/methods
7.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 7(3)2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303133

ABSTRACT

We estimated the prevalence of past 30-day cannabis use, evaluated reasons for use, and identified individual-level factors associated with cannabis use among cancer survivors before (2019) and during (2020 and 2021) the COVID-19 pandemic. Cancer survivors, aged 18 years and older, were identified from the 2019 (n = 8185), 2020 (n = 11 084), and 2021 (n = 12 248) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Prevalence of past 30-day cannabis use among survivors held steady through the pandemic (8.7%, 7.4%, and 8.4% in 2019, 2020 and 2021, respectively). Of those who used cannabis, 48.7% used it for medical reasons in 2019, 54.5% in 2020, and 43.5% in 2021. Survivors were more likely to report past 30-day cannabis use if they were younger, male, current or former tobacco smokers, and binge alcohol consumers and if they experienced poor mental health in the past 30-days. Our study identified subpopulations of cancer survivors that need to be targeted for evidence-informed discussions about cannabis use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Cannabis , Neoplasms , Humans , Male , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Smokers , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology
8.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 70(4): e30174, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273917

ABSTRACT

Personalized, risk-stratified care aims to "right size" the involvement of primary care providers (PCPs), oncology and specialized practitioners in caring for cancer survivors. Our survey found limited comfort among PCPs in cancer surveillance and management of treatment-related effects. In hypothetical case scenarios, PCPs reported least comfort in caring for a survivor of childhood cancer, followed by young adult-onset cancer, and greater comfort in caring for a survivor of adult-onset breast cancer. While education and training of PCPs is essential, risk-stratification strategies need to identify patients who may transition to primary care and those who may require ongoing survivorship-focused follow-up.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Young Adult , Humans , Female , Survivors , Medical Oncology , Primary Health Care
9.
OTJR (Thorofare N J) ; 43(3): 399-407, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277394

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic contributed to both existential distress and the rapid adoption of telehealth-based services. Little is known about the feasibility of delivering group occupational therapy intervention to address purpose-related existential distress via face-to-face synchronous videoconferencing. The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of providing a purpose in life renewal intervention to breast cancer survivors via Zoom. Descriptive data were collected on acceptability and implementability of the intervention. Limited-efficacy testing involved a prospective pretest-posttest study where participants with breast cancer (n = 15) received an eight-session purpose renewal group intervention plus a Zoom tutorial. Participants completed standardized measures of meaning and purpose at pretest and posttest, and a forced-choice Purpose Status Question. The purpose renewal intervention was acceptable and implementable via Zoom. Pre-post changes in purpose in life were not statistically significant. Group-based purpose in life renewal intervention is acceptable and implementable when delivered via Zoom.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Prospective Studies , Feasibility Studies , Pandemics
10.
Ann Fam Med ; (21 Suppl 1)2023 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276989

ABSTRACT

Context: Breast cancer survivors have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared to those without cancer history. CVD is the leading cause of death for breast cancer survivors. Objective: To assess current CVD risk counseling practices and risk perception in breast cancer survivors. Study design and analysis: Interviews conducted with breast cancer survivors. Analysis of categorical data by frequency and quantitative variables by mean and standard deviation. Inductive qualitative analysis performed using NVIVO. Setting: Academic Family Medicine Outpatient Practices Population studied: Breast cancer survivors with an identified primary care provider. Intervention/instrument: Interviews on CVD risk behaviors, risk perception, challenges with risk reduction, and previous history of risk counseling. Outcome measures: Self-reported history of CVD, risk perception, and risk behaviors. Results: The average age of participants (n=19) was 57 with 57% being white and 32% African American. Of interviewed women, 89.5% reported a personal history and 89.5% reported a family history of CVD. Only 52.6% had previously reported receipt of CVD counseling. Primary care providers most commonly provided the counseling (72.7%), however it was additionally provided by oncology (27.3%). Among breast cancer survivors, 31.6% perceived they were at increased CVD risk and 47.5% were unsure of their relative CVD risk compared to women their age. Factors affecting perceived CVD risk included family history, cancer treatments, cardiovascular diagnoses, and lifestyle factors. Video (78.9%) and text messaging (68.4%) were the most highly reported mechanisms through which breast cancer survivors requested to receive additional information and counseling on CVD risk and risk reduction. Commonly reported barriers to adopting risk reduction strategies (such as increasing physical activity) included time, resources, physical limitations, and competing responsibilities. Barriers specific to survivorship status include concerns for immune status during COVID, physical limitations associated with cancer treatment, and psychosocial aspects of cancer survivorship. Conclusions: These data suggest improving the frequency and content of CVD risk reduction counseling is needed. Strategies should identify the best methods for providing CVD counseling, and should address general barriers as well as unique challenges faced by cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Cardiovascular Diseases , Female , Humans , Perception , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Counseling
11.
Patient Educ Couns ; 112: 107716, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors are at greater risk for COVID-19 complications, emphasizing the importance of adherence to COVID-19 prevention. Active coping mechanisms can help manage pandemic stress but disengaged coping practices can have adverse effects. OBJECTIVES: 1) Identify differences in COVID-19 coping styles and COVID-19 preventive behaviors among cancer survivors in active treatment, survivors not in treatment, and a comparison group without a cancer history. 2) Exploring variables that may predict adherence to COVID-19 preventative behaviors. PATIENT INVOLVEMENT & METHODS: This study used an online survey among two categories of cancer survivors - one group in active treatment and one group no longer in treatment - and one group without a cancer history (N = 897 total). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Cancer survivors in treatment were more likely to utilize both active and disengaged coping (p < .001). This could indicate that the additional COVID-19 strain is making survivors more likely to engage in coping in any way possible. Cancer survivors not in treatment were less likely to report intent to carry out COVID- 19 preventative behaviors compared to the comparison group (p = .009). Providers should understand how survivors may use both coping mechanism types because these coping strategies predict both depression and adherence to COVID-19 preventive behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adaptation, Psychological , Survivors
12.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 70(6): e30291, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Caregivers and adolescents and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors may be at greater psychosocial risk from the COVID-19 pandemic than healthy peers due to complex and traumatic medical histories. This study describes COVID-19-related event exposures, impact, and distress among a large sample of caregivers and AYA cancer survivors and the relationship of these variables to demographic and cancer characteristics. PROCEDURE: From May 2020 to December 2021, 422 caregivers and 531 AYA survivors completed the COVID-19 Exposures and Family Impact Survey (CEFIS) and CEFIS-AYA, respectively. Total COVID-19-related exposures, average COVID-19-related impact, and COVID-19-related distress were calculated. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze free-text responses about the negative and positive effects of COVID-19. RESULTS: Caregivers and AYA reported an average of 7.4-7.8 COVID-19 exposures to pandemic-related events and a slightly negative impact of COVID-19 across psychosocial domains, with some positive impacts reported. COVID-19-related distress was moderate and clinically meaningful (4.9-5.2/10) for AYA and caregivers. Racial and ethnically minoritized AYA and caregivers reported higher COVID-19-related distress than non-Hispanic white caregivers. For AYA, distress was also higher among female, college-age (18-22 years), and long-term survivors compared with males, younger AYA, White and those recently off treatment. CEFIS outcomes remained relatively stable over time. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 had a significant and consistent negative impact on caregivers and AYA survivors. Racial and ethnically minoritized families and female, college-age, and long-term AYA survivors may require additional psychosocial support. Assessing for COVID-19 impact and distress is important in pediatric oncology to evaluate adjustment and plan targeted interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Male , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Young Adult , Child , Adult , Neoplasms/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Survivors/psychology
13.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(3): 173, 2023 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285501

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess safety, satisfaction, and overall adherence of a center-based cardiac rehabilitation (CBCR) program for cancer survivors at increased cardiovascular (CV) risk, compared to community-based exercise training (CBET). METHODS: The CORE study was a single-center, prospective, randomized controlled trial enrolling cancer survivors exposed to cardiotoxic cancer treatment and/or with previous CV disease. Participants were randomized to an 8-week CBCR program or CBET, twice a week. Overall feasibility (consent, retention, and completion rates), intervention adherence (percentage of exercise sessions attended), and safety were assessed. Adverse events (AEs) were registered, and participants' satisfaction was measured at the end of the study. RESULTS: Eighty out of 116 potentially eligible individuals were included; consent rate was 72.4%, and 77 (96.2%) started the study (retention rate 100% in CBCR vs 92.5% in CBET); completion rate was 92.5%. Intervention adherence was higher in CBCR (90.3 ± 11.8% vs 68.4 ± 22.1%, p < 0.001). Exercise-related AEs were mainly related to musculoskeletal conditions in both groups (7 in CBCR vs 20 in CBET, p < 0.001), accounting for exercise prescription modification in 47 sessions (18 (3.3%) in CBCR vs 29 (7.2%) in CBET, p = 0.006), none motivating exercise discontinuation. No participants reported major CV events. Overall, the satisfaction with the different aspects of the programs (e.g., expectations, monitoring) was higher in the CBCR. CONCLUSION: This exploratory analysis of the CORE trial suggests that both exercise-based interventions are feasible and safe in this setting. The higher intervention adherence and patient satisfaction in CBCR suggest that this comprehensive approach could be of interest in this population.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Prospective Studies , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Neoplasms/rehabilitation , Personal Satisfaction
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(2)2023 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2233211

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) and post-COVID-19 tectonic changes in healthcare delivery have made it possible for cancer survivors to obtain disease-related information for remote management online rather than through healthcare providers. To comprehend and evaluate health information, digital literacy is crucial. Objectives: This study examined cancer survivors' information-seeking behaviour, information sources, digital health literacy, and digital trends, as well as potential determinants of e-health information receptivity and online resource use. Methods: A national 30-item cross-sectional survey using a representative random sample of cancer survivors from Jordan's cancer registry was conducted. Chi-square tests established categorical variable relationships. Using the mean and standard deviation, we calculated the Likert scale's ordinal data average. A p-value < 0.05 was statistically significant. Logistic regression identified predictors of interest in late-trajectory information acquisition and use of e-health platforms (apps, portals) for cancer self-management. Results: Lower digital literacy and electronic searching were associated with older age and lower income, education, and employment status (p ≤ 0.001). Digital literacy independently predicted m-health app use for remote management and interest in cancer supportive care information. Digitally literate survivors preferred the use of digital platforms (p ≤ 0.001). Information acquisition barriers included "reliability" (26%, n = 25) and "health information trustworthiness" (16.2%, n = 25). Following treatment completion, Internet-seeking behaviour decreased significantly when compared to the early cancer trajectory. Conclusion: Our findings imply that Jordanian cancer survivors' low digital literacy may hinder information acquisition and technology-enabled cancer care. Digital interventions for cancer survivors should be adaptable to varying levels of digital health literacy. Healthcare policymakers should recognise digital inequities and devise focused initiatives to bridge the digital divide while responding to the urgent need to digitalise cancer care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Colorectal Neoplasms , Health Literacy , Telemedicine , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Survivors , Information Seeking Behavior , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Internet , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(2): 136, 2023 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230971

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify physical activity (PA) barriers and facilitators among Black and African American (Black/AA) cancer survivors that should be considered in future PA intervention development for this population. METHODS: A community advisory board (CAB) of Black/AA cancer survivors and patient advocates guided in-depth qualitative interviews (n = 19) that were completed via telephone using a semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using directed content analysis to detail a report of PA barriers and facilitators during and after cancer treatment. The CAB reviewed and interpreted these barriers and facilitators to identify the final results. RESULTS: Survivors (n = 19) of nine different types of cancer completed interviews. PA barriers during cancer treatments included physical and psychological suffering. PA barriers after cancer treatments included social and environmental constraints (e.g., lack of access needed for PA, safety concerns, and competing priorities). PA facilitators both during and after cancer treatments included family support, faith, and support from other survivors. PA facilitators during treatment also included feeling better after doing PA, setting realistic and flexible goals, and gaining a sense of control of one's health by striving for PA goals. CONCLUSIONS: To increase PA among Black/AA cancer survivors, PA interventions are needed that address structural barriers, include the role of faith, leverage family support, highlight the psychological benefits of PA, and use goal setting.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Black or African American , Exercise/psychology , Survivors/psychology , Qualitative Research , Neoplasms/therapy
17.
Front Public Health ; 10: 946721, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2215407

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Our objective was to (1) identify associated characteristics of financial hardship (FH), and (2) evaluate associations of FH with mental health symptoms among cancer survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Using data from the nationally representative COVID-19 Impact Survey, we defined cancer survivors as those with a self-reported diagnosis of cancer (n = 854,7.6%). We defined FH using the following question: "Based on your current financial situation, how would you pay for an unexpected $400 expense?" Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) to identify associated characteristics of FH and associations of FH with mental health symptoms among cancer survivors overall and by age (18-59 years/60+ years). Results: Forty-one percent of cancer survivors reported FH, with 58% in 18-59 and 33% in 60+ year old respondents. Compared to cancer survivors aged 60+ years, those aged 30-44 (aPR:1.74,95% CI:1.35-2.24), and 45-59 years (aPR:1.60,95% CI:1.27-1.99) were more likely to report FH. Compared to non-Hispanic(NH)-White cancer survivors, NH-Black cancer survivors had a 56% higher prevalence of FH (aPR:1.56; 95% CI: 1.23-1.97). Among 60+ years aged cancer survivors, NH-Black (aPR:1.80; 95% CI: 1.32-2.45) and NH-Asian cancer survivors (aPR:10.70,95% CI:5.6-20.7) were more likely to experience FH compared to their NH-White counterparts. FH was associated with feeling anxious (aPR:1.51,95% CI:1.11-2.05), depressed (aPR:1.66,95% CI:1.25-2.22), and hopeless (aPR:1.84,95% CI:1.38-2.44). Conclusion: Minoritized communities, younger adults, and cancer survivors with low socioeconomic status had a higher burden of FH, which was associated with feelings of anxiety, depression, and hopelessness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Middle Aged , Mental Health , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Low Socioeconomic Status , Neoplasms/epidemiology
18.
J Cancer Surviv ; 17(4): 974-985, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2158150

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Breast cancer (BC) survivors are increasingly interested in learning about healthy lifestyles to reduce the risk of BC recurrence and mortality. The DianaWeb study, a community-based participatory research, offers BC patients a specific interactive website to help them in adopting and maintain correct lifestyles, in line with World Cancer Research Fund recommendations. However, to limit the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, most countries introduced restrictions which, inevitably, caused sudden lifestyle changes. The current study aimed at evaluating changes in lifestyle in BC survivors before, during, and after the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We used data of 224 BC cancer survivors enrolled in the DianaWeb study. We evaluated the adherence to physical activity (PA) guidelines, to Mediterranean diet (MD), and WCRF recommendations, at baseline, during and after the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. We estimated the association between PA, MD, and WCRF adherence with sociodemographic characteristics, years from enrolment in the DianaWeb study, and type of breast cancer. RESULTS: As expected, during confinement periods, we observed a significant decrease in walking activity and in the percentage of patients performing vigorous PA. In post-quarantine, total weekly energy expenditure increased significantly. BC patients participating in the DianaWeb study for more than 3 years were more likely to be more active. There were no changes in MD and WCRF adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the proposed interactive website was useful in achieving durable lifestyle changes, that have not been undermined either during the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Patient education is essential for guiding BC survivors toward improving their health outcomes; therefore, an interactive website like the one proposed by the DianaWeb study may be useful to improve healthy lifestyles.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Humans , Female , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Exercise , Feeding Behavior
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(24)2022 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2163387

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused considerable disruption to cancer care and may have exacerbated existing challenges already faced by cancer survivors from rural areas. This has created a need for a rapid evidence synthesis to inform the development of tailored interventions that address the specific needs of rural cancer survivors who continue to be affected by the pandemic. The review was conducted following guidance from the Cochrane Rapid Review Methods Group. Database searches were performed via the EBSCOHost interface (includes MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO) on 25 May 2022 and supplemented with searches on Google Scholar. Peer-reviewed articles published after March 2020 that reported primary data on the experiences of cancer survivors residing in rural and remote settings during the pandemic were included. Findings were tabulated and written up narratively. Fourteen studies were included. The COVID-19 pandemic had a mostly detrimental impact on the experiences of rural cancer survivors. People's individual coping mechanisms were challenging for a range of reasons. Specifically, the pandemic impacted on their ability to access testing, treatment, check-ups and supportive care, their ability to maintain and access social support with close friends and family, as well as negative consequences to their finances and emotional wellbeing with some reporting feelings of psychological distress including depression and anxiety. This review provides important insight into the experiences of rural cancer survivors that may help inform tailored support in line with the needs and challenges faced because of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Pandemics , Social Support , Adaptation, Psychological , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy
20.
Curr Oncol ; 29(11): 8431-8441, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099385

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study begins to explore cancer survivors' evolving perceptions of "Focus on the Future," a 6-week supportive virtual program led by trained volunteers and health care professionals. Through purposive sampling, participants (n = 10) enrolled in the program were individually interviewed shortly before attending, mid-way through, and at program completion. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to develop key elements of program expectations and users' perceptions over time. Three themes transpired from the data: (1) Trustworthiness and timeliness of survivorship information and expert guidance, (2) Normalization of survivors' experiences, and (3) Virtual program delivery issues. Some participants' perceptions remained unchanged from pre-program expectations to post-program completion such as appreciating the efficiency of virtual delivery and "health safe" exchanges given the COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast, other perceptions became more polarized including drawbacks related to "more superficial" virtual connections and uneven topic relevance as the program evolved. Program participants appreciated timely information and support from volunteers and experts through virtual means and consecutive weekly sessions. Gauging participants' perceptions across time also offer opportunities to adjust program content and delivery features. Future research should explore key program development strategies to ensure that cancer supportive programs are optimally person-centered, co-designed, and situation-responsive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Survivors , Qualitative Research , Neoplasms/therapy
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