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1.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 9(1)2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Northern England has been experiencing a persistent rise in the number of primary liver cancers, largely driven by an increasing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) secondary to alcohol-related liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we review the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on primary liver cancer services and patients in our region. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with newly diagnosed liver cancer in our region. DESIGN: We prospectively audited our service for the first year of the pandemic (March 2020-February 2021), comparing mode of presentation, disease stage, treatments and outcomes to a retrospective observational consecutive cohort immediately prepandemic (March 2019-February 2020). RESULTS: We observed a marked decrease in HCC referrals compared with previous years, falling from 190 confirmed new cases to 120 (37%). Symptomatic became the the most common mode of presentation, with fewer tumours detected by surveillance or incidentally (% surveillance/incidental/symptomatic; 34/42/24 prepandemic vs 27/33/40 in the pandemic, p=0.013). HCC tumour size was larger in the pandemic year (60±4.6 mm vs 48±2.6 mm, p=0.017), with a higher incidence of spontaneous tumour haemorrhage. The number of new cases of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) fell only slightly, with symptomatic presentation typical. Patients received treatment appropriate for their cancer stage, with waiting times shorter for patients with HCC and unchanged for patients with ICC. Survival was associated with stage both before and during the pandemic. 9% acquired COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSION: The pandemic-associated reduction in referred patients in our region was attributed to the disruption of routine healthcare. For those referred, treatments and survival were appropriate for their stage at presentation. Non-referred or missing patients are expected to present with more advanced disease, with poorer outcomes. While protective measures are necessary during the pandemic, we recommend routine healthcare services continue, with patients encouraged to engage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
2.
Curr Oncol ; 29(3): 1422-1429, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736842

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to direct most of the available resources towards its management. This has led to the neglect of all other pathologies, including cancer. The aim of this study was to verify whether the difficulty in accessing the health system has led to a reduction in new diagnoses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and whether this has already been reflected in a more advanced stage of the cancer. A single-center, retrospective study including adult patients with a new diagnosis of HCC was performed. Patients were divided into three groups: the prelockdown phase (May 2019-February 2020), the lockdown phase (March 2020-December 2020), and the postlockdown phase (January 2021-October 2021); 247 patients were included. The number of patients diagnosed with HCC distinctly diminished in the periods March 2020-December 2020 (n = 69; -35%) and January 2021-October 2021 (n = 72; -32%) as compared to the period May 2019-February 2020 (n = 106). Noteworthy was the reduced surveillance in the period January 2021-October 2021 as compared to May 2019-February 2020 (22.9% vs. 36.6%, p = 0.056). No significant changes have yet been observed in tumor characteristics (BCLC staging distribution remained unvaried, p = 0.665). In conclusion, the number of new HCC diagnoses decreased sharply in the first 2 years of the pandemic, with no worsening of the stage. A more advanced stage of the disease could be expected in the next few years in patients who have escaped diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
4.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 117(4): 678-684, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625363

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic's impact on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening and diagnosis among patients with cirrhosis in the Veterans Health Administration. METHODS: Rates and predictors of screening and diagnosis were reviewed September 1, 2019-February 29, 2020 ("pre-COVID-19," N = 94,612) and April 1, 2020-September 30, 2020 ("post-COVID-19," N = 88,073). RESULTS: Screening and diagnosis rates declined by 44% and 13%, respectively, after the COVID-19 pandemic. Screening declined irrespective of liver disease severity, but diagnosis declined only in Model for End Stage Liver Disease-Sodium score <20 or Fibrosis-4 score <3.25. Fibrosis-4 score ≥3.25 and HCC risk ≥1.5%/year strongly predicted HCC diagnosis but only moderately predicted receipt of screening. DISCUSSION: Screening and diagnosis rates declined after the COVID-19 pandemic. Prioritizing screening for patients at greatest risk for HCC may reduce delays in diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , End Stage Liver Disease , Liver Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Hepatol Commun ; 6(1): 223-236, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597246

ABSTRACT

Prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could be affected by lack of or delayed therapy. We aimed to characterize the prevalence, correlates, and clinical impact of therapeutic underuse and delay in patients with HCC. Patients with HCC diagnosed between 2010 and 2017 were analyzed from the United States National Cancer Database. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with no and delayed (>90 days after diagnosis) HCC treatment. Cox proportional hazards regression with landmark analysis assessed the association between therapeutic delay and overall survival (OS), accounting for immortal time bias. Of 116,299 patients with HCC, 24.2% received no treatment and 18.4% of treated patients had delayed treatment. Older age, Black, Hispanic, lower socioeconomic status, earlier year of diagnosis, treatment at nonacademic centers, Northeast region, increased medical comorbidity, worse liver dysfunction, and higher tumor burden were associated with no treatment. Among treated patients, younger age, Hispanic, Black, treatment at academic centers, West region, earlier tumor stage, and receipt of noncurative treatment were associated with treatment delays. In multivariable Cox regression with a landmark of 150 days, patients with and without treatment delays had similar OS (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.04) with a median survival of 33.7 vs. 32.1 months, respectively. However, therapeutic delay was associated with worse OS in patients who had tumor, nodes, and metastases (TNM) stage 1 (aHR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.11) or received curative treatment (aHR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05-1.18). Conclusion: One-fourth of patients with HCC receive no therapy and one-fifth of treated patients experience treatment delays. Both were associated with demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics of patients as well as facility type and region. The association between therapeutic delay and survival was stage and treatment dependent.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Age of Onset , Aged , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/ethnology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Female , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/ethnology , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Social Class , Tumor Burden , United States/epidemiology
6.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(42): 7271-7284, 2021 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526865

ABSTRACT

Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a defective liver-tropic virus that needs the helper function of hepatitis B virus (HBV) to infect humans and replicate. HDV is transmitted sexually or by a parenteral route, in co-infection with HBV or by super-infection in HBV chronic carriers. HDV infection causes acute hepatitis that may progress to a fulminant form (7%-14% by super-infection and 2%-3% by HBV/HDV co-infection) or to chronic hepatitis (90% by HDV super-infection and 2%-5% by HBV/HDV co-infection), frequently and rapidly progressing to cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Peg-interferon alfa the only recommended therapy, clears HDV in only 10%-20% of cases and, consequently, new treatment strategies are being explored. HDV endemicity progressively decreased over the 50 years from the identification of the virus, due to improved population lifestyles and economic levels, to the use of HBV nuclei(t)side analogues to suppress HBV replication and to the application of universal HBV vaccination programs. Further changes are expected during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 pandemic, unfortunately towards increased endemicity due to the focus of healthcare towards coronavirus disease 2019 and the consequently lower possibility of screening and access to treatments, lower care for patients with severe liver diseases and a reduced impulse to the HBV vaccination policy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Coinfection , Hepatitis B , Hepatitis D , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Hepatitis B/diagnosis , Hepatitis B/drug therapy , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis B virus , Hepatitis D/diagnosis , Hepatitis D/drug therapy , Hepatitis D/epidemiology , Hepatitis Delta Virus , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
In Vivo ; 35(6): 3377-3383, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485630

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Liver injury has been frequently reported in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection, but data are still lacking regarding the impact of pre-existing liver damage and neoplasia on SARS-CoV-2 infection outcome and vice-versa. This study aimed to assess the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients, both in therapeutic-naïve and patients treated with direct acting antivirals. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 21 patients with a personal history of HCV infection, that have been diagnosed with different forms of HCC and who were subsequently infected with SARS-CoV-2. Patients were monitored by liver function tests, tumoral markers, blood cell count, and coagulation profile periodically. RESULTS: Solitary HCC nodules were predominant among the subjects who achieved sustained virologic response, while multinodular and infiltrative patterns were mostly prevalent among the treatment-naïve group. Most patients had mild and moderate COVID-19 infections. CONCLUSION: Within the current global pandemic crisis, cancer patients are highly vulnerable and in need of constant monitoring. Among patients with HCC, the ones with cured HCV infection may be at a lower risk of fatality than those with active HCV infection, when diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Hepatitis C, Chronic , Hepatitis C , Liver Neoplasms , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Hepatitis C, Chronic/complications , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis C, Chronic/epidemiology , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257369, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416897

ABSTRACT

Australia was one of the first countries to introduce government-funded unrestricted access to direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, with 88,790 treated since March 2016. However, treatment uptake is declining which could potentially undermine Australia's progress towards the WHO HCV elimination targets. Using mathematical modelling, we updated estimates for those living with chronic HCV in Australia, new cases of decompensated cirrhosis (DC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and liver-related mortality among the HCV-cured and viraemic populations from 2015 to 2030. We considered various DAA treatment scenarios incorporating annual treatment numbers to 2020, and subsequent uptake per year of 6,790 (pessimistic), 8,100 (intermediate), and 11,310 (optimistic). We incorporated the effects of excess alcohol consumption and reduction in progression to DC and HCC among cirrhosis-cured versus viraemic individuals. At the end of 2020, we estimated 117,810 Australians were living with chronic HCV. New cases per year of DC, HCC, and liver-related mortality among the HCV viraemic population decreased rapidly from 2015 (almost eliminated by 2030). In contrast, the growing population size of those cured with advanced liver disease meant DC, HCC, and liver-related mortality declined slowly. The estimated reduction in liver-related mortality from 2015 to 2030 in the combined HCV viraemic and cured population is 25% in the intermediate scenario. With declining HCV treatment uptake and ongoing individual-level risk of advanced liver disease complications, including among cirrhosis-cured individuals, Australia is unlikely to achieve all WHO HCV elimination targets by 2030.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Hepatitis C, Chronic/epidemiology , Hepatitis C, Chronic/prevention & control , Australia/epidemiology , Calibration , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Disease Progression , Epidemics , Epidemiological Monitoring , Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Hepatitis C, Chronic/mortality , Humans , Incidence , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/drug therapy , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Models, Theoretical , Prevalence , Treatment Outcome , World Health Organization
9.
HPB (Oxford) ; 24(3): 342-352, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the work status of clinicians in China and their management strategy alteration for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A nationwide online questionnaire survey was conducted in 42 class-A tertiary hospitals across China. Experienced clinicians of HCC-related specialties responded with their work status and management suggestions for HCC patients during the pandemic. RESULTS: 716 doctors responded effectively with a response rate of 60.1%, and 664 were included in the final analysis. Overall, 51.4% (341/664) of clinicians reported more than a 60% reduction of the regular workload and surgeons declared the highest proportion of workload reduction. 92.5% (614/664) of the respondents have been using online medical consultation to substitute for the "face-to-face" visits. Adaptive adjustment for the treatment strategy for HCC was made, including the recommendations of noninvasive and minimally invasive treatments such as transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for early and intermediate stage. Targeted therapy has been the mainstay for advanced stage and also as a bridge therapy for resectable HCC. DISCUSSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, online medical consultation is recommended to avoid social contact. Targeted therapy as a bridge therapy is recommended for resectable HCC considering the possibility of delayed surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Chemoembolization, Therapeutic , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(8): 1520-1530, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317650

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is expected to have a long-lasting impact on the approach to care for patients at risk for and with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to the risks from potential exposure and resource reallocation. The goal of this document is to provide recommendations on HCC surveillance and monitoring, including strategies to limit unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide high-quality care for patients. Publications and guidelines pertaining to the management of HCC during COVID-19 were reviewed for recommendations related to surveillance and monitoring practices, and any available guidance was referenced to support the authors' recommendations when applicable. Existing HCC risk stratification models should be utilized to prioritize imaging resources to those patients at highest risk of incident HCC and recurrence following therapy though surveillance can likely continue as before in settings where COVID-19 prevalence is low and adequate protections are in place. Waitlisted patients who will benefit from urgent LT should be prioritized for surveillance whereas it would be reasonable to extend surveillance interval by a short period in HCC patients with lower risk tumor features and those more than 2 years since their last treatment. For patients eligible for systemic therapy, the treatment regimen should be dictated by the risk of COVID-19 associated with route of administration, monitoring and treatment of adverse events, within the context of relative treatment efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , alpha-Fetoproteins
11.
World J Gastroenterol ; 27(25): 3780-3789, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302602

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted hospital organization, with the necessity to quickly react to face the pandemic. The management of the oncological patient has been modified by necessity due to different allocation of nurses and doctors, requiring new strategies to guarantee the correct assistance to the patients. Hepatocellular carcinoma, considered as one of the most aggressive types of liver cancer, has also required a different management during this period in order to optimize the management of patients at risk for and with this cancer. The aim of this document is to review recommendations on hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance and management, including surgery, liver transplantation, interventional radiology, oncology, and radiotherapy. Publications and guidelines from the main scientific societies worldwide regarding the management of hepatocellular carcinoma during the COVID-19 pandemic were reviewed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 19(9): 1063-1071, 2021 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256975

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delays in diagnosis and treatment have been reported for many cancers, with resultant stage migration and worse survival; however, few data exist in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These data are of particular importance in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has caused disruptions in healthcare processes and may continue to impact cancer care for the foreseeable future. The aim of our study was to characterize the prevalence and clinical significance of diagnostic and treatment delays in patients with HCC. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients diagnosed with HCC between January 2008 and July 2017 at 2 US health systems. Diagnostic and treatment delays were defined as >90 days between presentation and HCC diagnosis and between diagnosis and treatment, respectively. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with diagnostic and treatment delays and Cox proportional hazard models to identify correlates of overall survival. RESULTS: Of 925 patients with HCC, 39.0% were diagnosed via screening, 33.1% incidentally, and 27.9% symptomatically. Median time from presentation to diagnosis was 37 days (interquartile range, 18-94 days), with 120 patients (13.0%) experiencing diagnostic delays. Median time from HCC diagnosis to treatment was 46 days (interquartile range, 29-74 days), with 17.2% of patients experiencing treatment delays. Most (72.5%) diagnostic delays were related to provider-level factors (eg, monitoring indeterminate nodules), whereas nearly half (46.2%) of treatment delays were related to patient-related factors (eg, missed appointments). In multivariable analyses, treatment delays were not associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.60-1.35); these results were consistent across subgroup analyses by Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage and treatment modality. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic and therapeutic delays exceeding 3 months are common in patients with HCC; however, observed treatment delays do not seem to significantly impact overall survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Nat Rev Dis Primers ; 7(1): 6, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075224

ABSTRACT

Liver cancer remains a global health challenge, with an estimated incidence of >1 million cases by 2025. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer and accounts for ~90% of cases. Infection by hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus are the main risk factors for HCC development, although non-alcoholic steatohepatitis associated with metabolic syndrome or diabetes mellitus is becoming a more frequent risk factor in the West. Moreover, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-associated HCC has a unique molecular pathogenesis. Approximately 25% of all HCCs present with potentially actionable mutations, which are yet to be translated into the clinical practice. Diagnosis based upon non-invasive criteria is currently challenged by the need for molecular information that requires tissue or liquid biopsies. The current major advancements have impacted the management of patients with advanced HCC. Six systemic therapies have been approved based on phase III trials (atezolizumab plus bevacizumab, sorafenib, lenvatinib, regorafenib, cabozantinib and ramucirumab) and three additional therapies have obtained accelerated FDA approval owing to evidence of efficacy. New trials are exploring combination therapies, including checkpoint inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors or anti-VEGF therapies, or even combinations of two immunotherapy regimens. The outcomes of these trials are expected to change the landscape of HCC management at all evolutionary stages.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/etiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Sorafenib
16.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(7): 1469-1479.e19, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-773811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Chronic liver disease (CLD) represents a major global health burden. We undertook this study to identify the factors associated with adverse outcomes in patients with CLD who acquire the novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We conducted a multi-center, observational cohort study across 21 institutions in the United States (US) of adult patients with CLD and laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 between March 1, 2020 and May 30, 2020. We performed survival analysis to identify independent predictors of all-cause mortality and COVID-19 related mortality, and multivariate logistic regression to determine the risk of severe COVID-19 in patients with CLD. RESULTS: Of the 978 patients in our cohort, 867 patients (mean age 56.9 ± 14.5 years, 55% male) met inclusion criteria. The overall all-cause mortality was 14.0% (n = 121), and 61.7% (n = 535) had severe COVID-19. Patients presenting with diarrhea or nausea/vomiting were more likely to have severe COVID-19. The liver-specific factors associated with independent risk of higher overall mortality were alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-4.55), decompensated cirrhosis (HR 2.91 [1.70-5.00]) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (HR 3.31 [1.53-7.16]). Other factors were increasing age, diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and current smoker. Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.33 [1.47-3.70]) and decompensated cirrhosis (OR 2.50 [1.20-5.21]) were independently associated with risk for severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The risk factors which predict higher overall mortality among patients with CLD and COVID-19 are ALD, decompensated cirrhosis and HCC. Hispanic ethnicity and decompensated cirrhosis are associated with severe COVID-19. Our results will enable risk stratification and personalization of the management of patients with CLD and COVID-19. Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT04439084.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver Neoplasms , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , United States
17.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A ; 31(3): 266-272, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720927

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pandemic rendered the surgical approach as well as the surgical indication very complex due to the outstanding consumption of public health system' resources, especially in the intensive care subdivision. A multidisciplinary team-based strategy is necessary to adapt guidelines and medical practices to the actual situation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in the therapeutic algorithm in a small group of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) enlisted for surgery during the COVID-19 outbreak. Materials and Methods: A multidisciplinary strategy has been adopted to allocate HCC patients to a treatment that permitted to reduce the risk of complications and the hospital stay, thus preventing contamination by the virus. Nasopharyngeal swab and a chest radiograph were performed in all patients within 48 hours before the surgical procedure: in the suspected cases with negative COVID tests, we prudently postponed surgery and repeated the diagnostic tests after 15 days. Results: During the emergency state, 11 HCC patients were treated (8 laparoscopic ablations and 3 hepatic resections). We reported only 1 postoperative complication (hemothorax) and 1 death during the follow-up for COVID pneumonia. Comparing our performances with those in the same time frame in the past 4 years, we treated a similar number of HCC patients, obtaining a decrease in operative timing (P = .0409) and hospital stay (P = .0412) (Fig. 2b) with similar rates of immediate postoperative complications, without ICU admissions. Conclusions: An adapted algorithm for the treatment of HCC to COVID outbreak permitted to manage safely these patients by identifying those most at risk of evolution of the neoplastic disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/surgery , Disease Management , Guideline Adherence , Hepatectomy/methods , Laparoscopy/methods , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Ann Saudi Med ; 40(4): 273-280, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612198

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a novel coronavirus was identified in patients in Wuhan, China. The virus, subsequently named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, spread worldwide and the disease (coronavirus disease 2019 or COVID-19) was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Older adults and individuals with comorbidities have been reported as being more vulnerable to COVID-19. Patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) have compromised immune function due to cirrhosis and are more susceptible to infection. However, it is unclear if patients with CLD are more vulnerable to COVID-19 and its complications than other populations. The high number of severe cases of COVID-19 has placed an unusual burden on health systems, compromising their capacity to provide the regular care that patients with CLD require. Hence, it is incredibly crucial at this juncture to provide a set of interim recommendations on the management of patients with CLD during the current COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Amides/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azetidines/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Drug Combinations , Drug Interactions , Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/therapy , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/therapy , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis/therapy , Liver Diseases/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Liver Transplantation , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Purines , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles , Ritonavir/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Ultrasonography/methods
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