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1.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther ; 22(5): 549-559, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806096

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a variable entity, encompassing bulky primary tumors, nodal involvement, or both. Multidisciplinary evaluation is essential to discuss multiple treatment options, to outline optimal management, and to examine the main debated topics and critical issues not addressed by current trials and guidelines that influence daily clinical practice. AREAS COVERED: From March to 5 May 2021 ,meetings were scheduled in a webinar format titled 'Radio Talk' due to the COVID-19 pandemic; the faculty was composed of 6 radiation oncologists from 6 different Institutions of Italy, all of them were the referring radiation oncologist for lung cancer treatment at their respective departments and were or had been members of AIRO (Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) Thoracic Oncology Study Group. The topics covered included: pulmonary toxicity, cardiac toxicity, radiotherapy dose, fractionation and volumes, unfit/elderly patients, multidisciplinary management. EXPERT OPINION: The debate was focused on the unmet needs triggered by case reports, personal experiences and questions; the answers were often not univocal; however, the exchange of opinion and the contribution of different centers confirmed the role of multidisciplinary management and the necessity that the most critical issues should be investigated in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Aged , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Radiation Oncologists
3.
Ann Surg ; 272(6): 925-929, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873175

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the overall survival of patients with operable stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo "early" SBRT (within 0-30 days after diagnosis) versus "delayed" surgery (90-120 days after diagnosis). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: During the COVID-19 pandemic, national guidelines have recommended patients with operable stage IA NSCLC to consider delaying surgery by at least 3 months or, alternatively, to undergo SBRT without delay. It is unknown which strategy is associated with better short- and long-term outcomes. METHODS: Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling and propensity score-matched analysis was used to compare the overall survival of patients with stage IA NSCLC in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2015 who underwent "early" SBRT (0-30 days after diagnosis) versus that of patients who underwent "delayed" wedge resection (90-120 days after diagnosis). RESULTS: During the study period, 570 (55%) patients underwent early SBRT and 475 (45%) underwent delayed wedge resection. In multivariable analysis, delayed resection was associated with improved survival [adjusted hazard ratio 0.61; (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50-0.76)]. Propensity-score matching was used to create 2 groups of 279 patients each who received early SBRT or delayed resection that were well-matched with regard to baseline characteristics. The 5-year survival associated with delayed resection was 53% (95% CI: 45%-61%) which was better than the 5-year survival associated with early SBRT (31% [95% CI: 24%-37%]). CONCLUSION: In this national analysis, for patients with stage IA NSCLC, extended delay of surgery was associated with improved survival when compared to early treatment with SBRT.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Radiosurgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment
4.
Lung Cancer ; 146: 230-235, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616484

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has spread around the planet, sending billions of people into lockdown as health services struggle to cope. Meanwhile in Asia, where the disease began, the spread continues, in China it seems for now to have passed its peak. Italy, Spain, France, UK, and the US have been the countries more affected in terms of deaths. The coronavirus is more dangerous to the elderly and those with certain pre-existing medical conditions which is precisely the profile of lung cancer patients. Essential cancer services should be delivered but all steps should be taken to protect patients and the health workforce from infection with COVID-19. This presents a major challenge to radiotherapy (RT) departments worldwide. An international panel with expertise in the management of lung cancer in high-volume comprehensive centres has come together to share its experience on COVID-19 preparedness to deliver optimal care in such exceptional circumstances. A comprehensive systematic review of the literature through a PubMed search was undertaken. Twelve recommendations including, among others, the consideration of shorter courses, delays, and the omission of RT for lung cancer are proposed by the panel. In summary, we recommend the screening of every single person accessing the treatment room, the consideration of hypofractionation and to delay postoperative RT for non-small cell lung cancer, to avoid twice-daily treatments and delay or deliver prophylactic cranial irradiation during radio(chemo)therapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer, review image guided RT images for suspicious image findings, and the use of single-fraction RT for the palliative treatment of stage IV lung cancer patients. Given that lung cancer is one of the most common and severe pathologies in radiation oncology departments, the following recommendations require particularly urgent consideration. The decision-making paths strongly depend on locally available resources, and a tailored approach should be used to attend lung cancer patients during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Coronavirus Infections/radiotherapy , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/radiotherapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/radiotherapy , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/virology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , France/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Palliative Care/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/complications , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/epidemiology , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/virology , Spain/epidemiology
6.
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) ; 32(8): 481-489, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245621

ABSTRACT

Patients treated with curative-intent lung radiotherapy are in the group at highest risk of severe complications and death from COVID-19. There is therefore an urgent need to reduce the risks associated with multiple hospital visits and their anti-cancer treatment. One recommendation is to consider alternative dose-fractionation schedules or radiotherapy techniques. This would also increase radiotherapy service capacity for operable patients with stage I-III lung cancer, who might be unable to have surgery during the pandemic. Here we identify reduced-fractionation for curative-intent radiotherapy regimes in lung cancer, from a literature search carried out between 20/03/2020 and 30/03/2020 as well as published and unpublished audits of hypofractionated regimes from UK centres. Evidence, practical considerations and limitations are discussed for early-stage NSCLC, stage III NSCLC, early-stage and locally advanced SCLC. We recommend discussion of this guidance document with other specialist lung MDT members to disseminate the potential changes to radiotherapy practices that could be made to reduce pressure on other departments such as thoracic surgery. It is also a crucial part of the consent process to ensure that the risks and benefits of undergoing cancer treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertainties surrounding toxicity from reduced fractionation have been adequately discussed with patients. Furthermore, centres should document all deviations from standard protocols, and we urge all colleagues, where possible, to join national/international data collection initiatives (such as COVID-RT Lung) aimed at recording the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on lung cancer treatment and outcomes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/radiotherapy , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/virology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2 , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/virology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
7.
Cancer Radiother ; 24(3): 182-187, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-100544

ABSTRACT

Overall treatment time is an important factor of local recurrence and indirectly of distant evolution, namely in case of protracted treatments. The current pandemic impacts on the duration of radiotherapy if patients under treatments and synchronously suffering from COVID-19. The models used to compensate the total dose in case of temporary treatment interruption are well known but it is of importance in that pandemic context to update and homogenize clinical practice in order to improve local control without increasing normal tissue complications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Withholding Treatment , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Cell Proliferation , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Male , Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Radiobiology/methods , Radiotherapy Dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/radiotherapy
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