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1.
Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi ; 25(5): 295-302, 2022 May 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847419

ABSTRACT

Though the coronavirus disease is still raging in 2021, clinical research on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) did not stop. However, benefiting from advances in lung cancer treatment modality, NSCLC patients have experienced significant improvements in overall survival and quality of life. Currently, research advances on targeted therapy and immunotherapy have together transformed the status of postoperative adjuvant therapy and established a new standard treatment modality for resectable NSCLC. There are equally important research advances in locally advanced and advanced NSCLC, including new treatment modalities, new therapeutic agents, etc., all of which bringing more options for clinical treatment. These therapies will bring changes to NSCLC and will gradually lead to the chronicity of lung cancer in the foreseeable future. Therefore, this paper reviews important studies that will change clinical practice in NSCLC treatment and noteworthy research advances in 2021.
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Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Combined Modality Therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Quality of Life
2.
Asian J Surg ; 45(8): 1553-1558, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814136

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There is limited literature on patients with a history of COVID-19 pneumonia who underwent anatomical lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study was aimed to share the early postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent lung resection after COVID-19 pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 30 patients who underwent lobectomy with thoracotomy and systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection due to NSCLC in a single center between November 2018 and September 2021. The patients were divided into two groups regarding COVID-19 pneumonia history; the COVID-19 group consisted of 14 patients (46.7%) and the non-COVID-19 group 16 (53.3%) patients. The patients' age, gender, comorbidity, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) value, tumor type and size, resection type, postoperative air leak duration, total drainage volume, drain removal time, postoperative complications, and length of stay (LOS) were recorded. RESULTS: 9 (30%) patients were female, and 21 (70%) were male. The mean age was 62.1 ± 8.91 years. Our comparison of postoperative air leak duration, total drainage volume, time to drain removal, postoperative complications, and LOS between the COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 groups revealed no statistically significant difference. CONCLUSION: Anatomical lung resection can be performed safely in NSCLC patients with a history of COVID-19 pneumonia without significant difference in early postoperative morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonectomy/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/adverse effects
3.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 164(2): 378-385, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712841

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The influence of SARS-CoV-2 on surgery for non-small cell lung cancer needs to be understood to inform clinical decision making during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study reports on the 90-day rate of infection as well as the morbidity and mortality of lung surgery for cancer in a tertiary care hospital located in a pandemic epicenter. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of a prospective database to identify consecutive patients who underwent lung cancer resection before (January 1, 2020-March 10, 2020, group 1; 57 patients) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 11, 2020-June 10, 2020, group 2; 41 patients). The primary end point was the occurrence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first 90-days after surgery. The secondary outcome measure was 90-day perioperative morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Patient characteristics were not significantly different between the groups. Ninety-day COVID-19 infection rates was 7.3% (3 out of 41) for patients undergoing an operation during the pandemic and 3.5% (2 out of 57) in patients operated on immediately before the pandemic. All patients tested positive 10 to 62 days after the index surgical procedure following hospital discharge. Four COVID-19-positive patients were symptomatic and 4 out of 5 patients required hospitalization, were men, previous or current smokers with hyperlipidemia, and underwent a sublobar resection. Univariate analysis did not identify any differences in postoperative complications before or during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ninety-day mortality was 5% (2 out of 41) for lung cancer surgery performed during the pandemic, with all deaths occurring due to COVID-19, compared with 0% (0 out of 57) mortality in patients who underwent an operation before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, COVID-19 infections occurred in 7.3% of patients who underwent surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. In this series all infections occurred after hospital discharge. Our results suggest that COVID-19 infections occurring within 90 days of surgery portend a 40% mortality, warranting close postoperative surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Surg Res ; 274: 213-223, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707290

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the current era of episode-based hospital reimbursements, it is important to determine the impact of hospital size on contemporary national trends in surgical technique and outcomes of lobectomy. METHODS: Patients aged >18 y undergoing open and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy from 2008 to 2014 were identified using insurance claims data from the National Inpatient Sample. The impact of hospital size on surgical approach and outcomes for both open and VATS lobectomy were analyzed. RESULTS: Over the 7-y period, 202,668 lobectomies were performed nationally, including 71,638 VATS and 131,030 open. Although the overall number of lobectomies decreased (30,058 in 2008 versus 27,340 in 2014, P < 0.01), the proportion of VATS lobectomies increased (24.0% versus 46.9%), and open lobectomies decreased (76.0% versus 53.0%, all P < 0.01). When stratified by hospital size, small hospitals had a significant increase in the proportion of open lobectomies (6.4%-12.2%; P = 0.01) and trend toward increased number of VATS lobectomies (2.7%-12.2%). Annual mortality rates for VATS (range: 1.0%-1.9%) and open (range: 1.9%-2.4%) lobectomy did not significantly differ over time (all P > 0.05) but did decrease among small hospitals (4.1%-1.3% and 5.1%-1.1% for VATS and open, respectively; both P < 0.05). After adjusting for confounders, hospital bed size was not a predictor of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of VATS lobectomies has increased over time, more so among small hospitals. Mortality rates for open lobectomy remain consistently higher than VATS lobectomy (range 0.4%-1.4%) but did not significantly differ over time. This data can help benchmark hospital performance in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy
6.
Thorac Cancer ; 12(21): 2865-2872, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, has high morbidity rates. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) as day surgery makes surgical treatment ideally in time with the same quality of medical care. This study aimed to assess the safety of stage I NSCLC patients who underwent VATS at a day surgery center. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and tumor features of VATS patients at a single center, West China Hospital, from June 1, 2019, to December 31, 2020. Patients fulfilled all inclusion criteria, did not meet any exclusion criteria and underwent wedge resection, segmentectomy, or lobectomy with systematic lymph node dissection. RESULTS: The median patient age was 43 (range, 19-67) years. Of the 209 patients, most were women. A total of 108 (51.7%) patients underwent segmentectomy, 87 (41.6%) lobectomy, and 14 (6.7%) wedge resection with systematic lymph node dissection. According to the AJCC/UICC eighth edition of lung cancer stage grouping, stages IA, IA1, IA2, and IA3 were 195 (93.3%), 122 (58.4%), 50 (23.9%), and one (0.5%), respectively. A total of 36 (17.2%) patients were stage 0. Adenocarcinoma was predominantly the postoperative pathological diagnosis, as only 14 (6.7%) were benign. A total of 201 (96.17%) patients were discharged without a chest tube. The most common chief complaints were cough, incisional pain, and shortness of breath. No severe complications or life-threatening emergencies were observed. CONCLUSIONS: The day surgery mode of VATS for stage I NSCLC is safe and feasible, which makes surgical treatment ideally in time for stage I NSCLC patients with the same quality of medical care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/methods , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
7.
J Surg Oncol ; 125(2): 290-298, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The role of salvage thoracic surgery in managing advanced-stage lung cancer following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors is currently unclear. We present a series of nine patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent pulmonary resection following treatment with pembrolizumab. METHODS: We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of pulmonary resection undertaken following treatment with pembrolizumab for advanced-stage lung cancer. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: In six cases, surgery was indicated for persistent localized disease after treatment, and in three cases for nonresponsive synchronous/metachronous lung nodules while on treatment for stage IV lung cancer. Dense hilar fibrosis was present in all patients. Minimal access surgery was achieved in five cases (video-assisted n = 2, robotic-assisted n = 3). There was no in-hospital mortality. One patient died within 60 days from community-acquired COVID-19 pneumonitis. Seven patients remain free of disease between 5 and 22 months follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary resection is safe and technically feasible following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Surgical challenges relate to postimmunotherapy fibrosis, but with increased experience and a robotic approach, minimal access surgery is achievable. Further prospective studies are required to assess the surgical impact on disease control and overall survival in this patient cohort.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy , Aged , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Retrospective Studies , Salvage Therapy
8.
Ann Surg ; 273(5): 850-857, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171640

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of extended delay to surgery for stage I NSCLC. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with NSCLC may experience delays in care, and some national guidelines recommend delays in surgery by >3 months for early NSCLC. METHODS: Using data from the National Lung Screening Trial, a multi-center randomized trial, and the National Cancer Data Base, a multi-institutional oncology registry, the impact of "early" versus "delayed" surgery (surgery received 0-30 vs 90-120 days after diagnosis) for stage I lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was assessed using multivariable Cox regression analysis with penalized smoothing spline functions and propensity score-matched analyses. RESULTS: In Cox regression analysis of the National Lung Screening Trial (n = 452) and National Cancer Data Base (n = 80,086) cohorts, an increase in the hazard ratio was seen the longer surgery was delayed. In propensity score-matched analysis, no significant differences in survival were found between early and delayed surgery for stage IA1 adenocarcinoma and IA1-IA3 SCC (all P > 0.13). For stage IA2-IB adenocarcinoma and IB SCC, delayed surgery was associated with worse survival (all P < 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: The mortality risk associated with an extended delay to surgery differs across patient subgroups, and difficult decisions to delay care during the COVID-19 pandemic should take substage and histologic subtype into consideration.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Adenocarcinoma/mortality , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/surgery , Clinical Decision-Making , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Propensity Score , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ann Surg ; 273(5): 850-857, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101937

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of extended delay to surgery for stage I NSCLC. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with NSCLC may experience delays in care, and some national guidelines recommend delays in surgery by >3 months for early NSCLC. METHODS: Using data from the National Lung Screening Trial, a multi-center randomized trial, and the National Cancer Data Base, a multi-institutional oncology registry, the impact of "early" versus "delayed" surgery (surgery received 0-30 vs 90-120 days after diagnosis) for stage I lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was assessed using multivariable Cox regression analysis with penalized smoothing spline functions and propensity score-matched analyses. RESULTS: In Cox regression analysis of the National Lung Screening Trial (n = 452) and National Cancer Data Base (n = 80,086) cohorts, an increase in the hazard ratio was seen the longer surgery was delayed. In propensity score-matched analysis, no significant differences in survival were found between early and delayed surgery for stage IA1 adenocarcinoma and IA1-IA3 SCC (all P > 0.13). For stage IA2-IB adenocarcinoma and IB SCC, delayed surgery was associated with worse survival (all P < 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: The mortality risk associated with an extended delay to surgery differs across patient subgroups, and difficult decisions to delay care during the COVID-19 pandemic should take substage and histologic subtype into consideration.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Adenocarcinoma/mortality , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/surgery , Clinical Decision-Making , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Propensity Score , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) ; 33(5): 283-291, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978251

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To report long-term outcomes of patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early stage, peripherally located non-small cell lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected retrospectively between September 2009 and May 2019. Electronic medical records were reviewed for baseline characteristics, treatment details and outcomes. All patients were treated according to local protocol based on the national UK SABR Consortium guidelines. Risk-adapted treatment schedules were used depending on the size and the location of the tumour (54 Gy in three fractions, 55 Gy in five fractions, 60 Gy in eight fractions or 50 Gy in 10 fractions). Overall survival outcomes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: In total, 412 patients were included in the analysis. The median age was 76 years (range 48-93 years). Histological confirmation was obtained in 233 cases (56.6%). The median overall survival for all patients was 42.3 months (95% confidence interval 37.3-47.3 months), with 3- and 5-year overall survival of 52.8% and 37.3%, respectively. For biopsy-proven patients (56.6%), 3- and 5-year overall survival was 57.3% and 40.1%, respectively. With respect to overall survival, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed no significant difference in survival by technique (volume-modulated arc therapy versus conformal; three-dimensional computed tomography versus four-dimensional computed tomography), tumour location, smoking status at first contact, pre-treatment tumour stage or pre-treatment standardised uptake value. Survival was poorer for patients who received the 50 Gy in 10 fractions schedule. Treatment was very well tolerated with very low rates of grade 3-4 toxicity (1%). CONCLUSIONS: SABR for peripherally located, medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer can be safely and effectively implemented in a non-academic institution with appropriate equipment and training. Overall survival outcomes and toxicity rates are comparable with internationally published studies. Patients treated with 50 Gy in 10 fractions had a poorer survival outcome.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Radiosurgery/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cancer Care Facilities , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnostic imaging , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Female , Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Radiosurgery/methods , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
11.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(6): 1222-1227, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910370

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in patient reluctance to seek care due to fear of contracting the virus, especially in New York City which was the epicentre during the surge. The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety of patients who have undergone pulmonary resection for lung cancer as well as provider safety, using COVID-19 testing, symptoms and early patient outcomes. METHODS: Patients with confirmed or suspected pulmonary malignancy who underwent resection from 13 March to 4 May 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Between 13 March and 4 May 2020, 2087 COVID-19 patients were admitted, with a median daily census of 299, to one of our Manhattan campuses (80% of hospital capacity). During this time, 21 patients (median age 72 years) out of 45 eligible surgical candidates underwent pulmonary resection-13 lobectomies, 6 segmentectomies and 2 pneumonectomies were performed by the same providers who were caring for COVID-19 patients. None of the patients developed major complications, 5 had minor complications, and the median length of hospital stay was 2 days. No previously COVID-19-negative patient (n = 20/21) or healthcare provider (n = 9: 3 surgeons, 3 surgical assistants, 3 anaesthesiologists) developed symptoms of or tested positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary resection for lung cancer is safe in selected patients, even when performed by providers who care for COVID-19 patients in a hospital with a large COVID-19 census. None of our patients or providers developed symptoms of COVID-19 and no patient experienced major morbidity or mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Health Services Accessibility , Hospitalization , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Perioperative Care/methods , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
12.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(1): 248-254, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has led surgical societies to recommend delaying diagnosis and treatment of suspected lung cancer for lesions less than 2 cm. Delaying diagnosis can lead to disease progression, but the impact of this delay on mortality is unknown. The COVID-19 infection rate at which immediate operative risk exceeds benefit is unknown. We sought to model immediate versus delayed surgical resection in a suspicious lung nodule less than 2 cm. METHODS: A decision analysis model was developed, and sensitivity analyses performed. The base case was a 65-year-old male smoker with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presenting for surgical biopsy of a 1.5 to 2 cm lung nodule highly suspicious for cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. We compared immediate surgical resection to delayed resection after 3 months. The likelihood of key outcomes was derived from the literature where available. The outcome was 5-year overall survival. RESULTS: Immediate surgical resection resulted in a similar but slightly higher 5-year overall survival when compared with delayed resection (0.77 versus 0.74) owing to the risk of disease progression. However, if the probability of acquired COVID-19 infection is greater than 13%, delayed resection is favorable (0.74 vs 0.73). CONCLUSIONS: Immediate surgical biopsy of lung nodules suspicious for cancer in hospitals with low COVID-19 prevalence likely results in improved 5-year survival. However, as the risk of perioperative COVID-19 infection increases above 13%, a delayed approach has similar or improved survival. This balance should be frequently reexamined at each health care facility throughout the curve of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Delayed Diagnosis/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/etiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Computer Simulation , Decision Support Techniques , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/etiology , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Risk , Smoking/adverse effects , Time Factors
13.
Ann Surg ; 272(6): 925-929, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873175

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the overall survival of patients with operable stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo "early" SBRT (within 0-30 days after diagnosis) versus "delayed" surgery (90-120 days after diagnosis). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: During the COVID-19 pandemic, national guidelines have recommended patients with operable stage IA NSCLC to consider delaying surgery by at least 3 months or, alternatively, to undergo SBRT without delay. It is unknown which strategy is associated with better short- and long-term outcomes. METHODS: Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling and propensity score-matched analysis was used to compare the overall survival of patients with stage IA NSCLC in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2015 who underwent "early" SBRT (0-30 days after diagnosis) versus that of patients who underwent "delayed" wedge resection (90-120 days after diagnosis). RESULTS: During the study period, 570 (55%) patients underwent early SBRT and 475 (45%) underwent delayed wedge resection. In multivariable analysis, delayed resection was associated with improved survival [adjusted hazard ratio 0.61; (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50-0.76)]. Propensity-score matching was used to create 2 groups of 279 patients each who received early SBRT or delayed resection that were well-matched with regard to baseline characteristics. The 5-year survival associated with delayed resection was 53% (95% CI: 45%-61%) which was better than the 5-year survival associated with early SBRT (31% [95% CI: 24%-37%]). CONCLUSION: In this national analysis, for patients with stage IA NSCLC, extended delay of surgery was associated with improved survival when compared to early treatment with SBRT.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Radiosurgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment
14.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(5): 1682-1688, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838056

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak was officially declared in France on March 14, 2020. The objective of this study is to report the incidence and outcome of COVID-19 after surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer in Paris Public Hospitals during the pandemic. METHODS: We retrospective analyzed a prospective database including all patients who underwent non-small cell lung cancer resection between March 14, 2020, and May 11, 2020, in the 5 thoracic surgery units of Paris Public Hospitals. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first 30 days after surgery. RESULTS: Study group included 115 patients (male 57%, age 64.6 ± 10.7 years, adenocarcinoma 66%, cT1 62%, cN0 82%). During the first month after surgery, 6 patients (5%) were diagnosed with COVID-19. As compared with COVID-negative patients, COVID-positive patients were more likely to be operated on during the first month of the pandemic (100% vs 54%, P = .03) and to be on corticosteroids preoperatively (33% vs 4%, P = .03). Postoperative COVID-19 was associated with an increased rate of readmission (50% vs 5%, P = .004), but no difference in 30-day morbidity (for the study group: grade 2, 24%; grade 3, 7%; grade 4, 1%) or mortality (n = 1 COVID-negative patient, 0.9%). Immediate oncologic outcomes did not differ significantly between groups (R0 resection 99%, nodal upstaging 14%, adjuvant chemotherapy 29%). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical treatment of non-small cell lung cancer was associated with a rate of postoperative COVID-19 of 5% with a significant impact on readmissions but not on other outcomes studied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy/adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonectomy/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(3): e181-e182, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796736

ABSTRACT

Concomitant coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is a major risk factor for complications in any type of surgical procedure, especially in thoracic surgery, were the primary organ involved, the lung, is manipulated to perform parenchymal resection. However, it is not clear whether previous infection from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may lead to increased morbidity and mortality for subsequent procedures once radiologic resolution is achieved. We report a young patient with lung cancer who successfully underwent a right upper lobectomy for primary adenocarcinoma by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with no complication in the early postoperative phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Pandemics , Postoperative Period
16.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(3): 598-604, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733389

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is currently a lack of clinical data on the novel beta-coronavirus infection [caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] and concomitant primary lung cancer. Our goal was to report our experiences with 5 patients treated for lung cancer while infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 5 adult patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted to our thoracic surgery unit between 29 January 2020 and 4 March 2020 for surgical treatment of a primary lung cancer. Clinical data and outcomes are reported. RESULTS: All patients were men with a mean age of 74.0 years (range 67-80). Four of the 5 patients (80%) reported chronic comorbidities. Surgery comprised minimally invasive lobectomy (2 patients) and segmentectomy (1 patient), lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection (1 patient) and pneumonectomy (1 patient). Mean chest drain duration was 12.4 days (range 8-22); mean hospital stay was 33.8 days (range 21-60). SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms were fever (3 patients), persistent cough (3 patients), diarrhoea (2 patients) and syncope (2 patients); 1 patient reported no symptoms. Morbidity related to surgery was 60%; 30-day mortality was 40%. Two patients (1 with a right pneumonectomy, 74 years old; 1 with a lobectomy with chest wall resection and reconstruction, 70 years old), developed SARS-CoV-2-related lung failure leading to death 60 and 32 days after surgery, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Lung cancer surgery may represent a high-risk factor for developing a severe case of coronavirus disease 2019, particularly in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. Additional strategies are needed to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection during treatment for lung cancer.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Treatment Outcome
17.
Khirurgiia (Mosk) ; (7): 82-85, 2020.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690197

ABSTRACT

Available data indicate a worse prognosis in cancer patients with COVID-19. Surgical treatment of lung cancer in the conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic poses new challenges to ensure the perioperative safety of patients. OBJECTIVE: To prevent infection of patients in the perioperative period and, in case of infection, to prevent the severe course of COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic within two months (March-April 2020) 138 patients underwent surgical treatment for malignant tumors, including 22 videothoracoscopic operations: 3 (13.6%) segmentectomies, 16 (72.7%) lobectomies, and 5 (22.7%) bilobectomies for non-small cell lung cancer. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Following the principles that ensure the prevention of infection and the prevention of severe COVID-19, we managed to avoid the first stage of the pandemic (March-April 2020) cases of infection with a new coronavirus infection in patients who underwent surgical treatment for lung cancer.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Russia , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Clin Lung Cancer ; 22(3): 156-160, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-622762

ABSTRACT

The highly transmissible novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has infected over 8.8 million people globally and has upended the delivery of health care in the United States, creating unprecedented challenges to providing care to patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The initial surge of patients with COVID-19 that have flooded hospitals has put a strain on physical space, workforce, and supplies. In addition, social distancing and the risk of COVID-19 transmission has created significant barriers for thoracic surgeons to diagnose and treat patients. Many hospitals across the country have temporarily suspended elective operations to preserve hospital beds, ventilators, and personal protective equipment. Currently, the pandemic has greatly disrupted the current standard of resection after adequate staging with imaging and/or surgical staging for early stage NSCLC well beyond the initial acute phase; therefore, a new paradigm for effective management will need to be devised until the COVID-19 pandemic is eradicated with systematic vaccination and herd immunity. Thoracic surgeons will need to recalibrate their approach to ensure that patients receive timely and effective treatment for early stage NSCLC. The management of early stage NSCLC during the COVID-19 pandemic should be balanced with available hospital resources, risk of progression of disease, risk of transmission of COVID-19 to patient and surgeon, and the availability of alternative therapies. This article will address the current challenges with treating early stage NSCLC during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide a clinical framework for providing effective surgical therapy while mitigating the risk of transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to patients and surgeons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Perioperative Care , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Triage
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