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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e054558, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759369

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite extensive evidence of its benefits and recommendation by guidelines, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remains highly underused with only 20%-50% of eligible patients participating. We aim to implement and evaluate the Country Heart Attack Prevention (CHAP) model of care to improve CR attendance and completion for rural and remote participants. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: CHAP will apply the model for large-scale knowledge translation to develop and implement a model of care to CR in rural Australia. Partnering with patients, clinicians and health service managers, we will codevelop new approaches and refine/expand existing ones to address known barriers to CR attendance. CHAP will codesign a web-based CR programme with patients expanding their choices to CR attendance. To increase referral rates, CHAP will promote endorsement of CR among clinicians and develop an electronic system that automatises referrals of in-hospital eligible patients to CR. A business model that includes reimbursement of CR delivered in primary care by Medicare will enable sustainable access to CR. To promote CR quality improvement, professional development interventions and an accreditation programme of CR services and programmes will be developed. To evaluate 12-month CR attendance/completion (primary outcome), clinical and cost-effectiveness (secondary outcomes) between patients exposed (n=1223) and not exposed (n=3669) to CHAP, we will apply a multidesign approach that encompasses a prospective cohort study, a pre-post study and a comprehensive economic evaluation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved by the Southern Adelaide Clinical Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC/20/SAC/78) and by the Department for Health and Wellbeing Human Research Ethics Committee (2021/HRE00270), which approved a waiver of informed consent. Findings and dissemination to patients and clinicians will be through a public website, online educational sessions and scientific publications. Deidentified data will be available from the corresponding author on reasonable request. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12621000222842.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation , Cardiovascular Diseases , Myocardial Infarction , Aged , Australia , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Humans , National Health Programs , Prospective Studies
3.
Heart Lung ; 52: 1-7, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation (HBCR) has been considered a reasonable alternative to Center-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (CBCR) in patients with established cardiovascular disease, especially in the midst of COVID-19 pandemic. However, the long-term cardiovascular outcomes of patients referred to HBCR remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: To compare outcomes of patients who were referred and attended HBCR vs patients referred but did not attend HBCR (Non-HBCR). METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 269 patients referred to HBCR at Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center (PVAMC). From November 2017 to March 2020, 427 patients were eligible and referred for Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) at PVAMC. Of total patients, 158 patients were referred to CBCR and 269 patients to HBCR based on patient and/or clinician preference. The analysis of outcomes was focused on HBCR patients. We compared outcomes of patients who were referred and attended HBCR vs patients referred but did not attend HBCR (Non-HBCR) from 3 to 12 months of the referral date. HBCR consisted of face-to-face entry exam with exercise prescription, weekly phone calls for education and exercise monitoring, with adjustments where applicable, for 12-weeks and an exit exam. Primary outcome was composite of all-cause mortality and hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were all-cause hospitalization, all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalizations, separately. We used cox proportional methods to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CI. We adjusted for imbalanced characteristics at baseline: smoking, left ventricular ejection fraction and CABG status. RESULTS: A total of 269 patients (mean age: 72, 98% Male) were referred to HBCR, however, only 157 (58%) patients attended HBCR. The primary outcome occurred in 30 patients (19.1%) in the HBCR group and 30 patients (30%) in the Non-HBCR group (adjusted HR=0.56, CI 0.33-0.95, P=.03). All-cause mortality occurred in 6.4% of patients in the HBCR group and 13% patients in the Non-HBCR group 3 to 12 months after HBCR referral (adjusted HR=0.43, CI 0.18-1.0, P= .05). There was no difference in cardiovascular hospitalizations (HBCR: 5.7% vs Non-HBCR: 10%, adjusted HR 0.57, CI 0.22-1.4, P= .23) or all cause hospitalizations at 3 to 12 months between the groups (HBCR: 12.7% vs Non-HBCR: 21%, adjusted HR 0.53, CI 0.28-1.01, P= .05). CONCLUSION: Completion of HBCR among referred patients was associated with a lower risk of the combined all-cause mortality and all-cause hospitalizations up to 12 months. Based on the outcomes, HBCR is a reasonable option that can improve access to CR for patients who are not candidates of or cannot attend CBCR. Randomized-controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left
4.
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev ; 41(2): 88-92, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406511

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged how and whether patients with heart disease are able to safely access center-based exercise training and cardiac rehabilitation (CR). This commentary provides an experience-based overview of how one health system quickly developed and applied inclusive policies to allow patients to have safe and effective access to exercise-based CR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Heart Failure/rehabilitation , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Comorbidity , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am ; 32(2): 263-276, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392486

ABSTRACT

Cardiopulmonary telerehabilitation is a safe and effective alternative to traditional center-based rehabilitation. It offers a sustainable solution to more conveniently meet the needs of patients with acute or chronic, preexisting or newly acquired, cardiopulmonary diseases. To maximize success, programs should prioritize basic, safe, and timely care options over comprehensive or complex approaches. The future should incorporate new strategies learned during a global pandemic and harness the power of information and communication technology to provide evidence-based patient-centered care. This review highlights clinical considerations, current evidence, recommendations, and future directions of cardiopulmonary telerehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Telerehabilitation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/economics , Humans , Pandemics , Respiratory Therapy/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telerehabilitation/economics , United States/epidemiology
8.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 43, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285506

ABSTRACT

Background: We investigated impacts of COVID-19 on cardiac rehabilitation (CR) delivery around the globe, including virtual delivery, as well as effects on providers and patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a piloted survey was administered to CR programs globally via REDCap from April to June 2020. The 50 members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (ICCPR) and personal contacts facilitated program identification. Results: Overall, 1062 (18.3% program response rate) responses were received from 70/111 (63.1% country response rate) countries in the world with existent CR programs. Of these, 367 (49.1%) programs reported they had stopped CR delivery, and 203 (27.1%) stopped temporarily (mean = 8.3 ± 2.8 weeks). Alternative models were delivered in 322 (39.7%) programs, primarily through low-tech modes (n = 226,19.3%). Furthermore, 353 (30.2%) respondents were re-deployed, and 276 (37.3%) felt the need to work due to fear of losing their job, despite the perceived risk of contracting COVID-19 (mean = 30.0% ± 27.4/100). Also, 266 (22.5%) reported anxiety, 241(20.4%) were concerned about exposing their family, 113 (9.7%) reported increased workload to transition to remote delivery, and 105 (9.0%) were juggling caregiving responsibilities during business hours. Patients were often contacting staff regarding grocery shopping for heart-healthy foods (n = 333, 28.4%), how to use technology to interact with the program (n = 329, 27.9%), having to stop their exercise because they have no place to exercise (n = 303, 25.7%), and their risk of death from COVID-19 due to pre-existing cardiovascular disease (n = 249, 21.2%). Respondents perceived staff (n = 488, 41.3%) and patient (n = 453, 38.6%) personal protective equipment, as well as COVID-19 screening (n = 414, 35.2%), and testing (n = 411, 35.0%) as paramount to in-person service resumption. Conclusion: Given the estimated number of CR programs globally, these results suggest approximately 4400 CR programs globally have ceased or temporarily stopped service delivery. Those that remain open are implementing new technologies to ensure their patients receive CR safely, despite the challenges. Highlights: - COVID-19 has impacted cardiac rehabilitation (CR) delivery around the globe.- In this cross-sectional study, a survey was completed by 1062 (18.3%) CR programs from 70 (63.1%) countries.- The pandemic has resulted in at least temporary cessation of ~75% of CR programs, with others ceasing initiation of new patients, reducing components delivered, and/or changing of mode delivery with little opportunity for planning and training.- There is also significant psychosocial and economic impact on CR providers.- Alternative CR model (e.g., home-based, virtual) reimbursement advocacy is needed, to ensure safe, accessible secondary prevention delivery.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Duration of Therapy , Global Health , Humans , Reimbursement Mechanisms , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telerehabilitation/methods
9.
Heart Vessels ; 37(1): 77-82, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274823

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to clarify the effects of gardening on hemodynamic response, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during exercise, and body weight in patients in whom phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation (CR) was interrupted due to the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Among 76 outpatients participating in consecutive phase 2 CR in both periods from March to April and June to July 2020, which were before and after CR interruption, respectively, at Sanda City Hospital were enrolled. The inclusion criterion was outpatients whose CR was interrupted due to COVID-19. Patients under the age of 65 were excluded. We compared the data of hemodynamic response and RPE during exercise on the last day before interruption and the first day after interruption when aerobic exercise was performed at the same exercise intensity in the gardener group and the non-gardener group. Forty-one patients were enrolled in the final analysis. After CR interruption, the gardener group did not show any significant difference in all items, whereas the non-gardener group experienced significant increase in HR (Peak) (p = 0.004) and worsening of the Borg scale scores for both dyspnea and lower extremity fatigue (p = 0.039 and p = 0.009, respectively). Older phase 2 CR patients engaged in gardening did not show any deterioration in hemodynamic response or RPE during exercise, despite CR interruption and refraining from going outside. Gardening may be recommended as one of the activities that can maintain or improve physical function in older phase 2 CR patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Gardening , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Hemodynamics , Humans , Physical Functional Performance , Treatment Outcome
10.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263930

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This meta-analysis aims to (1) evaluate the efficacy of physical activity interventions in heart failure and (2) to identify intervention characteristics significantly associated with the interventions' efficacy. METHODS: Randomised controlled trials reporting intervention effects on physical activity in heart failure were combined in a meta-analysis using a random-effect model. Exploratory meta-analysis was performed by specifying the general approach (eg, cardiac rehabilitation), strategies used (eg, action planning), setting (eg, centre based), mode of delivery (eg, face to face or online), facilitator (eg, nurse), contact time and behavioural change theory use as predictors in the random-effect model. RESULTS: Interventions (n=21) had a significant overall effect (SMD=0.54, 95% CI (0.13 to 0.95), p<0.0005). Combining an exercise programme with behavioural change intervention was found efficacious (SMD=1.26, 95% CI (0.26 to 2.26), p<0.05). Centre-based (SMD=0.98, 95% CI (0.35 to 1.62), and group-based (SMD=0.89, 95% CI (0.29 to 1.50),) delivery by a physiotherapist (SMD=0.84, 95% CI (0.03 to 1.65),) were significantly associated with efficacy. The following strategies were identified efficacious: prompts/cues (SMD=3.29, 95% CI (1.97 to 4.62)), credible source (standardised mean difference, SMD=2.08, 95% CI (0.95;3.22)), adding objects to the environment (SMD=1.47, 95% CI (0.41 to 2.53)), generalisation of the target behaviour SMD=1.32, 95% CI (0.22 to 2.41)), monitoring of behaviour by others without feedback (SMD=1.02, 95% CI (0.05 to 1.98)), self-monitoring of outcome(s) of behaviour (SMD=0.79, 95% CI (0.06 to 1.52), graded tasks (SMD=0.73, 95% CI (0.22 to 1.24)), behavioural practice/rehearsal (SMD=0.72, 95% CI (0.26 to 1.18)), action planning (SMD=0.62, 95% CI (0.03 to 1.21)) and goal setting (behaviour) (SMD=0.56, 95% CI (0.03 to 1.08)). CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis suggests intervention characteristics that may be suitable for promoting physical activity in heart failure. There is moderate evidence in support of an exercise programme combined with a behavioural change intervention delivered by a physiotherapist in a group-based and centre-based settings. PROSPERO REGISTERATION: CRD42015015280.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy/methods , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Exercise/physiology , Heart Failure/rehabilitation , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Treatment Outcome
12.
Rev. bras. ter. intensiva ; 33(1): 167-171, jan.-mar. 2021. tab
Article in English, Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1197643

ABSTRACT

RESUMO A história natural da doença e o tratamento de pacientes após a COVID-19 ainda se apresentam em construção. Os sintomas são persistentes, mesmo em casos leves, e as consequências decorrentes da infecção incluem fadiga, dispneia, taquicardia, perda de massa muscular e diminuição da capacidade funcional. Sobre a reabilitação cardiopulmonar, parece haver melhora na capacidade funcional, na qualidade de vida e no prognóstico com o Teste da Caminhada de 6 Minutos, sendo este utilizado como avaliador prognóstico e terapêutico. Assim, o objetivo deste relato de casos é descrever a experiência de quatro casos, de diferentes gravidades, que realizaram um programa de reabilitação cardiopulmonar pós-COVID-19, avaliados com Teste da Caminhada de 6 Minutos, força muscular periférica e duplo produto em repouso, para verificar o efeito da reabilitação após 3 meses de protocolo de, no mínimo, 300 minutos por semana. Os quatro casos apresentaram aumento da distância percorrida no teste da caminhada entre 16% e 94%. Houve aumento da força muscular periférica em 20% até seis vezes seu valor inicial, e a redução do duplo produto em repouso variou entre 8% e 42%. O programa de reabilitação cardiopulmonar apresentou impacto positivo nos casos acompanhados, com melhora da capacidade funcional, mesmo com a variabilidade da gravidade dos casos pós-COVID-19.


ABSTRACT The natural history of the disease, and the treatment of post-COVID-19 patients, are still being built. Symptoms are persistent, even in mild cases, and the infection consequences include fatigue, dyspnea, tachycardia, muscle loss, and reduced functional capacity. Regarding cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, there seems to be an improvement in functional capacity, quality of life, and prognosis with the 6-Minute Walk Test used as a prognostic and therapeutic evaluator. Therefore, this case series report aims to present our experience with four cases of different severity levels, involved in a post-COVID-19 cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program. These patients were assessed with the 6-Minute Walk Test, peripheral muscle strength, and double product at rest, to assess the results after a three-month rehabilitation protocol of at least 300 minutes per week. The four patients had their distance covered during the walk test increased between 16% and 94%. Peripheral muscle strength was improved by 20% to six times the baseline values, and double product at rest was reduced by 8% to 42%. The cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program had a positive impact on these cases, improving functional capacity despite the different severity levels in these post-COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Dyspnea/rehabilitation , Muscle Strength , Fatigue/rehabilitation , Walk Test , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Respiratory Therapy/methods , Breathing Exercises/methods , COVID-19/complications
13.
Eur J Prev Cardiol ; 28(5): 541-557, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099595

ABSTRACT

This Delphi consensus by 28 experts from the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC) provides initial recommendations on how cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) facilities should modulate their activities in view of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A total number of 150 statements were selected and graded by Likert scale [from -5 (strongly disagree) to +5 (strongly agree)], starting from six open-ended questions on (i) referral criteria, (ii) optimal timing and setting, (iii) core components, (iv) structure-based metrics, (v) process-based metrics, and (vi) quality indicators. Consensus was reached on 58 (39%) statements, 48 'for' and 10 'against' respectively, mainly in the field of referral, core components, and structure of CR activities, in a comprehensive way suitable for managing cardiac COVID-19 patients. Panelists oriented consensus towards maintaining usual activities on traditional patient groups referred to CR, without significant downgrading of intervention in case of COVID-19 as a comorbidity. Moreover, it has been suggested to consider COVID-19 patients as a referral group to CR per se when the viral disease is complicated by acute cardiovascular (CV) events; in these patients, the potential development of COVID-related CV sequelae, as well as of pulmonary arterial hypertension, needs to be focused. This framework might be used to orient organization and operational of CR programmes during the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Comorbidity , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Heart Vessels ; 36(8): 1184-1189, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052972

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to clarify the effects of the interruption of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and refraining from going outside due to the COVID-19 pandemic on hemodynamic response and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during exercise including differences by age in phase 2 CR outpatients. Among 76 outpatients participating in consecutive phase 2 CR in both periods from March to April and June to July 2020, which were before and after CR interruption, respectively, at Sanda City Hospital were enrolled. The inclusion criterion was outpatients whose CR was interrupted due to COVID-19. We compared the data of hemodynamic response and RPE during exercise on the last day before interruption and the first day after interruption when aerobic exercise was performed at the same exercise intensity in the < 75 years group and ≥ 75 years group. Fifty-three patients were enrolled in the final analysis. Post-CR interruption, peak heart rate increased significantly (p = 0.009) in the < 75 years group, whereas in the ≥ 75 years group, weight and body mass index decreased significantly (p = 0.009, 0.011, respectively) and Borg scale scores for both dyspnea and lower extremities fatigue worsened significantly (both, p < 0.001). CR interruption and refraining from going outside due to the COVID-19 pandemic affected the hemodynamic response, RPE during exercise and body weight in phase 2 CR outpatients. In particular, patients aged ≥ 75 years appeared to be placed at an increased risk of frailty.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Cardiovascular Diseases , Frailty , Hemodynamics , Physical Exertion , Aged , Anthropometry/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Cardiac Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/etiology , Exercise/physiology , Exercise Test/methods , Exercise Test/statistics & numerical data , Female , Frailty/etiology , Frailty/physiopathology , Frailty/prevention & control , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 21(4): 497-500, 2020 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005373

ABSTRACT

Cardiac Rehabilitation programs have shown to improve outcomes. The COVID-19 pandemic has posed barriers to these programs. A virtual platform might be a good solution to these challenges. Tele Cardiac Rehabilitation and remote patient monitoring provide an excellent alternative practical solution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Heart Diseases/rehabilitation , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(1)2020 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000332

ABSTRACT

Promoting regular physical activity (PA) and improving exercise capacity are the primary goals of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Mobile technologies (mTechs) like smartphones, smartwatches, and fitness trackers might help patients in reaching these goals. This review aimed to scope current scientific literature on mTechs in CR to assess the impact on patients' exercise capacity and to identify gaps and future directions for research. PubMed, CENTRAL, and CDSR were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). These RCTs had to utilize mTechs to objectively monitor and promote PA of patients during or following CR, aim at improvements in exercise capacity, and be published between December 2014 and December 2019. A total of 964 publications were identified, and 13 studies met all inclusion criteria. Home-based CR with mTechs vs. outpatient CR without mTechs and outpatient CR with mTechs vs. outpatient CR without mTechs did not lead to statistically significant differences in exercise capacity. In contrast, outpatient CR followed by home-based CR with mTechs led to significant improvement in exercise capacity as compared to outpatient CR without further formal CR. Supplying patients with mTechs may improve exercise capacity. To ensure that usage of and compliance with mTechs is optimal, a concentrated effort of CR staff has to be achieved. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented lack of patient support while away from institutional CR. Even though mTechs lend themselves as suitable assistants, evidence is lacking that they can fill this gap.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Exercise/physiology , Humans , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Smartphone , Telemedicine/methods
19.
Acta Cardiol ; 76(2): 151-157, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The first surge of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic led to a shutdown of all non-urgent medical services such as cardiac rehabilitation. Therefore, centres had to develop remote and innovative ways to deliver the core components of CR during this shutdown. This increase in usage of remote rehabilitation services provides a chance to assess patients' experiences and willingness-to-pay of remote CR sessions. METHODS: This was a prospective single-centre study. From 17 July 2020, to 19 August 2020, we conducted an anonymous survey about the patient experiences of the cardiac telerehabilitation services provided at Jessa Hospital Hasselt during the COVID-19 pandemic. A link to an electronic questionnaire was sent via email to 155 patients who were invited to participate in the cardiac telerehabilitation sessions during the closure of the rehabilitation centre due to COVID-19. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients (35% of all invited patients) did participate in remote CR and completed the questionnaire. The mean age of the respondents was 65.4 ± 10.5 years, 63% were male and 70% of the participants were retired. A total of 91% possessed a smartphone and all those patients used their smartphone regularly to send text messages. Ninety-four per cent of the participants were satisfied with the provided telerehabilitation sessions and 70% of the participants would be prepared to pay for these sessions like for centre-based CR sessions. Twenty per cent of patients would even prefer the telerehabilitation sessions above centre-based CR sessions. CONCLUSION: Most patients believed that remote CR could be an option after the COVID-19 pandemic when it is combined with centre-based CR sessions. Patients are willing to pay the same amount for a telerehabilitation session as a centre-based CR session. This demonstrates that highly motivated patients are open to shift certain parts of CR from face-to-face interactions to digital interactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Exercise Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Patient Outcome Assessment , Telerehabilitation/methods , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
R I Med J (2013) ; 103(9): 30-33, 2020 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditional rehabilitation services, whether they are cardiac, pulmonary, or vascular, consist of 6-36 center-based, supervised sessions; however, due to COVID-19, in-person visits were suspended. This study sought to implement a transitional home-based treatment plan (HBTP) to patients. METHOD: Patients enrolled in a rehabilitation service at the Miriam Hospital during the time of temporary closure were provided with a HBTP that was individualized to their needs and multi-disciplinary in nature. Patients were called weekly for continual guidance and support. RESULTS: Of the 129 patients that received a HBTP, 115 (89%) participated in follow-up correspondence (63±12 years, 83% white, 66% male, 81% enrolled in cardiac rehab). Nearly 70% of patients continued to participate in regular exercise and upon re-opening, 69 (60%) of patients returned to center-based care. Psychosocial factors appeared to inhibit treatment adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Patients are receptive to an HBTP and subsequent follow-up throughout temporary closure of rehabilitation services.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Exercise Therapy/methods , Heart Diseases/rehabilitation , Lung Diseases/rehabilitation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Vascular Diseases/rehabilitation , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Exercise Therapy/organization & administration , Female , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutrition Therapy/methods , Quality Improvement , Relaxation Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2
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