Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 41
Filter
1.
ANZ J Surg ; 92(5): 1007-1014, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774736

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on global surgery. In particular, deleterious effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the heart and cardiovascular system have been described. To inform surgical patients, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis aiming to characterize outcomes of COVID-19 positive patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: The study protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42021228533) and conformed with PRISMA 2020 and MOOSE guidelines. PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE and Web of Science were searched between 1 January 2019 to 24 February 2022 for studies reporting outcomes on COVID-19 positive patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Study screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were conducted in duplicate. Meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model where at least two studies had sufficient data for that variable. RESULTS: Searches identified 4223 articles of which 18 studies were included with a total 44 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Within these studies, 12 (66.7%) reported populations undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, three (16.7%) aortic valve replacements (AVR) and three (16.7%) aortic dissection repairs. Overall mean postoperative length of ICU stay was 3.39 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38, 6.39) and mean postoperative length of hospital stay was 17.88 (95% CI: 14.57, 21.19). CONCLUSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated studies of limited quality which characterized cardiac surgery in COVID-19 positive patients and demonstrates that these patients have poor outcomes. Further issues to be explored are effects of COVID-19 on decision-making in cardiac surgery, and effects of COVID-19 on the cardiovascular system at a cellular level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(5): e377-e380, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474341

ABSTRACT

Postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) represents a well-known mechanical complication of myocardial infarction, determining cardiogenic shock with high mortality rates. Surgical correction requires significant expertise to avoid cardiac rupture, uncontrollable bleeding, residual shunts, heart failure, and death. In the last year, we observed a substantial increase of VSR at our hospital, related to the delayed presentation of people with acute chest pain to the emergency departments during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. We discuss our innovative triple-layer patch technique in a recent consecutive series of 8 patients. This technique proved effective in all patients, with no residual shunt or cardiac rupture.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Prostheses and Implants , Ventricular Septal Rupture/surgery , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Ventricular Septal Rupture/diagnosis , Ventricular Septal Rupture/epidemiology
3.
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg ; 31(1): 42-47, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455304

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The use of digital chest drainage units (CDUs) has become increasingly common in thoracic surgery due to several advantages. However, in cardiac surgery, its use is still limited in favour of conventional analogue CDUs. In order to investigate the potential benefit of digital CDUs in cardiac surgery, we compared the safety and efficacy of both systems in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our centre. METHODS: We retrospectively investigated 265 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery at our institution between June 2017 and October 2017. These patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with analogue (A, n = 65) and digital CDUs (D, n = 200). Postoperative outcome was analysed and compared between both groups. In addition, the 'user experience' was evaluated by means of a questionnaire. RESULTS: The median age of the cohort was 70 years (P = 0.167), 25.3% of patients were female (P = 0.414). There were no differences in terms of re-explorative surgery or use of blood products. Nor was there a difference in the overall amount of fluid collected. However, during the first 6 h, more fluid was collected by the digital CDUs. The overall rate of technical failure was 0.4%. We observed a significantly higher rate of clotting in the tubing system of the digital CDUs (P = 0.042). Concerning the user experience, the digital CDUs were associated with a more favourable ease of use on the regular wards (P < 0.001). With regard to the overall user experience, the digital CDUs outperformed the analogue systems (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Digital CDUs can be safely and effectively applied in patients after cardiac surgery. Due to the improved patient mobility and simplified chest tube management, the use of digital CDUs may be advantageous for patients after cardiac surgery. However, the issue of clotting of the tubing systems should be addressed by further technical improvements.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Chest Tubes , Drainage/methods , Postoperative Care/methods , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 10: CD013101, 2020 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453526

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Corticosteroids are routinely given to children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in an attempt to ameliorate the inflammatory response. Their use is still controversial and the decision to administer the intervention can vary by centre and/or by individual doctors within that centre. OBJECTIVES: This review is designed to assess the benefits and harms of prophylactic corticosteroids in children between birth and 18 years of age undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science in June 2020. We also searched four clinical trials registers and conducted backward and forward citation searching of relevant articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included studies of prophylactic administration of corticosteroids, including single and multiple doses, and all types of corticosteroids administered via any route and at any time-point in the perioperative period. We excluded studies if steroids were administered therapeutically. We included individually randomised controlled trials (RCTs), with two or more groups (e.g. multi-drug or dose comparisons with a control group) but not 'head-to-head' trials without a placebo or a group that did not receive corticosteroids. We included studies in children, from birth up to 18 years of age, including preterm infants, undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of CPB. We also excluded studies in patients undergoing heart or lung transplantation, or both; studies in patients already receiving corticosteroids; in patients with abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; and in patients given steroids at the time of cardiac surgery for indications other than cardiac surgery. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the Covidence systematic review manager to extract and manage data for the review. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risks of bias. We resolved disagreements by consensus or by consultation with a third review author. We assessed the certainty of evidence with GRADE. MAIN RESULTS: We found 3748 studies, of which 888 were duplicate records. Two studies had the same clinical trial registration number, but reported different populations and interventions. We therefore included them as separate studies. We screened titles and abstracts of 2868 records and reviewed full text reports for 84 studies to determine eligibility. We extracted data for 13 studies. Pooled analyses are based on eight studies. We reported the remaining five studies narratively due to zero events for both intervention and placebo in the outcomes of interest. Therefore, the final meta-analysis included eight studies with a combined population of 478 participants. There was a low or unclear risk of bias across the domains. There was moderate certainty of evidence that corticosteroids do not change the risk of in-hospital mortality (five RCTs; 313 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33 to 2.07) for children undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. There was high certainty of evidence that corticosteroids reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation (six RCTs; 421 participants; mean difference (MD) 11.37 hours lower, 95% CI -20.29 to -2.45) after the surgery. There was high-certainty evidence that the intervention probably made little to no difference to the length of postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) stay (six RCTs; 421 participants; MD 0.28 days lower, 95% CI -0.79 to 0.24) and moderate-certainty evidence that the intervention probably made little to no difference to the length of the postoperative hospital stay (one RCT; 176 participants; mean length of stay 22 days; MD -0.70 days, 95% CI -2.62 to 1.22). There was moderate certainty of evidence for no effect of the intervention on all-cause mortality at the longest follow-up (five RCTs; 313 participants; RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.33 to 2.07) or cardiovascular mortality at the longest follow-up (three RCTs; 109 participants; RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.07 to 2.46). There was low certainty of evidence that corticosteroids probably make little to no difference to children separating from CPB (one RCT; 40 participants; RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.01 to 3.92). We were unable to report information regarding adverse events of the intervention due to the heterogeneity of reporting of outcomes. We downgraded the certainty of evidence for several reasons, including imprecision due to small sample sizes, a single study providing data for an individual outcome, the inclusion of both appreciable benefit and harm in the confidence interval, and publication bias. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Corticosteroids  probably do not change the risk of mortality for children having heart surgery using CPB at any time point. They probably reduce the duration of postoperative ventilation in this context, but have little or no effect on the total length of postoperative ICU stay or total postoperative hospital stay. There was inconsistency in the adverse event outcomes reported which, consequently, could not be pooled. It is therefore impossible to provide any implications and policy-makers will be unable to make any recommendations for practice without evidence about adverse effects. The review highlighted the need for well-conducted RCTs powered for clinical outcomes to confirm or refute the effect of corticosteroids versus placebo in children having cardiac surgery with CPB. A core outcome set for adverse event reporting in the paediatric major surgery and intensive care setting is required.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiopulmonary Bypass/adverse effects , Inflammation/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Bias , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/mortality , Cardiopulmonary Bypass/mortality , Cause of Death , Child , Child, Preschool , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Heart-Lung Machine/adverse effects , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hydrocortisone/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Inflammation/etiology , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data
5.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 701-705, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339452

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has thoroughly and deeply affected the provision of healthcare services worldwide. In order to limit the in-hospital infections and to redistribute the healthcare professionals, cardiac percutaneous intervention in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD) patients were limited to urgent or emergency ones. The aim of this article is to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Pediatric and ACHD cath laboratory activity during the so-called 'hard lockdown' in Italy. Eleven out of 12 Italian institutions with a dedicated Invasive Cardiology Unit in Congenital Heart Disease actively participated in the survey. The interventional cardiology activity was reduced by more than 50% in 6 out of 11 centers. Adolescent and ACHD patients suffered the highest rate of reduction. There was an evident discrepancy in the management of the hard lockdown, irrespective of the number of COVID-19 positive cases registered, with a higher reduction in Southern Italy compared with the most affected regions (Lombardy, Piedmont, Veneto and Emilia Romagna). Although the pandemic was brilliantly addressed in most cases, we recognize the necessity for planning new, and hopefully homogeneous, strategies in order to be prepared for an upcoming new outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Emergency Medical Services , Heart Defects, Congenital , Infection Control , Risk Management/methods , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/trends , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Semin Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 25(2): 128-137, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228973

ABSTRACT

This year will be forever marked by the drastic changes COVID-19 wrought on our personal and professional lives. New roles and challenges in critical care have forced us to be constantly nimble and flexible in how we approach medicine. The strain of these challenges is apparent throughout the health care community and our society as a whole. Despite this adversity, 2020 will also be remembered for fantastic advances in research. This article is a collection of influential and exciting studies published in 2020 encompassing a broad swath of critical care with a focus on cardiothoracic critical care. Themes include examinations of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, the impact of sedation and other risk factors on perioperative mortality, a novel fluid resuscitation strategy following cardiac surgery, and advances in the fields of heart and lung transplantation as well as how they were affected by COVID-19. Given that many cardiothoracic intensivists were redeployed to the care of SARS-CoV-2 patients, we also discuss important advances in therapeutics for the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Heart Transplantation , Humans , Lung Transplantation , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/therapy , Risk Factors
7.
Semin Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 25(2): 151-155, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228972

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has affected every aspect of life over the last year. This article reviews some of the effects that the pandemic had on cardiac surgery including volumes, ethical concerns with resource-intense procedures like dissection and transplant, and ECMO for COVID-19-derived refractory respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Heart Transplantation/methods , Humans , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology
8.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 77(13): 1644-1655, 2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147716

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have been considered potentially high risk for novel coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) mortality or other complications. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to define the impact of COVID-19 in adults with CHD and to identify risk factors associated with adverse outcomes. METHODS: Adults (age 18 years or older) with CHD and with confirmed or clinically suspected COVID-19 were included from CHD centers worldwide. Data collection included anatomic diagnosis and subsequent interventions, comorbidities, medications, echocardiographic findings, presenting symptoms, course of illness, and outcomes. Predictors of death or severe infection were determined. RESULTS: From 58 adult CHD centers, the study included 1,044 infected patients (age: 35.1 ± 13.0 years; range 18 to 86 years; 51% women), 87% of whom had laboratory-confirmed coronavirus infection. The cohort included 118 (11%) patients with single ventricle and/or Fontan physiology, 87 (8%) patients with cyanosis, and 73 (7%) patients with pulmonary hypertension. There were 24 COVID-related deaths (case/fatality: 2.3%; 95% confidence interval: 1.4% to 3.2%). Factors associated with death included male sex, diabetes, cyanosis, pulmonary hypertension, renal insufficiency, and previous hospital admission for heart failure. Worse physiological stage was associated with mortality (p = 0.001), whereas anatomic complexity or defect group were not. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 mortality in adults with CHD is commensurate with the general population. The most vulnerable patients are those with worse physiological stage, such as cyanosis and pulmonary hypertension, whereas anatomic complexity does not appear to predict infection severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Cyanosis , Heart Defects, Congenital , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Causality , Comorbidity , Cyanosis/diagnosis , Cyanosis/etiology , Cyanosis/mortality , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Heart Defects, Congenital/classification , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Heart Defects, Congenital/physiopathology , Heart Defects, Congenital/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Hypertension, Pulmonary/etiology , Hypertension, Pulmonary/mortality , Male , Mortality , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Symptom Assessment
9.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(5): e377-e380, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144498

ABSTRACT

Postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) represents a well-known mechanical complication of myocardial infarction, determining cardiogenic shock with high mortality rates. Surgical correction requires significant expertise to avoid cardiac rupture, uncontrollable bleeding, residual shunts, heart failure, and death. In the last year, we observed a substantial increase of VSR at our hospital, related to the delayed presentation of people with acute chest pain to the emergency departments during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. We discuss our innovative triple-layer patch technique in a recent consecutive series of 8 patients. This technique proved effective in all patients, with no residual shunt or cardiac rupture.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Prostheses and Implants , Ventricular Septal Rupture/surgery , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Ventricular Septal Rupture/diagnosis , Ventricular Septal Rupture/epidemiology
10.
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 34(1): 182-188, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1019911

ABSTRACT

As New York State quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, innovative strategies to provide care for the COVID-19 negative patients with urgent or immediately life threatening cardiovascular conditions became imperative. To date, there has not been a focused analysis of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, we seek to summarize the selection, screening, exposure/conversion, and recovery of patients undergoing cardiac surgery during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained institutional database for patients undergoing urgent or emergency cardiac surgery from March 16, 2020 to May 15, 2020, encompassing the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. All patients were operated on in a single institution in New York City. Preoperative demographics, imaging studies, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed. Between March 16, 2020 and May 15, 2020, a total of 54 adult patients underwent cardiac surgery. Five patients required reoperative sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass was utilized in 81% of cases. Median age was 64.3 (56.0; 75.3) years. Two patients converted to COVID-19 positive during the admission. There was one operative mortality (1.9%) associated with an acute perioperative COVID-19 infection. Median length of hospital stay was 5 days (4.0; 8.0) and 46 patients were discharged to home. There was 100% postoperative follow up and no patient had COVID-19 conversion following discharge. The delivery of cardiac surgical care was safely maintained in the midst of a global pandemic. The outcomes demonstrated herein suggest that with proper infection control, isolation, and patient selection, results similar to those observed in non-COVID series can be replicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Adult , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United States
11.
J Card Surg ; 35(12): 3650-3652, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901097

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In this report we describe the clinical presentation, laboratory findings and outcomes of four patients that were referred for urgent cardiothoracic intervention and tested positive for COVID-19. METHODS: The St. Elizabeth's Medical Center Institutional Review Board exempted the study from review (waived review). In each case, verbal informed consent was obtained by the study participant or health care proxy. RESULTS: The majority of the patients undergoing surgery had low Society of Thoracic Surgeons score and uneventful operating time. The mortality was very high and driven primarily by the viral syndrome. Laboratory markers that have been associated with disease severity in the general population were also prognostic in our population. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that these patients have very high mortality, whereas prevention and preoperative screening is required in preventing nosocomial spreading of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Heart Diseases/surgery , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Fatal Outcome , Female , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
12.
Cardiol Young ; 30(11): 1588-1594, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-899833

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is currently ravaging the globe and the African continent is not left out. While the direct effects of the pandemic in regard to morbidity and mortality appear to be more significant in the developed world, the indirect harmful effects on already insufficient healthcare infrastructure on the African continent would in the long term be more detrimental to the populace. Women and children form a significant vulnerable population in underserved areas such as the sub-Saharan region, and expectedly will experience the disadvantages of limited healthcare coverage which is a major fall out of the pandemic. Paediatric cardiac services that are already sparse in various sub-Saharan countries are not left out of this downsizing. Restrictions on international travel for patients out of the continent to seek medical care and for international experts into the continent for regular mission programmes leave few options for children with cardiac defects to get the much-needed care.There is a need for a region-adapted guideline to scale-up services to cater for more children with congenital heart disease (CHD) while providing a safe environment for healthcare workers, patients, and their caregivers. This article outlines measures adapted to maintain paediatric cardiac care in a sub-Saharan tertiary centre in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic and will serve as a guide for other institutions in the region who will inadvertently need to provide these services as the demand increases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiology , Delivery of Health Care , Heart Defects, Congenital/therapy , Pediatrics , Thoracic Surgery , Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Catheterization/methods , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Developing Countries , Echocardiography/methods , Echocardiography, Transesophageal/methods , Emergency Service, Hospital , Heart Defects, Congenital/diagnosis , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Mass Screening , Nigeria , Personal Protective Equipment , Point-of-Care Systems , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/methods
13.
Ann Card Anaesth ; 23(4): 485-492, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895449

ABSTRACT

Background: An acute respiratory disease (COVID-19), caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2,), has been declared a pandemic by WHO. A surgery on COVID-19 patients not only involves a risk of spread of the disease but also there is a serious concern for the patient's surgical outcomes and resources requirement. Aim: The retrospective study is aimed to provide a protocol for pre-operative testing of SARS CoV-2 using RT-PCR in the patient undergoing cardio-thoracic surgeries. Material and Methods: To analyze the impact of pre-operative testing of SARS- CoV-2 using RT-PCR in the patient undergoing elective cardio-thoracic surgeries. The patient who underwent surgical interventions during the COVID-19 lockdown period was divided into two phases. Phase I (without COVID-19 RT-PCR testing) and Phase II (with pre-operative COVID-19 RT-PCR testing). The retrospective comparison between the two study groups was done using Student t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Chi square (χ2) test depending upon the clinical variable to be analyzed. Results: During the early phase (phase I), 26 patients underwent cardio-thoracic surgery without COVID-19 RT-PCR test. Whereas, during phase II, all patients were tested for COVID-19 using RT-PCR, preoperatively and a total of 64 surgeries were performed during this phase. One patient planned for CABG was positive on RT-PCR for COVID-19 and was sent to the quarantine ward. The difference in the pre-operative hospital stay between two groups was found to be statistically significant and a significant decrease in the number of PPE kits used, during the phase I. Conclusion: All asymptomatic patients should be tested for COVID-19 using RT-PCR prior to cardio-thoracic surgeries not only to contain the disease but to avoid potential implications of COVID-19 on the perioperative course, without added financial implications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Preoperative Care/methods , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
14.
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg ; 31(6): 755-762, 2020 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889563

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has profoundly affected all health care professionals. The outbreak required a thorough reorganization of the Italian regional local health care system to preserve resources such as ventilators, beds in intensive care units and surgical and anaesthesiological staff. Levels of priority were created, together with a rigorous triage procedure for patients with COVID-19, which led to postponement of all elective procedures. Urgent cases were discussed with the local heart team and percutaneous approaches were selected as the first treatment option to reduce hospital stay. COVID-19 and COVID-19-free pathways were created, including adequate preparation of the operating room, management of anaesthesiological procedures, transportation of patients and disinfection. It was determined that patients with chronic diseases were at increased risk of adverse outcomes. Systemic inflammation, cytokine storm and hypercoagulability associated with COVID-19 increased the risk of heart failure and cardiac death. In this regard, the early use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be life-saving in patients with severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome or refractory heart failure. The goal of this paper was to report the Italian experience during the COVID-19 pandemic in the setting of cardiovascular surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Heart Failure/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Comorbidity , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology
15.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 96(3): 659-663, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-806095

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has strained health care resources around the world, causing many institutions to curtail or stop elective procedures. This has resulted in an inability to care for patients with valvular and structural heart disease in a timely fashion, potentially placing these patients at increased risk for adverse cardiovascular complications, including CHF and death. The effective triage of these patients has become challenging in the current environment, as clinicians have had to weigh the risk of bringing susceptible patients into the hospital environment during the COVID-19 pandemic against the risk of delaying a needed procedure. In this document, the authors suggest guidelines for how to triage patients in need of structural heart disease interventions and provide a framework for how to decide when it may be appropriate to proceed with intervention despite the ongoing pandemic. In particular, the authors address the triage of patients in need of transcatheter aortic valve replacement and percutaneous mitral valve repair. The authors also address procedural issues and considerations for the function of structural heart disease teams during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/surgery , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Triage/standards , COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Female , Heart Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Societies, Medical , Triage/statistics & numerical data , United States
16.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e925931, 2020 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-802826

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The worldwide spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-COV-2) has created unprecedented situations for healthcare professionals and healthcare systems. Although infection with this virus is considered the main health problem currently, other diseases are still prevalent. CASE REPORT This report describes a 59-year-old man who presented with symptoms of dyspnea and fever that were attributed to Covid-19 infection. His clinical condition deteriorated and further examinations revealed a subjacent severe aortic regurgitation due to acute infective endocarditis. Surgical treatment was successful. CONCLUSIONS The results of diagnostic tests for Covid-19 should be re-evaluated whenever there are clinical mismatches or doubts, as false-positive Covid-19 test results can occur. Clinical interpretation should not be determined exclusively by the Covid-19 pandemic. This case report highlights the importance of using validated and approved serological and molecular testing to detect infection with SARS-CoV-2, and to repeat tests when there is doubt about presenting symptoms.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Insufficiency/surgery , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis , Endocarditis/complications , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Aortic Valve Insufficiency/complications , Aortic Valve Insufficiency/diagnosis , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Critical Illness , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/etiology , Endocarditis/virology , False Positive Reactions , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Prognosis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Risk Assessment , Treatment Outcome
17.
Ann Surg ; 272(4): e275-e279, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-767004

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course of a consecutive series of patients operated of urgent cardiac surgery during COVID-19 outbreak. BACKGROUND: In Italy, COVID outbreak has mostly occurred in the metropolitan area of Milan, and in the surrounding region of Lombardy, and previously "conventional" hospitals were converted into COVID spokes to increase ICU beds availability, and to allow only urgent CS procedures. METHODS: Among urgent CS patients (left main stenosis with unstable angina, acute endocarditis, valvular regurgitation with impending heart failure), 10 patients (mean age = 57 ± 9 years), despite a negative admission triage, developed COVID-pneumonia postoperatively, at a median of 7 days after CS. RESULTS: Patients showed typical lymphopenia, higher prothrombotic profile, and higher markers of inflammation (ferritin and interleukin-6 values). At the zenith of pulmonary distress, patients presented with severe hypoxia (median PaO2/FIO2 ratio = 116), requiring advanced noninvasive ventilation (Venturi mask and continuous positive airway pressure) in the majority of cases. All patients were treated with hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and low-molecular-weight heparin at anticoagulant dose. Overall in-hospital mortality was 10% (1/10), peaking 25% in patients who developed COVID pneumonia immediately after CS. The remaining patients, with late infection, were all discharged home without oxygen support, at a median of 25 days after symptom onset. CONCLUSIONS: As postoperative mortality in case of COVID pneumonia is not negligible, meticulous rules (precise triage, safe hospital path, high level of protection for health-care teams, prompt diagnosis of suspicious symptoms) should be strictly followed in patients undergoing CS during COVID pandemic. The role of therapies alternative to CS should be further assessed.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Aged , COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/mortality , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergencies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Risk Assessment
19.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 21(10): 765-771, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745112

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical course of COVID-19 in patients who had recently undergone a cardiac procedure and were inpatients in a cardiac rehabilitation department. METHODS: All patients hospitalized from 1 February to 15 March 2020 were included in the study (n = 35; 16 men; mean age 78 years). The overall population was divided into two groups: group 1 included 10 patients who presented with a clinical picture of COVID-19 infection and were isolated, and group 2 included 25 patients who were COVID-19-negative. In group 1, nine patients were on chronic oral anticoagulant therapy and one patient was on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel. A chest computed tomography scan revealed interstitial pneumonia in all 10 patients. RESULTS: During hospitalization, COVID-19 patients received azithromycin and hydroxychloroquine in addition to their ongoing therapy. Only the patient on ASA with clopidogrel therapy was transferred to the ICU for mechanical ventilation because of worsening respiratory failure, and subsequently died from cardiorespiratory arrest. All other patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy recovered and were discharged. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that COVID-19 patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy may have a more favorable and less complicated clinical course. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm this preliminary observation.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Coronavirus Infections , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral , Postoperative Complications , Aged , Anti-Infective Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications/blood , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
20.
Pediatr Cardiol ; 41(8): 1813-1818, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743709

ABSTRACT

In this review, we provide a brief description of recently published articles addressing topics relevant to pediatric cardiologists. Our hope is to provide a summary of the latest articles published recently in other journals in our field. The articles address (1) pulmonary valve repair in patients with tetralogy of Fallot and in patients with congenital pulmonary stenosis which seems to be a promising technique in selected patients, (2) the use of Losartan in patients with Marfan syndrome mostly in addition to beta blockers may result in a lower aortic root dilation rate and better clinical outcomes, (3) a summary of the characteristics of adults with congenital heart disease in the USA showed a wide variation in prevalence, associated morbidities, health care utilization and insurance type in different locations in the USA, (4) a large single center study confirmed that right ventricular morphology is associated with worse outcomes after the Fontan operation and that atrioventricular valve regurgitation is an important predictor of worse outcomes and precedes ventricular dysfunction post Fontan operation, (5) a large study describing the multi system inflammatory syndrome in children temporarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA showing that ventricular dysfunction is the most common cardiac manifestation (6) the reality of "limping to transplantation" showing that patients with one or more modifiable risk factors including mechanical ventilation, kidney or liver dysfunction are at significant increase risk post cardiac transplantation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Cardiology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Defects, Congenital , Pediatrics , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Child , Heart Defects, Congenital/classification , Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery , Humans , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL