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2.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 79(16): 1639-1643, 2022 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882125
3.
Circulation ; 144(23): e461-e471, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666518

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had worldwide repercussions for health care and research. In spring 2020, most non-COVID-19 research was halted, hindering research across the spectrum from laboratory-based experimental science to clinical research. Through the second half of 2020 and the first half of 2021, biomedical research, including cardiovascular science, only gradually restarted, with many restrictions on onsite activities, limited clinical research participation, and the challenges associated with working from home and caregiver responsibilities. Compounding these impediments, much of the global biomedical research infrastructure was redirected toward vaccine testing and deployment. This redirection of supply chains, personnel, and equipment has additionally hampered restoration of normal research activity. Transition to virtual interactions offset some of these limitations but did not adequately replace the need for scientific exchange and collaboration. Here, we outline key steps to reinvigorate biomedical research, including a call for increased support from the National Institutes of Health. We also call on academic institutions, publishers, reviewers, and supervisors to consider the impact of COVID-19 when assessing productivity, recognizing that the pandemic did not affect all equally. We identify trainees and junior investigators, especially those with caregiving roles, as most at risk of being lost from the biomedical workforce and identify steps to reduce the loss of these key investigators. Although the global pandemic highlighted the power of biomedical science to define, treat, and protect against threats to human health, significant investment in the biomedical workforce is required to maintain and promote well-being.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Cardiology/trends , Research Design/trends , Research Personnel/trends , Advisory Committees , American Heart Association , Biomedical Research/education , Cardiology/education , Diffusion of Innovation , Education, Professional/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Public Opinion , Research Personnel/education , Time Factors , United States
4.
Arch Cardiol Mex ; 91(Supl): 18-24, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649074

ABSTRACT

OBJETIVO: Determinar la percepción de los médicos internos residentes (MIR) de cardiología de España sobre el efecto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en su formación y la adaptación realizada por sus servicios. MÉTODOS: Estudio de corte transversal a través de una plataforma de encuesta digital con el objetivo de conocer la opinión individual de los MIR de cardiología sobre la influencia de la pandemia en su formación. Se realiza un análisis estadístico para determinar los factores que influyeron en la percepción de la formación afectada. RESULTADOS: Participó un total de 180 MIR de las 17 comunidades autónomas (CA). Los MIR de tercer año fueron los más afectados, junto con los que rotaban en imagen cardíaca. Los residentes de las CA con una prevalencia >5 casos/1,000 habitantes fueron los que mayor probabilidad tuvieron de ser desplazados de sus servicios. CONCLUSIONES: Según la opinión de los participantes, el efecto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en su formación fue más negativa en los residentes de tercer año y los que rotaban en imagen cardíaca. OBJECTIVE: The objectives were to analyze the perception of the Cardiology Fellows in Training (FIT) of Spain about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their academic training and to know the adaptative changes performed by their department. METHODS: A cross-sectional study performed through a digital survey platform for Cardiology FIT. Chi2 analysis and logistic regression were performed to determine the factors that influenced on the perception of an affected training. RESULTS: A total of 180 FIT from the 17 regions of Spain participated. Third year FIT and those rotating in cardiac imaging were the most affected with statistically significant difference. The residents of the regions with a prevalence of >5 cases/1,000 inhabitants were the most likely to be displaced from their departments. CONCLUSIONS: According to the opinion of the participants, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their academic training was more negative in third year FITs and those rotating in cardiac imaging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Cardiology/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Spain
5.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 711-715, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496885

ABSTRACT

CoronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) had a huge impact on human health and economy. However, to this date, the effects of the pandemic on the training of young cardiologists are only partially known. To assess the consequences of the pandemic on the education of the cardiologists in training, we performed a 23-item national survey that has been delivered to 1443 Italian cardiologists in training, registered in the database of the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC). Six hundred and thirty-three cardiologists in training participated in the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents affirmed that the training programme has been somewhat stopped or greatly jeopardized by the pandemic. For 61% of the fellows in training (FITs), the pandemic had a negative effect on their education. Moreover, 59% of the respondents believe that they would not be able to fill the gap gained during that period over the rest of their training. A negative impact on the psycho-physical well being has been reported by 86% of the FITs. The COVID-19 pandemic had an unparalleled impact on the education, formation and mental state of the cardiologists in training. Regulatory agencies, universities and politicians should make a great effort in the organization and reorganization of the teaching programs of the cardiologists of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology/education , Communicable Disease Control , Education , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Cardiologists/psychology , Cardiologists/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Cardiol Young ; 31(3): 377-380, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331353

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound impact on medical educational curricula. We aimed to examine the impact of these unprecedented changes on the formal education of paediatric cardiology fellows through a nationwide survey. A REDCap™-based voluntary anonymous survey was sent to all current paediatric cardiology fellows in the United States of America in May, 2020. Of 143 respondents, 121 were categorical fellows, representing over one-fourth of all categorical paediatric cardiology fellows in the United States of America. Nearly all (140/143, 97.9%) respondents utilised online learning during the pandemic, with 134 (93.7%) reporting an increase in use compared to pre-pandemic. The percentage of respondents reporting curriculum supplementation with outside lectures increased from 11.9 to 88.8% during the pandemic. Respondents considered online learning to be "equally or more effective" than in-person lectures in convenience (133/142, 93.7%), improving fellow attendance (132/142, 93.0%), improving non-fellow attendance (126/143, 88.1%), and meeting individual learning needs (101/143, 70.6%). The pandemic positively affected the lecture curriculum of 83 respondents (58.0%), with 35 (24.5%) reporting no change and 25 (17.5%) reporting a negative effect. A positive effect was most noted by those whose programmes utilised supplemental outside lectures (62.2 versus 25.0%, p = 0.004) and those whose lecture frequency did not decrease (65.1 versus 5.9%, p < 0.001). Restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic have greatly increased utilisation of online learning platforms by medical training programmes. This survey reveals that an online lecture curriculum, despite inherent obstacles, offers advantages that may mitigate some negative consequences of the pandemic on fellowship education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/education , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships , Pediatrics/education , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e048690, 2021 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280433

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, conferring a disparate burden on low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Haiti represents a resource-constrained setting, limited by a paucity of resources and trained cardiovascular professionals equipped to address the increasing burden of CVD. OBJECTIVE: Here, we describe the creation of a comprehensive cardiology curriculum delivered through a virtual classroom. The curriculum was created to augment cardiovascular education in LMICs such as Haiti. METHODS: Over one academic year (May 2019-2020), International Cardiology Curriculum Accessible by Remote Distance Learning-Haiti consisted of biweekly, live-streamed, synchronous didactic lectures, seminars and case presentations broadcasted to 16 internal medicine (IM) residents at Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais, one of only four IM training programmes in Haiti. The virtual classroom was created using commercially available videoconferencing and data-sharing platforms. Prelecture and postlecture surveys and an end of the year survey were administered to assess the impact of the curriculum. RESULTS: Participant performance analysis revealed that 80% of the curriculum demonstrated a positive trend in knowledge acquisition postintervention. Based on the end of the year evaluation, 94% of participants reported that the curriculum was educational and relevant to medical practice in Haiti and 100% reported that the curriculum was good to excellent. Additionally, the curriculum was cited as an effective means of maintaining trainee education during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: This international medical education pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of augmenting cardiology education in LMICs by creating a virtual curriculum made possible by local partnerships, internet access and technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Cardiology/education , Curriculum , Haiti , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Hosp Med ; 16(6): 353-356, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270269

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically disrupted the educational experience of medical trainees. However, a detailed characterization of exactly how trainees' clinical experiences have been affected is lacking. Here, we profile residents' inpatient clinical experiences across the four training hospitals of NYU's Internal Medicine Residency Program during the pandemic's first wave. We mined ICD-10 principal diagnosis codes attributed to residents from February 1, 2020, to May 31, 2020. We translated these codes into discrete medical content areas using a newly developed "crosswalk tool." Residents' clinical exposure was enriched in infectious diseases (ID) and cardiovascular disease content at baseline. During the pandemic's surge, ID became the dominant content area. Exposure to other content was dramatically reduced, with clinical diversity repopulating only toward the end of the study period. Such characterization can be leveraged to provide effective practice habits feedback, guide didactic and self-directed learning, and potentially predict competency-based outcomes for trainees in the COVID era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/education , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Humans , International Classification of Diseases , New York City
12.
Eur Heart J ; 42(15): 1453-1455, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240889
13.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(6): 929-932, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225175

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 brought telemedicine to the forefront of clinical cardiology. We aimed to examine the extent of trainees' involvement in and comfort with telemedicine practices in Canada with the use of a web-based self-administered survey. Eighty-six trainees from 12 training programs completed the survey (65% response rate). Results showed that before COVID-19, 39 trainees (45%) had telemedicine exposure, compared with 67 (78%) after COVID-19 (P < 0.001). However, only 44 trainees (51%) reported being comfortable or very comfortable with the use of telemedicine. Of the 67 trainees who were involved in telemedicine, 4 (6%) had full supervision during virtual visits, 13 (19%) had partial supervision, and 50 (75%) had minimal or no supervision. Importantly, 67 trainees (78%) expressed the need for telemedicine-specific training and 64 (74%) were willing to have their virtual visits recorded for the purpose of evaluation and feedback. Furthermore, 47 (55%) felt strongly or very strongly positive about incorporating telemedicine into their future practice. The main perceived barriers to telemedicine use were concerns about patients' engagement, fear of weakening the patient-physician relationship, and unfamiliarity with telemedicine technology. These barriers, together with training in virtual physical examination skills and medicolegal aspects of telemedicine, are addressed in several established internal medicine telemedicine curricula that could be adapted by cardiology programs. In conclusion, while the degree of telemedicine involvement since COVID-19 was high, the trainees' comfort level with telemedicine practice remains suboptimal likely due to lack of training and inadequate staff supervision. Therefore, a cardiology telemedicine curriculum is needed to ensure that trainees are equipped to embrace telemedicine in cardiovascular clinical care.


Subject(s)
Cardiology/education , Cardiology/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Canada/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Curriculum/statistics & numerical data , Health Care Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet
14.
Am J Cardiol ; 151: 114-117, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184785

ABSTRACT

With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, resources have been reallocated and elective cases have been deferred to minimize the spread of the disease, altering the workflow of cardiac catheterization laboratories across the country. This has in turn affected the training experience of cardiology fellows, including diminished procedure numbers and a narrow breadth of cases as they approach the end of their training before joining independent practice. It has also taken a toll on the emotional well-being of fellows as they see their colleagues, loved ones, patients or even themselves struggling with COVID-19, with some succumbing to it. The aim of this opinion piece is to focus attention on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fellows and their training, challenges faced as they transition to practicing in the real world in the near future and share the lessons learned thus far. We believe that this is an important contribution and would be of interest not only to cardiology fellows-in-training and cardiologists but also trainees in other procedural specialties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiology/education , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Pandemics , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Cardiol Young ; 32(2): 185-197, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180202

ABSTRACT

Despite enormous strides in our field with respect to patient care, there has been surprisingly limited dialogue on how to train and educate the next generation of congenital cardiologists. This paper reviews the current status of training and evolving developments in medical education pertinent to congenital cardiology. The adoption of competency-based medical education has been lauded as a robust framework for contemporary medical education over the last two decades. However, inconsistencies in frameworks across different jurisdictions remain, and bridging gaps between competency frameworks and clinical practice has proved challenging. Entrustable professional activities have been proposed as a solution, but integration of such activities into busy clinical cardiology practices will present its own challenges. Consequently, this pivot towards a more structured approach to medical education necessitates the widespread availability of appropriately trained medical educationalists, a development that will better inform curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment. Differentiation between superficial and deep learning, the vital role of rich formative feedback and coaching, should guide our trainees to become self-regulated learners, capable of critical reasoning yet retaining an awareness of uncertainty and ambiguity. Furthermore, disruptive innovations such as "technology enhanced learning" may be leveraged to improve education, especially for trainees from low- and middle-income countries. Each of these initiatives will require resources, widespread advocacy and raised awareness, and publication of supporting data, and so it is especially gratifying that Cardiology in the Young has fostered a progressive approach, agreeing to publish one or two articles in each journal issue in this domain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology , Education, Medical , Cardiology/education , Curriculum , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(3): 519-522, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071173

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on cardiology training. Novel opportunities have been identified in several domains: patient exposure, procedural experience, didactic education, research and development, advocacy and well-being, and career advancement. Lessons learned from COVID-19 should be used to further improve fellowship training such as, for example, through the development of a competency-based training and evaluation system. Multimodality teaching that incorporates telelearning provides creative solutions for trainee and continuing medical education. Fellow-initiated research should be supported and nurtured. Enhanced attention to trainee well-being and burnout is particularly important. The emerging cardiologists of the future and the way they are trained will be shaped by the COVID-19 challenge of our generation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Quality of Health Care , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Forecasting
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