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1.
Arch Cardiol Mex ; 91(Suplemento COVID): 095-101, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1609000

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2), detected in Wuhan, China, causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which was declared pandemic, and has caused more than 19 million confirmed cases and more than 700 thousand deaths worldwide. When our institution was converted to COVID's hospital since early April 2020, specific care protocols were developed, with the aim of improving the quality of care and safety of patients and the staff involved in their management. Airway management represents one of the highest risks of direct contact infection with aerosol generation (orotracheal intubation, secretion aspiration, extubation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, high flow oxygen therapy, noninvasive ventilation, and invasive ventilation). We present the current recommendations for airway management as well as a step-by-step airway management protocol to carry out a more secure procedure based on the literature reported so far.


El nuevo coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2), detectado en Wuhan (China), causante de la enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), que se declaró como pandemia, ha causado más de 19 millones de casos confirmados y más de 700 mil muertes en el mundo. Nuestra institución se reconvirtió a hospital COVID desde principios de abril del 2020, con lo que se desarrollaron protocolos de atención específicos, con el objetivo de mejorar la calidad de atención y seguridad de los pacientes y el personal involucrado en su manejo. El manejo de la vía aérea representa uno de los riesgos más altos de contagio por contacto directo en la generación de aerosoles (intubación orotraqueal, aspiración de secreciones, extubación, resucitación cardiopulmonar, terapia de oxígeno de alto flujo, ventilación no invasiva y ventilación invasiva). Presentamos las recomendaciones actuales para el manejo de la vía aérea, así como un protocolo de manejo paso a paso para llevar a cabo un procedimiento con mayor seguridad basados en la literatura reportada hasta el momento.


Subject(s)
Airway Management/methods , COVID-19 , Cardiology , Airway Management/standards , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/standards , Humans
3.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(11): 840-847, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394701

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The spreading speed of the COVID-19 pandemic forced the medical community to produce efforts in updating and sharing the evidence about this new disease, trying to preserve the accuracy of the data but at the same time avoiding the potentially harmful delay from discovery to implementation. The aim of our analysis was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical literature in terms of proportion of COVID-19-related published papers and temporal patterns of publications within a sample of general/internal medicine and cardiology journals. METHODS: We searched through PubMed scientific papers published from 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2021 about COVID-19 in ten major medical journals, of which five were in general/internal medicine and five in the cardiology field. We analyzed the proportion of COVID-19-related papers, and we examined temporal trends in the number of published papers. RESULTS: Overall, the proportion of COVID-19-related papers was 18.5% (1986/10 756). This proportion was higher among the five selected general/internal medicine journals, compared with cardiology journals (23.8% vs 9.5%). The vast majority of papers were not original articles; in particular, in cardiology journals, there were 28% 'original articles', 17% 'review articles' and 55.1% 'miscellaneous', compared with 20.2%, 5.1% and 74.7% in general/internal medicine journals, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis highlights the big impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on international scientific literature. General and internal medicine journals were mainly involved, with cardiology journals only at a later time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Dissemination/methods , Publishing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiology/methods , Humans , Internal Medicine/methods , Periodicals as Topic , Publishing/organization & administration , Publishing/trends , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(8): 1260-1262, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252584

ABSTRACT

It is now widely recognized that COVID-19 illness can be associated with significant intermediate and potentially longer-term physical limitations. The term, "long COVID-19" is used to define any patient with persistent symptoms after acute COVID-19 infection (ie, after 4 weeks). It is postulated that cardiac injury might be linked to symptoms that persist after resolution of acute infection, as part of this syndrome. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Rapid Response Team has generated this document to provide guidance to health care providers on the optimal management of patients with suspected cardiac complications of long COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Myocarditis/therapy , Patient Care Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Canada , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/trends , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Myocardial Ischemia/etiology , Myocardial Ischemia/physiopathology , Myocardial Ischemia/therapy , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocarditis/physiopathology , Myocarditis/virology , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration
10.
Am J Med ; 134(8): 945-951, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179206

ABSTRACT

Before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, use of telehealth services had been limited in cardiovascular care. Potential benefits of telehealth include improved access to care, more efficient care management, reduced costs, the ability to assess patients within their homes while involving key caretakers in medical decisions, maintaining social distance, and increased patient satisfaction. Challenges include changes in payment models, issues with data security and privacy, potential depersonalization of the patient-clinician relationship, limitations in the use of digital health technologies, and the potential impact on disparities, including socioeconomic, gender, and age-related issues and access to technology and broadband. Implementation and expansion of telehealth from a policy and reimbursement practice standpoint are filled with difficult decisions, yet addressing these are critical to the future of health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Patient Care , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Infection Control , Organizational Innovation , Patient Care/economics , Patient Care/methods , Patient Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e214157, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168796

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented shift in ambulatory cardiovascular care from in-person to remote visits. Objective: To understand whether the transition to remote visits is associated with disparities in patient use of care, diagnostic test ordering, and medication prescribing. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study used electronic health records data for all ambulatory cardiology visits at an urban, multisite health system in Los Angeles County, California, during 2 periods: April 1, 2019, to December 31, 2019 (pre-COVID) and April 1 to December 31, 2020 (COVID-era). Statistical analysis was performed from January to February 2021. Exposure: In-person or remote ambulatory cardiology clinic visit at one of 31 during the pre-COVID period or COVID-era period. Main Outcomes and Measures: Comparison of patient characteristics and frequencies of medication ordering and cardiology-specific testing across 4 visit types (pre-COVID in-person (reference), COVID-era in-person, COVID-era video, COVID-era telephone). Results: This study analyzed data from 87 182 pre-COVID in-person, 74 498 COVID-era in-person, 4720 COVID-era video, and 10 381 COVID-era telephone visits. Across visits, 79 572 patients were female (45.0%), 127 080 patients were non-Hispanic White (71.9%), and the mean (SD) age was 68.1 (17.0) years. Patients accessing COVID-era remote visits were more likely to be Asian, Black, or Hispanic individuals (24 934 pre-COVID in-person visits [28.6%] vs 19 742 COVID-era in-person visits [26.5%] vs 3633 COVID-era video visits [30.4%] vs 1435 COVID-era telephone visits [35.0%]; P < .001 for all comparisons), have private insurance (34 063 pre-COVID in-person visits [39.1%] vs 25 474 COVID-era in-person visits [34.2%] vs 2562 COVID-era video visits [54.3%] vs 4264 COVID-era telephone visits [41.1%]; P < .001 for COVID-era in-person vs video and COVID-era in-person vs telephone), and have cardiovascular comorbidities (eg, hypertension: 37 166 pre-COVID in-person visits [42.6%] vs 31 359 COVID-era in-person visits [42.1%] vs 2006 COVID-era video visits [42.5%] vs 5181 COVID-era telephone visits [49.9%]; P < .001 for COVID-era in-person vs telephone; and heart failure: 14 319 pre-COVID in-person visits [16.4%] vs 10 488 COVID-era in-person visits [14.1%] vs 1172 COVID-era video visits [24.8%] vs 2674 COVID-era telephone visits [25.8%]; P < .001 for COVID-era in-person vs video and COVID-era in-person vs telephone). After adjusting for patient and visit characteristics and in comparison with pre-COVID in-person visits, during video and telephone visits, clinicians had lower odds of ordering any medication (COVID-era in-person: odds ratio [OR], 0.62 [95% CI, 0.60-0.64], COVID-era video: OR, 0.22 [95% CI, 0.20-0.24]; COVID-era telephone: OR, 0.14 [95% CI, 0.13-0.15]) or tests, such as electrocardiograms (COVID-era in-person: OR, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.58-0.62]; COVID-era video: OR, 0.03 [95% CI, 0.02-0.04]; COVID-era telephone: OR, 0.02 [95% CI, 0.01-0.03]) or echocardiograms (COVID-era in-person: OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.18-1.24]; COVID-era video: OR, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.42-0.52]; COVID-era telephone: OR, 0.28 [95% CI, 0.25-0.31]). Conclusions and Relevance: Patients who were Asian, Black, or Hispanic, had private insurance, and had at least one of several cardiovascular comorbidities used remote cardiovascular care more frequently in the COVID-era period. Clinician ordering of diagnostic testing and medications consistently decreased when comparing pre-COVID vs COVID-era and in-person vs remote visits. Further studies are needed to clarify whether these decreases represent a reduction in the overuse of tests and medications vs an underuse of indicated testing and prescribing.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Cardiology/methods , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Telemedicine/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Insurance, Health , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 16(1): 20, 2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115235

ABSTRACT

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, most institutions have changed the way patients are assessed or investigated. Using novel non-contact technology, it is possible to continuously monitor the lung function of peri-operative patients undergoing cardiothoracic procedures. Primarily, this results in increased patient surveillance, and therefore, safety. Many centres, globally, are starting to use structured light plethysmography (SLP) technology, providing a non-aerosol generating procedure in place of traditional spirometry. While more evidence is needed, our clinical usage; previous and on-going studies; demonstrate definite potential that SLP is a valuable tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cardiology/methods , Plethysmography/methods , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Internet , Light , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Preoperative Period , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnostic imaging , Reproducibility of Results , Respiratory Function Tests , Spirometry
13.
OMICS ; 24(5): 264-277, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084246

ABSTRACT

Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the key drivers of digital health. Digital health and AI applications in medicine and biology are emerging worldwide, not only in resource-rich but also resource-limited regions. AI predates to the mid-20th century, but the current wave of AI builds in part on machine learning (ML), big data, and algorithms that can learn from massive amounts of online user data from patients or healthy persons. There are lessons to be learned from AI applications in different medical specialties and across developed and resource-limited contexts. A case in point is congenital heart defects (CHDs) that continue to plague sub-Saharan Africa, which calls for innovative approaches to improve risk prediction and performance of the available diagnostics. Beyond CHDs, AI in cardiology is a promising context as well. The current suite of digital health applications in CHD and cardiology include complementary technologies such as neural networks, ML, natural language processing and deep learning, not to mention embedded digital sensors. Algorithms that build on these advances are beginning to complement traditional medical expertise while inviting us to redefine the concepts and definitions of expertise in molecular diagnostics and precision medicine. We examine and share here the lessons learned in current attempts to implement AI and digital health in CHD for precision risk prediction and diagnosis in resource-limited settings. These top 10 lessons on AI and digital health summarized in this expert review are relevant broadly beyond CHD in cardiology and medical innovations. As with AI itself that calls for systems approaches to data capture, analysis, and interpretation, both developed and developing countries can usefully learn from their respective experiences as digital health continues to evolve worldwide.


Subject(s)
Cardiology/methods , Heart Defects, Congenital/diagnosis , Heart Defects, Congenital/etiology , Algorithms , Artificial Intelligence , Humans , Machine Learning , Neural Networks, Computer , Precision Medicine/methods
14.
Eur Heart J ; 41(19): 1839-1851, 2020 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260376

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses an unprecedented challenge to healthcare worldwide. The infection can be life threatening and require intensive care treatment. The transmission of the disease poses a risk to both patients and healthcare workers. The number of patients requiring hospital admission and intensive care may overwhelm health systems and negatively affect standard care for patients presenting with conditions needing emergency interventions. This position statements aims to assist cardiologists in the invasive management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. To that end, we assembled a panel of interventional cardiologists and acute cardiac care specialists appointed by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) and from the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACVC) and included the experience from the first and worst affected areas in Europe. Modified diagnostic and treatment algorithms are proposed to adapt evidence-based protocols for this unprecedented challenge. Various clinical scenarios, as well as management algorithms for patients with a diagnosed or suspected COVID-19 infection, presenting with ST- and non-ST-segment elevation ACS are described. In addition, we address the need for re-organization of ACS networks, with redistribution of hub and spoke hospitals, as well as for in-hospital reorganization of emergency rooms and cardiac units, with examples coming from multiple European countries. Furthermore, we provide a guidance to reorganization of catheterization laboratories and, importantly, measures for protection of healthcare providers involved with invasive procedures.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Cardiology/standards , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Acute Coronary Syndrome/virology , COVID-19 , Cardiology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/virology
19.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 20(1): 448, 2020 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873939

ABSTRACT

The 2020 annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was the first ever to be held virtually. Under the spotlight of 'the cutting edge of cardiology', exciting and ground-breaking cardiovascular (CV) science was presented both in basic and clinical research. This commentary summarizes essential updates from ESC 2020-The Digital Experience. Despite the challenges that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has posed on the conduct of clinical trials, the ESC Congress launched the results of major studies bringing innovation to the field of general cardiology, cardiac surgery, heart failure, interventional cardiology, and atrial fibrillation. In addition to three new ESC guidelines updates, the first ESC Guidelines on Sports Cardiology and Exercise in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease were presented. As former ESC president, Professor Casadei undoubtedly pointed out the ESC Congress 2020 was a great success. During the ESC 2020 Congress, BMC Cardiovascular Disorders updated to seven journal sections including Arrhythmias and Electrophysiology, CV Surgery, Coronary Artery Disease, Epidemiology and Digital health, Hypertension and Vascular biology, Primary prevention and CV Risk, and Structural Diseases, Heart Failure, and Congenital Disorders. To conclude, an important take-home message for all CV health care professionals engaged in the COVID-19 pandemic is that we must foresee and be prepared to tackle the dramatic, long-term CV complications of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Cardiology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telecommunications/organization & administration , Annual Reports as Topic , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/standards , Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/classification , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Congresses as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Europe , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
20.
Curr Atheroscler Rep ; 22(12): 72, 2020 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-812523

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review highlights selected studies related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention that were presented at the 2020 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress-The Digital Experience. RECENT FINDINGS: The studies reviewed include clinical trials on novel RNA interference-based lipid-lowering therapies AKCEA-APOCIII-LRx and vupanorsen (AKCEA-ANGPTL3-LRx); the EVAPORATE trial assessing the effects of icosapent ethyl on coronary plaque volume progression; the LoDoCo2 trial evaluating the efficacy of low-dose colchicine in cardiovascular disease risk reduction among patients with chronic coronary artery disease; as well as the EMPEROR-Reduced trial evaluating cardiovascular and renal outcomes with empagliflozin in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. In addition, we review the BPLTTC analysis on blood pressure treatment across blood pressure levels and CVD status and discuss findings from the BRACE CORONA study that examined continuing versus suspending angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blockers in patients on these antihypertensive medications who were hospitalized with COVID-19 infection. The studies presented at the 2020 digital ESC Congress highlight the continuing advancements in the field of CVD prevention.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Cardiology , Cardiovascular Agents/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Lipid Regulating Agents/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Benzhydryl Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic , Congresses as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Eicosapentaenoic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Eicosapentaenoic Acid/pharmacology , Europe , Glucosides/pharmacology , Humans , Oligonucleotides/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Telecommunications
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