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2.
Int J Cardiol ; 360: 104-110, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814499

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We sought to determine, using advanced echocardiography, the prevalence and type of cardiovascular sequelae after COVID19 infection with marked elevation of cardiovascular biomarkers (CVB), and their prognostic implications. METHODS: All patients admitted from March 1st to May 25th, 2020 to a tertiary referral hospital were included. Those with cardiovascular diseases or dead during admission were excluded. Patients with hs-TnI > 45 ng/L, NT-proBNP>300 pg/mL, and D-dimer >8000 ng/mL were matched with COVID controls (three biomarkers within the normal range) based on intensive care requirements and age, and separately analyzed. RESULTS: From 2025 patients, 80 patients with significantly elevated CVB and 29 controls were finally included. No differences in baseline characteristics were observed among groups, but elevated CVB patients were sicker. Follow-up echocardiograms showed no differences among groups regarding LVEF and only slight differences between groups within the normal range. Hs-TnI patients had lower myocardial work and longitudinal strain. The presence of an abnormal echocardiogram was more frequent in the elevated CVB group compared to controls (23.8 vs 10.3%, P = 0.123) but mainly associated with mild abnormalities in deformation parameters. Management did not change in any case and no major cardiovascular events except deep vein thrombosis occurred after a median follow-up of 7 months. CONCLUSION: Minimal abnormalities in cardiac structure and function are observed in COVID19 survivors without previous cardiovascular diseases who presented a significant CVB rise at admission, with no impact on patient management or short-term prognosis. These results do not support a routine screening program after discharge in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Echocardiography , Humans , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain , Peptide Fragments , Prognosis , Survivors
4.
Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) ; 26(11): 1312-1339, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1552205

ABSTRACT

Background: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of the cardiovascular disease (CVD). Several risk factors lead to atherosclerosis, and altered nutrition is one among those. Nutrition has been ignored quite often in the process of CVD risk assessment. Altered nutrition along with carotid ultrasound imaging-driven atherosclerotic plaque features can help in understanding and banishing the problems associated with the late diagnosis of CVD. Artificial intelligence (AI) is another promisingly adopted technology for CVD risk assessment and management. Therefore, we hypothesize that the risk of atherosclerotic CVD can be accurately monitored using carotid ultrasound imaging, predicted using AI-based algorithms, and reduced with the help of proper nutrition. Layout: The review presents a pathophysiological link between nutrition and atherosclerosis by gaining a deep insight into the processes involved at each stage of plaque development. After targeting the causes and finding out results by low-cost, user-friendly, ultrasound-based arterial imaging, it is important to (i) stratify the risks and (ii) monitor them by measuring plaque burden and computing risk score as part of the preventive framework. Artificial intelligence (AI)-based strategies are used to provide efficient CVD risk assessments. Finally, the review presents the role of AI for CVD risk assessment during COVID-19. Conclusions: By studying the mechanism of low-density lipoprotein formation, saturated and trans fat, and other dietary components that lead to plaque formation, we demonstrate the use of CVD risk assessment due to nutrition and atherosclerosis disease formation during normal and COVID times. Further, nutrition if included, as a part of the associated risk factors can benefit from atherosclerotic disease progression and its management using AI-based CVD risk assessment.


Subject(s)
Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Atherosclerosis/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Nutritional Status , Algorithms , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Radiology ; 301(2): 263-277, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398732

ABSTRACT

Despite the global coronavirus pandemic, cardiovascular imaging continued to evolve throughout 2020. It was an important year for cardiac CT and MRI, with increasing prominence in cardiovascular research, use in clinical decision making, and in guidelines. This review summarizes key publications in 2020 relevant to current and future clinical practice. In cardiac CT, these have again predominated in assessment of patients with chest pain and structural heart diseases, although more refined CT techniques, such as quantitative plaque analysis and CT perfusion, are also maturing. In cardiac MRI, the major developments have been in patients with cardiomyopathy and myocarditis, although coronary artery disease applications remain well represented. Deep learning applications in cardiovascular imaging have continued to advance in both CT and MRI, and these are now closer than ever to routine clinical adoption. Perhaps most important has been the rapid deployment of MRI in enhancing understanding of the impact of COVID-19 infection on the heart. Although this review focuses primarily on articles published in Radiology, attention is paid to other leading journals where published CT and MRI studies will have the most clinical and scientific value to the practicing cardiovascular imaging specialist.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Cardiovascular System/diagnostic imaging , Humans
7.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 350-355, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351995

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 bezeichnet eine der schlimmsten Krisen unserer Generation und stellt (nicht nur) für das Gesundheitssystem eine schwer bewältigbare Herausforderung dar. Mortalität und Morbidität sind im Vergleich zu anderen saisonalen Erkrankungen wie der Influenza deutlich erhöht. COVID-19 bedroht allerdings nicht die gesamte Bevölkerung in gleichem Maße. Hochrisikopatienten sind älter und leiden an kardiovaskulären Erkrankungen wie Bluthochdruck, Diabetes mellitus oder einer koronaren Herzerkrankung. Um das Risiko für einen schweren Erkrankungsverlaufs zu quantifizieren bedarf es einer multimodalen Herangehensweise. Verschiedene Risikostratifizierungssysteme stehen zu Verfügung um ungünstige Verläufe wie Intensivbehandlung oder Gesamtmortalität vorauszusagen. Biomarker wie Troponin-I, D-Dimere und NT pro-BNP kombiniert mit echokardiographischen Parametern wie links- und rechtsventrikulärer Pumpfunktion sowie pulmonalarteriellem Druck können hilfreich sein um Hochrisikopatienten zu identifizieren, die ein intensiviertes Monitoring und eine stringentere Behandlung benötigen. Da kardiovaskuläre Risikofaktoren und Komorbiditäten von großer Bedeutung zur Abschätzung des Verlaufs einer SARS-CoV-2 Infektion sind, könnten alle hospitalisierten COVID-19 Patienten von einer routinemäßigen kardiologischen Betreuung durch ein COVID-19-Heart-Team profitieren. Ein frühzeitiges Erkennen von (kardiovaskulären) Hochrisikopatienten könnte das Management erleichtern sowie die Prognose einer schweren SARS-CoV-2 Infektion verbessern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Echocardiography , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Humans , Models, Cardiovascular , Pandemics , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Curr Atheroscler Rep ; 23(7): 37, 2021 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226237

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been the cause of significant global morbidity and mortality. Here, we review the literature to date of the short-term and long-term consequences of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on the heart. RECENT FINDINGS: Early case reports described a spectrum of cardiovascular manifestations of COVID-19, including myocarditis, stress cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarction, and arrhythmia. However, in most cases, myocardial injury in COVID-19 appears to be predominantly mediated by the severity of critical illness rather than direct injury to myocardium from viral particles. While cardiac magnetic resonance imaging remains a powerful tool for diagnosing acute myocarditis, it should be used judiciously in light of low baseline prevalence of myocarditis. Guiding an athletic patient through return to play (RTP) after COVID-19 infection is a challenging process. More recent data show RTP has been a safe endeavor using a screening protocol. "Long COVID" or post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection has also been described. The reported symptoms span a large breadth of cardiopulmonary and neurologic complaints including fatigue, palpitations, chest pain, breathlessness, brain fog, and dysautonomia including postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Management of POTS/dysautonomia primarily centers on education, exercise, and salt and fluid repletion. Our understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on the cardiovascular system is constantly evolving. As we enter a new age of survivorship, additional research is needed to catalogue the burden of persistent cardiopulmonary symptoms. Research is also needed to learn how acute management may alter the likelihood and prevalence of this chronic syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Return to Sport , SARS-CoV-2 , Athletes , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/rehabilitation , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index , Troponin/blood
9.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 47(6): 100847, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157221

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been showing patterns of extensive rise in prevalence in the contemporary era, affecting the quality of life of millions of people and leading the causes of death worldwide. It has been a provocative challenge for modern medicine to diagnose CVD in its crib, owing to its etiological factors being attributed to a large array of systemic diseases, as well as its non-binary hideous nature that gradually leads to functional disability. Novel echocardiography techniques have enabled the cardiac ultrasound to provide a comprehensive analysis of the heart in an objective, feasible, time- and cost-effective manner. Speckle tracking echocardiography, contrast echocardiography, and 3D echocardiography have shown the highest potential for widespread use. The uses of novel modalities have been elaborately demonstrated in this study as a proof of concept that echocardiography has a place in routine general practice with supportive evidence being as recent as its role in the concurrent COVID-19 pandemic. Despite such evidence, many uses remain off-label and unexploited in practice. Generalization of echocardiography at the point of care can become a much-needed turning point in the clinical approach to case management. To actualize such aspirations, we recommend further prospective and interventional studies to examine the effect of implementing advanced techniques at the point of care on the decision-making process and evaluate their effectiveness in prevention of cardiovascular morbidities and mortalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Stethoscopes , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Echocardiography/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life
11.
Trends Cardiovasc Med ; 31(1): 8-16, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065613

ABSTRACT

The management of patients infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may be difficult due to the need for dedicated in-hospital pathways, protective measures for healthcare professionals and isolated beds of intensive care, particularly in areas overwhelmed by wide viral spread. Although pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a variety of cardiovascular complications have been reported. An integrated diagnostic algorithm in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients with suspected cardiac involvement (laboratory findings of myocardial injury and electrocardiographic changes) may help to avoid unnecessary examinations and minimize the risk of operator infection. Due to its mobility and bedside feasibility, echocardiography is the first-line imaging technique in this clinical setting. It quickly provides information on ventricular functions, pulmonary hypertension, valve disease and pericardial effusion. In case of ST-segment elevation (STE), urgent coronary angiography should be performed. Cardiac ultrasound helps distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial disease and may detect pericardial disease. Transmural ischemic electrocardiographic changes, with or without early elevated troponin levels or echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities, will determine the need for early invasive coronary angiography. Computed tomography (CT) through its multiple applications (chest CT; CT pulmonary angiography and coronary CT angiography; late iodine enhancement CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance might be helpful in reinforcing or redirecting diagnostic hypothesis emerged by other clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings. The current pandemic makes it challenging to perform serial invasive and non-invasive diagnostic testing in COVID-19 patients and high serum troponin level. Nevertheless, thoughtful and systematic use of an appropriate multimodality imaging strategy is clinically relevant to detect cardiac injury and distinguish myocardial infarction from, myocarditis, takotsubo syndrome and pulmonary embolism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Multimodal Imaging , Cardiac Imaging Techniques , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Circ J ; 85(3): 323-329, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058289

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 84thAnnual Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society (JCS) was held in a web-based format for the first time in its history as "The Week for JCS 2020" from Monday, July 27 to Sunday, August 2, 2020. All sessions, including general abstracts, were streamed live or on-demand. The main theme of the meeting was "Change Practice!" and the aim was to organize the latest findings in the field of cardiovascular medicine and discuss how to change practice. The total number of registered attendees was over 16,800, far exceeding our expectations, and many of the sessions were viewed by far more people than at conventional face-to-face scientific meetings. At this conference, the power of online information dissemination was fully demonstrated, and the evolution of online academic meetings will be a direction that cannot be reversed in the future. The meeting was completed with great success, and we express our heartfelt gratitude to all affiliates for their enormous amount of work, cooperation, and support.


Subject(s)
Cardiology/organization & administration , Congresses as Topic/organization & administration , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Telecommunications/organization & administration , Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Congresses as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Congresses as Topic/trends , Humans , Japan , Research , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/trends
13.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052327

ABSTRACT

AIMS: It was predicted internationally that transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) would be vital during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. We therefore, designed a study to report the demand for TTE in two large District General Hospitals during the rise in the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in the UK. A primary clinical outcome of 30-day mortality was also assessed. METHODS: The TTE service across two hospitals was reconfigured to maximise access to inpatient scanning. All TTEs of suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 patients over a 3-week period were included in the study. All patients were followed up until at least day 30 after their scan at which point the primary clinical outcome of mortality was recorded. Comparative analysis based on mortality was conducted for all TTE results, biochemical markers and demographics. RESULTS: 27 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 had a TTE within the inclusion window. Mortality comparative analysis showed the deceased group were significantly older (mean 68.4, SD 11.9 vs 60.5, SD 13.0, p=0.03) and more commonly reported fatigue in their presenting symptoms (29.6% vs 71.4%, p=0.01). No other differences were identified in the demographic or biochemical data. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was noted in 7.4% of patients and right ventricular impairment or dilation was seen in 18.5% patients. TTE results were not significantly different in mortality comparative analysis. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an achievable approach to TTE services when under increased pressure. Data analysis supports the limited available data suggesting right ventricular abnormalities are the most commonly identified echocardiographic change in SARS-CoV-2 patients. No association can be demonstrated between mortality and TTE results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Echocardiography/methods , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Echocardiography/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology
15.
J Comput Assist Tomogr ; 45(2): 253-262, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926527

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease has spread worldwide since it was first discovered in China's Hubei province in December 2019. Respiratory illness is the primary manifestation of COVID-19 disease, and its pathophysiology as well as the clinical and cross-sectional imaging manifestations has been adequately reported. However, there is emerging evidence of its multisystemic nature, with associated extrapulmonary manifestations including gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal, and neurological findings. There is still limited understanding with regard to the extrapulmonary involvement in this disease. This review aims to put together the prevalence, proposed pathophysiology, and the spectrum of clinical and cross-sectional imaging manifestations of associated extrapulmonary findings in COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Kidney Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging ; 14(3): 541-555, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-907074

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to explore the spectrum of cardiac abnormalities in student athletes who returned to university campus in July 2020 with uncomplicated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). BACKGROUND: There is limited information on cardiovascular involvement in young individuals with mild or asymptomatic COVID-19. METHODS: Screening echocardiograms were performed in 54 consecutive student athletes (mean age 19 years; 85% male) who had positive results of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction nasal swab testing of the upper respiratory tract or immunoglobulin G antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2. Sequential cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 48 (89%) subjects. RESULTS: A total of 16 (30%) athletes were asymptomatic, whereas 36 (66%) and 2 (4%) athletes reported mild and moderate COVID-19 related symptoms, respectively. For the 48 athletes completing both imaging studies, abnormal findings were identified in 27 (56.3%) individuals. This included 19 (39.5%) athletes with pericardial late enhancements with associated pericardial effusion. Of the individuals with pericardial enhancements, 6 (12.5%) had reduced global longitudinal strain and/or an increased native T1. One patient showed myocardial enhancement, and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction or reduced global longitudinal strain with or without increased native T1 values was also identified in an additional 7 (14.6%) individuals. Native T2 findings were normal in all subjects, and no specific imaging features of myocardial inflammation were identified. Hierarchical clustering of left ventricular regional strain identified 3 unique myopericardial phenotypes that showed significant association with the cardiac magnetic resonance findings (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: More than 1 in 3 previously healthy college athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection showed imaging features of a resolving pericardial inflammation. Although subtle changes in myocardial structure and function were identified, no athlete showed specific imaging features to suggest an ongoing myocarditis. Further studies are needed to understand the clinical implications and long-term evolution of these abnormalities in uncomplicated COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Athletes , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Universities , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
18.
CA Cancer J Clin ; 70(6): 480-504, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750753

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has given rise to a pandemic of unprecedented proportions in the modern era because of its highly contagious nature and impact on human health and society: coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and established CV disease (CVD) are among those initially identified at the highest risk for serious complications, including death. Subsequent studies have pointed out that patients with cancer are also at high risk for a critical disease course. Therefore, the most vulnerable patients are seemingly those with both cancer and CVD, and a careful, unified approach in the evaluation and management of this patient population is especially needed in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. This review provides an overview of the unique implications of the viral outbreak for the field of cardio-oncology and outlines key modifications in the approach to this ever-increasing patient population. These modifications include a shift toward greater utilization of cardiac biomarkers and a more focused CV imaging approach in the broader context of modifications to typical practice pathways. The goal of this strategic adjustment is to minimize the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection (or other future viral outbreaks) while not becoming negligent of CVD and its important impact on the overall outcomes of patients who are being treated for cancer.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Anthracyclines/adverse effects , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Proteasome Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Radiotherapy/adverse effects , Receptor, ErbB-2/antagonists & inhibitors , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Trastuzumab/adverse effects
19.
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson ; 22(1): 61, 2020 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742419

ABSTRACT

The aim of this document is to provide specific recommendations on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocols in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. In patients without COVID-19, standard CMR protocols should be used based on clinical indication as usual. Protocols used in patients who have known / suspected active COVID-19 or post COVID-19 should be performed based on the specific clinical question with an emphasis on cardiac function and myocardial tissue characterization. Short and dedicated protocols are recommended.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Societies, Medical , United States
20.
Arq. bras. cardiol ; 115(1): 111-126, jul. 2020. graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-722291

ABSTRACT

Resumo A pandemia da doença causada pelo novo coronavírus (COVID-19) trouxe grandes desafios para o sistema de saúde devido ao aumento exponencial do número de pacientes acometidos. A racionalização de recursos e a indicação correta e criteriosa de exames de imagem e procedimentos intervencionistas tornaram-se necessárias, priorizando a segurança do paciente, do ambiente e dos profissionais da saúde. Esta revisão visa auxiliar e orientar os profissionais envolvidos na realização desses exames e procedimentos a fazê-los de forma eficaz e segura.


Abstract The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a huge challenge to the health system because of the exponential increase in the number of individuals affected. The rational use of resources and correct and judicious indication for imaging exams and interventional procedures are necessary, prioritizing patient, healthcare personnel, and environmental safety. This review was aimed at guiding health professionals in safely and effectively performing imaging exams and interventional procedures.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Betacoronavirus , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Echocardiography , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
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