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1.
Arq Bras Cardiol ; 119(1): 37-45, 2022 07.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on mortality from several diseases worldwide, especially cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Brazil is a continent-sized country with significant differences in the health care structure between its federative units. OBJECTIVE: Analyze in-hospital mortality from CVDs in the Brazilian public health system during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic (2020). METHODS: This is an ecological study analyzing the absolute number of in-hospital deaths and the rate of in-hospital mortality in Brazil, its macro-regions, and federative units. Data were obtained from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. To analyze excess mortality, the P-score was used. It compares the events observed with those expected for a given place and period. The P-score was corrected by the joinpoint regression model, with a 95% confidence interval and 5% significance level. RESULTS: There were 93,104 in-hospital deaths due to CVD in Brazil in 2020, representing 1,495 fewer deaths (P score: -1.58) than expected. The central-west region had a positive P-score, with a 15.1% increase in the number of deaths. Ten federative units showed a greater number of deaths in 2020. There was also a 13.3% excess in-hospital mortality at the country level, and an excess in-hospital mortality in all macro-regions. CONCLUSIONS: There was a decrease in the absolute number of in-hospital deaths, as well as an increase in in-hospital mortality from CVD in Brazil, in 2020, after the COVID-19 pandemic onset.


FUNDAMENTO: A pandemia da COVID-19 tem causado um impacto sobre a mortalidade por várias doenças em todo o mundo, especialmente por doenças cardiovasculares (DCVs). O Brasil é um país de dimensões continentais com diferenças significativas na estrutura de saúde entre seus estados. OBJETIVO: Analisar a mortalidade hospitalar por DCV no sistema público de saúde durante o primeiro ano da pandemia por COVID-19 (2020) no Brasil. MÉTODOS: Este é um estudo ecológico analisando o número absoluto de mortes hospitalares e a taxa de mortalidade hospitalar no Brasil, suas macrorregiões, e unidades federativas. Os dados foram obtidos do Sistema de Informações Hospitalares (SIH) do Ministério da Saúde. O P-escore foi usado para analisar o excesso de mortalidade. O escore compara os eventos observados com os eventos esperados para um dado local e período. O escore-P foi corrigido por um modelo de regressão joinpoint, com um intervalo de confiança de 95% e nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: Houve 93.104 óbitos hospitalares por DCV no Brasil em 2020, o que representa 1495 menos óbitos (escore-P: -1,58) que o esperado. A região centro-oeste apresentou um escore-P positivo, com um aumento de 15,1% no número de mortes. Dez estados apresentaram um maior número de óbitos em 2020. Ainda, observou-se um excesso de 13,3% de mortalidade hospitalar no país como um todo, e um excesso de mortalidade hospitalar em todas as macrorregiões. CONCLUSÕES: Houve uma diminuição no número absoluto de óbitos hospitalares, bem como um aumento na taxa de mortalidade por DCV no Brasil em 2020, após o início da pandemia por COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Circulation ; 143(8): 837-851, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883363

ABSTRACT

More than 40 years after the 1978 Bethesda Conference on the Declining Mortality from Coronary Heart Disease provided the scientific community with a blueprint for systematic analysis to understand declining rates of coronary heart disease, there are indications the decline has ended or even reversed despite advances in our knowledge about the condition and treatment. Recent data show a more complex situation, with mortality rates for overall cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and stroke, decelerating, whereas those for heart failure are increasing. To mark the 40th anniversary of the Bethesda Conference, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Heart Association cosponsored the "Bending the Curve in Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: Bethesda + 40" symposium. The objective was to examine the immediate and long-term outcomes of the 1978 conference and understand the current environment. Symposium themes included trends and future projections in cardiovascular disease (in the United States and internationally), the evolving obesity and diabetes epidemics, and harnessing emerging and innovative opportunities to preserve and promote cardiovascular health and prevent cardiovascular disease. In addition, participant-led discussion explored the challenges and barriers in promoting cardiovascular health across the lifespan and established a potential framework for observational research and interventions that would begin in early childhood (or ideally in utero). This report summarizes the relevant research, policy, and practice opportunities discussed at the symposium.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Congresses as Topic , Coronary Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Disease/mortality , Coronary Disease/pathology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Humans , Morbidity/trends , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/mortality , Stroke/pathology , Survival Rate/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urbanization
3.
PLoS Med ; 19(2): e1003904, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686090

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Deaths in the first year of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in England and Wales were unevenly distributed socioeconomically and geographically. However, the full scale of inequalities may have been underestimated to date, as most measures of excess mortality do not adequately account for varying age profiles of deaths between social groups. We measured years of life lost (YLL) attributable to the pandemic, directly or indirectly, comparing mortality across geographic and socioeconomic groups. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used national mortality registers in England and Wales, from 27 December 2014 until 25 December 2020, covering 3,265,937 deaths. YLLs (main outcome) were calculated using 2019 single year sex-specific life tables for England and Wales. Interrupted time-series analyses, with panel time-series models, were used to estimate expected YLL by sex, geographical region, and deprivation quintile between 7 March 2020 and 25 December 2020 by cause: direct deaths (COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases), cardiovascular disease and diabetes, cancer, and other indirect deaths (all other causes). Excess YLL during the pandemic period were calculated by subtracting observed from expected values. Additional analyses focused on excess deaths for region and deprivation strata, by age-group. Between 7 March 2020 and 25 December 2020, there were an estimated 763,550 (95% CI: 696,826 to 830,273) excess YLL in England and Wales, equivalent to a 15% (95% CI: 14 to 16) increase in YLL compared to the equivalent time period in 2019. There was a strong deprivation gradient in all-cause excess YLL, with rates per 100,000 population ranging from 916 (95% CI: 820 to 1,012) for the least deprived quintile to 1,645 (95% CI: 1,472 to 1,819) for the most deprived. The differences in excess YLL between deprivation quintiles were greatest in younger age groups; for all-cause deaths, a mean of 9.1 years per death (95% CI: 8.2 to 10.0) were lost in the least deprived quintile, compared to 10.8 (95% CI: 10.0 to 11.6) in the most deprived; for COVID-19 and other respiratory deaths, a mean of 8.9 years per death (95% CI: 8.7 to 9.1) were lost in the least deprived quintile, compared to 11.2 (95% CI: 11.0 to 11.5) in the most deprived. For all-cause mortality, estimated deaths in the most deprived compared to the most affluent areas were much higher in younger age groups, but similar for those aged 85 or over. There was marked variability in both all-cause and direct excess YLL by region, with the highest rates in the North West. Limitations include the quasi-experimental nature of the research design and the requirement for accurate and timely recording. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we observed strong socioeconomic and geographical health inequalities in YLL, during the first calendar year of the COVID-19 pandemic. These were in line with long-standing existing inequalities in England and Wales, with the most deprived areas reporting the largest numbers in potential YLL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Adult , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cause of Death , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , England/epidemiology , Female , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Life Expectancy , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/mortality , Residence Characteristics , Respiratory Tract Diseases/mortality , Socioeconomic Factors , Wales/epidemiology
4.
J Surg Res ; 272: 146-152, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591893

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to compare COVID-19- and not-COVID-19-related mortality rates in two Italian regions during the pandemic period when the same isolation rules and therapeutic approaches were introduced for all hospitals in Italy. Risk factors for not-COVID-19-related deaths during the pandemic were analyzed; we tried to assess a possible correlation between reducing hospital visits and "deferrable" vascular operations and the increased cardiovascular mortality not related to COVID-19 infection. METHODS: We analyzed COVID-19- and not-COVID-19-related mortality rates in two Italian regions in the period January 2020-January 2021. We compared mortality rates during the pandemic period with those of the previous five years. We tried to determine the factors involved in increased mortality rates during the pandemic period. RESULTS: Despite the same isolation rules for people and the same therapeutic approaches for hospitals, mortality rates did not increase in the region Lazio, where the pandemic was not severe. In the region Lombardy, the mortality rate was doubled in comparison with the previous years, and 50% of the increase was related to not-COVID-19 deaths. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in mortality rates for not-COVID-19-related deaths in the region Lombardy was connected to the generalized turmoil in the acute phase of an overwhelming pandemic, including diffuse stress, inadequate communications, reluctance to ask for medical help unless symptoms were severe, and unexpected inadequate number of health workers, hospital beds, and intensive care unit beds. Reduced hospital visits may have had a fundamental role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Pharmacol Res ; 176: 106053, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586872

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Administration of glucocorticoids might reduce mortality in patients with severe COVID-19 but have adverse cardiometabolic effects. OBJECTIVES: to investigate the effect of systemic administration of glucocorticoids on cardiovascular complications and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalised with respiratory viral infections, including COVID-19, SARS, MERS and influenza. METHODS: We identified randomised trials published prior to July 28th, 2021. The Mantel-Haenszel random effects method and the Hartung and Knapp adjustment were used to obtain pooled estimates of treatment effect with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: No randomised trials of glucocorticoids for SARS, MERS or influenza reported relevant outcomes. We included eleven COVID-19 randomised trials (8109 patients). Overall, compared to placebo or standard care, glucocorticoids were not associated with a reduction of in-hospital mortality (p = 0.09). In a pre-specified sub-analysis, in-hospital mortality was reduced by 19% when follow-up was restricted to 14 days from randomisation (5/11 trials, 1329 patients, p = 0.02). With longer follow-up (9/11 trials, 7874 patients), administration of glucocorticoids was associated with a trend to benefit for those requiring mechanical ventilation (RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.57-1.27) but possible harm for those not receiving oxygen at randomisation (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.00 - 1.61), an effect that was significantly different amongst subgroups (p = 0.0359). Glucocorticoids reduced the risk of worsening renal function by 37% (4/11 trials); reported rate of other cardiovascular complications was low. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of systemic glucocorticoids to patients hospitalised with COVID-19 does not lower mortality overall but may reduce it in those requiring respiratory support and increase it in those who do not.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Influenza, Human/mortality , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
N Engl J Med ; 385(25): 2325-2335, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), the use of recombinant human erythropoietin and its derivatives for the treatment of anemia has been linked to a possibly increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, and other adverse events. Several trials have suggested that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (PHIs) are as effective as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in increasing hemoglobin levels. METHODS: In this randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial, we assigned patients with CKD who were undergoing dialysis and who had a hemoglobin level of 8.0 to 11.5 g per deciliter to receive an oral HIF-PHI (daprodustat) or an injectable ESA (epoetin alfa if they were receiving hemodialysis or darbepoetin alfa if they were receiving peritoneal dialysis). The two primary outcomes were the mean change in the hemoglobin level from baseline to weeks 28 through 52 (noninferiority margin, -0.75 g per deciliter) and the first occurrence of a major adverse cardiovascular event (a composite of death from any cause, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke), with a noninferiority margin of 1.25. RESULTS: A total of 2964 patients underwent randomization. The mean (±SD) baseline hemoglobin level was 10.4±1.0 g per deciliter overall. The mean (±SE) change in the hemoglobin level from baseline to weeks 28 through 52 was 0.28±0.02 g per deciliter in the daprodustat group and 0.10±0.02 g per deciliter in the ESA group (difference, 0.18 g per deciliter; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12 to 0.24), which met the prespecified noninferiority margin of -0.75 g per deciliter. During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, a major adverse cardiovascular event occurred in 374 of 1487 patients (25.2%) in the daprodustat group and in 394 of 1477 (26.7%) in the ESA group (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.07), which also met the prespecified noninferiority margin for daprodustat. The percentages of patients with other adverse events were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with CKD undergoing dialysis, daprodustat was noninferior to ESAs regarding the change in the hemoglobin level from baseline and cardiovascular outcomes. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline; ASCEND-D ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02879305.).


Subject(s)
Anemia/drug therapy , Barbiturates/therapeutic use , Darbepoetin alfa/therapeutic use , Epoetin Alfa/therapeutic use , Glycine/analogs & derivatives , Hematinics/therapeutic use , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Aged , Anemia/etiology , Barbiturates/adverse effects , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Darbepoetin alfa/adverse effects , Epoetin Alfa/adverse effects , Female , Glycine/adverse effects , Glycine/therapeutic use , Hematinics/adverse effects , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/antagonists & inhibitors , Intention to Treat Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/blood , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Stroke/epidemiology
7.
N Engl J Med ; 385(25): 2313-2324, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575625

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Daprodustat is an oral hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are not undergoing dialysis, the efficacy and safety of daprodustat, as compared with the conventional erythropoiesis-stimulating agent darbepoetin alfa, are unknown. METHODS: In this randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial with blinded adjudication of cardiovascular outcomes, we compared daprodustat with darbepoetin alfa for the treatment of anemia in patients with CKD who were not undergoing dialysis. The primary outcomes were the mean change in the hemoglobin level from baseline to weeks 28 through 52 and the first occurrence of a major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE; a composite of death from any cause, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke). RESULTS: Overall, 3872 patients were randomly assigned to receive daprodustat or darbepoetin alfa. The mean (±SD) baseline hemoglobin levels were similar in the two groups. The mean (±SE) change in the hemoglobin level from baseline to weeks 28 through 52 was 0.74±0.02 g per deciliter in the daprodustat group and 0.66±0.02 g per deciliter in the darbepoetin alfa group (difference, 0.08 g per deciliter; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.13), which met the prespecified noninferiority margin of -0.75 g per deciliter. During a median follow-up of 1.9 years, a first MACE occurred in 378 of 1937 patients (19.5%) in the daprodustat group and in 371 of 1935 patients (19.2%) in the darbepoetin alfa group (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.19), which met the prespecified noninferiority margin of 1.25. The percentages of patients with adverse events were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with CKD and anemia who were not undergoing dialysis, daprodustat was noninferior to darbepoetin alfa with respect to the change in the hemoglobin level from baseline and with respect to cardiovascular outcomes. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline; ASCEND-ND ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02876835.).


Subject(s)
Anemia/drug therapy , Barbiturates/therapeutic use , Darbepoetin alfa/therapeutic use , Glycine/analogs & derivatives , Hematinics/therapeutic use , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Aged , Anemia/etiology , Barbiturates/adverse effects , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Darbepoetin alfa/adverse effects , Female , Glycine/adverse effects , Glycine/therapeutic use , Hematinics/adverse effects , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/antagonists & inhibitors , Intention to Treat Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/blood , Stroke/epidemiology
8.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248995, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575502

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced healthcare services organization to adjust to mutating healthcare needs. Not exhaustive data are available on the consequences of this on non-COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the pandemic on non-COVID-19 patients living in a one-million inhabitants' area in Northern Italy (Bologna Metropolitan Area-BMA), analyzing time trends of Emergency Department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and mortality. We conducted a retrospective observational study using data extracted from BMA healthcare informative systems. Weekly trends of ED visits, hospitalizations, in- and out-of-hospital, all-cause and cause-specific mortality between December 1st, 2019 to May 31st, 2020, were compared with those of the same period of the previous year. Non-COVID-19 ED visits and hospitalizations showed a stable trend until the first Italian case of COVID-19 has been recorded, on February 19th, 2020, when they dropped simultaneously. The reduction of ED visits was observed in all age groups and across all severity and diagnosis groups. In the lockdown period a significant increase was found in overall out-of-hospital mortality (43.2%) and cause-specific out-of-hospital mortality related to neoplasms (76.7%), endocrine, nutritional and metabolic (79.5%) as well as cardiovascular (32.7%) diseases. The pandemic caused a sudden drop of ED visits and hospitalizations of non-COVID-19 patients during the lockdown period, and a concurrent increase in out-of-hospital mortality mainly driven by deaths for neoplasms, cardiovascular and endocrine diseases. As recurrencies of the COVID-19 pandemic are underway, the scenario described in this study might be useful to understand both the population reaction and the healthcare system response at the early phases of the pandemic in terms of reduced demand of care and systems capability in intercepting it.


Subject(s)
Cause of Death , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/mortality , Metabolic Diseases/pathology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Nat Hum Behav ; 6(1): 55-63, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541210

ABSTRACT

The effects of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) public health policies on non-COVID-19-related mortality are unclear. Here, using death registries based on 300 million Chinese people and a difference-in-differences design, we find that China's strict anti-contagion policies during the COVID-19 pandemic significantly reduced non-COVID-19 mortality outside Wuhan (by 4.6%). The health benefits persisted and became even greater after the measures were loosened: mortality was reduced by 12.5% in the medium term. Significant changes in people's behaviours (for example, wearing masks and practising social distancing) and reductions in air pollution and traffic accidents could have driven these results. We estimate that 54,000 lives could have been saved from non-COVID-19 causes during the 50 days of strict policies and 293,000 in the subsequent 115 days. The results suggest that virus countermeasures not only effectively controlled COVID-19 in China but also brought about unintended and substantial public health benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Mortality/trends , Neoplasms/mortality , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Wounds and Injuries/mortality , Accidents, Traffic/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Air Pollution/statistics & numerical data , Cause of Death , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Public Health , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
11.
N Engl J Med ; 385(20): 1845-1855, 2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In patients with symptomatic heart failure, sacubitril-valsartan has been found to reduce the risk of hospitalization and death from cardiovascular causes more effectively than an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor. Trials comparing the effects of these drugs in patients with acute myocardial infarction have been lacking. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients with myocardial infarction complicated by a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, pulmonary congestion, or both to receive either sacubitril-valsartan (97 mg of sacubitril and 103 mg of valsartan twice daily) or ramipril (5 mg twice daily) in addition to recommended therapy. The primary outcome was death from cardiovascular causes or incident heart failure (outpatient symptomatic heart failure or heart failure leading to hospitalization), whichever occurred first. RESULTS: A total of 5661 patients underwent randomization; 2830 were assigned to receive sacubitril-valsartan and 2831 to receive ramipril. Over a median of 22 months, a primary-outcome event occurred in 338 patients (11.9%) in the sacubitril-valsartan group and in 373 patients (13.2%) in the ramipril group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.04; P = 0.17). Death from cardiovascular causes or hospitalization for heart failure occurred in 308 patients (10.9%) in the sacubitril-valsartan group and in 335 patients (11.8%) in the ramipril group (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.07); death from cardiovascular causes in 168 (5.9%) and 191 (6.7%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.08); and death from any cause in 213 (7.5%) and 242 (8.5%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.05). Treatment was discontinued because of an adverse event in 357 patients (12.6%) in the sacubitril-valsartan group and 379 patients (13.4%) in the ramipril group. CONCLUSIONS: Sacubitril-valsartan was not associated with a significantly lower incidence of death from cardiovascular causes or incident heart failure than ramipril among patients with acute myocardial infarction. (Funded by Novartis; PARADISE-MI ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02924727.).


Subject(s)
Aminobutyrates/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Biphenyl Compounds/therapeutic use , Heart Failure/prevention & control , Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Ramipril/therapeutic use , Valsartan/therapeutic use , Aged , Aminobutyrates/adverse effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Biphenyl Compounds/adverse effects , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Double-Blind Method , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypotension/chemically induced , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Proportional Hazards Models , Ramipril/adverse effects , Stroke Volume , Valsartan/adverse effects , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/etiology
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21472, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500505

ABSTRACT

Acute healthcare services are extremely important, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, as healthcare demand has rapidly intensified, and resources have become insufficient. Studies on specific prepandemic hospitalization and emergency department visit (EDV) trends in proximity to death are limited. We examined time-trend specificities based on sex, age, and cause of death in the last 2 years of life. Datasets containing all hospitalizations and EDVs of elderly residents in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy (N = 411,812), who died between 2002 and 2014 at ≥ 65 years, have been collected. We performed subgroup change-point analysis of monthly trends in the 2 years preceding death according to sex, age at death (65-74, 75-84, 85-94, and ≥ 95 years), and main cause of death (cancer, cardiovascular, or respiratory disease). The proportion of decedents (N = 142,834) accessing acute healthcare services increased exponentially in proximity to death (hospitalizations = 4.7, EDVs = 3.9 months before death). This was inversely related to age, with changes among the youngest and eldest decedents at 6.6 and 3.5 months for hospitalizations and at 4.6 and 3.3 months for EDVs, respectively. Healthcare use among cancer patients intensified earlier in life (hospitalizations = 6.8, EDVs = 5.8 months before death). Decedents from respiratory diseases were most likely to access hospital-based services during the last month of life. No sex-based differences were found. The greater use of acute healthcare services among younger decedents and cancer patients suggests that policies potentiating primary care support targeting these at-risk groups may reduce pressure on hospital-based services.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Cause of Death , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Terminal Care
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20073, 2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462039

ABSTRACT

Kidney transplantation recipients (KTR) with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at higher risk of death than general population. However, mortality risk factors in KTR are still not clearly identified. Our objective was to systematically analyze published evidence for risk factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 KTR. Electronic databases were searched for eligible studies on 1 August 2021. All prospective and retrospective studies of COVID-19 in KTR were considered eligible without language restriction. Since data in case reports and series could potentially be subsets of larger studies, only studies with ≥ 50 patients were included. Random-effects model meta-analysis was used to calculate weighted mean difference (WMD) and pooled odds ratio (OR) of factors associated with mortality. From a total 1,137 articles retrieved, 13 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis comprising 4,440 KTR. Compared with survivors, non-survivors were significantly older (WMD 10.5 years, 95% CI 9.3-11.8). KTR of deceased donor were at higher risk of death (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.10-2.74). Comorbidities including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and active cancer significantly increased mortality risk. KTR with dyspnea (OR 5.68, 95% CI 2.11-15.33) and pneumonia (OR 10.64, 95% CI 3.37-33.55) at presentation were at higher mortality risk, while diarrhea decreased the risk (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47-0.78). Acute kidney injury was associated with mortality (OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.36-7.70). Inflammatory markers were significantly higher in the non-survivors, including C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and interleukine-6. A number of COVID-19 mortality risk factors were identified from KTR patient characteristics, presenting symptoms, and laboratory investigations. KTR with these risk factors should receive more intensive monitoring and early therapeutic interventions to optimize health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transplant Recipients
15.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(10): 1547-1554, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439940

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically altered the delivery of healthcare services, resulting in significant referral pattern changes, delayed presentations, and procedural delays. Our objective was to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on all-cause mortality in patients awaiting commonly performed cardiac procedures. METHODS: Clinical and administrative data sets were linked to identify all adults referred for: (1) percutaneous coronary intervention; (2) coronary artery bypass grafting; (3) valve surgery; and (4) transcatheter aortic valve implantation, from January 2014 to September 2020 in Ontario, Canada. Piece-wise regression models were used to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on referrals and procedural volume. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the effect of the pandemic on waitlist mortality for the 4 procedures. RESULTS: We included 584,341 patients who were first-time referrals for 1 of the 4 procedures, of whom 37,718 (6.4%) were referred during the pandemic. The pandemic period was associated with a significant decline in the number of referrals and procedures completed compared with the prepandemic period. Referral during the pandemic period was a significant predictor for increased all-cause mortality for the percutaneous coronary intervention (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-2.27) and coronary artery bypass grafting (hazard ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.01), but not for surgical valve or transcatheter aortic valve implantation referrals. Procedural wait times were shorter during the pandemic period compared with the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant decrease in referrals and procedures completed for cardiac procedures during the pandemic period. Referral during the pandemic was associated with increased all-cause mortality while awaiting coronary revascularization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronary Artery Bypass/statistics & numerical data , Delayed Diagnosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data , Waiting Lists/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Delayed Diagnosis/psychology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Ontario/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment/organization & administration
16.
Circ J ; 85(11): 2111-2115, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435579

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine whether disease severity varied according to whether coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients had multiple or single cardiovascular diseases and risk factors (CVDRFs).Methods and Results:COVID-19 patients with single (n=281) or multiple (n=412) CVDRFs were included retrospectively. Multivariable logistic regression showed no significant difference in the risk of in-hospital death between groups, but patients with multiple CVDRFs had a significantly higher risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio: 1.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-2.81). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients with multiple CVDRFs have a higher risk of complications than those with a single CDVRF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Female , Health Status , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index
19.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(16): e020255, 2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356988

ABSTRACT

Background The acuity and magnitude of the first wave of the COVID-19 epidemic in New York mandated a drastic change in healthcare access and delivery of care. Methods and Results We retrospectively studied patients admitted with an acute cardiovascular syndrome as their principal diagnosis to 13 hospitals across Northwell Health during March 11 through May 26, 2020 (first COVID-19 epidemic wave) and the same period in 2019. Three thousand sixteen patients (242 COVID-19 positive) were admitted for an acute cardiovascular syndrome during the first COVID-19 wave compared with 9422 patients 1 year prior (decrease of 68.0%, P<0.001). During this time, patients with cardiovascular disease presented later to the hospital (360 versus 120 minutes for acute myocardial infarction), underwent fewer procedures (34.6% versus 45.6%, P<0.001), were less likely to be treated in an intensive care unit setting (8.7% versus 10.8%, P<0.001), and had a longer hospital stay (2.91 [1.71-6.05] versus 2.87 [1.82-4.95] days, P=0.033). Inpatient cardiovascular mortality during the first epidemic outbreak increased by 111.1% (3.8 versus 1.8, P<0.001) and was not related to COVID-19-related admissions, all cause in-hospital mortality, or incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac deaths in New York. Admission during the first COVID-19 surge along with age and positive COVID-19 test independently predicted mortality for cardiovascular admissions (odds ratios, 1.30, 1.05, and 5.09, respectively, P<0.0001). Conclusions A lower rate and later presentation of patients with cardiovascular pathology, coupled with deviation from common clinical practice mandated by the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, might have accounted for higher in-hospital cardiovascular mortality during that period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization , Inpatients , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Young Adult
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