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1.
Circ Res ; 132(10): 1374-1386, 2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320322

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 leading to the ongoing global pandemic. Infected patients developed a range of respiratory symptoms, including respiratory failure, as well as other extrapulmonary complications. Multiple comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic kidney diseases, are associated with the severity and increased mortality of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 infection also causes a range of cardiovascular complications, including myocarditis, myocardial injury, heart failure, arrhythmias, acute coronary syndrome, and venous thromboembolism. Although a variety of methods have been developed and many clinical trials have been launched for drug repositioning for COVID-19, treatments that consider cardiovascular manifestations and cardiovascular disease comorbidities specifically are limited. In this review, we summarize recent advances in drug repositioning for COVID-19, including experimental drug repositioning, high-throughput drug screening, omics data-based, and network medicine-based computational drug repositioning, with particular attention on those drug treatments that consider cardiovascular manifestations of COVID-19. We discuss prospective opportunities and potential methods for repurposing drugs to treat cardiovascular complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Myocarditis , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Drug Repositioning , Prospective Studies , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Myocarditis/therapy
2.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 24(Suppl 2): e168-e177, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313254

ABSTRACT

In 2015, the Italian Society of Cardiology and its Working Group on Telemedicine and Informatics issued a position paper on Telecardiology, resuming the most eminent evidence supporting the use of information and communication technology in principal areas of cardiovascular care, ranked by level of evidence. More than 5 years later and after the global shock inflicted by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, an update on the topic is warranted. Recent evidence and studies on principal areas of cardiovascular disease will be therefore reported and discussed, with particular focus on telemedicine for cardiovascular care in the COVID-19 context. Novel perspectives and opportunities disclosed by artificial intelligence and its applications in cardiovascular disease will also be discussed. Finally, modalities by which machine learning have realized remote patient monitoring and long-term care in recent years, mainly filtering critical clinical data requiring selective hospital admission, will be provided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Telemedicine , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Artificial Intelligence , SARS-CoV-2 , Informatics
3.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 452, 2023 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of telehealth in the management of care and care delivery has been increasing significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Telehealth is an emerging technology used to manage care for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in Jordan. However, implementing this approach in Jordan faces many challenges that need to be explored to identify practical solutions. PURPOSE: To explore the perceived challenges and barriers to using telehealth in managing acute and chronic CVDs among healthcare professionals. METHODS: A qualitative, exploratory study was conducted by interviewing 24 health professionals at two hospitals in different clinical areas in Jordan. RESULTS: Several barriers were reported by participants that affected the utilization of telehealth services. The barriers were categorized into the following four themes: Drawbacks related to patients, Health providers' concerns, Procedural faults, and telehealth To complement the service only. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that telehealth can be instrumental in supporting care management for patients with CVD. It means that understanding the advantages and barriers to implementing telehealth by the healthcare providers in Jordan can improve many aspects of the healthcare services for patients with CVD within the healthcare settings in Jordan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Telemedicine , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Jordan , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel
4.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 39(6): 827-832, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319604

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has had a negative impact on the health care of patients with cardiovascular disease and patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease. The restrictions affecting access to the health care system have conditioned the care received, resulting in poorer control and a higher risk of events. Taking action to improve the care provided during health emergencies is mandatory. It is important to promote the development of telemedicine and patient empowerment by fostering health literacy and a higher degree of self-care. In addition, primary care and coordination between health care levels should be improved. Moreover, the simplification and optimization of treatment, for example, using the cardiovascular polypill, have led to an improvement in adherence, better control of vascular risk factors, and a reduced risk of events. The present document provides specific recommendations for improving the care provided to patients under a health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Risk Factors
5.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1148394, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301050

ABSTRACT

The disease burden related to non-communicable diseases is a major public health problem in Indonesia. About one-third of all deaths in Indonesia are caused by cardiovascular disease. This study describes the cost of cardiovascular disease from claims data for Advanced Referral Health Facilities at BPJS Kesehatan before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed claims data on the National Health Insurance system managed by BPJS. The data comes from referral health facilities throughout Indonesia in 2019 and 2020. Cardiovascular service claims data by sex and age group were analyzed descriptively and with different tests between years. There was a decrease in the number of patients accessing cardiovascular services at referral health facilities for all genders, age groups, and types of main diagnoses, by around 27.8%, from 933,017 (2019) to 673,801 (2020). There was a significant decrease in total claims for all types of cardiovascular disease during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to before, especially the reduction in aneurysms and aortic dissection (40.2%) and hypertensive heart disease (39.6%). The decline also occurred in all sexes and age groups, with an average percentage decline of 31.2%. Our findings show that the reduction in the cost of cardiovascular disease claims goes hand in hand with the decrease in the number of cardiovascular patient visits. To guarantee treatment for cardiovascular disease patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, BPJS can maximize the telemedicine services that have been built. The organizer of the National Health Insurance program in Indonesia has developed a JKN mobile application that has the potential for telemedicine services guaranteed by JKN. On the other hand, BPJS needs to limit promotive and preventive budgets related to CVD so that it does not become a potential catastrophic financing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Hypertension , Humans , Male , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics
6.
Cardiovasc Res ; 119(8): 1624-1640, 2023 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256197

ABSTRACT

The haemostatic system is pivotal to maintaining vascular integrity. Multiple components involved in blood coagulation have central functions in inflammation and immunity. A derailed haemostasis is common in prevalent pathologies such as sepsis, cardiovascular disorders, and lately, COVID-19. Physiological mechanisms limit the deleterious consequences of a hyperactivated haemostatic system through adaptive changes in gene expression. While this is mainly regulated at the level of transcription, co- and posttranscriptional mechanisms are increasingly perceived as central hubs governing multiple facets of the haemostatic system. This layer of regulation modulates the biogenesis of haemostatic components, for example in situations of increased turnover and demand. However, they can also be 'hijacked' in disease processes, thereby perpetuating and even causally entertaining associated pathologies. This review summarizes examples and emerging concepts that illustrate the importance of posttranscriptional mechanisms in haemostatic control and crosstalk with the immune system. It also discusses how such regulatory principles can be used to usher in new therapeutic concepts to combat global medical threats such as sepsis or cardiovascular disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Hemostatics , MicroRNAs , Humans , COVID-19/genetics , Hemostasis/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Blood Coagulation/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , MicroRNAs/genetics
7.
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes ; 16(5): e009652, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has evolved through multiple phases characterized by new viral variants, vaccine development, and changes in therapies. It is unknown whether rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profiles and complications have changed over time. METHODS: We analyzed the American Heart Association COVID-19 CVD registry, a national multicenter registry of hospitalized adults with active COVID-19 infection. The time period from April 2020 to December 2021 was divided into 3-month epochs, with March 2020 analyzed separately as a potential outlier. Participating centers varied over the study period. Trends in all-cause in-hospital mortality, CVD risk factors, and in-hospital CVD outcomes, including a composite primary outcome of cardiovascular death, cardiogenic shock, new heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction, were evaluated across time epochs. Risk-adjusted analyses were performed using generalized linear mixed-effects models. RESULTS: A total of 46 007 patient admissions from 134 hospitals were included (mean patient age 61.8 years, 53% male, 22% Black race). Patients admitted later in the pandemic were younger, more likely obese, and less likely to have existing CVD (Ptrend ≤0.001 for each). The incidence of the primary outcome increased from 7.0% in March 2020 to 9.8% in October to December 2021 (risk-adjusted Ptrend=0.006). This was driven by an increase in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction and stroke (Ptrend<0.0001 for each). The overall rate of in-hospital mortality was 14.2%, which declined over time (20.8% in March 2020 versus 10.8% in the last epoch; adjusted Ptrend<0.0001). When the analysis was restricted to July 2020 to December 2021, no temporal change in all-cause mortality was seen (adjusted Ptrend=0.63). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a shifting risk factor profile toward a younger population with lower rates of established CVD, the incidence of diagnosed cardiovascular complications of COVID increased from the onset of the pandemic through December 2021. All-cause mortality decreased during the initial months of the pandemic and thereafter remained consistently high through December 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , Adult , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Risk Factors , Pandemics , American Heart Association , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Registries , Hospital Mortality , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Heart Disease Risk Factors
8.
Dan Med J ; 70(4)2023 Mar 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283594

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Oxygen treatment of hypoxaemia is considered an essential part of the treatment of patients who are acutely admitted with medical conditions affecting cardiovascular and/or pulmonary function. Despite the important role of oxygen administration for these patients, clinical evidence on how to control supplemental oxygen to avoid hypoxaemia and hyperoxia is limited. We aim to investigate whether an automatic closed-loop oxygen administration system (O2matic) may maintain normoxaemia better than usual care. METHODS: This study will be an investigator-initiated, prospective, randomised clinical trial. The patients are randomised during admission after informed consent is obtained, at a 1:1 ratio with conventional oxygen treatment or O2matic oxygen treatment for 24 hours. The primary outcome is time within the desired peripheral capillary oxygen saturation interval: 92-96%. CONCLUSION: This study will examine the clinical applicability of a novel automated feedback device termed O2matic and assess whether the device is superior to standard care in keeping the patients in the optimal saturation interval. We hypothesise that the O2matic will increase time within the desired saturation interval. FUNDING: Johannes Grand's salary during this project is supported by a research grant from the Danish Cardiovascular Academy funded by Novo Nordisk Foundation grant number NNF20SA0067242 and by The Danish Heart Foundation. CLINICALTRIALS: gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05452863). Registered on 11 July 2022.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Prospective Studies , Hypoxia/therapy , Oxygen , Treatment Outcome , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
9.
Open Heart ; 10(1)2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271364

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic led to a reduction in hospital admissions and intervention for other diseases in many countries. We aimed to assess the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on cardiovascular disease (CVD) hospitalisations, management and mortality in Switzerland. METHODS: Swiss hospital discharge and mortality data for period 2017-2020. CVD hospitalisations, CVD interventions and CVD mortality were assessed before (2017-2019) and during (2020) the pandemic. Expected numbers of admissions, interventions and deaths for 2020 were computed using simple linear regression model. RESULTS: Compared with 2017-2019, 2020 was characterised by a reduction of CVD admissions in age groups 65-84 and ≥85 by approximately 3700 and 1700 cases, respectively, and by an increase in the percentage of admissions with a Charlson index >8. The total number of CVD-related deaths decreased from 21 042 in 2017 to 19 901 in 2019, and increased to 20 511 in 2020, with an estimated excess of 1139 deaths. This increase was due to out-of-hospital deaths (+1342), while the number of in-hospital deaths decreased from 5030 in 2019 to 4796 in 2020, which concerned mostly subjects aged ≥85 years. The total number of admissions with cardiovascular interventions increased from 55 181 in 2017 to 57 864 in 2019, and decreased in 2020, with an estimated reduction of 4414 admissions; percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) was the exception, as the number and percentage of emergency admissions with PTCA increased. The preventive measures applied against COVID-19 inverted the seasonal pattern of CVD admissions, the highest number of admissions being found in summer and the lowest in winter. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to a reduction in CVD hospital admissions, planned CVD interventions, an increase in total and out-of-hospital CVD deaths and a change in seasonal patterns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Switzerland/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hospitalization
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285795

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) initiated a pandemic that has deteriorated health care access and thus disadvantaged vulnerable populations [...].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Health Services Accessibility
11.
Cardiovasc Res ; 118(7): 1618-1666, 2022 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250914

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Since its emergence in early 2020, the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has reached pandemic levels, and there have been repeated outbreaks across the globe. The aim of this two part series is to provide practical knowledge and guidance to aid clinicians in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular (CV) disease in association with COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: A narrative literature review of the available evidence has been performed, and the resulting information has been organized into two parts. The first, which was reported previously, focused on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and diagnosis of CV conditions that may be manifest in patients with COVID-19. This second part addresses the topics of: care pathways and triage systems and management and treatment pathways, both of the most commonly encountered CV conditions and of COVID-19; and information that may be considered useful to help patients with CV disease (CVD) to avoid exposure to COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This comprehensive review is not a formal guideline but rather a document that provides a summary of current knowledge and guidance to practicing clinicians managing patients with CVD and COVID-19. The recommendations are mainly the result of observations and personal experience from healthcare providers. Therefore, the information provided here may be subject to change with increasing knowledge, evidence from prospective studies, and changes in the pandemic. Likewise, the guidance provided in the document should not interfere with recommendations provided by local and national healthcare authorities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Critical Pathways , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
12.
Circulation ; 147(3): 254-266, 2023 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239065

ABSTRACT

Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a guideline-recommended, multidisciplinary program of exercise training, risk factor management, and psychosocial counseling for people with cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is beneficial but underused and with substantial disparities in referral, access, and participation. The emergence of new virtual and remote delivery models has the potential to improve access to and participation in CR and ultimately improve outcomes for people with CVD. Although data suggest that new delivery models for CR have safety and efficacy similar to traditional in-person CR, questions remain regarding which participants are most likely to benefit from these models, how and where such programs should be delivered, and their effect on outcomes in diverse populations. In this review, we describe important gaps in evidence, identify relevant research questions, and propose strategies for addressing them. We highlight 4 research priorities: (1) including diverse populations in all CR research; (2) leveraging implementation methodologies to enhance equitable delivery of CR; (3) clarifying which populations are most likely to benefit from virtual and remote CR; and (4) comparing traditional in-person CR with virtual and remote CR in diverse populations using multicenter studies of important clinical, psychosocial, and cost-effectiveness outcomes that are relevant to patients, caregivers, providers, health systems, and payors. By framing these important questions, we hope to advance toward a goal of delivering high-quality CR to as many people as possible to improve outcomes in those with CVD.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Evidence Gaps , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Caregivers
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2244750

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been responsible for an epidemic of devastating proportion, and it has represented a challenge for worldwide healthcare systems with the need of resources reallocation in order to face epidemic spread. Italy was one of the hardest hit countries by COVID-19, and the Italian government adopted strict rules to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, such as national lockdown and home quarantine; moreover, the Italian healthcare system had to rapidly re-organize the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways, with a reallocation of health resources and hospital beds, in order to manage COVID-19 patients. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the effects of the first pandemic wave on cardiovascular assistance in Italy with the purpose of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the Italian health system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Italy/epidemiology
14.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 12(4): e028713, 2023 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242562

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic affected outpatient care delivery and patients' access to health care. However, no prior studies have documented telehealth use among patients with cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results We documented the number of telehealth and in-person outpatient encounters per 100 patients with cardiovascular disease and the percentage of telehealth encounters from January 2019 to June 2021, and the average payments per telehealth and in-person encounters across a 12-month period (July 2020-June 2021) using the MarketScan commercial database. From February 2020 to April 2020, the number of in-person encounters per 100 patients with cardiovascular disease decreased from 304.2 to 147.7, whereas that of telehealth encounters increased from 0.29 to 25.3. The number of in-person outpatient encounters then increased to 280.7 in June 2020, fluctuated between 268.1 and 346.4 afterward, and ended at 268.1 in June 2021, lower than the prepandemic levels. The number of telehealth encounters dropped to 16.8 in June 2020, fluctuated between 8.8 and 16.6 afterward, and ended at 8.8 in June 2021, higher than the prepandemic levels. Patients who were aged 18 to 35 years, women, and living in urban areas had higher percentages of telehealth encounters than those who were aged 35 to 64 years, men, and living in rural areas, respectively. The mean (95% CI) telehealth and in-person outpatient encounter costs per visit were $112.8 (95% CI, $112.4-$113.2) and $161.4 (95% CI, $160.4- $162.4), respectively. Conclusions There were large fluctuations in telehealth and in-person outpatient encounters during the pandemic. Our results provide insight into increased telehealth use among patients with cardiovascular disease after telehealth policy changes were implemented during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Telemedicine , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Delivery of Health Care
15.
Can J Cardiol ; 39(6): 716-725, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2233138

ABSTRACT

There has been substantial excess morbidity and mortality during the COVID-19 pandemic, not all of which was directly attributable to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and many non-COVID-19 deaths were cardiovascular. The indirect effects of the pandemic have been profound, resulting in a substantial increase in the burden of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, both in individuals who survived SARS-CoV-2 infection and in people never infected. In this report, we review the direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection on cardiovascular and cardiometabolic disease burden in COVID-19 survivors as well as the indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the cardiovascular health of people who were never infected with SARS-CoV-2. We also examine the pandemic effects on health care systems and particularly the care deficits caused (or exacerbated) by health care delayed or foregone during the COVID-19 pandemic. We review the consequences of: (1) deferred/delayed acute care for urgent conditions; (2) the shift to virtual provision of outpatient care; (3) shortages of drugs and devices, and reduced access to: (4) diagnostic testing, (5) cardiac rehabilitation, and (6) homecare services. We discuss the broader implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for cardiovascular health and cardiovascular practitioners as we move forward into the next phase of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Delivery of Health Care
16.
ACS Nano ; 17(3): 2761-2781, 2023 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2221751

ABSTRACT

Vascular disorders, characterized by vascular endothelial dysfunction combined with inflammation, are correlated with numerous fatal diseases, such as coronavirus disease-19 and atherosclerosis. Achieving vascular normalization is an urgent problem that must be solved when treating inflammatory vascular diseases. Inspired by the vascular regulatory versatility of nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) catalyzing l-arginine (l-Arg), the eNOS-activating effects of l-Arg, and the powerful anti-inflammatory and eNOS-replenishing effects of budesonide (BUD), we constructed a bi-prodrug minimalist nanoplatform co-loaded with BUD and l-Arg via polysialic acid (PSA) to form BUD-l-Arg@PSA. This promoted vascular normalization by simultaneously regulating vascular endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Mediated by the special affinity between PSA and E-selectin, which is highly expressed on the surface of activated endothelial cells (ECs), BUD-l-Arg@PSA selectively accumulated in activated ECs, targeted eNOS expression and activation, and promoted NO production. Consequently, the binary synergistic regulation of the NO/eNOS signaling pathway occurred and improved vascular endothelial function. NO-induced nuclear factor-kappa B alpha inhibitor (IκBα) stabilization and BUD-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) response gene site occupancy achieved dual-site blockade of the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby reducing the inflammatory response and inhibiting the infiltration of inflammation-related immune cells. In a renal ischemia-reperfusion injury mouse model, BUD-l-Arg@PSA reduced acute injury. In an atherosclerosis mouse model, BUD-l-Arg@PSA decreased atherosclerotic plaque burden and improved vasodilation. This represents a revolutionary therapeutic strategy for inflammatory vascular diseases.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Animals , Mice , Arginine , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Nitric Oxide , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/genetics , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy
17.
Biomolecules ; 12(12)2022 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199738

ABSTRACT

Although cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of non-communicable diseases-dependent death worldwide, their effects are still largely underestimated in women [...].


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , Female , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Risk Factors
18.
Eur J Med Res ; 28(1): 22, 2023 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196463

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Healthcare concepts for chronic diseases based on tele-monitoring have become increasingly important during COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To study the effectiveness of a novel integrated care concept (NICC) that combines tele-monitoring with the support of a call centre in addition to guideline therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or treatment-resistant hypertension. DESIGN: A prospective, parallel-group, open-label, randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: Between December 2017 and August 2019 at the Rostock University Medical Center (Germany). PARTICIPANTS: Including 960 patients with either atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or treatment-resistant hypertension. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to either NICC (n = 478) or standard-of-care (SoC) (n = 482) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients in the NICC group received a combination of tele-monitoring and intensive follow-up and care through a call centre. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Three primary endpoints were formulated: (1) composite of all-cause mortality, stroke, and myocardial infarction; (2) number of inpatient days; (3) the first plus cardiac decompensation, all measured at 12-months follow-up. Superiority was evaluated using a hierarchical multiple testing strategy for the 3 primary endpoints, where the first step is to test the second primary endpoint (hospitalization) at two-sided 5%-significance level. In case of a non-significant difference between the groups for the rate of hospitalization, the superiority of NICC over SoC is not shown. RESULTS: The first primary endpoint occurred in 1.5% of NICC and 5.2% of SoC patients (OR: 3.3 [95%CI 1.4-8.3], p = 0.009). The number of inpatient treatment days did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.122). The third primary endpoint occurred in 3.6% of NICC and 8.1% of SoC patients (OR: 2.2 [95%CI 1.2-4.2], p = 0.016). Four patients died of all-cause death in the NICC and 23 in the SoC groups (OR: 4.4 [95%CI 1.6-12.6], p = 0.006). Based on the prespecified hierarchical statistical analysis protocol for multiple testing, the trial did not meet its primary outcome measure. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or treatment-resistant hypertension, the NICC approach was not superior over SoC, despite a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiac decompensation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03317951.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Hypertension , Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Atrial Fibrillation/therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Chronic Disease , Hypertension/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy
19.
Heart Lung Circ ; 32(3): 348-352, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2165343

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 and the lockdowns have affected health care provision internationally, including medical procedures and methods of consultation. We aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 at two Australian hospitals, focussing on cardiovascular hospital admissions, the use of community resources and cardiovascular risk factor control through a mixed methods approach. METHODS: Admissions data from the quaternary referral hospital were analysed, and 299 patients were interviewed from July 2020 to December 2021. With the admissions data, the number, complexity and mortality of cardiology hospital admissions, prior to the first COVID-19 lockdown (T0=February 2018-July 2019) were compared to after the introduction of COVID-19 lockdowns (T1=February 2020-July 2021). During interviews, we asked patients about hospital and community health resource use, and their control of cardiovascular risk factors from the first lockdown. RESULTS: Admission data showed a reduction in hospital presentations (T0=138,099 vs T1=128,030) and cardiology admissions after the lockdown period began (T0=4,951 vs T1=4,390). After the COVID-19-related lockdowns began, there was an increased complexity of cardiology admissions (T0=18.7%, 95% CI 17.7%-19.9% vs T1=20.3%, 95% CI 19.1%-21.5%, chi-square test: 4,158.658, p<0.001) and in-hospital mortality (T0=2.3% of total cardiology admissions 95% CI 1.9%-2.8% vs T1=2.8%, 95% CI 2.3%-3.3%, chi-square test: 4,060.217, p<0.001). In addition, 27% of patients delayed presentation due to fears of COVID-19 while several patients reported reducing their general practitioner or pathology/imaging appointments (27% and 11% respectively). Overall, 19% reported more difficulty accessing medical care during the lockdown periods. Patients described changes in their cardiovascular risk factors, including 25% reporting reductions in physical activity. CONCLUSION: We found a decrease in hospital presentations but with increased complexity after the introduction of COVID-19 lockdowns. Patients reported being fearful about presenting to hospital and experiencing difficulty in accessing community health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Risk Factors , Australia/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Hospitals
20.
Biomolecules ; 12(10)2022 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2154887

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent the leading cause of death in the world despite innovations in therapies and advances in the general management of patients [...].


Subject(s)
Cardiology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Biomarkers
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