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2.
Ann Surg ; 276(5): 743-745, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135835

Subject(s)
Surgeons , Career Choice , Humans
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 757, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professional calling (PC) is crucial for ascertaining their professional goals and fulfilling career choices in nursing students. Thus, understanding its antecedents and helping schools improve PC among nursing students is critical. This study aims to explore whether professional identity (PI), as a crucial antecedent of PC, acts as an intermediary between career self-efficacy (CSE) and professional calling during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A sample of 565 nursing students were selected by a web-based survey through convenience sampling. The study was conducted from October to November 2020. Measures of CSE, PI, and PC were assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed demographic data and the correlation of the research variables. The significance of the mediation effect was assessed using a bootstrap method with SPSS. RESULTS: CSE during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak (r = 0. 359, p < 0. 01) and PI (r = 0. 670, p < 0. 01) were both relevant to PC among nursing students. In addition, CSE had a positive indirect effect on PC through PI (ß = 0. 288, p < 0. 05). CONCLUSIONS: Higher scores in CSE and a better PI were associated with PC in nursing students. Furthermore, a better CSE had an indirect effect on the PC of students through PI. The favorable evidence in our study confirms that nursing educators can adopt PI interventions to improve the sense of PC among nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Pandemics , Career Choice , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 3146-3156, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Role models are essential in medical education, yet empirical research is relatively insufficient on the influence of prosocial modelling on medical students' career commitment. The prosocial behaviour of medical staff involved in the fight against the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at the beginning of 2020 presents an opportunity to fill the research gap. We explored and compared the different associations of the two most important role models for medical students - parents and faculty- with medical students' career commitment. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted with 99,559 undergraduate students majoring in clinical medicine in mainland China. Questions were asked to collect information about participants in the battle against COVID-19, medical students' determination to practice medicine after graduation, as well as students' socio-demographic characteristics. Chi-square tests and hierarchical regressions were performed to examine the associations between parent and faculty involvement and students' career commitment. RESULTS: The results showed statistically significant associations between prosocial modelling during the COVID-19 pandemic in China and students' intention to pursue medical careers. The association of faculty involvement (OR = 1.165, p < .001) with students' career commitment was greater than that of parents (OR = 0.970, p > .05). For faculty involvement, the association was stronger among male students (OR = 1.323, p < .001) and students who were already determined to be doctors (OR = 1.219, p < .001) before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides new evidence on the potential roles of parents and faculty in shaping medical students' career commitment. Encouraging faculty to act as positive role models could help medical students increase their intention to become doctors.KEY MESSAGESProsocial modelling could enhance students' intention to pursue medical careers.The association of prosocial behaviour of faculty is larger than that of parents on medical students.Those who have prior medical career commitment are much more likely to persist in the medical profession, and prosocial modelling of faculty is positively associated with their medical career commitment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Male , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Faculty , Parents
6.
Urology ; 143: 55-61, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096092

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate urology applicants' opinions about the interview process during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An anonymous survey was emailed to applicants to our institution from the 2019 and 2020 urology matches prior to issuance of professional organization guidelines. The survey inquired about attitudes toward the residency interview process in the era of COVID-19 and which interview elements could be replicated virtually. Descriptive statistics were utilized. RESULTS: Eighty percent of urology applicants from the 2019 and 2020 matches received our survey. One hundred fifty-six people (24% of recipients) responded. Thirty-four percent preferred virtual interviews, while 41% in-person interviews at each program, and 25% regional/centralized interviews. Sixty-four percent said that interactions with residents (pre/postinterview social and informal time) were the most important interview day component and 81% said it could not be replicated virtually. Conversely, 81% believed faculty interviews could be replicated virtually. Eighty-seven percent believed that city visits could not be accomplished virtually. A plurality felt that away rotations and second-looks should be allowed (both 45%). COMMENT: Applicants feel that faculty interviews can be replicated virtually, while resident interactions cannot. Steps such as a low-stakes second looks after programs submit rank lists (potentially extending this window) and small virtual encounters with residents could ease applicant concerns. CONCLUSION: Applicants have concerns about changes to the match processes. Programs can adopt virtual best practices to address these issues.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Elife ; 112022 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056252

ABSTRACT

Physician-scientists have epitomized the blending of deep, rigorous impactful curiosity with broad attention to human health for centuries. While we aspire to prepare all physicians with an appreciation for these skills, those who apply them to push the understanding of the boundaries of human physiology and disease, to advance treatments, and to increase our knowledge base in the arena of human health can fulfill an essential space for our society, economies, and overall well-being. Working arm in arm with basic and translational scientists as well as expert clinicians, as peers in both groups, this career additionally serves as a bridge to facilitate the pace and direction of research that ultimately impacts health. Globally, there are remarkable similarities in challenges in this career path, and in the approaches employed to overcome them. Herein, we review how different countries train physician-scientists and suggest strategies to further bolster this career path.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Physicians , Biomedical Research/education , Career Choice , Humans
8.
J Dent Educ ; 86(10): 1405-1417, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047683

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This study examines the journey of US dental schools' predoctoral senior class of 2022, from the influences on and their motivations to pursue careers in dentistry, the aspects of their dental school experiences, plans upon graduation, and the investment in their careers. METHODS: The study is an analysis of the results of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Survey of Dental School Seniors, 2022 Graduating Class. Each year, ADEA surveys senior predoctoral students from the accredited US dental schools. Whenever feasible, the answers of the survey respondents from the 2022 class were compared with their 2017 counterparts and with the responses of 2022 predoctoral senior students of historically underrepresented race and ethnicity groups. RESULTS: The analysis revealed that 47% of the 2022 respondents decided to become a dentist before going to undergraduate college, more than the proportion of their 2017 colleagues (44%). When it comes to preparedness to practice dentistry, the responses indicated a high level of readiness to go into the profession. Nineteen percent of survey participants reported that the COVID-19 pandemic affected their professional plans immediately after graduation. Between 2017 and 2022, the share of survey respondents who planned to join a private practice immediately after graduation increased from 48% to 53%. Almost a third of the 2022 respondents who planned to go into private practice immediately upon graduation intended to join a dental service organization. When accounting for inflation, the average education debt for students graduating with debt who responded to ADEA 2022 survey was 11% lower from what the 2017 respondents reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study finds that some preferences changed from the 2017 cohort to the 2022 cohort toward deciding to go to dental school before college and joining a private practice upon graduation. Senior students responding to the ADEA survey in 2022 stated a high level of preparedness to practice dentistry. US dental schools pursued consistently their mission to educate, train, and graduate oral health professionals fully prepared to go into the profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Schools, Dental , Career Choice , Dentists , Education, Dental , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 80(11): 1110-1113, 2022 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007791
10.
Radiography (Lond) ; 28 Suppl 1: S84-S92, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004442

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A clinical visit (work experience) provides an opportunity for prospective students, prior to registration, to visit a clinical department to observe health professionals in practice. The Covid-19 pandemic interrupted access to clinical visits; this article explores the value of clinical visits and the alternatives implemented as a response to Covid-19 restrictions from an academic perspective. METHODS: This article reports the quantitative phase of a three-phase mixed methods study. A survey was distributed to Higher Education Institution (HEI) education leaders for onward distribution to academics supporting recruitment for diagnostic radiography, therapeutic radiography and operating department practice programmes. Qualtrics online survey software was used to administer the survey which was launched in October 2020. Descriptive statistics summarised the data. RESULTS: Representing 37.7% (n = 18/49) of eligible universities, 34 responses from 18 HEIs across England and Wales were received Seventy-eight percent of respondents strongly agreed that they are vital in confirming career choices. Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, 64% of respondents' programmes had a clinical visit requirement, yet with improvements in simulation and online learning alternatives, 48% agreed that in the longer-term clinical visits will become obsolete. CONCLUSION: Requirements for clinical visits vary between professions and HEIs; academics welcome an opportunity to standardise work experience. Regardless of prospective student background and selected profession/university, all should have equitable and easily available access to high quality resources to support career decision-making. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The enforced withdrawal of clinical visits may impact upon subsequent attrition associated with 'misinformed career choice'. Alternatives to clinical visits, while less onerous for students, admissions staff and clinical colleagues alike, need to be carefully evaluated to ensure they offer prospective students a realistic understanding of the profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Career Choice , Humans , Pandemics , Radiography , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Radiography (Lond) ; 28 Suppl 1: S77-S83, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004441

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Clinical visits (work experience opportunities) are a recommended part of admissions processes for many diagnostic and therapeutic radiography courses but not for operating department practice (ODP) where observational visits are challenging for applicants to obtain. The Covid-19 pandemic interrupted access to visits for all prospective students; this study presents a review of the value of clinical visits and alternatives. METHODS: This article reports the initial qualitative phase of a three-phase mixed methods study. Using a critical realist approach, focus groups explored first year student experiences of the 'ideal' pre-admission clinical visit and alternative resources. A structured review of Online Prospectus (OLP) entries was undertaken by two student researchers to ascertain the requirements for clinical visits for the three professions. RESULTS: Four focus groups included 25 first year students interviewed prior to their first clinical placement (14 therapeutic radiography, 5 diagnostic radiography and 6 ODP students). Three themes were constructed, namely: informing career choices, the clinical visit experience, and the value of clinical visits. Clinical visits affirmed rather than inspired career choices. The best timing for a visit was before admission interviews and optimal duration was a full day. Interacting with current students was the most valued aspect. Videos and simulations provided in-depth information about the professional role and allowed replay, but some participants found the videos uninspiring. OLP entries present a confusing picture for applicants who may be researching several Universities and professions. CONCLUSION: Clinical visits were deemed 'vital' to radiography student career choices, yet ODPs who could not access visits were comfortable with videos. Simulated visits are a safe option amidst the pandemic but must capture the dynamic and patient-centred nature of practice to accurately inform career choices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19 Testing , Career Choice , Humans , Radiography , Students
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 619, 2022 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Calling within the medical context receives growing academic attention and empirical research has started to demonstrate its beneficial effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate what motivates students to enter medical school and what role calling may play (i), to evaluate if calling influences the way in which they experience their studies (ii), and to compare medical students' experience of calling with those of physicians. METHODS: A questionnaire survey was distributed among medical students (N = 1048; response rate above 60%) of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. It was supplemented by a group discussion between bachelor medical students (N = 8) and senior physicians (N = 4), focusing on different facets of calling. An existing data set of a survey among physicians, addressing calling with the same questionnaire, was used to compare students' and physicians' attitudes towards calling. Survey data were analyzed with the habitual statistical procedures for categorical and continuous variables. The group discussion was analyzed with thematic analysis. RESULTS: The survey showed that experiencing calling is a motivational factor for study choice and influences positively choice consistency. Students experiencing calling differed from those who did not: they attributed different definitions to calling, indicated more often prosocial motivational factors for entering medical school and perceived the learning context as less burdensome. The analysis of the group discussion revealed that the concept of calling has a fluid definition. It was conceived as having the characteristics of a double-edged sword and as originating from within or outside or from a dialectic interplay between the inner and outer world. Finally, calling is experienced less often by physicians than by medical students, with a decreasing prevalence as the immersion in the clinical years of the study of medicine progresses. CONCLUSIONS: Calling plays an important role in study choice and consistency of medical students. Given its relevance for medical students and its ramifications with the learning context, calling should become a topic of the reflexive parts of the medical curriculum. We critically discuss the role played by calling for medical students and provide some perspectives on how calling could be integrated in the reflection and teaching on physicianhood.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Motivation , Physicians , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Physicians/psychology , Schools, Medical , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland
14.
Front Public Health ; 10: 911868, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1971132

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to elicit the stated job preferences of Chinese medical staff in the post-pandemic era and identify the relative importance of different factors in the practice environment. Methods: We used an online discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey instrument to elicit the job preferences of medical staff (doctors and nurses) in tertiary hospitals in Anhui, China. Attributes and levels were generated using qualitative methods, and four attributes were considered: career development, workload, respect from society, and monthly income. A set of profiles was created using a D-efficient design. The data were analyzed considering potential preference heterogeneity, using the conditional logit model and the latent class logit (LCL) model. Results: A total of 789 valid questionnaires were included in the analysis, with an effective response rate of 73.33%. Career development, workload, respect from society, and monthly income were significant factors that influenced job preferences. Three classes were identified based on the LCL model, and preference heterogeneity among different medical staff was demonstrated. Class 1 (16.17%) and Class 2 (43.51%) valued respect from society most, whereas Class 3 (40.32%) prioritized monthly income. We found that when respect from society was raised to a satisfactory level (50-75% positive reviews), the probability of medical staff choosing a certain job increased by 69.9%. Conclusion: Respect from society was the most preferred attribute, while workload, monthly income, and career development were all key factors in the medical staff's job choices. The heterogeneity of the medical professionals' preferences shows that effective policy interventions should be customized to accommodate these drive preferences.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Choice Behavior , China , Humans , Medical Staff , Pandemics
15.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 60: 152019, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From 2008 to 2017, 28.8 % fewer United States allopathic medical students (MD seniors) applied to pathology residency in the Main Residency Match (MRM) and 27.5 % fewer matched. This study is a 5-year follow-up. METHODS: MRM data from 2018 to 2022 were reviewed to determine the numbers of MD seniors that applied and matched to pathology residency and other major medical specialties. RESULTS: From 2018 to 2022, the number of MD seniors applying to pathology increased 4.6 % from 237 to 248, while MD seniors matching to pathology increased 5.0 % from 220 to 231. For the 4 years from 2018 to 2021, there was a slight decline in MD seniors filling pathology positions, followed by a substantial 16.7 % spike in 2022. For the entire 5-year interval, because the number of filled pathology residency positions increased by 9.0 %, the percentage of filled positions taken by MD seniors declined from 38.7 % to 37.3 %. Of the 15 major medical specialties evaluated, pathology now has the 14th lowest percentage of filled positions taken by MD seniors. CONCLUSIONS: The number of MD seniors applying and matching to pathology residency increased over the past 5-years, in contrast to the timespan of 2008 to 2017. However, the percentage of pathology residency positions taken by MD seniors continued to decline and remains low compared to other major medical specialties. MRM data should be continually monitored to study trends in MD seniors filling pathology residency positions in the context of new recruitment efforts and the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Students, Medical , Career Choice , Humans , Schools, Medical , United States
16.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(10): 1170-1176, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1945366

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide an updated evaluation of radiology residency program websites in light of virtual interviewing during the COVID-19 pandemic and encourage programs to improve the quality of their online website presence. METHODS: We evaluated the websites of 197 US radiology residency programs between November and December 2021 for the presence or absence of 30 metrics. The metrics chosen are those considered important by applicants when choosing a program and have been used in other similar papers. RESULTS: Of the 197 programs, 192 (97.5%) had working websites. The average radiology residency website had 16 of 30 (54%) metrics listed on their websites. Five programs did not have accessible websites and were not included in the analysis. The most comprehensive website had 29 of 30 (97%) of metrics listed and the least comprehensive website had 2 of 30 (7%). There is a statistically significant difference in website comprehensiveness between top 20 and non-top 20 radiology program websites. CONCLUSION: Although radiology residency program websites have generally become more comprehensive over time, there is still room for improvement, especially in times of virtual interviews when residency applicants are becoming more and more reliant on program websites to gain essential information about a program. Some key areas to include are diversity and inclusion initiatives, resident wellness, applicant information, program benefits, and showcase of people in the program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Radiology , Career Choice , Education, Medical, Graduate , Humans , Pandemics , Radiology/education
18.
J Surg Res ; 279: 442-452, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926708

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Medical trainees who participate in global rotations demonstrate improved cultural sensitivity, increased involvement in humanitarian efforts, and ability to adapt to limited resources. The global coronavirus pandemic halted global rotations for medical trainees. Domestic rural surgery (DRS) may offer a unique alternative. We aimed to understand medical students' perceptions of the similarities and differences between global surgery and DRS and how students' priorities impact career choices. METHODS: An electronic survey was administered at eleven medical training institutions in Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan in spring 2021. Mixed methods analysis was performed for students who reported an interest in global surgery. Quantitative analysis was completed using Stata 16.1. RESULTS: Of the 697 medical student respondents, 202 were interested in global surgery. Of those, only 18.3% were also interested in DRS. Students interested in DRS had more rural exposures. Rural exposures associated with DRS interest were pre-clinical courses (P = 0.002), clinical rotations (P = 0.045), and rural health interest groups (P < 0.001). Students interested in DRS and those unsure were less likely to prioritize careers involving teaching or research, program prestige, perceived career advancement, and well-equipped facilities. The students who were unsure were willing to utilize DRS exposures. CONCLUSIONS: Students interested in global surgery express a desire to practice in low-resource settings. Increased DRS exposures may help students to understand the overlap between global surgery and DRS when it comes to working with limited resources, achieving work-life balance and practice location.


Subject(s)
Rural Health Services , Students, Medical , Career Choice , Humans , Rural Population , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 9(1)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923267

ABSTRACT

There were respiratory consultant post vacancies in 82% of surveyed UK hospitals in 2021. Understanding respiratory trainees' career intentions is vital to plan and train a future respiratory workforce. In 2020, the British Thoracic Society surveyed trainee members (n=144) to assess career plans and perceived barriers and facilitators when applying for consultant posts. Most trainees (79, 55.6%) report intending to pursue UK-based posts with general internal medicine responsibilities. Consultant applications are influenced by location, hospital type, previous local experience and availability of subspecialty posts. Insufficient guidance is available regarding consultant applications.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Pulmonary Medicine , Humans , Intention , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
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