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1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258660, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511817

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 precautions, the Vanderbilt University summer biomedical undergraduate research program, the Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA), rapidly transitioned from offering an in-person training program to a virtual seminar format. Our program typically supports undergraduate development through research and/or clinical experience, meeting with individuals pursuing postgraduate training, and providing career development advice. Evidence supports the idea that summer programs transform undergraduates by clarifying their interest in research and encouraging those who haven't previously considered graduate studies. We were interested in exploring whether a virtual, synchronous program would increase participants' scientific identity and clarify postgraduate career planning. Rather than create a virtual research exposure, our 5-week "Virtual VSSA" program aimed to simulate the casual connections that would naturally be made with post-undergraduate trainees during a traditional summer program. In seminars, presenters discussed 1) their academic journey, explaining their motivations, goals, and reasons for pursuing a career in science as well as 2) a professional story that illustrated their training. Seminars included Vanderbilt University and Medical School faculty, M.D., MD/Ph.D., as well as Ph.D. students from diverse scientific and personal backgrounds. In addition, weekly informational sessions provided an overview of the nature of each degree program along with admissions advice. Through pre-and post-program surveys, we found that students who registered for this experience already strongly identified with the STEMM community (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine). However, participation in the Virtual VSSA increased their sense of belonging. We also uncovered a gap in participants' understanding of postgraduate pathways prior to participation and found that our program significantly increased their self-reported understanding of postgraduate programs. It also increased their understanding of why someone would pursue a Ph.D. or Ph.D./MD versus M.D. These changes did not uniformly impact participants' planned career paths. Overall, by providing personal, tangible stories of M.D., MD/Ph.D., and Ph.D. training, the Virtual VSSA program offered seminars that positively impacted students' sense of belonging with and connection to the STEMM disciplines.


Subject(s)
Engineering/education , Mathematics/education , Technology/education , Academies and Institutes , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Faculty/education , Humans , Knowledge , Mentors/education , Minority Groups/education , Schools, Medical , Students , Universities
2.
Nature ; 599(7884): 331-334, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510573
3.
Elife ; 92020 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497821
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 534, 2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477413

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 epidemic affected the career choice of healthcare professionals and students. Career choice regret of healthcare professionals and students during COVID-19 outbreak and its affected factors are largely unexplored. METHODS: Convenience sample of nurses, doctors, and medical students were recruited from hospitals and universities nationwide. The data collected including demographic information, professional value before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, and career choice regret level by an online questionnaire. Multinominal logistic regression was employed to explore the factors associated with career choice regret. RESULTS: In total, 9322 participants of convenience sampling were enrolled in, including 5786 nurses, 1664 doctors, and 1872 medical students. 6.7% participants had career choice regret. Multinominal logistic regression analysis showed, compared to participants with no regret, that as levels of psychological resilience increased, the odds of experiencing career choice regret decreased (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.94-0.96), while participants with lower professional value evaluation after the COVID-19 outbreak had higher probability to experience career choice regret (OR = 1.55,95% CI 1.50-1.61). Medical students were more likely to regret than nurses (OR = 1.65,95% CI 1.20-2.28), participants whose career/major choice was not their personal ideal had higher risk of experience career choice regret (OR = 1.59,95% CI 1.29-1.96), while participants who were very afraid of the coronavirus had higher risk to experience career choice regret then participants with no fear at all (OR = 2.00,95% CI 1.24-3.21). As for the medical students, results indicated that medical students major in nursing and undergraduates had higher risk to experience career choice regret compared to medical students major in clinical medicine and postgraduate (Master or PhD), with an odds ratios of 2.65(95% CI 1.56-4.49) and 6.85 (95% CI 2.48-18.91)respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A minority of healthcare professionals and medical students regretted their career choices during the COVID-19 outbreak. Enhance personal psychological resilience and professional value would helpful to reduce career choice regret among healthcare professionals and students during pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Career Choice , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Emotions , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Sci Med Sport ; 23(9): 792-799, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454328

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in current field-based athletes. DESIGN: Meta-analysis. METHODS: This review was conducted and reported in accordance with PRISMA and pre-registered with PROSPERO. Articles were retrieved via online database search engines, with no date or language restriction. Studies investigating current field-based athletes (>18years) for CVD risk factors according to the European Society of Cardiology and American Heart Association were screened. Full texts were screened using Covidence and Cochrane criteria. Eligible articles were critically appraised using the AXIS tool. Individual study estimates were assessed by random-effect meta-analyses to examine the overall effect. RESULTS: This study was ascribed a 1b evidence level, according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. 41 studies were identified, including 5546 athletes from four sports; American football; soccer; rugby and baseball mean ages: 18-28. Despite participation in sport, increased body mass was associated with increased total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, hypertension, systolic blood pressure, and decreased high-density lipoprotein. Linemen had increased prevalence of hypertension compared to non-athletes. Conflicting findings on fasting glucose were prevalent. There were inconsistencies in screening and reporting of CVD risk factors. Sport specific anthropometric demands were associated with elevated prevalence of CVD risk factors, most notably: elevated body mass; dyslipidemia; elevated systolic blood pressure and; glucose. CONCLUSIONS: There are elevated levels of risk for CVD in some athletes, primarily football players. Lifestyle behaviours associated with elite athleticism, particularly football linemen potentially expose players to greater metabolic and CVD risk, which is not completely offset by sport participation.


Subject(s)
Athletes , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Sports/statistics & numerical data , Anthropometry , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Pressure , Career Choice , Humans , Prevalence , Risk Factors
9.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 21(5): e522-e525, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404073

ABSTRACT

The foundation programme is a 2-year training programme for newly qualified doctors and aims to bridge the gap between medical school and specialty training. The pandemic led to some major disruptions to foundation training. As foundation trainees, we encountered new challenges: there were reduced learning opportunities and our future paths became uncertain with changes to specialty training applications and membership exams. However, it is said that every crisis creates new opportunities and is a test of our resilience and innovativeness. There was the adoption of novel teaching methods, new research opportunities, increased importance given to teamwork and support for our wellbeing and mental health. We learnt lessons from this crisis that we should take forward to improve foundation training for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Attitude of Health Personnel , Career Choice , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical
10.
J Prof Nurs ; 36(3): 99, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382738
11.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(3): 462e-474e, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on surgical training programs, reflecting decreases in elective surgical cases and emergency restructuring of clinical teams. The effect of these measures on U.S. plastic surgery resident education and wellness has not been characterized. METHODS: An institutional review board-exempted anonymous survey was developed through expert panel discussion and pilot testing. All current U.S. plastic surgery trainees were invited to complete a cross-sectional 28-question survey in April of 2020. Respondents were queried regarding demographic information, educational experiences, and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 668 residents responded to the survey, corresponding to a 56.1 percent response rate. Sex, training program type, postgraduate year, and region were well represented within the sample. Nearly all trainees (97.1 percent) reported restructuring of their clinical teams. One-sixth of respondents were personally redeployed to assist with the care of COVID-19 patients. A considerable proportion of residents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their education (58.1 percent) and wellness (84.8 percent). Residents found virtual curriculum effective and meaningful, and viewed an average of 4.2 lectures weekly. Although most residents did not anticipate a change in career path, some reported negative consequences on job prospects or fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on U.S. plastic surgery education and wellness. Although reductions in case volume may be temporary, this may represent a loss of critical, supervised clinical experience. Some effects may be positive, such as the development of impactful virtual lectures that allow for cross-institutional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Status , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2120642, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355859

ABSTRACT

Importance: As medical faculty have central roles during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to study the pandemic's association with the vitality and careers of medical school faculty. Objective: To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected midcareer research faculty in academic medicine. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study included medical school faculty who participated in the C-Change Mentoring and Leadership Institute. All US medical school faculty recipients of recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) RO1, RO1-equivalent, and K awards were invited to apply to the institute. The 99 applicants who met inclusion criteria were stratified by degree (MD or MD/PhD vs PhD), gender, and race/ethnicity. Enrollment was offered to applicants randomly selected for 40 spots, demographically balanced by sex, underrepresented in medicine minority (URMM) status, and degree. In April 2020, an inquiry was emailed to faculty enrolled in the institute requesting responses to questions about meaning in work, career choice, and values. A qualitative analysis of narrative data responses, using grounded theory, was undertaken to determine key themes. This study is part of a NIH-funded randomized trial to test the efficacy of a group peer mentoring course for midcareer faculty and study the course's mechanisms of action. Main Outcomes and Measures: Key themes in data. Results: Of 40 enrolled participants, 39 responded to the inquiry, for a response rate of 97%. The analytic sample included 39 faculty members; 19 (47%) were women, 20 (53%) identified as URMM, and 20 (53%) had an MD or MD with PhD vs 19 (47%) with PhD degrees. Key themes in the data that emerged describing faculty lived experience of the pandemic included increased meaningfulness of work; professionalism and moral responsibility; enhanced relationships with colleagues; reassertion of career choice; disrupted research; impact on clinical work; attention to health disparities, social justice and advocacy; increased family responsibilities; psychological stress; and focus on leadership. Conclusions and Relevance: During the pandemic, diverse PhD and physician investigators reported increased meaningfulness in work and professionalism and enhanced relationships, all intrinsic motivators associated with vitality. Working during the pandemic appears to have produced intrinsic rewards positively associated with vitality, in addition to adverse mental health effects. These findings have implications for combatting burnout and retaining investigators in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Professionalism , Research Personnel/psychology , Adult , Career Choice , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
14.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 54: 151805, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336215

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have shown that relatively few MD, DO, and underrepresented in medicine (URM) students and physicians are matching into pathology residency in the United States (US). In the 2021 Main Residency Match, just 33.6% of filled pathology residency positions were taken by senior year students at US allopathic medical schools. This has been attributed to the fact that pathology is not a required rotation in most US medical schools, pathology is often taught in an integrated curriculum in the US where is does not stand out as a distinct field, and because the COVID-19 pandemic led to a suspension of in-person pathology rotations and electives. Ultimately, many US medical students fail to consider pathology as a career pathway. The objective of this article is to provide medical students with basic information, in the form of frequently asked questions (FAQs), about pathology training and career opportunities. This was accomplished by forming a team of MD and DO pathology attendings, pathology trainees, and a medical student from multiple institutions to create a pathology guide for medical students. This guide includes information about post-sophomore fellowships, 5 major pathology residency tracks, more than 20 fellowship pathways, and allopathic and osteopathic board examinations. This guide also contains photographs and descriptions of major pathology sub-specialties, including the daily and on-call duties and responsibilities of pathology residents. The exciting future of pathology is also discussed. This guide supports the agenda of the College of American Pathologists' (CAP) Pathologist Pipeline Initiative to improve student recruitment into pathology.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Fellowships and Scholarships , Internship and Residency , Pathology/education , Students, Medical , Biomedical Research/economics , Biomedical Research/education , Humans , Pathology/economics , Pathology/methods , Periodicals as Topic , Research Support as Topic , Specialization , United States
15.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(6): e1008989, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315876

ABSTRACT

Postdoctoral programs in the pharmaceutical and life science industry offer opportunities for personal and professional development, if you know why to join, what to expect, and how to prepare.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Drug Industry , Education, Pharmacy, Graduate/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Research Personnel , Humans
16.
MEDICC Rev ; 22(3): 12-15, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305048

ABSTRACT

Science journalism was little known in Cuba when Iramis Alonso wrote her the-sis on the specialized fi eld in 1990. That year, journalism degree from the Uni-versity of Havana in hand, she set off to Cuba's eastern countryside to complete two years of social service reporting for local, regional and national print media. Living in the mountains of Holguín, a typical day for the cub reporter took her to caves, forests and fi elds for stories on the intersection of science, culture and the environment. Alonso credits this formative experience with igniting her passion for investigative and sci-ence journalism, setting her on a unique career path as a journalist and editor specializing in the sciences writ large: climate change, astronomy, mathemat-ics and other hard sciences, engineer-ing, information technologies and social sciences, among others.


Subject(s)
Journalism , Social Sciences , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Cuba , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workforce
17.
J Osteopath Med ; 121(11): 843-848, 2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302038

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Medical student involvement in research is an important metric used by residency programs across most specialties to better assess the candidates' commitment to advancing medicine as well as their specialty of interest. One strategy is presentation of research work at national conferences in the specialty of interest; another is simply attending these events for networking purposes with program directors. However, attending these conferences carries cost. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the cost incurred by medical students to attend the premier annual scientific meeting of each major medical specialty in 2020, during the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and to evaluate whether "research intensive" specialties carried greater conference registration costs. METHODS: Potential medical specialties to which students can apply upon graduation were identified in the National Residency Match Program (NRMP). "Research intensive" specialties were defined as those with a mean number of abstracts, presentations, or publications ≥10 per matched applicant in the 2020 NRMP. The premier conference for each specialty was determined by membership in the American Medical Association House of Delegates in the NRMP. The cost to be a member of each conference's parent organization and attend the annual meeting were determined by internet search. Subgroup analysis was conducted to compare cost between research intensive and non research intensive specialties. RESULTS: The registration cost of 19 virtual conferences held in 2020 were analyzed in this study. The average cost to attend as a medical student member of the hosting organization for all conferences was $49.82 (range, $0-$331; SD±$92.18), while the average cost to attend as a nonmember across all conferences was $188.16 (range, $0-$595; SD±$176.35; p<0.001). Seven of 19 (36.8%) meetings had free registration for medical students who are members of the hosting organization. The premier meetings affiliated with the seven research intensive specialties had a significantly higher mean cost for medical students who were members of the parent organization than the meetings of the other specialties ($125.60 vs. $49.20; p=0.031). There was no significant difference in mean registration cost between research intensive and non research intensive specialty conference registration for nonmember medical students (p=0.85). Vascular surgery, radiation oncology, and emergency medicine were the three specialties with the most expensive medical student member registration fees overall ($331, $200, and $195, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Medical student attendance and presentation at national scientific meetings was found to be significantly more costly for research intensive specialties, although all meetings were held in an online format due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, this reflects an increased financial burden to an already indebted medical student population and compounds the stresses brought on by the pandemic. More national medical societies might consider free meeting registration to reflect support for medical students and encourage their continued participation in research to advance their specialty of interest.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medicine , Students, Medical , Career Choice , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 139(8): 896-897, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290764

ABSTRACT

Importance: Emerging vision scientists who have yet to be awarded their first independent funding may have their research careers disproportionately affected by early COVID-19-related disruptions. In September 2020, the Alliance for Eye and Vision Research convened a panel of 22 such scientists (nominated by their academic institutions) to communicate to the US Congress about the importance of vision research. As part of the effort, interviews were conducted with scientists about the effect of the pandemic on their research. Observations: Qualitative areas of adverse consequences from the early months of COVID-19 disruptions included striking interruptions of patient-based research, limits on other types of clinical research, loss of research time for scientists with young children (especially women), challenges with animal colonies and cell cultures, impediments to research collaborations, and loss of training time. Conclusions and Relevance: The early months during the COVID-19 pandemic increased career stress on many early-stage investigators in the vision field and delayed (and may potentially derail) their ability to attract their first independent research funding grant. As a result, federal and private granting agencies may need to take these factors into account to retain talented, early-stage vision researchers.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/complications , Career Choice , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Research Personnel/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Biomedical Research/education , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Ophthalmology/education , Quarantine/psychology , Research Personnel/psychology , Research Support as Topic/organization & administration , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
19.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(6): 729-730, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279401
20.
ANZ J Surg ; 91(6): 1059-1060, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266307
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