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2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 387, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in not only significant mortalities in Vietnam but has had an impact on its economy. Previous studies have highlighted how the pandemic has had a marginal impact on Vietnamese healthcare workers working at the frontlines. To date, there have been several other studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on intentions to transition between jobs among healthcare professionals, but this has yet to be explored amongst Vietnamese healthcare workers. METHODS: To achieve the study's objectives an online cross-sectional study was conducted between September to November 2021. Snowball sampling methodology was adopted for the recruitment of participants. The questionnaire that was used for this study comprised of the following sections: (a) socio-demographic information; (b) impact of COVID-19 on work; (c) risk of exposure to COVID-19; (d) career choices/intentions to change job, and (e) motivation at work. RESULTS: There were 5727 completed the entire survey. 17.2% of the respondents have had increased job satisfaction, 26.4% reported increased motivation to work, and 40.9% reported decreased motivation to work. Whilst there were changes in the daily work intensity and the level of work-related stress, more than 60% of respondents we sampled did not intend to switch careers. Demographic variables like gender, whether one was a student or an existing healthcare worker, and income related to work motivation. The community's stigma was a negative factor that declined intrinsic motivation as well as decreased work retention. CONCLUSIONS: Our study is instrumental in identifying the impact of COVID-19 on career choices amongst Vietnamese healthcare workers. The factors identified have clear implications for policymaking.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Health Personnel
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 427, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the medical undergraduates constitute the future workforce in China, their career preferences hold a significant bearing on the quality of healthcare services, particularly in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We aim to understand the current state of the willingness to practice medicine among medical undergraduates and to analyze the related influential factors. METHODS: During the COVID-19 epidemic, we conducted a cross-sectional survey via an online platform from February 15, 2022, to May 31, 2022, to collect participants' demographic information, psychology, and factors influencing their career choices. The general self-efficacy scale (GSES) was used to evaluate medical students' perceptions of their self-efficacy. Futhermore, we conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to explore the influencing factors of medical undergraduates' willingness to pursure a caree in medicine. RESULTS: A total of 2348 valid questionnaires were included, and 1573 (66.99%) were willing to practice medicine for medical undergraduates after graduation. The mean GESE scores in the willingness group (2.87 ± 0.54) were significantly higher than those of the unwillingness group (2.73 ± 0.49). The multiple logistic regression showed that several factors were positively associated with willingness to practice medicine as a career, including students' GSES score (OR = 1.87), current major, household income, personal ideals (OR = 1.97), family support (OR = 1.44), high income (OR = 1.77), and social respect (OR = 2.19). Compared with those who were very afraid of COVID-19, students who did not express any fear towards the COVID-19 pandemic had a higher preference for choosing the medical profession as a career. Conversely, students thinking of high tension in the doctor-patient relationship, heavy workload, and long training were less likely to choose medical work after graduation. CONCLUSIONS: The study highlights a noteworthy prevalence of medical undergraduates who expressed their willingness to pursue medicine as a career post-graduation. Several factors, including but not limited to current major, household income, psychological factors, personal preferences, and career needs or preferences, were significantly associated with this willingness. Moreover, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical students' career choices cannot be overlooked.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Career Choice
4.
Br J Community Nurs ; 28(5): 216-218, 2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320412
5.
Health Econ ; 32(5): 1120-1147, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2289408

ABSTRACT

This study examines the long-term effect of a pandemic on a crucial human capital decision, namely college major choice. Using China's 2008-2016 major-level National College Entrance Examination (Gaokao) entry grades, we find that the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) had a substantial deterrent effect on the choice of majoring in medicine among high school graduates who experienced the pandemic in their childhood. In provinces with larger intensities of SARS impact, medical majors become less popular as the average Gaokao grades of enrolled students decline. Further evidence from a nationally representative survey shows that the intensity of the SARS impact significantly decreases children's aspirations to pursue medical occupations, but does not affect their parents' expectations for their children to enter the medical profession. Our discussion on the effect mechanism suggests that the adverse influence of SARS on the popularity of medical majors likely originates from students' childhood experiences.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Child , Humans , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Pandemics , Career Choice , Students , China/epidemiology
8.
Nurse Educ ; 48(4): E116-E121, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250600

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although in the past, the decision to enter the nursing profession was mainly due to intrinsic motives, more recent generations present additional extrinsic career choice motives. The motivation of choosing a nursing career may be affected by global health events, such as COVID-19. PURPOSE: To examine the motivation for choosing a nursing career during COVID-19. METHODS: A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted among 211 first-year nursing students at a university in Israel. A questionnaire was distributed during 2020 and 2021. Linear regression evaluated the motives that predict choosing a nursing career during COVID-19. RESULTS: Intrinsic motives were the leading motives for choosing a nursing career in a univariate analysis. A multivariate linear model revealed that choosing a nursing career during the pandemic was associated with extrinsic motives (ß= .265, P < .001). Intrinsic motives did not predict choosing a nursing career during COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Reassessment of motives among candidates may help the efforts of faculty and nursing to recruit and retain nurses in the profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Nursing Education Research , Career Choice , Surveys and Questionnaires , Motivation
9.
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus ; 60(2): 95-100, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283091

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the factors influencing residents' choice to pursue a pediatric ophthalmology fellowship. METHODS: A nine-question survey was distributed to third-year (PGY-4) ophthalmology residents of United States-based Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education residency training programs in ophthalmology. RESULTS: One hundred two of 502 residents completed the survey. Fifty percent of all respondents had no debt and 14.7% had more than $300,000 in debt. Forty-four (43.1%) rated the quality of pediatric ophthalmology teaching in their residency program as "excellent," 37 (36.3%) did not enjoy performing clinical ophthalmologic examinations on children, 83 (81.4%) had a clinical role model in pediatric ophthalmology, 29 (28.4%) believed pediatric ophthalmology is a prestigious subspecialty, 47 (46.1%) reported that economic factors influenced their post-residency decisions, 60 (58.8%) believed a hybrid fellowship combining adult cataract surgery and pediatric ophthalmology would be a popular fellowship, and 58 (56.9%) had a first-year (PGY-2) residency rotation of at least 1 month in pediatric ophthalmology. Enjoying the ophthalmologic examination of children most strongly predicted whether a resident would pursue a pediatric ophthalmology fellowship (Phi = 0.482). CONCLUSIONS: The desire to work with children overwhelmingly superseded other factors influencing a resident's decision to pursue a pediatric ophthalmology fellowship. Improving economic issues may be one of several factors that increase the attractiveness of the pediatric ophthalmology subspecialty. There is a dilemma in encouraging more residents to pursue pediatric ophthalmology in the setting of fewer technological advances consistent with lower perceived prestige. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2023;60(2):95-100.].


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Ophthalmology , Adult , Child , Humans , United States , Ophthalmology/education , Career Choice , Education, Medical, Graduate , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce
10.
Rural Remote Health ; 23(1): 7409, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271584

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite substantial investment in rural workforce support, sustaining the necessary recruitment and retention of general practitioners (GPs) in rural areas remains a challenge. Insufficient medical graduates are choosing a general/rural practice career. Medical training at postgraduate level, particularly for those 'between' undergraduate medical education and specialty training, remains strongly reliant on hospital experience in larger hospitals, potentially diverting interest away from general/rural practice. The Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund (RJDTIF) program offered junior hospital doctors (interns) an experience of 10 weeks in a rural general practice, aiming to increase their consideration of general/rural practice careers This study aimed to evaluate the educational and potential workforce impact of the RJDTIF program. METHODS: Up to 110 places were established during 2019-2020 for Queensland's interns to undertake an 8-12-week rotation (depending on individual hospital rosters) out of regional hospitals to work in a rural general practice. Participants were surveyed before and after the placement, although only 86 were invited due to the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Descriptive quantitative statistics were applied to the survey data. Four semi-structured interviews were conducted to further explore the experiences post-placement, with audio-recordings transcribed verbatim. Semi-structured interview data were analysed using inductive, reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: In total, 60 interns completed either survey, although only 25 were matched as completing both surveys. About half (48%) indicated they had preferenced the rural GP term and 48% indicated strong enthusiasm for the experience. General practice was indicated as the most likely career option for 50%, other general specialty 28% and subspecialty 22%. Likelihood to be working in a regional/rural location in 10 years was indicated as 'likely' or 'very likely' for 40%, 'unlikely' for 24% and 'unsure' for 36%. The two most common reasons for preferencing a rural GP term were experiencing training in a primary care setting (50%) and gaining more clinical skills through increased patient exposure (22%). The overall impact on pursuing a primary care career was self-assessed as much more likely by 41%, but much less by 15%. Interest in a rural location was less influenced. Those rating the term poor or average had low pre-placement enthusiasm for the term. The qualitative analysis of interview data produced two themes: importance of the rural GP term for interns (hands-on learning, skills improvement, influence on future career choice and engagement with the local community), and potential improvements to rural intern GP rotations. CONCLUSION: Most participants reported a positive experience from their rural GP rotation, which was recognised as a sound learning experience at an important time with respect to choosing a specialty. Despite the challenges posed by the pandemic, this evidence supports the investment in programs that provide opportunities for junior doctors to experience rural general practice in these formative postgraduate years to stimulate interest in this much-needed career pathway. Focusing resources on those who have at least some interest and enthusiasm may improve its workforce impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , General Practitioners , Rural Health Services , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Family Practice/education , Career Choice , Professional Practice Location
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 158, 2023 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268834

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study explored the specialty preferences of China-educated international medical students (IMSs), who are mainly from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and constitute a potential medical workforce both for their home countries and foreign countries, and the influence of migration intentions on their specialty preferences. METHODS: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted at 5 universities in China. The questionnaire link was distributed electronically among the IMSs at the 5 universities via emails. The questionnaire enquired IMSs' demographic information, migration intentions and their specialty preferences. The Chi-square test was applied to determine the influence of the respondent's gender, intention to practise in the home country and intention to practise in a high-income country on their specialty choices. The Chi-square test was also applied to determine the influence of the respondent's gender, year of study and country of origin on their preferences for generalist-orientated or non-generalist orientated specialties. RESULTS: Altogether, 452 IMSs returned their responses, yielding a response rate of 64.1%. Approximately half of the IMSs planned to not return to their home country. The most selected specialty was general surgery and the least selected specialty was physical medicine and rehabilitation. No significant differences were evident in most specialty preferences between those who intended to return home and those who intended to stay abroad. Among the IMSs having intentions of returning to their home country, male students tended to choose a generalist-orientated specialty, while female students tended to choose a non-generalist-orientated specialty. CONCLUSION: China-educated IMSs could play important roles in the primary care services as well as other shortage specialties both for their home countries or foreign countries. Therefore, it is recommended that governments in these countries plan migration and recruitment policies that cater for these studying-abroad medical students from LMICs, especially in this challenging time during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Male , Female , Developing Countries , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Career Choice , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
GMS J Med Educ ; 40(1): Doc4, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286867

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Students frequently rely on part-time jobs to earn a living wage. We sought to evaluate the sociodemographic status of Swiss medical students and their perception regarding equal career opportunities in view of impaired part-time job opportunities under the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We conducted an anonymous online survey among Swiss medical students from Bern and Geneva over a period of 4 months between December 2020 and April 2021. We evaluated sociodemographic data, current living situation, part-time job occupation as well as other sources of income to fund living expenses, and, by means of a five-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree and 5=strongly agree), whether COVID-19 was perceived as impeding equal career opportunities. Results: Of 968 participants, corresponding to around 13.8% of all medical students in Switzerland, 81.3% had part-time jobs. Amongst the employed, 54.8% worked to afford living expenses and 28.9% reported a negative financial impact due to reduced part-time jobs under the pandemic. The loss of part-time jobs was perceived to make medical studies a privilege for students with higher socioeconomic status (4.11±1.0), whose opportunity to study is independent of a regular income. A governmental backup plan was considered crucial to support affected students (4.22±0.91). Discussion: COVID-19 and its sequelae are perceived as a threat for Swiss medical students and lead to a disadvantage for those with lower socioeconomic status. Nationwide measures should be established to foster equal career opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology , Pandemics , Career Choice , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupations
13.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1081360, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286052

ABSTRACT

Introduction: To unearth superior countermeasures that improve psychological health and upgrade the quality of employment for medical students in China in post-epidemic era, this study was designed to determine the possible factors affecting psychological status and future career choice of this population. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was carried out. Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) were applied to measure psychological state. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were adopted to filtrate related factors for psychological health and employment intention. Results: A total of 936 medical students, including 522 from eastern universities and 414 from western universities, were enrolled in the study. Anxiety among students in China's western universities was higher than that in China's eastern universities (30.4% vs. 22.0%), but no differences in the occurrences of stress (11.4% vs. 13.4%), depression (28.7% vs. 24.5%) and insomnia (30.7% vs. 25.7%). Grades, academic ranking, household income, attitudes about COVID-19 were associated with the occurrence of psychological problems. In addition, major, education level, academic ranking, family income, and clinical experience may affect the choice of future employment location and employment income. Notably, household income affected by COVID-19 and the perception of epidemic prevention and control resulted in changes in future employment region and income. COVID-19 can lead medical students with psychological problems to have a negative attitude toward future employment. Encouragingly, multiple activities, namely, proactive consideration of employment, taking part in career planning training lectures and timely adjustment of career planning, were beneficial to the professional identity of medical students. Conclusion: This study suggests that medical student psychology is influenced by COVID-19 and academic and financial pressures; actively coping with COVID-19 and making career planning in advance will contribute to optimizing future employment. Our findings provide a potent guideline for relevant departments to accurately adjust job deployment and for medical students to actively choose a career in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , China/epidemiology
14.
Acad Pediatr ; 23(5): 1011-1019, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242675

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Determine extent of impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on career choice and employment of pediatricians entering pediatric workforce. METHODS: A national, cross-sectional electronic survey of pediatricians registering for the 2021 American Board of Pediatrics initial general certifying examination on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on 3 aspects of career (career choice, employment search, employment offers) was performed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression to determine factors associated with the pandemic's impact on career. Thematic analysis was used to generate themes for open-ended survey questions. RESULTS: Over half (52.3%, 1767 of 3380) of pediatricians responded. Overall, 29.1% reported that the pandemic impacted their career (career choice [10.4%], employment search [15.6%], or employment offers [19.0%]); applicants to general pediatrics (GP) (52.9%) or pediatric hospitalist (PH) positions (49.3%) were most affected. Multivariate logistic regression modeling found those applying to GP (odds ratio [OR]: 3.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.22-6.60), PH (OR: 9.02, 95% CI: 5.60-14.52), and International Medical Graduates (IMGs) (OR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.39-2.59) most likely to experience any career impact. CONCLUSIONS: Almost one third of pediatricians registering for the initial general pediatrics certifying examination reported their careers were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, with 10% of respondents reporting the pandemic impacted their career choice. Half of new pediatricians seeking employment reported being impacted by the pandemic, particularly IMGs. As the pandemic evolves, career advising will continue to be critical to support trainees in their career choices and employment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Child , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pediatricians , Workforce , Career Choice
15.
J Surg Educ ; 80(5): 646-656, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2221073

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted students' opportunities for away rotations (ARs). Schools and specialty organizations innovated by supplementing in-person ARs (ipARs) with virtual ARs (vARs). We sought to determine how ipAR and vAR completion varied by intended specialty among 2021 graduates. DESIGN: Using de-identified Association of American Medical Colleges 2021 Graduation Questionnaire (GQ) data, we examined AR completion by specialty and community-based school attendance (among other variables) in univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression models. SETTING: Students graduating from MD-degree granting U.S. medical schools were invited to complete the 2021 GQ, administered electronically on a confidential basis. PARTICIPANTS: Our study included data for 15,451 GQ respondents (74% of all 2021 graduates). RESULTS: Among GQ respondents, 18% (2,787/15,451) completed ARs: 8% (1,279/15,451) ipAR only, 8% (1,218/15,451) vAR only, and 2% (290/15,541) both. In univariate analysis, specialty and community-based school attendance (each p < 0.001), among other variables, were associated with ipAR and with vAR. In multivariable logistic regression, surgical specialties associated with greater odds of AR completion (vs. general surgery reference) included neurological surgery (ipAR: adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.1-3.3; vAR AOR=3.1, 95% CI=1.9-4.9), ophthalmology (ipAR: AOR=2.3, 95% CI=1.6-3.3; vAR: AOR=2.5, 95% CI=1.7-3.7), orthopedic surgery (ipAR: AOR=2.5, 95% CI=1.8-3.4; vAR: AOR=12.4, 95%CI=9,2-16.5), otolaryngology (ipAR: AOR=1.8, 95% CI=1.2-2.8; vAR: AOR=4,8, 95% CI=3.4-6.9), plastic surgery (ipAR: AOR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2-3.5; vAR: AOR=13.9, 95% CI=9.3-20.7) and urology (ipAR: AOR=2,1, 95% CI=1.4-3.2; vAR: AOR=11.9, 95% CI=8.4-16.8). Community-based medical school attendance was also associated with greater odds of ipAR (AOR=4.6, 95% CI=3.1-6.7) and vAR (AOR=1.8, 95% CI=1.4-2.3). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of AR completion was low. Differences we observed by specialty and medical school type aligned well with recommended circumstances for ipARs for the class of 2021. Substantial specialty-specific differences in vAR completion suggest that various surgical specialties were among the early innovators in this regard.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medicine , Students, Medical , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Career Choice , Schools, Medical
16.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0279411, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197095

ABSTRACT

Hong Kong hospitality and tourism industry has been battered by the triple whammy of social unrest, Sino-US trade war and COVID-19 pandemic in recent years. To understand how vulnerable tourism students may be in terms of career shock when facing the three major challenges, 407 tourism students in Hong Kong were surveyed. Structural equation modelling found a positive correlation between affect (an intrinsic, motivating factor) and extraneous events (an extrinsic, demotivating factor), indicating that motivation and demotivating factors may co-exist. Affect was more positively correlated with three career choice outcomes (intent to join the industry, desire for a lifelong career, and resilience in face of unfavourable circumstances) than was Extraneous. In face of career shock arising from extraneous events, tourism students still tend to have a strong intent to join the workforce, take it as a lifelong career, and remain resilient despite the hardship. However, the career shock was a greater concern for those in hotel-related disciplines and for students aged over 20 than younger ones. The findings offer an empirical basis to guide policy makers, academia and the industry in strategy formulation to ensure sustainable quality and manpower supply in the post-crisis future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Career Choice , Humans , Adult , Pandemics , Tourism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students
17.
Fam Med ; 55(1): 3-11, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2205128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic restricted the availability of face-to-face primary care visits. This rapidly increased the proportion of primary care patient-clinician visits conducted virtually and asynchronously (remote consultations via video, telephone, and web-based text/email), altering the educational environment for medical students. Our study explored the impact of the increased proportion of primary care visits conducted virtually and asynchronously, on medical students' self-reported interest in pursuing a career in general (family) practice. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey study of medical students at six universities within England and Wales to explore the impact of the increased proportion of primary care visits conducted virtually and asynchronously on medical students' interest in pursuing a career in general practice. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-four medical students were recruited between December 2020 and May 2021; 79 (51%) of the participants reported being less interested in pursuing a career in general practice as a result of the increased proportion of virtual and asynchronous primary care visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. This increased to 104 (68%) of the participants reporting being less interested should primary care visits continue to be delivered virtually or asynchronously by default. Analysis of open-ended survey questions identified a poorer educational experience, concerns regarding the impact on patient care, an isolated working environment and technological challenges as key negative themes. CONCLUSIONS: Sociable, supportive working and learning environments and offering equitable care are important motivators for the future workforce. There is a need to develop robust training and assessment in patient-clinician virtual visits and asynchronous communication and to integrate this into curricula.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Students, Medical , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Career Choice
19.
J Clin Invest ; 132(24)2022 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2194489
20.
Curr Opin Cardiol ; 38(2): 94-102, 2023 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190893

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic prohibited Canadian medical students from in-person observerships. This may be particularly detrimental to under-represented groups that may consider surgical subspecialties. To address the unprecedented need for alternative surgical career exploration and diversity within the profession, The University of Toronto Cardiac Surgery Interest Group and Division of Cardiac Surgery collaborated on virtual experiential programming. RECENT FINDINGS: Medical students were invited to virtual (1) observerships of a cardiac bypass case, (2) mentorship sessions with surgeons, (3) resident teaching sessions, (4) multidisciplinary case-based Heart Team discussions to further their understanding of the scope of Cardiac surgery, and (5) a virtual coronary anastomosis training program. Additionally, a comprehensive virtual program was spearheaded to increase interest in Cardiac surgery among low-income Black high school students. SUMMARY: Trainee response to the virtual education, mentorship, and skill acquisition was positive. Trainees reported high levels of interest in the profession, particularly among females and under-represented minorities, supporting the principles of equity diversity, and inclusion in Cardiac surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Female , Humans , Curriculum , Diversity, Equity, Inclusion , Canada , Career Choice , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/education
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