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1.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
N Engl J Med ; 385(27): 2499-2501, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592290
5.
FASEB J ; 35(11): e21973, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462504

ABSTRACT

Contemporary science has become increasingly multi-disciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. Collaborative research efforts have enabled investigators to respond to the demands of an increasingly complex 21st century landscape, including pressing scientific challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For over 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs-led by the National Institutes of Health-is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Intersectoral Collaboration , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academies and Institutes/organization & administration , Career Mobility , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Policy , Program Evaluation , Research Support as Topic , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , Universities/organization & administration
8.
Trends Cancer ; 7(10): 879-882, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373288

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a detrimental effect on research. However, little has been done to identify and solve the unique challenges faced by early career investigators (ECIs). As a group of American Cancer Society-funded ECIs, we provide recommendations for solving these challenges in the aftermath of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Research Personnel , Work-Life Balance , Humans , Mentoring , Research Personnel/economics , Societies, Scientific
9.
J Biomol Tech ; 32(2): 74-82, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365806

ABSTRACT

Across the United States, the number of staff scientists (master's- or doctoral-level professionals working in nonfaculty roles) has grown by 35% since 2010, and they play an increasingly important role in research efforts. However, few targeted resources are available, which potentially limits the effectiveness of this group. Launched in 2016, the staff scientist path at Emory has tripled in size over 4 y to 138 staff. The present case study evaluated the perceptions of staff scientists related to onboarding experiences and professional development needs, including those needs arising from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) impacts in the workplace. A survey of Emory staff scientists was conducted from May to June 2019 as part of a program evaluation initiative to assess perceptions of onboarding and professional development opportunities. Interviews with a subset of scientists informed the survey development and identified COVID-19-related impacts on daily work. Results indicated the need for targeted orientation resources specific to staff scientists, accurate and timely information and resources to support scientists' supervisors, and professional development for scientists in leadership and management-related skills. Remote work associated with COVID-19 accentuated the need for managerial skills, including team development in digital work environments. Findings from this case study can inform policies and practices at Emory and other institutions that employ a similar staff scientist model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Workplace , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Career Mobility , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
J Biomol Tech ; 32(2): 74-82, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268398

ABSTRACT

Across the United States, the number of staff scientists (master's- or doctoral-level professionals working in nonfaculty roles) has grown by 35% since 2010, and they play an increasingly important role in research efforts. However, few targeted resources are available, which potentially limits the effectiveness of this group. Launched in 2016, the staff scientist path at Emory has tripled in size over 4 y to 138 staff. The present case study evaluated the perceptions of staff scientists related to onboarding experiences and professional development needs, including those needs arising from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) impacts in the workplace. A survey of Emory staff scientists was conducted from May to June 2019 as part of a program evaluation initiative to assess perceptions of onboarding and professional development opportunities. Interviews with a subset of scientists informed the survey development and identified COVID-19-related impacts on daily work. Results indicated the need for targeted orientation resources specific to staff scientists, accurate and timely information and resources to support scientists' supervisors, and professional development for scientists in leadership and management-related skills. Remote work associated with COVID-19 accentuated the need for managerial skills, including team development in digital work environments. Findings from this case study can inform policies and practices at Emory and other institutions that employ a similar staff scientist model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Workplace , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Career Mobility , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
Acad Radiol ; 28(9): 1185-1190, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242843

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic stresses the tenuous balance between domestic obligations and academic output for women across professions. Our investigation aims to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on the home duties and workplace productivity of academic radiologists with respect to gender. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 49-question survey was distributed to 926 members of Association of University Radiologists in October 2020. Several categories were addressed: demographics; workplace changes; stress levels and personal experiences with illness; time spent on domestic obligations; and perception of productivity during COVID-19. Statistical analyses were performed using SAS version 9.4 software (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). RESULTS: A total of 96 responses across 30 states, 53.1% male and 46.9% female were received. Women report spending more time on unpaid domestic duties than men prior to COVID-19, with men spending a median of 5-10 h/wk and women spending a median of 10-15 h/wk (p = 0.043). With pandemic onset, both genders reported that women did more of the homecare, when not split equally. Women with young children reported a significant decrease in work-from-home productivity compared to men with young children (p = 0.007). Men reported they had more time to be productive compared to women (p = 0.012). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to disrupt the advancement of women in radiology leadership roles by creating disparate effects on productivity due to increased workloads at home for women. This could potentially lead to decreases in promotions and research productivity in years to come that far outlast the acute phases of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , Career Mobility , Child , Child, Preschool , Faculty, Medical , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
13.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0246899, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218416

ABSTRACT

This study is the first in the world to investigate the expected impact of the COVID-19 crisis on career outcomes and career aspirations. To this end, high-quality survey research with a relevant sample of Flemish (Belgian) employees was conducted. About 21% of them fear losing their jobs due to the crisis-14% are concerned that they will even lose their jobs in the near future. In addition, 26% expect to miss out on promotions that they would have received had the COVID-19 crisis not occurred. This fear of a negative impact is higher in vulnerable groups, such migrants. In addition, we observe that many respondents believe they will look at the labour market differently and will have different work-related priorities in the future. In this respect, more than half of the respondents indicate that they have attached more importance to working conditions and work-life balance since the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Employment , Adult , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Mobility , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Work-Life Balance
14.
J Infus Nurs ; 43(4): 185-186, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169711
15.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(3): 151-153, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165568

ABSTRACT

The decision to continue a career advancement program in midst of our health system's response to the COVID-19 pandemic was made after weighing the pros and cons. At a time when high priority was placed on educating the frontline nurses on rapidly changing protocols and supporting mental health, our organization reallocated resources and ways of doing things in order to maintain some form of normalcy. By doing so, we were able to demonstrate our commitment to professional development even in the face of adversity and highlight the resourcefulness of nursing professional development practitioners. As the COVID-19 crisis has laid bare, we live in an increasingly complex and interconnected world, and agility will be essential to future nursing professional development practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Career Mobility , Nursing Staff/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Evaluation Research
19.
Autism Res ; 14(6): 1078-1087, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147553

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted autism research and services. Early career researchers (ECRs) are particularly vulnerable to the impact of the pandemic on job security and career development. The goal of this study was to capture the challenges ECRs are facing during the pandemic and the supports that are needed for career development and research. ECRs were invited to complete an online survey that focused on four major areas; the impact of COVID-19 on their research; changes in productivity due to COVID-19; changes to training due to COVID-19; and current mental health. 150 ECRs were eligible and provided sufficient data for inclusion. All but one ECRs reported their research had been negatively impacted by the pandemic. Reductions in productivity were reported by 85% of ECRs. The biggest impacts included recruitment of participants, increased needs at home and personal mental health. ECRs reported a 3-fold increase in burnout, as well as increased anxiety. ECR supports, such as funding, flexibility, and tenure extensions, are required to ensure ASD research does not suffer from a "lost generation" of researchers. LAY SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has had negative impacts on research around the world. Loss of productivity impedes autism research discoveries. However, researchers in the earliest phases of their career, specifically postdoctoral fellows through individuals in assistant professor (or equivalent) positions, are particularly vulnerable to long-lasting effects of pandemic-related disruptions which may limit their ability to continue as autism researchers. This survey highlights the needs of this group and identifies mechanisms by which these early career researchers may be supported in this time. This is critical to ensure the next generation of ASD researchers and clinician scientists continue on the path to advancing understanding of autism in the decades to come.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Efficiency , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Research Personnel , Biomedical Research/trends , Career Mobility , Humans , Research Personnel/economics , Research Personnel/education , Research Personnel/psychology
20.
Econ Hum Biol ; 41: 100997, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141727

ABSTRACT

This study examines the effect of Income Support Programs (ISPs) on job search effort, work- place mobility, COVID-19 cases, and mortality growth rates. To identify ISPs' causal effect, I use the variation in their introductions' timing across countries and implement a difference-in-difference and multi-event analysis method. I find that ISPs led to a 4.4-8.29 percentage points reduction in workplace mobility and a 6.6-11.6 percentage points reduction in job search effort levels. They also caused a 21.8-47.7 and 17.1-29.7 percentage points reduction in the COVID-19 case growth rate and COVID-19 mortality growth rates, respectively. Using the event analysis estimates, I simulated the counterfactual job search effort, workplace mobility, and the number of COVID-19 cases and mortality without income support programs. The average global job search effort and workplace mobility without ISPs would have been 11.12 and 9.26 percent higher than the observed mean job search effort and workplace mobility. However, these would have come at the cost of 3.69 million and 166, 690 additional COVID-19 cases and mortality than the cases and deaths registered by May 15th.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Mobility , Income/statistics & numerical data , Public Assistance/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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