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1.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 56, 2022 01 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635427

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is sparse evidence on the impact on vulnerable populations of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of our study was to explore burden and mental wellbeing (including depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms) in caregivers of people with dementia during the first wave of the pandemic in Italy and southern Switzerland, two bordering regions severely hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted an online cross-sectional survey with family carers of people with dementia between May and June 2020. We registered socio-demographic characteristics, and information about the relationship with the care recipient, dementia subtype, care inputs from others, and the need of care of the person with dementia. We measured caregiver burden with the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), psychological distress with the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21), and perceived isolation with the 3-item UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLALS3). RESULTS: Caregivers (N =571) reported moderate to severe care-related burden (mean=54.30; SD=18.33), moderate anxiety symptoms (mean=10.04; SD=6.93), mild depressive symptoms (mean=11.79; SD=6.12) and mild stress (mean=12.95; SD=5.53), and 72.3% of participants reported to feel lonely. All scores were significantly more severe in Swiss compared to Italian caregivers (all p values<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: We found that caregivers' burden, anxiety symptoms, depression and perceived loneliness were marked during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, in two severely hit bordering countries. Regional differences in the impact of the epidemic on caregivers could be due to contextual, societal, and cultural circumstances. As the pandemic endures, support to caregivers of people with dementia should be proportionate and tailored to needs and adapted to contextual factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMC Palliat Care ; 20(1): 193, 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, millions of people with advanced cancer and their family caregivers are experiencing physical and psychological distress. Psychosocial support and education can reduce distress and prevent avoidable healthcare resource use. To date, we lack knowledge from large-scale studies on which interventions generate positive outcomes for people with cancer and their informal caregivers' quality of life. This protocol describes the DIAdIC study that will evaluate the effectiveness of two psychosocial and educational interventions aimed at improving patient-family caregiver dyads' emotional functioning and self-efficacy. METHODS: We will conduct an international multicenter three-arm randomized controlled trial in Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. In each country, 156 dyads (936 in total) of people with advanced cancer and their family caregiver will be randomized to one of the study arms: 1) a nurse-led face-to-face intervention (FOCUS+), 2) a web-based intervention (iFOCUS) or 3) a control group (care as usual). The two interventions offer tailored psychoeducational support for patient-family caregiver dyads. The nurse-led face-to-face intervention consists of two home visits and one online video session and the web-based intervention is completed independently by the patient-family caregiver dyad in four online sessions. The interventions are based on the FOCUS intervention, developed in the USA, that addresses five core components: family involvement, optimistic outlook, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. The FOCUS intervention will be adapted to the European context. The primary outcomes are emotional functioning and self-efficacy of the patient and the family caregiver, respectively. The secondary outcomes are quality of life, benefits of illness, coping, dyadic communication, and ways of giving support of the patient and family caregiver. DISCUSSION: DIAdIC aims to develop cost-effective interventions that integrate principles of early palliative care into standard care. The cross-country setup in six European countries allows for comparison of effectiveness of the interventions in different healthcare systems across Europe. By focusing on empowerment of the person with cancer and their family caregiver, the results of this RCT can contribute to the search for cost-effective novel interventions that can relieve constraints on professional healthcare. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registration on ClinicalTrials.gov on 12/11/2020, identifier NCT04626349 . DATE AND VERSION IDENTIFIER: 20211209_DIAdIC_Protocol_Article.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Neoplasms , Humans , Internet , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Neoplasms/therapy , Psychosocial Support Systems , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 119, 2022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630760

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been highly disruptive, with the closure of schools causing sudden shifts for students, educators and parents/caregivers to remote learning from home (home-schooling). Limited research has focused on home-schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic, with most research to date being descriptive in nature. The aim of the current study was to comprehensively quantify the psychosocial impacts of home-schooling on parents and other caregivers, and identify factors associated with better outcomes. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of 1,296 Australian adults was recruited at the beginning of Australian COVID-19 restrictions in late-March 2020, and followed up every two weeks. Data for the current study were drawn from waves two and three. Surveys assessed psychosocial outcomes of psychological distress, work and social impairment, and wellbeing, as well as a range of home-schooling factors. RESULTS: Parents and caregivers who were home-schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic experienced significantly higher levels of psychological distress and work/social impairment compared to those who were not home-schooling or had no school-aged children. A current mental health diagnosis or lower levels of perceived support from their child's school negatively affected levels of psychological distress, work and social impairment, and wellbeing in parents and caregivers involved in home-schooling. CONCLUSIONS: The mental health impacts of home-schooling were high and may rise as periods of home-schooling increase in frequency and duration. Recognising and acknowledging the challenges of home-schooling is important, and should be included in psychosocial assessments of wellbeing during periods of school closure. Emotional and instrumental support is needed for those involved in home-schooling, as perceived levels of support is associated with improved outcomes. Proactive planning by schools to support parents may promote better outcomes and improved home-schooling experiences for students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Australia/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613759

ABSTRACT

Social distancing measures imposed because of the COVID-19 pandemic presented challenges to the health and wellbeing of people with dementia, family carers, and healthcare professionals. This study investigated the impact of these measures on all involved in the care for people with dementia. For this qualitative study, 20 family carers and 20 healthcare professionals from home care and long-term care (LTC) participated in a semi-structured interview. Interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic analysis approach. For people with dementia, the social distancing measures resulted in a deterioration of physical health. The impact on their emotional state and behaviour depended on the stage of dementia. Family carers experienced difficulty coping with visiting restrictions, anxiety regarding safety, and changes in carer burden. Healthcare professionals had an increased workload, and felt guilty about adhering to restrictive measures. Differences between home care and LTC were reported (i.e., societal initiatives focussed on LTC, scarcity of activities for community-dwelling people with dementia, use of personal protective equipment more intrusive for home care). The social distancing measures had a negative impact on persons with dementia, their family carers, and healthcare professionals. More attention is needed for community-dwelling people with dementia and family carers in times of social isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers , Delivery of Health Care , Dementia/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142057, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604871

ABSTRACT

Importance: Closure of day care centers has been implemented globally to contain the COVID-19 pandemic but has negative effects on children's health and psychosocial well-being. Objective: To investigate the feasibility of surveillance among children and childcare workers and to model the efficacy of surveillance on viral spread prevention. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted at 9 day care centers in Wuerzburg, Germany, from October 2020 to March 2021. Participants included children attending day care, childcare workers, and household members. Participating day care centers were assigned to different surveillance modules in a nonrandomized feasibility study. A mathematical model for SARS-CoV-2 spread in day care centers was developed to identify optimal surveillance. Interventions: Modules 1, 2, and 3 involved continuous surveillance of asymptomatic children and childcare workers by SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction testing of either midturbinate nasal swabs twice weekly (module 1) or once weekly (module 2) or self-sampled saliva samples twice weekly (module 3). Module 4 involved symptom-based, on-demand testing of children, childcare workers, and their household members by oropharyngeal swabs. All participants underwent SARS-CoV-2 antibody status testing before and after the sampling period. Questionnaires on attitudes and perception of the pandemic were administered in weeks 1, 6, and 12. Mathematical modeling was used to estimate SARS-CoV-2 spread in day care centers. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcomes were acceptance of the respective surveillance protocols (feasibility study) and the estimated number of secondary infections (mathematical modeling). Results: Of 954 eligible individuals (772 children and 182 childcare workers), 592 (62%), including 442 children (median [IQR] age, 3 [2-4] years; 214 [48.6%] female) and 150 childcare workers (median [IQR] age, 29 [25-44] years; 129 [90.8%] female) participated in the surveillance. In total, 4755 tests for SARS-CoV-2 detected 2 infections (1 childcare worker and 1 adult household member). Acceptance for continuous surveillance was highest for biweekly saliva testing (150 of 221 eligible individuals [67.9%; 95% CI, 61.5%-73.7%]) compared with biweekly (51 of 117 individuals [43.6%; 95% CI, 35.0%-52.6%]) and weekly (44 of 128 individuals [34.4%; 95% CI, 26.7%-43.0%]) midturbinate swabbing (P < .001). Dropout rates were higher for midturbinate swabbing (biweekly, 11 of 62 participants [18%]; once weekly, 11 of 55 participants [20%]) than for saliva testing (6 of 156 participants [4%]). Mathematical modeling based on study and literature data identified biweekly testing of at least 50% of children and childcare workers as minimal requirements to limit secondary infections. Conclusions and Relevance: In this nonrandomized controlled trial, surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 in 9 German day care centers was feasible and well accepted. Mathematical modeling estimated that testing can minimize the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in day care centers. These findings enable setup of surveillance programs to maintain institutional childcare. Trial Registration: German Registry for Clinical Trials Identifier: DRKS00023721.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caregivers , Child Care , Child Day Care Centers , Child Health , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Feasibility Studies , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Saliva , Specimen Handling
6.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(1): 105-111, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604345

ABSTRACT

Informal care, or care provided by family and friends, is the most common form of care received by community-dwelling older adults with functional limitations. However, less is known about informal care provision within residential care settings including residential care facilities (for example, assisted living) and nursing homes. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study (2016) and the National Health and Aging Trends Study (2015), we found that informal care was common among older adults with functional limitations, whether they lived in the community, a residential care facility, or a nursing home. The hours of informal care provided were also nontrivial across all settings. This evidence suggests that informal caregiving and some of the associated burdens do not end when a person transitions from the community to residential care or a nursing home setting. It also points to the large role that families play in the care and well-being of these residents, which is especially important considering the recent visitor bans during the COVID-19 epidemic. Family members are an invisible workforce in nursing homes and residential care facilities, providing considerable front-line work for their loved ones. Providers and policy makers could improve the lives of both the residents and their caregivers by acknowledging, incorporating, and supporting this workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Aged , Caregivers , Humans , Nursing Homes , Residential Facilities , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e054607, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603906

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A demand for informal care exists worldwide. Lithuania presents an interesting case example where the need for the informal care is increasing, but relatively little research has been conducted documenting caregivers' experiences and needs. OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to investigate Lithuanian informal caregiver characteristics, support needs and burden. In addition, the impact of the COVID-19 on the caregiver's and care receiver's well-being was investigated. METHODS: The study was conducted online between May and September 2020. Informal caregivers and individuals with informal caregiving experiences were invited to participate in the survey. The survey questionnaire comprised 38 multiple-choice items including participant demographic characteristics, availability of the support, support needs, well-being and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, caregiver burden was assessed with the 24-item Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI). RESULTS: A total of 226 individuals completed the survey. Most of the participants were women (87.6%). Almost half of the participants (48.7%) were not receiving any support, and a total of 73.9% expressed a need to receive more professional support. Participants were found to experience high burden on the CBI (M=50.21, SD=15.63). Women were found to be significantly more burdened than men (p=0.011). Even though many participants experienced psychological problems (55.8%), only 2.2% were receiving any psychological support. Finally, majority of the participants did not experience any changes in their own (63.7%) or the well-being of their care receiver (68.1%) due to the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: Most of the participants were identified as intensive caregivers experiencing a high burden. A majority did not experience changes in their well-being due to COVID-19. We propose several recommendations for increasing accessibility and availability of support for informal caregivers in Lithuania based on the study findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lithuania , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593793

ABSTRACT

This research aims to identify the factors that influence caregivers' decisions about the aged care providers they select for their elder relatives when caring from a distance and what they value once they have engaged a service. Adult long-distance carers for older relatives living within Australia were purposively sampled and they participated in audio-recorded interviews. A thematic analysis was employed to investigate the data. A sample of 13 participants enabled data saturation with no new major themes identified in the final three interviews. Participants were 50 to 65 years (Mean = 59.8) and mostly (77%) female. Four themes emerged relating to selection of care providers: (1) availability of care, (2) financial arrangements, (3) proximity and location, and (4) reputation of care provider. Five themes detailed valued qualities of care: (1) vigilant monitoring and responsivity, (2) communication with family, (3) flexibility and proactiveness of care, (4) staffing, and (5) access to appropriate and holistic care to maintain wellbeing. Long-distance caregivers face barriers in selecting and managing aged care services from afar within a complex Australian aged care system. They strongly value regular, proactive communication about the wellbeing of their relatives and may be particular beneficiaries of communication and assistive monitoring technologies.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Communication , Adult , Aged , Australia , Female , Humans , Qualitative Research
9.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260506, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been a shift in focus of international dementia policies from improving diagnostic rates to enhancing the post-diagnostic support provided to people with dementia and their carers. There is, however, little agreement over what constitutes good post-diagnostic support. This study aimed to identify the components of post-diagnostic dementia support. METHODS: We adopted a qualitative design using interviews, focus groups and observation to explore the perspectives of key stakeholders on the content of post-diagnostic dementia support. Purposive sampling was used to identify sites in England and Wales recognised as delivering good practice. Participants included 17 people with dementia, 31 carers, 68 service managers or funders, and 78 frontline staff. Interviews and focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed for analysis. Forty-eight sessions of observation were completed and recorded in fieldnotes. Components were identified through an inductive, thematic approach and cross-checked against national guidelines and existing frameworks; they were subsequently critically reviewed by a range of experts and our mixed stakeholder panel. RESULTS: Twenty distinct components of post-diagnostic support were identified, related to five themes: timely identification and management of needs; understanding and managing dementia; emotional and psychological wellbeing; practical support; and integrating support. The first and last of these were cross-cutting themes facilitating the delivery of a unique constellation of components of post-diagnostic support to each individual living with dementia or dyad at a particular time. CONCLUSIONS: Our work offers an empirically based framework to inform the development and delivery of holistic, integrated and continuous dementia care from diagnosis to end of life. It highlights the relevance of many components to both people living with dementia and their carers. Since the framework was developed in England and Wales, further research is needed to explore the relevance of our components to other sectors, countries and care systems.


Subject(s)
Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/diagnosis , Social Support , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) contributed to increasing prevalence of depressive symptoms and other psychological repercussions, particularly in the disease population in Hong Kong. Nonetheless, the caregiver burden of caregivers of persons with dementia (CGPWD), has been under-investigated. AIMS: This study examined the psychological impact and its correlates on the CGPWD in Hong Kong amid the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: CGPWD referred from rehabilitation clinics and online seminar were used to recruit participants to complete an online questionnaire by the end of the second-wave of the COVID-19 outbreak (June 2021). To be eligible, either full-time or part-time CGPWD, aged 18 or above, can understand Cantonese, currently reside in Hong Kong and offering care to PWD for at least one year, were recruited. Those CGPWD diagnosed with any type of psychiatric disorder were excluded from this study. The Chinese Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-22), and Nonattachment Scale (NAS-7) were used to measure participants' depression, perceived stress, anxiety symptoms, caregiver burden and wisdom in subjective feelings of internal stress. The modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey (mMOS-SS) and the SARS Appraisal Inventory (SAI) were also administered to measure participants' perceived support and coping efficacy. Follow-up responses were gathered by the end of third-wave outbreak (October 2021). RESULTS: A total of 51 CGPWD participated, of which, 33 (64.7%) suffered from probable depression (CES-D score ≥ 16). Participants also showed a significant increase in depression symptom scores at the three-month follow-up period (t = 2.25, p = 0.03). CGPWD with probable depression had less non-attachment awareness and higher scores in anxiety, stress, caregiving burden, and coronavirus impact (all p < 0.05) than those without. CONCLUSIONS: High prevalence of depressive symptoms was noted among our CGPWD sample and these symptoms seemed to worsen substantially. Contingent online mental health support should be prioritized to those CGPWD to reduce psychiatric morbidity and the global disease burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Caregivers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580826

ABSTRACT

Caregivers of individuals with cancer in the COVID-19 pandemic are faced with the demands of cancer and the health needs produced by it, along with their own health and self-care needs, and the uncertainties of expectations and risks. A qualitative analytical phenomenological study with caregivers of individuals with cancer registered at the state referral hospital supplying medications, who answered the sociodemographic assessment questionnaires and semi-structured questions about their feelings and perceptions in the COVID-19 pandemic. Bardin's content analysis was used, with methodological quality assessed using SRQR Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research and the MAXQDA software. Most of the caregivers are women, married, Catholic, of low income and education, aged between 30 and 60 years, optimistic, comply with health guidelines regarding social distancing, use of masks, and routine hand hygiene, do not practice regular physical activities, mention concern for their own physical and financial survival, and that of their family. The main need identified in the affective sphere was to reframe contact with family members, seeking to strengthen the bonds of affection. The feeling of emotional vulnerability shows the importance of building effective public policies for social support consistent with the improvement of health care for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , Caregivers , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 755391, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574477

ABSTRACT

Objective: This caregiver case study applies the lens of relational coordination theory (RC) to examine the value of telehealth as a medium of care coordination for a pediatric patient with hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (hEDS) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an unprecedented burden on the delivery of healthcare around the globe and has increased the reliance on telehealth services. Delivering telehealth requires a high level of communication and coordination within and across providers as well as between providers, patients and their families. However, it is less clear how telehealth impacts the coordination of care. In this paper, we provide insight into the quality of care coordination between providers and an informal caregiver following policy changes to the provider payment structure in Massachusetts. Methods: This paper employs a single-case, autoethnographic study design where one of the authors uses their experiential insights, as mother of the patient, to inform a wider cultural and political understanding of the shift to remote caregiving for a pediatric patient with hEDS. Data was collected using reflective journaling, interactive interviews, and participant observation and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Findings revealed four interrelating roles of the caregiver including, logistics support, boundary spanner, home health aide, and cultural translator. The adoption of telehealth was associated with improved timeliness and frequency of communication between the caregiver and providers. Findings about the impact of telehealth adoption on accuracy of communication were mixed. Mutual respect between the caregiver and providers remained unchanged during the study period. Conclusions: This paper highlights areas where payer policy may be modified to incentivize timely communication and improve coordination of care through telehealth services. Additional insight from the perspective of an informal caregiver of a patient with a rare chronic disease provides an understudied vantage to the care coordination process. We contribute to relational coordination theory by observing the ways that caregivers function as boundary spanners, and how this process was facilitated by the adoption of telehealth. Insights from this research will inform the development of telehealth workflows to engage caregivers in a way that adds value and strengthens relational coordination in the management of chronic disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Caregivers , Child , Communication , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 51(6): 11-12, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568057

ABSTRACT

Recent outbreaks in Australia and the detection of more virulent SARS-CoV-2 strains suggest that Covid-19 is not yet over. In July 2021, three states in Australia were in lockdown as a result of community transmission of the Delta variant. Despite being effective at mitigating outbreaks, lockdowns could have adverse effects on the elderly and people with dementia. This commentary reviews general lockdown and aged-care lockdown policies in Victoria, New South Wales, and South Australia and highlights how these could affect the well-being of people with dementia and their caregivers. Drawing from literature on Covid-19 and dementia, this commentary provides pragmatic recommendations on how to consider the well-being of people with dementia and their care providers in Covid-19 management policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Aged , Caregivers , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Br J Psychiatry ; 218(1): 7-9, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556719

ABSTRACT

Children and adults with neurodevelopmental disorders make up an estimated 10% of the population. Addressing health inequalities and poorer life outcomes is essential to deliver better quality care. Two parent-carers working in national roles in England suggest ways to increase understanding and work together in coproduction to achieve this.


Subject(s)
Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Psychiatry , Adult , Caregivers , Child , England , Humans , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/therapy , Quality of Health Care
15.
Soins ; 66(861): 44-46, 2021 Dec.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550080

ABSTRACT

The intensive care psychologist was strongly mobilised during the COVID-19 health crisis. His clinical practice is both specific, with regard to the situations of extreme suffering that he is led to encounter, but also plural, as he is faced with the intersecting vulnerabilities of patients, families and carers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Critical Care , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533002

ABSTRACT

A 62-year old man attended accident and emergency in June 2020 with dense right sided weakness, aphasia and confusion. Investigations revealed a left middle cerebral artery infarct, and he was admitted under the stroke team for ongoing inpatient rehabilitation. He was discharged home in September 2020 and received community stroke rehabilitation from physiotherapy, nursing, occupational therapy and speech and language therapy. He is now working towards a graded discharge from the Community Stroke and Neuro Rehab Team, after achieving his rehabilitation goals. In this case, the multidisciplinary team adopted different ways of working to accommodate the patients' priorities while also negotiating the COVID-19 pandemic. This included taking a transdisciplinary approach to rehabilitation and considering alternative supported self-management strategies. This case highlighted several learning points, particularly the potential benefits of shared goal setting for patients with communication difficulties and transdisciplinary approaches to community stroke rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Caregivers , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Home Healthc Now ; 39(6): 344-350, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532615

ABSTRACT

Telehospice has been recognized as a way to meet the needs of hospice patients and their caregivers. The purpose of this study was to examine the comfort of hospice staff using telehospice to connect virtually with patients and caregivers. The hospice in this study uses Alpha Virtual Assist (AVA), which employs a commercial remote patient monitoring platform and a communication platform that focuses on holistic patient and caregiver comfort as well as interpersonal and interprofessional communication. A mixed methods research design was used. An online survey of hospice staff that included quantitative and qualitative items was used to collect data. Forty-four hospice staff agreed to participate. No differences were found in comfort levels with using AVA between nurses and other staff. Three themes emerged from the qualitative responses: Positive responses about AVA; AVA as an assistive device; and Problems with connectivity. Hospice staff were comfortable using telehospice technology and have effectively used this tool with hospice patients and their caregivers before and during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Caregivers , Communication , Humans , Pandemics
19.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1693-1707, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527983

ABSTRACT

In addition to the fears associated with contracting COVID-19, the pandemic has forced families across the United States to quickly transition to new patterns of living. These transitions present new stressors, including health-related concerns, new demands placed on families by lockdowns and stay-at-home orders, and the possibility of losing a job or inability to pay bills. Such stressors have the potential to disrupt collaboration between coparents in addition to basic family functioning. Drawing upon a family systems perspective, the current study thus sought to examine links between COVID-19-related stressors and family cohesion through coparental functioning. A total of 1,003 parent/caregivers (97% from the United States; 82% Caucasian, 74% female; M = 40.9 years old, SD = 8.5; Mincome = $83,631, SDincome = $36,320) of school-age children completed an initial online survey from the end of March to the end of April of 2020. Of the initial sample, a total of 685 parents/caregivers completed weekly diaries for a month. Based on multilevel modeling, results suggested that, at the between-family level, coparental conflict mediated the impact of the stress of parenting/work demands and financial stress on family cohesion. At the within-family level, weekly spikes in health-related stress were associated with corresponding spikes in coparental conflict, which, in turn, were associated with drops in family cohesion. Results from the current study suggest that beyond the fears associated with contracting the COVID-19 virus, other key stressors associated with the emerging pandemic played a role in increasing coparental conflict, ultimately exacerbating family functioning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Caregivers , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
20.
Soins ; 66(860): 52-56, 2021 Nov.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527863

ABSTRACT

The medical-psychological emergency units have been meeting with care teams to discuss their experiences and feelings about Covid-19 for a little over a year. This preventive approach allows for psycho-education and the identification of stressful states.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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