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2.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(5): 250-254, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354348

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To review current literature on texting as a sustainable intervention of case management in the outpatient setting. FINDINGS: Texting, as a case management intervention, provides the medically complex client with a pathway to achieve care plan goals. Texting increases adherence, communication, and self-management. It can increase client enrollment in disease management programs, while providing support, flexibility, convenience, cost savings, and increased participation. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: In current practice, such as management of the coronavirus (COVID-19), other pandemics, or natural/environmental disasters, texting is a solution-focused intervention that can deliver and retrieve real-time information to a medically complex population. It can link patients to resources and increase outreach, efficiency, quality, and coordination of care. Texting can promote adherence to appointments, increase medication compliance and disease management interventions, and provide motivational change messages. However, there are legal and regulatory concerns that carry potential consequences and implications that should be approached judiciously (Mellette, 2015). Texting is not one size fits all; it can cause HIPAA breeches, hinder communication with certain populations, confuse health messaging, and replace human communication, thereby reducing staffing in practice.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , Case Management/standards , Communication , Guidelines as Topic , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Text Messaging/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
3.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(8): 543-546, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234178

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Social distancing due to COVID-19 may adversely impact treatment of adults with serious mental illness, especially those receiving intensive forms of community-based care, in part through weakening of the therapeutic alliance. Veterans and staff at a Veterans Affair (VA) medical center were surveyed 3 months after social distancing disrupted usual service delivery in intensive community-based treatment programs. Veterans (n = 105) and staff (n = 112) gave similar multi-item ratings of service delivery after social distancing, which involved far less face-to-face contact and more telephone contact than usual and rated their therapeutic alliances and clinical status similarly as "not as good" on average than before social distancing. Self-reported decline in therapeutic alliance was associated with parallel decline in clinical status indicators. Both veterans and staff indicated clear preference for return to face-to-face service delivery after the pandemic with some telehealth included.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Case Management/standards , Community Mental Health Services/standards , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Patient Preference , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine/standards , Therapeutic Alliance , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Veterans
4.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(2): 62-69, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087857

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Since the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease known as COVID-19, case management has emerged as a critical intervention in the treatment of cases, particularly for patients with severe symptoms and medical complications. In addition, case managers have been on the front lines of the response across the health care spectrum to reduce risks of contagion, including among health care workers. The purpose of this article is to discuss the case management response, highlighting the importance of individual care plans to provide access to the right care and treatment at the right time to address both the consequences of the disease and patient comorbidities. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTINGS: The COVID-19 response spans the full continuum of health and human services, including acute care, subacute care, workers' compensation (especially catastrophic case management), home health, primary care, and community-based care. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: From the earliest days of the pandemic, case managers have assumed an important role on the front lines of the medical response to COVID-19, ensuring that procedures are in place for managing a range of patients: those who were symptomatic but able to self-isolate and care for themselves at home; those who had serious symptoms and needed to be hospitalized; and those who were asymptomatic and needed to be educated about the importance of self-isolating. Across the care spectrum, individualized responses to the clinical and psychosocial needs of patients with COVID-19 in acute care, subacute care, home health, and other outpatient settings have been guided by the well-established case management process of screening, assessing, planning, implementing, following up, transitioning, and evaluating. In addition, professional case managers are guided by values such as advocacy, ensuring access to the right care and treatment at the right time; autonomy, respecting the right to self-determination; and justice, promoting fairness and equity in access to resources and treatment. The value of justice also addresses the sobering reality that people from racial and ethnic minority groups are at an increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19. Going forward, case management will continue to play a major role in supporting patients with COVID-19, in both inpatient and outpatient settings, with telephonic follow-up and greater use of telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Case Management/standards , Critical Care Nursing/education , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/psychology , Patient Care Planning/standards , Patient-Centered Care/standards , Adult , Case Management/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Care Planning/statistics & numerical data , Patient-Centered Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Anaesthesia ; 76(2): 225-237, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960777

ABSTRACT

We convened a multidisciplinary Working Party on behalf of the Association of Anaesthetists to update the 2011 guidance on the peri-operative management of people with hip fracture. Importantly, these guidelines describe the core aims and principles of peri-operative management, recommending greater standardisation of anaesthetic practice as a component of multidisciplinary care. Although much of the 2011 guidance remains applicable to contemporary practice, new evidence and consensus inform the additional recommendations made in this document. Specific changes to the 2011 guidance relate to analgesia, medicolegal practice, risk assessment, bone cement implantation syndrome and regional review networks. Areas of controversy remain, and we discuss these in further detail, relating to the mode of anaesthesia, surgical delay, blood management and transfusion thresholds, echocardiography, anticoagulant and antiplatelet management and postoperative discharge destination. Finally, these guidelines provide links to supplemental online material that can be used at readers' institutions, key references and UK national guidance about the peri-operative care of people with hip and periprosthetic fractures during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Case Management/standards , Hip Fractures/therapy , Anesthesia/standards , COVID-19 , Guidelines as Topic , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Quality Improvement
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