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1.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 256(4): 309-319, 2022 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817583

ABSTRACT

This research investigated the histopathological changes in the tissue of the lung, heart and liver, hepatocyte cell death, autophagy, and the apoptosis inductions in the postmortem cases. Since December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a significant global health concern. In order to clarify the changes in tissues of the lung, heart and liver by COVID-19, samples were taken from five patients who died of COVID-19 and five control cases, and the pathological changes in the lung, liver, and heart tissue were studied by X-ray, computed tomography, histological studies, and stereological analysis. The formation of hyaline membranes, alveolar wall edema, and fibrin exudate was seen on histological analysis of the lungs in the COVID-19 group. Stereological analysis illustrated the number of hepatocytes, volume of the sinusoid, and volume of the liver have been decreased, however the pathological changes in the heart tissue were not observed. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme significantly increased. Real-time PCR results showed that the Bcl2, Caspase3, ATG5, and LC3 decreased while the Bax increased. COVID-19 causes fibrotic changes in the lung tissue and hepatocyte mortality in the liver tissue. Besides, it elevates the level of apoptosis and autophagy markers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caspase 3/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Apoptosis/genetics , Autophagosomes , Hepatocytes , Humans , Up-Regulation
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736945

ABSTRACT

Disruption of the alveolar-endothelial barrier caused by inflammation leads to the progression of septic acute lung injury (ALI). In the present study, we investigated the beneficial effects of simvastatin on the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and its related mechanisms. A model of ALI was induced within experimental sepsis developed by intraperitoneal injection of a single non-lethal LPS dose after short-term simvastatin pretreatment (10-40 mg/kg orally). The severity of the lung tissue inflammatory injury was expressed as pulmonary damage scores (PDS). Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL assay (DNA fragmentation) and expressed as an apoptotic index (AI), and immunohistochemically for cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome C, and anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL, an inhibitor of apoptosis, survivin, and transcriptional factor, NF-kB/p65. Severe inflammatory injury of pulmonary parenchyma (PDS 3.33 ± 0.48) was developed after the LPS challenge, whereas simvastatin significantly and dose-dependently protected lung histology after LPS (p < 0.01). Simvastatin in a dose of 40 mg/kg showed the most significant effects in amelioration alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, demonstrating this as a marked decrease of AI (p < 0.01 vs. LPS), cytochrome C, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Furthermore, simvastatin significantly enhanced the expression of Bcl-xL and survivin. Finally, the expression of survivin and its regulator NF-kB/p65 in the alveolar epithelium was in strong positive correlation across the groups. Simvastatin could play a protective role against LPS-induced ALI and apoptosis of the alveolar-endothelial barrier. Taken together, these effects were seemingly mediated by inhibition of caspase 3 and cytochrome C, a finding that might be associated with the up-regulation of cell-survival survivin/NF-kB/p65 pathway and Bcl-xL.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , NF-kappa B , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Apoptosis , Caspase 3/genetics , Caspase 3/metabolism , Cytochromes c/metabolism , Endotoxins/adverse effects , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung/pathology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Simvastatin/adverse effects , Survivin/genetics , Up-Regulation
3.
Metab Brain Dis ; 37(3): 711-728, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606836

ABSTRACT

The overload cytosolic free Ca2+ (cCa2+) influx-mediated excessive generation of oxidative stress in the pathophysiological conditions induces neuronal and cellular injury via the activation of cation channels. TRPM2 and TRPV4 channels are activated by oxidative stress, and their specific antagonists have not been discovered yet. The antioxidant and anti-Covid-19 properties of carvacrol (CARV) were recently reported. Hence, I suspected possible antagonist properties of CARV against oxidative stress (OS)/ADP-ribose (ADPR)-induced TRPM2 and GSK1016790A (GSK)-mediated TRPV4 activations in neuronal and kidney cells. I investigated the antagonist role of CARV on the activations of TRPM2 and TRPV4 in SH-SY5Y neuronal, BV-2 microglial, and HEK293 cells. The OS/ADPR and GSK in the cells caused to increase of TRPM2/TRPV4 current densities and overload cytosolic free Ca2+ (cCa2+) influx with an increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic (cROS), and mitochondrial (mROS) ROS. The changes were not observed in the absence of TRPM2 and TRPV4 or the presence of Ca2+ free extracellular buffer and PARP-1 inhibitors (PJ34 and DPQ). When OS-induced TRPM2 and GSK-induced TRPV4 activations were inhibited by the treatment of CARV, the increase of cROS, mROS, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis, cell death, cCa2+ concentration, caspase -3, and caspase -9 levels were restored via upregulation of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. In conclusion, the treatment of CARV modulated the TRPM2 and TRPV4-mediated overload Ca2+ influx and may provide an avenue for protecting TRPM2 and TRPV4-mediated neurodegenerative diseases associated with the increase of mROS and cCa2+. The possible TRPM2 and TRPV4 blocker action of carvacrol (CARV) via the modulation oxidative stress and apoptosis in the SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. TRPM2 is activated by DNA damage-induced (via PARP-1 activation) ADP-ribose (ADPR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (H2O2), although it is inhibited by nonspecific inhibitors (ACA and 2-APB). TRPV4 is activated by the treatments of GSK1016790A (GSK), although it is inhibited by a nonspecific inhibitor (ruthenium red, RuRe). The treatment of GSK induces excessive generation of ROS. The accumulation of free cytosolic Ca2+ (cCa2+) via the activations of TRPM2 and TRPV4 in the mitochondria causes the increase of mitochondrial membrane depolarization (ΔΨm). In turn, the increase of ΔΨm causes the excessive generation of ROS. The TRPM2 and TRPV4-induced the excessive generations of ROS result in the increase of apoptosis and cell death via the activations of caspase -3 (Casp-3) and caspase -9 (Casp-9) in the neuronal cells, although their oxidant actions decrease the glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) levels. The oxidant and apoptotic adverse actions of TRPM2 and TRPV4 are modulated by the treatment of CARV.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/pharmacology , Cymenes/pharmacology , TRPM Cation Channels/antagonists & inhibitors , TRPV Cation Channels/antagonists & inhibitors , Apoptosis/drug effects , Calcium/metabolism , Caspase 3/metabolism , Caspase 9/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Kidney/drug effects , Kidney/metabolism , Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/drug effects , Microglia/drug effects , Microglia/metabolism , Neurons/drug effects , Neurons/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Reactive Oxygen Species
4.
Ophthalmic Res ; 64(5): 785-792, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443682

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In December 2019, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic broke out. The virus rapidly spread globally, resulting in a major world public-health crisis. The major disease manifestation occurs in the respiratory tract. However, further studies documented other systemic involvement. This study investigates histopathologic eye changes in postmortem material of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded eyes from 5 patients (10 eyes) who died of COVID-19 at the University Hospital in Basel were included. Gross examination and histological evaluation were performed by 3 independent ophthalmopathologists. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using antibodies against fibrin, cleaved caspase 3, and ACE-2. Five enucleated eyes of patients not infected with SARS-CoV-2 served as control group. All cases have been studied for presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA by means of reverse transcription PCR and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH). The choroidal vessels of one case were analyzed with electron microscope. RESULTS: Ophthalmopathologically, 8 eyes from 4 patients displayed swollen endothelial cells in congested choroidal vessels. No further evidence of specific eye involvement of SARS-CoV-2 was found in any of the patients. In the 8 eyes with evidence of changes due to SARS-CoV-2, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated fibrin microthrombi, apoptotic changes of endothelial and inflammatory cells. In control eyes, ACE-2 was detectable in the conjunctiva, cornea, retina, and choroidea and displayed significantly lower amounts of stained cells as in COVID-19 eyes. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detectable in both bulbi of 2/5 patients, yet ISH failed to visualize viruses. Electron microscopy showed no significant results due to the artifacts. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: As already described in other organs of COVID-19 patients, the ophthalmological examination revealed-microthrombi, that is, hypercoagulation and vasculopathy most probably due to endothelial damage. A possible viral spread to the endothelial cells via ACE-2 provides one pathophysiological explanation. The expression of ACE-2 receptors in the conjunctiva hints toward its susceptibility to infection. To what extend eyes, function is disrupted by SARS-CoV-2 is subject to further studies, especially in the clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Choroid Diseases/pathology , Eye Infections, Viral/pathology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retinal Diseases/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Caspase 3/metabolism , Choroid/blood supply , Choroid/pathology , Choroid Diseases/virology , Ciliary Body/blood supply , Ciliary Body/pathology , Conjunctiva/metabolism , Cornea/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Eye Infections, Viral/virology , Female , Fibrin/metabolism , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , In Situ Hybridization , Male , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retinal Diseases/virology , Retinal Vessels/pathology , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology
6.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374305

ABSTRACT

According to the neurological symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection, it is known that the nervous system is influenced by the virus. We used pediatric human cerebral cortical cell line HCN-2 as a neuronal model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and, through transcriptomic analysis, our aim was to evaluate the effect of SARS-CoV-2 in this type of cells. Transcriptome analyses revealed impairment in TXN gene, resulting in deregulation of its antioxidant functions, as well as a decrease in the DNA-repairing mechanism, as indicated by the decrease in KAT5. Western blot analyses of SOD1 and iNOS confirmed the impairment of reduction mechanisms and an increase in oxidative stress. Upregulation of CDKN2A and a decrease in CDK4 and CDK6 point to the blocking of the cell cycle that, according to the deregulation of repairing mechanism, has apoptosis as the outcome. A high level of proapoptotic gene PMAIP1 is indeed coherent with neuronal death, as also supported by increased levels of caspase 3. The upregulation of cell-cycle-blocking genes and apoptosis suggests a sufferance state of neurons after SARS-CoV-2 infection, followed by their inevitable death, which can explain the neurological symptoms reported. Further analyses are required to deeply explain the mechanisms and find potential treatments to protect neurons from oxidative stress and prevent their death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cellular Senescence/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , Neurons/pathology , Oxidative Stress/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Caspase 3/metabolism , Cell Death , Cell Line , Cyclooxygenase 2/metabolism , Humans , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology
7.
Gastroenterology ; 160(5): 1647-1661, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations have been increasingly reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the roles of the GI tract in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are not fully understood. We investigated how the GI tract is involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection to elucidate the pathogenesis of COVID-19. METHODS: Our previously established nonhuman primate (NHP) model of COVID-19 was modified in this study to test our hypothesis. Rhesus monkeys were infected with an intragastric or intranasal challenge with SARS-CoV-2. Clinical signs were recorded after infection. Viral genomic RNA was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Host responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection were evaluated by examining inflammatory cytokines, macrophages, histopathology, and mucin barrier integrity. RESULTS: Intranasal inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 led to infections and pathologic changes not only in respiratory tissues but also in digestive tissues. Expectedly, intragastric inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 resulted in the productive infection of digestive tissues and inflammation in both the lung and digestive tissues. Inflammatory cytokines were induced by both types of inoculation with SARS-CoV-2, consistent with the increased expression of CD68. Immunohistochemistry and Alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff staining showed decreased Ki67, increased cleaved caspase 3, and decreased numbers of mucin-containing goblet cells, suggesting that the inflammation induced by these 2 types of inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 impaired the GI barrier and caused severe infections. CONCLUSIONS: Both intranasal and intragastric inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 caused pneumonia and GI dysfunction in our rhesus monkey model. Inflammatory cytokines are possible connections for the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 between the respiratory and digestive systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Gastroenteritis/pathology , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Lung/pathology , Animals , Bronchi/metabolism , Bronchi/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Caspase 3/metabolism , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Gastric Mucosa , Gastroenteritis/metabolism , Gastroenteritis/virology , Gastrointestinal Tract/immunology , Gastrointestinal Tract/metabolism , Goblet Cells/pathology , Intestine, Small/metabolism , Intestine, Small/pathology , Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Macaca mulatta , Nasal Mucosa , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Random Allocation , Rectum/metabolism , Rectum/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Trachea/metabolism , Trachea/pathology
8.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 130: 110627, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733946

ABSTRACT

Piroxicam (PM) is an oxicam-NSAID commonly recommended for various pain and associated inflammatory disorders. However, it is reported to have a gastric and hepato-renal toxic effect. Therefore, the current research was planned to investigate the possible mechanisms behind the mitigating action of the coenzyme (CoQ10), a natural, free radical scavenger, against PM tissue injury. Rats were assigned to five equal groups; Control, CoQ10 (10 mg/kg, orally), PM (7 mg/kg, i.p.), CoQ + PM L, and CoQ + PM H group. After 28 days, PM provoked severe gastric ulceration and marked liver and kidney damage indicated by an elevated gastric ulcer index and considerable alteration in liver and kidney biochemical tests. The toxic effects might be attributed to mitochondrial dysfunction and excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as indicated by enhanced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels along with decreased reduced-glutathione (GSH) levels and catalase (CAT) activity. Apoptotic cell death also was demonstrated by increased regulation of activated caspase-3 in the stomach, liver, and kidney tissues. Interestingly, external supplementation of CoQ10 attenuated the PM-inflicted deleterious oxidative harm and apoptosis. This ameliorative action was ascribed to the free radical scavenging activity of CoQ10.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/drug effects , Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Piroxicam/pharmacology , Ubiquinone/analogs & derivatives , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Caspase 3/metabolism , Dietary Supplements , Kidney/drug effects , Kidney/pathology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Male , Malondialdehyde/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Stomach/drug effects , Stomach/pathology , Stomach Ulcer/metabolism , Ubiquinone/pharmacology
9.
Br J Dermatol ; 184(1): 141-150, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are two distinctive acral manifestations of COVID-19 embodying disparate clinical phenotypes. One is perniosis occurring in mildly symptomatic patients, typically children and young adults; the second is the thrombotic retiform purpura of critically ill adults with COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: To compare the clinical and pathological profiles of these two different cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19. METHODS: We compared the light microscopic, phenotypic, cytokine and SARS-CoV-2 protein and RNA profiles of COVID-19-associated perniosis with that of thrombotic retiform purpura in critical patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: Biopsies of COVID-19-associated perniosis exhibited vasocentric and eccrinotropic T-cell- and monocyte-derived CD11c+ , CD14+ and CD123+ dendritic cell infiltrates. Both COVID-associated and idiopathic perniosis showed striking expression of the type I interferon-inducible myxovirus resistance protein A (MXA), an established marker for type I interferon signalling in tissue. SARS-CoV-2 RNA, interleukin-6 and caspase 3 were minimally expressed and confined to mononuclear inflammatory cells. The biopsies from livedo/retiform purpura showed pauci-inflammatory vascular thrombosis without any MXA decoration. Blood vessels exhibited extensive complement deposition with endothelial cell localization of SARS-CoV-2 protein, interleukin-6 and caspase 3; SARS-CoV-2 RNA was not seen. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19-associated perniosis represents a virally triggered exaggerated immune reaction with significant type I interferon signaling. This is important to SARS-CoV-2 eradication and has implications in regards to a more generalized highly inflammatory response. We hypothesize that in the thrombotic retiform purpura of critically ill patients with COVID-19, the vascular thrombosis in the skin and other organ systems is associated with a minimal interferon response. This allows excessive viral replication with release of viral proteins that localize to extrapulmonary endothelium and trigger extensive complement activation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Chilblains/diagnosis , Livedo Reticularis/diagnosis , Purpura/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Age Factors , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Caspase 3/immunology , Caspase 3/metabolism , Chilblains/immunology , Chilblains/pathology , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Foot , Hand , Humans , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Livedo Reticularis/immunology , Livedo Reticularis/pathology , Livedo Reticularis/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/analysis , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/metabolism , Purpura/immunology , Purpura/pathology , Purpura/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Skin/immunology , Skin/pathology , Skin/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/isolation & purification
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