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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 8403, 2022 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852501

ABSTRACT

In June-September 2021, we investigated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections in domestic dogs and cats (n = 225) in Bangkok and the vicinities, Thailand. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in a dog and a cat from COVID-19 positive households. Whole genome sequence analysis identified SARS-CoV-2 delta variant of concern (B.1.617.2). Phylogenetic analysis showed that SARS-CoV-2 isolated from dog and cat were grouped into sublineage AY.30 and AY.85, respectively. Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 could be detected in both dog (day 9) and cat (day 14) after viral RNA detection. This study raises awareness on spill-over of variant of concern in domestic animals due to human-animal interface. Thus, surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 in domestic pets should be routinely conducted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thailand/epidemiology
2.
Vet Med Sci ; 8(2): 899-906, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), besides causing human infection, has been shown to naturally infect several susceptible animal species including large cats (tigers, lions, pumas, spotted leopards), dogs, cats, ferrets, gorillas and minks. Cats and minks are continuing to be the most reported species with SARS-CoV-2 infections among animals but it needs to be investigated further. METHODS AND RESULTS: We report the detection of SARS-CoV-2 from a domestic cat that exhibited respiratory disease after being exposed to SARS-CoV-2 virus from humans in the same household. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in two oropharyngeal swabs collected at two time points, 11 days apart; the first, when the cat was reported to be sick and the second, before euthanasia due to poor prognosis. The viral nucleic acid detected at two time points showed no genomic variation and resembled the clade GH circulating in humans in the United States. Clinical and pathological findings noted in this 16-year-old cat were consistent with respiratory and cardiac insufficiency. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 viral infection was likely an incidental clinical finding, as the virus was not detected in fixed lungs, heart, or kidney tissues. Only fresh lung tissue collected at necropsy showed the presence of viral nucleic acid, albeit at a very low level. Further research is needed to clarify the clinical course of SARS-CoV-2 in companion animals of advanced age and underlying cardiac disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Humans , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 259(9): 1032-1039, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468297

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To establish a pathoepidemiological model to evaluate the role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first 10 companion animals that died while infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the US. ANIMALS: 10 cats and dogs that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and died or were euthanized in the US between March 2020 and January 2021. PROCEDURES: A standardized algorithm was developed to direct case investigations, determine the necessity of certain diagnostic procedures, and evaluate the role, if any, that SARS-CoV-2 infection played in the animals' course of disease and death. Using clinical and diagnostic information collected by state animal health officials, state public health veterinarians, and other state and local partners, this algorithm was applied to each animal case. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 was an incidental finding in 8 animals, was suspected to have contributed to the severity of clinical signs leading to euthanasia in 1 dog, and was the primary reason for death for 1 cat. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This report provides the global community with a standardized process for directing case investigations, determining the necessity of certain diagnostic procedures, and determining the clinical significance of SARS-CoV-2 infections in animals with fatal outcomes and provides evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can, in rare circumstances, cause or contribute to death in pets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Pets , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Res Vet Sci ; 140: 229-232, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401839

ABSTRACT

Several non-variant of concern SARS-CoV-2 infections in pets have been reported as documented in the OIE and GISAID databases and there is only one fully documented case of an alpha variant of concern (VOC)(B.1.1.7) in the United States so far. Here, we describe the first case in a cat infected with the alpha SARS-CoV-2 variant in Germany. A cat suffering from pneumonia was presented to a veterinary practice. The pneumonia was treated symptomatically, but 16 days later the cat was presented again. Since the owner had been tested positive for a SARS-CoV-2 infection in the meantime, swab samples were taken from the cat and analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 specific nucleic acids. The various RT-qPCR analyses and whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant in this cat. This study shows that pets living in close contact with SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 infected owners can contract this virus and also suffer from a respiratory disease. It is not clear yet whether onward transmissions to other cats and humans can occur. To minimize transmission risks, pet owners and veterinarians should comply to the hygienic rules published by OIE and others. It must be stated, that infections of cats with SARS-CoV-2 is still a rare event. Cats with clinical signs of a respiratory disease should be presented to a veterinarian, who will decide on further steps.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cats , Germany , Humans , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2
5.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(23): 710-713, 2020 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389844

ABSTRACT

On April 22, CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported cases of two domestic cats with confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These are the first reported companion animals (including pets and service animals) with SARS-CoV-2 infection in the United States, and among the first findings of SARS-CoV-2 symptomatic companion animals reported worldwide. These feline cases originated from separate households and were epidemiologically linked to suspected or confirmed human COVID-19 cases in their respective households. Notification of presumptive positive animal test results triggered a One Health* investigation by state and federal partners, who determined that no further transmission events to other animals or persons had occurred. Both cats fully recovered. Although there is currently no evidence that animals play a substantial role in spreading COVID-19, CDC advises persons with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to restrict contact with animals during their illness and to monitor any animals with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and separate them from other persons and animals at home (1).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Pandemics/veterinary , Pets/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/veterinary , Animals , COVID-19 , Cats , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , New York , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Zoonoses
6.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325792

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has affected millions of people globally since its first detection in late 2019. Besides humans, cats and, to some extent, dogs were shown to be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, highlighting the need for surveillance in a One Health context. Seven veterinary clinics from regions with high incidences of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) were recruited during the early pandemic (March to July 2020) for the screening of patients. A total of 2257 oropharyngeal and nasal swab specimen from 877 dogs and 260 cats (including 18 animals from COVID-19-affected households and 92 animals with signs of respiratory disease) were analyzed for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA using reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) targeting the viral envelope (E) and RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) genes. One oropharyngeal swab from an Italian cat, living in a COVID-19-affected household in Piedmont, tested positive in RT-qPCR (1/260; 0.38%, 95% CI: 0.01-2.1%), and SARS-CoV-2 infection of the animal was serologically confirmed six months later. One oropharyngeal swab from a dog was potentially positive (1/877; 0.1%, 95% CI: 0.002-0.63%), but the result was not confirmed in a reference laboratory. Analyses of convenience sera from 118 animals identified one dog (1/94; 1.1%; 95% CI: 0.02-5.7%) from Lombardy, but no cats (0/24), as positive for anti-SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) antibodies and neutralizing activity. These findings support the hypothesis that the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pet cat and dog populations, and hence, the risk of zoonotic transmission to veterinary staff, was low during the first wave of the pandemic, even in hotspot areas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/virology , Dog Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Oropharynx/virology , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
7.
Vet Q ; 41(1): 226-227, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316734
8.
Vet Microbiol ; 260: 109179, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313479

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has rapidly spread worldwide. Studies of transmission of the virus carried out in animals have suggested that certain animals may be susceptible to infection with SARS-CoV-2. The aim of the present study was to investigate the infection of SARS-CoV-2 in pets (18 cats and 20 dogs) from owners previously confirmed as COVID-19-positive. Oropharyngeal and rectal swabs were taken and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR assays, while blood samples were taken for antibody detection. Of the total pets analyzed, one cat was found reactive to SARS-CoV-2 by real-time RT-PCR of an oropharyngeal and a rectal swab. This cat presented only sneezing as a clinical sign. Serological analysis confirmed the presence of antibodies in the serum sample from this cat, as well as in the serum from another cat non-reactive to real-time RT-PCR. Complete sequence and phylogenetic analysis allowed determining that the SARS-CoV-2 genome belonged to the B.1.499 lineage. This lineage has been reported in different provinces of Argentina, mainly in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires. This study notifies the first detection of the natural infection and molecular analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a cat from Argentina whose owner where COVID-19-positive. Although there is currently no evidence that cats can spread COVID-19, results suggest that health authorities should test pets with COVID-19-positive owners.


Subject(s)
Cat Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , Argentina , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cats , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , DNA, Complementary/chemistry , Dogs , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/veterinary , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/classification
9.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256663

ABSTRACT

Registered cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections in the German human population increased rapidly during the second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in winter 2020/21. Since domestic cats are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, the occurrence of trans-species transmission needs to be monitored. A previous serosurvey during the first wave of the pandemic detected antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in 0.65% of feline serum samples that were randomly sampled across Germany. In the here-presented follow-up study that was conducted from September 2020 to February 2021, the seroprevalence rose to 1.36% (16/1173). This doubling of the seroprevalence in cats is in line with the rise of reported cases in the human population and indicates a continuous occurrence of trans-species transmission from infected owners to their cats.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Animals, Domestic , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/transmission , Cats , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Zoonoses/diagnosis , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/transmission
10.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138760

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in late 2019, domestic cats have been demonstrated to be susceptible to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) under natural and experimental conditions. As pet cats often live in very close contact with their owners, it is essential to investigate SARS-CoV-2 infections in cats in a One-Health context. This study reports the first SARS-CoV-2 infection in a cat in a COVID-19-affected household in Switzerland. The cat (Cat 1) demonstrated signs of an upper respiratory tract infection, including sneezing, inappetence, and apathy, while the cohabiting cat (Cat 2) remained asymptomatic. Nasal, oral, fecal, fur, and environmental swab samples were collected twice from both cats and analyzed by RT-qPCR for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA. Both nasal swabs from Cat 1 tested positive. In addition, the first oral swab from Cat 2 and fur and bedding swabs from both cats were RT-qPCR positive. The fecal swabs tested negative. The infection of Cat 1 was confirmed by positive SARS-CoV-2 S1 receptor binding domain (RBD) antibody testing and neutralizing activity in a surrogate assay. The viral genome sequence from Cat 1, obtained by next generation sequencing, showed the closest relation to a human sequence from the B.1.1.39 lineage, with one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) difference. This study demonstrates not only SARS-CoV-2 infection of a cat from a COVID-19-affected household but also contamination of the cats' fur and bed with viral RNA. Our results are important to create awareness that SARS-CoV-2 infected people should observe hygienic measures to avoid infection and contamination of animal cohabitants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/virology , Genome, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cats , Feces/virology , Male , Phylogeny , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Switzerland
11.
J Small Anim Pract ; 62(5): 336-342, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058011

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The emergence of the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has necessitated evaluation of the potential for SARS-CoV-2 infection in dogs and cats. Using a large data set, we evaluated the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory pathogens in samples submitted for respiratory testing from mid-February to mid-April 2020. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A SARS-CoV-2 real-time PCR was developed and validated. A subset of canine and feline samples submitted for respiratory pathogen panel testing to reference laboratories in Asia, Europe, and North America were also tested for SARS-CoV-2. The frequency of respiratory pathogens was compared for the February-April period of 2020 and 2019. RESULTS: Samples from 4616 patients were included in the study and 44% of canine and 69% of feline samples were PCR positive with Mycoplasma cynos and Bordetella bronchiseptica and Mycoplasma felis and feline calicivirus, respectively. No SARS-CoV-2 infections were identified. Positive results for respiratory samples were similar between years. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The data in this study suggest that during the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in early 2020, respiratory diseases in tested pet cats and dogs were caused by common veterinary pathogens and that SARS-CoV-2 infections in dogs and cats are rare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , Asia , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Europe , Mycoplasma , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Virol Methods ; 288: 114012, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-907187

ABSTRACT

In this study, a SYBR Green I-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was developed for the clinical diagnosis of feline astroviruses (FeAstVs). Specific primers were designed based on the conserved region of the FeAstV ORF1b gene. Experiments for specificity, sensitivity, and repeatability of the assay were carried out. In addition, the assay was evaluated using clinical samples. Specificity analysis indicated that the assay showed negative results with samples of Feline Parvovirus, Feline Herpesvirus, Feline Calicivirus, Feline Bocavirus, and Feline Coronavirus, indicating good specificity of the assay. Sensitivity analysis showed that the SYBR Green I-based real-time RT-PCR method could detect as low as 3.72 × 101 copies/µL of template, which is 100-fold more sensitive compared to the conventional RT-PCR. Both intra-assay and inter-assay variability were lower than 1 %, indicating good reproducibility. Furthermore, an analysis of 150 fecal samples showed that the positive detection rate of SYBR Green I-based real-time RT-PCR was higher than that of the conventional RT-PCR, indicating the high reliability of the method. The assay is cheap and effective. Therefore, it could provide support for the detection of FeAstV in large-scale clinical testing and epidemiological investigation.


Subject(s)
Astroviridae/genetics , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/virology , Organic Chemicals , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Animals , Benzothiazoles , Cats , Diamines , Quinolines , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/standards , Reproducibility of Results , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
J Feline Med Surg ; 22(6): 521-530, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-828632

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate if a combination of discrete clinical characteristics can be used to identify the most likely differential diagnoses in cats with spinal disease. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-one cats referred for further evaluation of spinal disease were included and categorised as follows: non-lymphoid neoplasia (n = 44); intervertebral disc disease (n = 42); fracture/luxation (n = 34); ischaemic myelopathy (n = 22); feline infectious peritonitis virus myelitis (n = 18); lymphoma (n = 16); thoracic vertebral canal stenosis (n = 11); acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (n = 11); traumatic spinal cord contusion (n = 8); spinal arachnoid diverticula (n = 7); lumbosacral stenosis (n = 5); and spinal empyema (n = 3). Information retrieved from the medical records included signalment, clinical history and clinical presentation. Univariate analyses of variables (clinical history, breed, age, sex, general physical examination findings, onset, progression, spinal hyperaesthesia, asymmetry, ambulatory status and neuroanatomical location) were performed, and variables were retained in a multivariate logistic regression model if P <0.05. RESULTS: Multivariate logistic regression revealed that intervertebral disc disease most often occurred in middle-aged, purebred cats with a normal general physical examination and an acute onset of painful and progressive clinical signs. Ischaemic myelopathy occurred most often in older cats with a stable or improving, non-painful, lateralising, C6-T2 myelopathy. Spinal fracture/luxation occurred most often in younger cats and resulted most often in a peracute onset, painful, non-ambulatory neurological status. Concurrent systemic abnormalities or abnormal findings detected on general physical examination were significantly associated with feline infectious peritonitis virus myelitis, spinal lymphoma or spinal empyema. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study suggests that using easily identifiable characteristics from the history and clinical examination can assist in obtaining a preliminary differential diagnosis when evaluating cats with spinal disease. This information could aid veterinary practitioners in clinical decision-making.


Subject(s)
Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Clinical Reasoning , Spinal Diseases/veterinary , Spinal Injuries/veterinary , Animals , Cat Diseases/etiology , Cats/injuries , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Male , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Diseases/diagnosis , Spinal Diseases/etiology , Spinal Injuries/diagnosis , Spinal Injuries/etiology
14.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 50(2): 447-465, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-824261

ABSTRACT

Bacterial pneumonia is a common clinical diagnosis in dogs but seems to occur less often in cats. Underlying causes include viral infection, aspiration injury, foreign body inhalation, and defects in clearance of respiratory secretions. Identification of the specific organisms involved in disease, appropriate use of antibiotics and adjunct therapy, and control of risk factors for pneumonia improve management.


Subject(s)
Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/etiology , Cat Diseases/therapy , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/etiology , Dog Diseases/therapy , Dogs , Male , Pneumonia, Bacterial/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Bacterial/etiology , Pneumonia, Bacterial/therapy , Pneumonia, Bacterial/veterinary , Prognosis , Risk Factors
15.
J Virol Methods ; 286: 113979, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-786045

ABSTRACT

Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) are members of the alphacoronavirus genus that are further characterized by serotype (types I and II) based on the antigenicity of the spike (S) protein and by pathotype based on the associated clinical conditions. Feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV) are associated with the vast majority of infections and are typically asymptomatic. Within individual animals, FECV can mutate and cause a severe and usually fatal disease called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), the leading infectious cause of death in domestic cat populations. There are no approved antiviral drugs or recommended vaccines to treat or prevent FCoV infection. The plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) traditionally employed to assess immune responses and to screen therapeutic and vaccine candidates is time-consuming, low-throughput, and typically requires 2-3 days for the formation and manual counting of cytolytic plaques. Host cells are capable of carrying heavy viral burden in the absence of visible cytolytic effects, thereby reducing the sensitivity of the assay. In addition, operator-to-operator variation can generate uncertainty in the results and digital records are not automatically created. To address these challenges we developed a novel high-throughput viral microneutralization assay, with quantification of virus-infected cells performed in a plate-based image cytometer. Host cell seeding density, microplate surface coating, virus concentration and incubation time, wash buffer and fluorescent labeling were optimized. Subsequently, this FCoV viral neutralization assay was used to explore immune correlates of protection using plasma from naturally FECV-infected cats. We demonstrate that the high-throughput viral neutralization assay using the Celigo Image Cytometer provides a robust and efficient method for the rapid screening of therapeutic antibodies, antiviral compounds, and vaccines. This method can be applied to various viral infectious diseases to accelerate vaccine and antiviral drug discovery and development.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus, Feline/isolation & purification , High-Throughput Screening Assays/veterinary , Image Cytometry/methods , Neutralization Tests/methods , Animals , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/virology , Cats , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Feline Infectious Peritonitis/diagnosis , Feline Infectious Peritonitis/virology , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Image Cytometry/veterinary , Neutralization Tests/veterinary , Viral Load
16.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 68(2): 973-976, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719399

ABSTRACT

Pets from COVID-19 owners were screened for SARS-CoV-2 (April-May 2020). From 23 pets, an asymptomatic cat showed positive RT-qPCRs results from oropharyngeal swab (negative rectal swab). Remaining pets were negative. This suggests that cats can contract the virus from their infected owners and may act as potential hosts for SARS-CoV-2. Their role in carrying live or infectious viruses and disseminating them needs more investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Ownership , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cats , Female , Humans , Spain
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