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1.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 40(1): 397-403, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023302

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic poses a challenge to treatment of patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain (UCPP), who are at risk to be postponed in the priority of care. We investigated pain, catastrophizing, and psychological status in UCPP patients during SARS-CoV-2 by means of Skype telephone calls. METHODS: A total of 28 UCPP patients underwent Skype video consultations. Pain intensity was assessed with Pain Numerical Rating Scale (PNRS). Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) were used to assess catastrophizing and psychological status. RESULTS: During SARS-CoV-2, UCPP patients showed higher intensity of pain than before (mean ± SD PNRS score: 7.25 ± 0.9 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7; p < .0001), with pain exacerbation in 75%; they showed higher PCS and DASS-21 scores as compared to before the pandemic (mean ± SD PCS total score: 32.4 ± 1.2 vs. 23.7 ± 3.5; mean ± SD DASS-21 total score: 42.03 ± 4.5 vs. 34.4 ± 2.2; p < .001 and p < .001, respectively). CONCLUSION: During SARS-CoV-2 pandemic UCPP patients presented with high intensity of pain, marked catastrophizing thoughts and severe alteration of the psychological status. These observations impose the need not to postpone assessment and treatment of these patients during the pandemic. Remote visits with video telephone calls are a simple way of continuing care in UCPP patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Pelvic Pain/physiopathology , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain Measurement , Pandemics , Pelvic Pain/psychology , Pelvic Pain/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Urology , Videoconferencing
2.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 40(1): 397-403, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-942443

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic poses a challenge to treatment of patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain (UCPP), who are at risk to be postponed in the priority of care. We investigated pain, catastrophizing, and psychological status in UCPP patients during SARS-CoV-2 by means of Skype telephone calls. METHODS: A total of 28 UCPP patients underwent Skype video consultations. Pain intensity was assessed with Pain Numerical Rating Scale (PNRS). Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) were used to assess catastrophizing and psychological status. RESULTS: During SARS-CoV-2, UCPP patients showed higher intensity of pain than before (mean ± SD PNRS score: 7.25 ± 0.9 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7; p < .0001), with pain exacerbation in 75%; they showed higher PCS and DASS-21 scores as compared to before the pandemic (mean ± SD PCS total score: 32.4 ± 1.2 vs. 23.7 ± 3.5; mean ± SD DASS-21 total score: 42.03 ± 4.5 vs. 34.4 ± 2.2; p < .001 and p < .001, respectively). CONCLUSION: During SARS-CoV-2 pandemic UCPP patients presented with high intensity of pain, marked catastrophizing thoughts and severe alteration of the psychological status. These observations impose the need not to postpone assessment and treatment of these patients during the pandemic. Remote visits with video telephone calls are a simple way of continuing care in UCPP patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Pelvic Pain/physiopathology , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain Measurement , Pandemics , Pelvic Pain/psychology , Pelvic Pain/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Urology , Videoconferencing
3.
Pain ; 162(2): 619-629, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940829

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a tremendous impact, including on individuals with chronic pain. The social distancing policies necessary to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2 have involved increased levels of social isolation. This cross-sectional survey study examined pain severity and interference among individuals with chronic pain during an early phase of social distancing mandates and identified characteristics of individuals who were most impacted. Approximately 4 to 8 weeks after social distancing mandates commenced in the state of Massachusetts, 150 patients with fibromyalgia, chronic spine, and postsurgical pain completed demographic, pain, social distancing, and validated psychosocial questionnaires. Patients self-reported an overall significant increase in pain severity and pain interference, compared with before social distancing, although both pain severity and interference were quite variable among individuals under conditions of social distancing. Several demographic, socioeconomic, and psychosocial factors were associated with greater pain severity and interference during social distancing. Multivariable linear regression demonstrated that female sex, nonwhite race, lower education, disability, fibromyalgia, and higher pain catastrophizing were independently associated with greater pain severity, while female sex and pain catastrophizing were independently associated greater pain interference. The findings suggest that individual differences among patients with chronic pain should be considered in the planning, development, and prioritization of interventions to improve pain care and to prevent worsening of symptoms during the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Back Pain/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Fibromyalgia/physiopathology , Pain, Postoperative/physiopathology , Physical Distancing , Adult , African Americans , Back Pain/psychology , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disabled Persons , Educational Status , Female , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Massachusetts , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pain Measurement , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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