Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
J Psychosoc Oncol ; 39(3): 366-384, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196918

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Given the uncertainty COVID-19 has caused for individuals with prior medical conditions, we examined the extent to which cancer survivors consider themselves at risk for the global COVID-19 pandemic (henceforth COVID), both in general and due to their cancer history. Additionally, we evaluated whether perceived vulnerability to COVID among cancer survivors predicts their cognitive/affective and behavioral responses to the pandemic. DESIGN/SAMPLE: Cancer survivors who completed primary cancer treatment (median months since treatment = 33.00) and were enrolled in prior behavioral trials with our research team (N = 146) completed two surveys in May-July 2020 (95.89% retention). METHODS: Participants rated perceived next-year risk of infection and of dying from COVID. We adapted established scales to assess perceived vulnerability to COVID generally versus as a cancer survivor, catastrophizing about possible COVID symptoms, COVID-related contamination fears, and adherence to COVID prevention behaviors. FINDINGS: In May 2020, on a 1-100 scale with 0 = no chance and 100 = definitely will occur, cancer survivors reported a chance in the next year of contracting COVID of M = 39.94 (SD = 23.90), and dying from COVID of M = 24.46 (SD = 24.84). Cancer survivors reported somewhat greater vulnerability to COVID compared to same-aged peers, increased contamination fears, and high adherence to COVID prevention measures. Similar findings emerged six weeks later, suggesting stability over time. In simple linear regression models, both general and cancer survivor-specific perceived COVID vulnerability predicted COVID symptom catastrophizing and contamination fears; in multivariable models, only general vulnerability remained a significant predictor. General perceived vulnerability and contamination fears predicted greater adherence to COVID prevention behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer survivors perceived elevated vulnerability to COVID even years after treatment, which predicted adherence to COVID prevention behaviors. Future research should identify the optimal balance between supporting cancer survivors' concerns and minimizing negative impacts on quality of life.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Disease Susceptibility/psychology , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Catastrophization/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
2.
J Gen Psychol ; 148(3): 272-304, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039677

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created major upheavals in the lives of people worldwide. The virus has mostly affected elderly populations, but there may be corollary effects on young adults' psychosocial adjustment due to educational, economic, and occupational disruptions. Using latent class analysis, we examined unique typologies of coping in response to the pandemic among young adults. We used an expanded set of indicators including traditional measures of problem- and emotion-focused coping as well as measures of resilience and coping flexibility. We also examined whether class membership could be predicted by demographics, stress appraisal, and psychosocial characteristics including catastrophic thinking and impulsivity. The sample of 1,391 young adults (ages 18-35) was recruited via Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) and snowball methods from late-April to early-May 2020. Six classes were identified: (1) Resilient Flexible Problem-Focused Copers, (2) Resilient Inflexible Problem-Focused Copers, (3) Non-Resilient Flexible Problem-Focused Venters, (4) Non-Resilient Flexible Problem-Focused Copers, (5) Non-Resilient Flexible Non-Copers, and (6) Non-Resilient Inflexible Non-Copers. Using Class 1 as the reference class, we found perceived centrality and uncontrollability of the pandemic as well as catastrophic thinking and impulsivity were significant predictors of class membership. The mean levels of stress appraisal and psychosocial characteristics varied significantly between the classes, reinforcing the structural validity of these classes. The findings suggest the importance of training young adults to develop resilience and flexibility as well as specific coping skills that can help offset the psychological effects of dramatic lifestyle changes that may result from pandemics or other health crises in the future.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Catastrophization/psychology , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Impulsive Behavior , Male , Problem Solving , Quality of Life/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
3.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 40(1): 397-403, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023302

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic poses a challenge to treatment of patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain (UCPP), who are at risk to be postponed in the priority of care. We investigated pain, catastrophizing, and psychological status in UCPP patients during SARS-CoV-2 by means of Skype telephone calls. METHODS: A total of 28 UCPP patients underwent Skype video consultations. Pain intensity was assessed with Pain Numerical Rating Scale (PNRS). Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) were used to assess catastrophizing and psychological status. RESULTS: During SARS-CoV-2, UCPP patients showed higher intensity of pain than before (mean ± SD PNRS score: 7.25 ± 0.9 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7; p < .0001), with pain exacerbation in 75%; they showed higher PCS and DASS-21 scores as compared to before the pandemic (mean ± SD PCS total score: 32.4 ± 1.2 vs. 23.7 ± 3.5; mean ± SD DASS-21 total score: 42.03 ± 4.5 vs. 34.4 ± 2.2; p < .001 and p < .001, respectively). CONCLUSION: During SARS-CoV-2 pandemic UCPP patients presented with high intensity of pain, marked catastrophizing thoughts and severe alteration of the psychological status. These observations impose the need not to postpone assessment and treatment of these patients during the pandemic. Remote visits with video telephone calls are a simple way of continuing care in UCPP patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Pelvic Pain/physiopathology , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain Measurement , Pandemics , Pelvic Pain/psychology , Pelvic Pain/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Urology , Videoconferencing
4.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 40(1): 397-403, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-942443

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic poses a challenge to treatment of patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain (UCPP), who are at risk to be postponed in the priority of care. We investigated pain, catastrophizing, and psychological status in UCPP patients during SARS-CoV-2 by means of Skype telephone calls. METHODS: A total of 28 UCPP patients underwent Skype video consultations. Pain intensity was assessed with Pain Numerical Rating Scale (PNRS). Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) were used to assess catastrophizing and psychological status. RESULTS: During SARS-CoV-2, UCPP patients showed higher intensity of pain than before (mean ± SD PNRS score: 7.25 ± 0.9 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7; p < .0001), with pain exacerbation in 75%; they showed higher PCS and DASS-21 scores as compared to before the pandemic (mean ± SD PCS total score: 32.4 ± 1.2 vs. 23.7 ± 3.5; mean ± SD DASS-21 total score: 42.03 ± 4.5 vs. 34.4 ± 2.2; p < .001 and p < .001, respectively). CONCLUSION: During SARS-CoV-2 pandemic UCPP patients presented with high intensity of pain, marked catastrophizing thoughts and severe alteration of the psychological status. These observations impose the need not to postpone assessment and treatment of these patients during the pandemic. Remote visits with video telephone calls are a simple way of continuing care in UCPP patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Pelvic Pain/physiopathology , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain Measurement , Pandemics , Pelvic Pain/psychology , Pelvic Pain/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Urology , Videoconferencing
5.
Pain ; 162(2): 619-629, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940829

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a tremendous impact, including on individuals with chronic pain. The social distancing policies necessary to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2 have involved increased levels of social isolation. This cross-sectional survey study examined pain severity and interference among individuals with chronic pain during an early phase of social distancing mandates and identified characteristics of individuals who were most impacted. Approximately 4 to 8 weeks after social distancing mandates commenced in the state of Massachusetts, 150 patients with fibromyalgia, chronic spine, and postsurgical pain completed demographic, pain, social distancing, and validated psychosocial questionnaires. Patients self-reported an overall significant increase in pain severity and pain interference, compared with before social distancing, although both pain severity and interference were quite variable among individuals under conditions of social distancing. Several demographic, socioeconomic, and psychosocial factors were associated with greater pain severity and interference during social distancing. Multivariable linear regression demonstrated that female sex, nonwhite race, lower education, disability, fibromyalgia, and higher pain catastrophizing were independently associated with greater pain severity, while female sex and pain catastrophizing were independently associated greater pain interference. The findings suggest that individual differences among patients with chronic pain should be considered in the planning, development, and prioritization of interventions to improve pain care and to prevent worsening of symptoms during the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Back Pain/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Catastrophization/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Fibromyalgia/physiopathology , Pain, Postoperative/physiopathology , Physical Distancing , Adult , African Americans , Back Pain/psychology , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disabled Persons , Educational Status , Female , Fibromyalgia/psychology , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Massachusetts , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pain Measurement , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
Neurol Sci ; 42(2): 389-397, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932556

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed at investigating the impact of COVID-19-related distress on patients with chronic pain, highlighting the effects of changes in individual habits and public health care reconfiguration on physical and psychological health. METHODS: During the pandemic, 80 participants (25 patients with small fibre neuropathy (SFN), 42 patients with chronic migraine (CM) and 13 patients' healthy family members (HFM)) were asked to evaluate their COVID-19 complains, changes in habits and clinical management, behaviour, mood, loneliness, quality of life (QoL), physical and mental health and coping strategies. Data were analysed by Spearman rho correlations and Mann-Whitney U tests. RESULTS: Patients had lower QoL, lower physical health and higher catastrophizing attitude towards pain than HFM. During the pandemic, SFN patients referred greater decline in clinical symptoms, worries about contagion and discomfort for disease management changes than CM patients. In the SFN group, the higher levels of disability were associated with suffering from changes in neurologist-patient relationship. CM patients complained of agitation/anxiety that was related to feelings of loneliness, depressive mood and catastrophism. DISCUSSION: Despite similar complains of change in habits and worries about COVID-19 pandemic, SFN and CM patients had distinct reactions. In SFN patients, pandemic distress impacted on physical health with worsening of clinical conditions, especially suffering from changes in their care. In CM patients, pandemic distress affected behaviour, mainly with psychological frailty. This suggests the need to customize public health care for patients with distinct chronic pain conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Catastrophization/psychology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Migraine Disorders/psychology , Neuralgia/psychology , Psychological Distress , Quality of Life/psychology , Small Fiber Neuropathy/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Family , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL