Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 25
Filter
1.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 44(1): e134-e137, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632085

ABSTRACT

To this day, there are limited data about the effects and management of coronavirus disease infection in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease. We present the management and successful clinical course of an 8-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell disease (SS) and severe acute chest syndrome secondary to coronavirus disease 2019 infection, complicated by cortical vein thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Sickle Cell/complications , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Anemia, Sickle Cell/pathology , Anemia, Sickle Cell/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Child , Erythrocyte Transfusion , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy
2.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(9): e340-e343, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370831

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe a term newborn with acquired severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and multisystem involvement including seizures associated to ischemic lesions in the brain. BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is predominantly a respiratory infection, but it may affect many other systems. Most pediatric COVID-19 cases range from asymptomatic to mild-moderate disease. There are no specific clinical signs described for neonatal COVID-19 infections. In children, severe central nervous system compromise has been rarely reported. CASE DESCRIPTION: We describe a 17-day-old newborn who acquired a SARS-CoV-2 infection in a family meeting that was admitted for fever, seizures and lethargy and in whom consumption coagulopathy, ischemic lesions in the brain and cardiac involvement were documented. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 neonatal infection can be associated with multi-organic involvement. In our patient, significant central nervous system compromise associated to ischemic lesions and laboratory findings of consumption coagulopathy were found. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Although neonatal SARS-CoV-2 infections are infrequent, they can be associated with multi-organic involvement. Neonatologists and pediatricians should be aware of this unusual way of presentation of COVID-19 in newborn infants.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/virology , COVID-19/complications , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Acyclovir/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/pathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Fever , Frontal Lobe/blood supply , Frontal Lobe/diagnostic imaging , Frontal Lobe/pathology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/drug therapy , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/pathology , Lethargy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Seizures
3.
J Asthma ; 58(8): 1128-1131, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317831

ABSTRACT

Seven species of coronavirus cause acute respiratory illness in humans. Coronavirus HKU 1 (CoV HKU 1) was first described in 2005 in an adult patient with pneumonia in Hong Kong. Although it is a well-known respiratory tract pathogen, there is not much information about its role in hospitalized adults, especially in southern Europe. Here, we describe a case of radiologically demonstrated CoV HKU 1-related bronchiolitis with acute respiratory failure in an adult female without significant comorbidities except obesity.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus , Pericardial Effusion/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchiolitis/therapy , Bronchodilator Agents/therapeutic use , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/therapy , Oxygen/therapeutic use , Pericardial Effusion/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy
4.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 5: CD015043, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The role of vitamin D supplementation as a treatment for COVID-19 has been a subject of considerable discussion. A thorough understanding of the current evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of vitamin D supplementation for COVID-19 based on randomised controlled trials is required. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether vitamin D supplementation is effective and safe for the treatment of COVID-19 in comparison to an active comparator, placebo, or standard of care alone, and to maintain the currency of the evidence, using a living systematic review approach. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register, Web of Science and the WHO COVID-19 Global literature on coronavirus disease to identify completed and ongoing studies without language restrictions to 11 March 2021. SELECTION CRITERIA: We followed standard Cochrane methodology. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating vitamin D supplementation for people with COVID-19, irrespective of disease severity, age, gender or ethnicity. We excluded studies investigating preventive effects, or studies including populations with other coronavirus diseases (severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed standard Cochrane methodology. To assess bias in included studies, we used the Cochrane risk of bias tool (ROB 2) for RCTs. We rated the certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach for the following prioritised outcome categories: individuals with moderate or severe COVID-19: all-cause mortality, clinical status, quality of life, adverse events, serious adverse events, and for individuals with asymptomatic or mild disease: all-cause mortality, development of severe clinical COVID-19 symptoms, quality of life, adverse events, serious adverse events. MAIN RESULTS: We identified three RCTs with 356 participants, of whom 183 received vitamin D. In accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) clinical progression scale, two studies investigated participants with moderate or severe disease, and one study individuals with mild or asymptomatic disease. The control groups consisted of placebo treatment or standard of care alone. Effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation for people with COVID-19 and moderate to severe disease We included two studies with 313 participants. Due to substantial clinical and methodological diversity of both studies, we were not able to pool data. Vitamin D status was unknown in one study, whereas the other study reported data for vitamin D deficient participants. One study administered multiple doses of oral calcifediol at days 1, 3 and 7,  whereas the other study gave a single high dose of oral cholecalciferol at baseline. We assessed one study with low risk of bias for effectiveness outcomes, and the other with some concerns about randomisation and selective reporting. All-cause mortality at hospital discharge (313 participants) We found two studies reporting data for this outcome. One study reported no deaths when treated with vitamin D out of 50 participants, compared to two deaths out of 26 participants in the control group (Risk ratio (RR) 0.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 2.13). The other study reported nine deaths out of 119 individuals in the vitamin D group, whereas six participants out of 118 died in the placebo group (RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.55 to 4.04]. We are very uncertain whether vitamin D has an effect on all-cause mortality at hospital discharge (very low-certainty evidence). Clinical status assessed by the need for invasive mechanical ventilation (237 participants) We found one study reporting data for this outcome. Nine out of 119 participants needed invasive mechanical ventilation when treated with vitamin D, compared to 17 out of 118 participants in the placebo group (RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.24 to 1.13). Vitamin D supplementation may decrease need for invasive mechanical ventilation, but the evidence is uncertain (low-certainty evidence). Quality of life We did not find data for quality of life. Safety of vitamin D supplementation for people with COVID-19 and moderate to severe disease We did not include data from one study, because assessment of serious adverse events was not described and we are concerned that data might have been inconsistently measured. This study reported vomiting in one out of 119 participants immediately after vitamin D intake (RR 2.98, 95% CI 0.12 to 72.30). We are very uncertain whether vitamin D supplementation is associated with higher risk for adverse events (very low-certainty). Effectiveness and safety of vitamin D supplementation for people with COVID-19 and asymptomatic or mild disease We found one study including 40 individuals, which did not report our prioritised outcomes, but instead data for viral clearance, inflammatory markers, and vitamin D serum levels. The authors reported no events of hypercalcaemia, but recording and assessment of further adverse events remains unclear. Authors administered oral cholecalciferol in daily doses for at least 14 days, and continued with weekly doses if vitamin D blood levels were > 50 ng/mL. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is currently insufficient evidence to determine the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation as a treatment of COVID-19. The evidence for the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID-19 is very uncertain. Moreover, we found only limited safety information, and were concerned about consistency in measurement and recording of these outcomes. There was substantial clinical and methodological heterogeneity of included studies, mainly because of different supplementation strategies, formulations, vitamin D status of participants, and reported outcomes. There is an urgent need for well-designed and adequately powered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with an appropriate randomisation procedure, comparability of study arms and preferably double-blinding. We identified 21 ongoing and three completed studies without published results, which indicates that these needs will be addressed and that our findings are subject to change in the future. Due to the living approach of this work, we will update the review periodically.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Calcifediol/administration & dosage , Cholecalciferol/administration & dosage , Vitamins/administration & dosage , 25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2/blood , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bias , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis
5.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 44(1): e134-e137, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232239

ABSTRACT

To this day, there are limited data about the effects and management of coronavirus disease infection in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease. We present the management and successful clinical course of an 8-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell disease (SS) and severe acute chest syndrome secondary to coronavirus disease 2019 infection, complicated by cortical vein thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Sickle Cell/complications , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Anemia, Sickle Cell/pathology , Anemia, Sickle Cell/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Child , Erythrocyte Transfusion , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy
6.
BMJ ; 373: n1038, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223582

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of repurposed and adjuvant drugs in patients admitted to hospital with covid-19 across three continents. DESIGN: Multinational network cohort study. SETTING: Hospital electronic health records from the United States, Spain, and China, and nationwide claims data from South Korea. PARTICIPANTS: 303 264 patients admitted to hospital with covid-19 from January 2020 to December 2020. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prescriptions or dispensations of any drug on or 30 days after the date of hospital admission for covid-19. RESULTS: Of the 303 264 patients included, 290 131 were from the US, 7599 from South Korea, 5230 from Spain, and 304 from China. 3455 drugs were identified. Common repurposed drugs were hydroxychloroquine (used in from <5 (<2%) patients in China to 2165 (85.1%) in Spain), azithromycin (from 15 (4.9%) in China to 1473 (57.9%) in Spain), combined lopinavir and ritonavir (from 156 (<2%) in the VA-OMOP US to 2,652 (34.9%) in South Korea and 1285 (50.5%) in Spain), and umifenovir (0% in the US, South Korea, and Spain and 238 (78.3%) in China). Use of adjunctive drugs varied greatly, with the five most used treatments being enoxaparin, fluoroquinolones, ceftriaxone, vitamin D, and corticosteroids. Hydroxychloroquine use increased rapidly from March to April 2020 but declined steeply in May to June and remained low for the rest of the year. The use of dexamethasone and corticosteroids increased steadily during 2020. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple drugs were used in the first few months of the covid-19 pandemic, with substantial geographical and temporal variation. Hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, lopinavir-ritonavir, and umifenovir (in China only) were the most prescribed repurposed drugs. Antithrombotics, antibiotics, H2 receptor antagonists, and corticosteroids were often used as adjunctive treatments. Research is needed on the comparative risk and benefit of these treatments in the management of covid-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Drug Repositioning/methods , Administrative Claims, Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Drug Combinations , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Fluoroquinolones/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Inpatients , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Safety , Spain/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Young Adult
7.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119288

ABSTRACT

A woman in her 70s presented to the emergency department with fever, fluctuating cognition and headache. A detailed examination revealed neurological weakness to the lower limbs with atonia and areflexia, leading to a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, alongside a concurrent COVID-19 infection. The patient required critical care escalation for respiratory support. After stepdown to a rehabilitation ward, she had difficulties communicating due to new aphonia, hearing loss and left third nerve palsy. The team used written communication with the patient, and with this the patient was able to signal neurological deterioration. Another neurological examination noted a different pattern of weakness to the lower limbs, along with new urinary retention, and spinal arachnoiditis was identified. After more than 10 weeks in the hospital, the patient was discharged. Throughout this case, there were multiple handovers between teams and specialties, all of which were underpinned by good communication and examination to achieve the best care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Meningitis, Escherichia coli/complications , Aged , Amoxicillin/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Coinfection , Combined Modality Therapy , Communication , Confusion/etiology , Critical Care , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Fever/etiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Meningitis, Escherichia coli/diagnostic imaging , Meningitis, Escherichia coli/drug therapy , Patient Care Team , Physical Therapy Modalities , Physician-Patient Relations , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
8.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(2): 100111, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064727

ABSTRACT

The worldwide incidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is rapidly increasing, but there exists limited information on coronavirus disease 2019 in pregnancy. Here, we present our experience with 7 confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 in pregnancy presenting to a single large New York City tertiary care hospital. Of the 7 patients, 5 presented with symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019, including cough, myalgias, fevers, chest pain, and headache. Of the 7 patients, 4 were admitted to the hospital, including 2 who required supportive care with intravenous hydration. Of note, the other 2 admitted patients who were asymptomatic on admission to the hospital, presenting instead for obstetrically indicated labor inductions, became symptomatic after delivery, each requiring intensive care unit admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carrier State , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Adult , Anesthesia, General , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bronchial Spasm/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Cesarean Section , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Health Personnel , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal , Labor, Induced , New York City , Nicardipine/therapeutic use , Occupational Exposure , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Postpartum Hemorrhage/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy in Diabetics , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Inertia/therapy
11.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 23(2): e13501, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949310

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) might increase the risk of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Although several case reports and small series have been reported in the general population, scarce information is available regarding coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated IPA in the setting of solid organ transplantation. We describe a case of a kidney transplant recipient with severe COVID-19 that was subsequently diagnosed with probable IPA on the basis of the repeated isolation of Aspergillus fumigatus in sputum cultures, repeatedly increased serum (1 â†’ 3)-ß-d-glucan levels, and enlarging cavitary nodules in the CT scan. The evolution was favorable after initiation of isavuconazole and nebulized liposomal amphotericin B combination therapy and the withdrawal of immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury , Administration, Inhalation , Amphotericin B/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Deprescriptions , Female , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hyperoxaluria, Primary/complications , Hyperoxaluria, Primary/diagnosis , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnostic imaging , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/immunology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/etiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/pathology , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/adverse effects , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Prednisone/adverse effects , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sputum , Tacrolimus/adverse effects , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Triazoles/therapeutic use
12.
Trials ; 21(1): 934, 2020 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934298

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Zilucoplan (complement C5 inhibitor) has profound effects on inhibiting acute lung injury post COVID-19, and can promote lung repair mechanisms that lead to improvement in lung oxygenation parameters. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of Zilucoplan in improving oxygenation and short- and long-term outcome of COVID-19 patients with acute hypoxic respiratory failure. TRIAL DESIGN: This is a phase 2 academic, prospective, 2:1 randomized, open-label, multi-center interventional study. PARTICIPANTS: Adult patients (≥18y old) will be recruited at specialized COVID-19 units and ICUs at 9 Belgian hospitals. The main eligibility criteria are as follows: 1) Inclusion criteria: a. Recent (≥6 days and ≤16 days) SARS-CoV-2 infection. b. Chest CT scan showing bilateral infiltrates within the last 2 days prior to randomisation. c. Acute hypoxia (defined as PaO2/FiO2 below 350 mmHg or SpO2 below 93% on minimal 2 L/min supplemental oxygen). d. Signs of cytokine release syndrome characterized by either high serum ferritin, or high D-dimers, or high LDH or deep lymphopenia or a combination of those. 2) Exclusion criteria: e. Mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours prior to randomisation. f. Active bacterial or fungal infection. g. History of meningococcal disease (due to the known high predisposition to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections of individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways). INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Patients in the experimental arm will receive daily 32,4 mg Zilucoplan subcutaneously and a daily IV infusion of 2g of the antibiotic ceftriaxone for 14 days (or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first) in addition to standard of care. These patients will receive additional prophylactic antibiotics until 14 days after the last Zilucoplan dose: hospitalized patients will receive a daily IV infusion of 2g of ceftriaxone, discharged patients will switch to daily 500 mg of oral ciprofloxacin. The control group will receive standard of care and a daily IV infusion of 2g of ceftriaxone for 1 week (or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first), to control for the effects of antibiotics on the clinical course of COVID-19. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary endpoint is the improvement of oxygenation as measured by mean and/or median change from pre-treatment (day 1) to post-treatment (day 6 and 15 or at discharge, whichever comes first) in PaO2/FiO2 ratio, P(A-a)O2 gradient and a/A PO2 ratio. (PAO2= Partial alveolar pressure of oxygen, PaO2=partial arterial pressure of oxygen, FiO2=Fraction of inspired oxygen). RANDOMISATION: Patients will be randomized in a 2:1 ratio (Zilucoplan: control). Randomization will be done using an Interactive Web Response System (REDCap). BLINDING (MASKING): In this open-label trial neither participants, caregivers, nor those assessing the outcomes will be blinded to group assignment. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 81 patients will be enrolled: 54 patients will be randomized to the experimental arm and 27 patients to the control arm. TRIAL STATUS: ZILU-COV protocol Version 4.0 (June 10 2020). Participant recruitment started on June 23 2020 and is ongoing. Given the uncertainty of the pandemic, it is difficult to predict the anticipated end date. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered on Clinical Trials.gov on May 11th, 2020 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04382755 ) and on EudraCT (Identifier: 2020-002130-33 ). FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Complement C5/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Acute Disease , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Belgium/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Ceftriaxone/administration & dosage , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Injections, Subcutaneous , Oxygen/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Treatment Outcome
13.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 56(11)2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902595

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary antigen (u-Ag) testing has recently gained attention in the early diagnosis of severe and critical acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2/pneumococcal co-infection. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Streptococcus pneumoniae u-Ag testing in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, in order to assess whether pneumococcal co-infection is associated with different mortality rate and hospital stay in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Charts, protocols, mortality, and hospitalization data of a consecutive series of COVID-19 patients admitted to a tertiary hospital in northern Italy during COVID-19 outbreak were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent Streptococcus pneumoniae u-Ag testing to detect an underlying pneumococcal co-infection. Covid19+/u-Ag+ and Covid19+/u-Ag- patients were compared in terms of overall survival and length of hospital stay using chi-square test and survival analysis. RESULTS: Out of 575 patients with documented pneumonia, 13% screened positive for the u-Ag test. All u-Ag+ patients underwent treatment with Ceftriaxone and Azithromycin or Levofloxacin. Lopinavir/Ritonavir or Darunavir/Cobicistat were added in 44 patients, and hydroxychloroquine and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in 47 and 33 patients, respectively. All u-Ag+ patients were hospitalized. Mortality was 15.4% and 25.9% in u-Ag+ and u-Ag- patients, respectively (p = 0.09). Survival analysis showed a better prognosis, albeit not significant, in u-Ag+ patients. Median hospital stay did not differ among groups (10 vs. 9 days, p = 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The routine use of Streptococcus pneumoniae u-Ag testing helped to better target antibiotic therapy with a final trend of reduction in mortality of u-Ag+ COVID-19 patients having a concomitant pneumococcal infection. Randomized trials on larger cohorts are necessary in order to draw definitive conclusion.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coinfection/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antigens, Bacterial/urine , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Cobicistat/therapeutic use , Coinfection/urine , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Female , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Levofloxacin/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/complications , Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/urine , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Streptococcus pneumoniae/immunology
15.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(8)2020 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742204

ABSTRACT

Bacterial co-infection in the ongoing pandemic of COVID-19 is associated with poor outcomes but remains little understood. A 22-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of fever, headache, neck stiffness, rigours and confusion. She was noted to have a purpuric rash over her hands and feet. Cerebrospinal fluid bacterial PCR was positive for Neisseria meningitidis A concurrent nasopharyngeal RT-PCR was positive for SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of COVID-19. She was treated with antibiotics for bacterial meningitis and made a complete recovery. Bacterial infection from nasopharyngeal organisms has followed previous pandemic viral upper respiratory illnesses and the risk of bacterial co-infection in COVID-19 remains unclear. Research characterising COVID-19 should specify the frequency, species and outcome of bacterial co-infection. Management of bacterial co-infection in COVID-19 presents major challenges for antimicrobial stewardship and clinical management. Judicious use of local antibiotic guidelines and early liaison with infection specialists is key.


Subject(s)
Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Meningitis, Meningococcal/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Meningitis, Meningococcal/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(7)2020 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-649010

ABSTRACT

The clinical implications of COVID-19 in pregnancy remain unknown. While preliminary reports demonstrate that pregnant patients have a similar symptomatic presentation to the general population, the appropriate management and timing of delivery in these patients is still unclear, as pregnancy may impose additional risk factors and impede recovery in gravid patients. In this brief report, we present a case of COVID-19 in a pregnant patient with severe respiratory compromise, whose clinical status significantly improved after caesarean delivery. We also address the potential benefits of experimental therapy, including tocilizumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets interleukin-6 receptors.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Cesarean Section , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Adult , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Disease Progression , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
18.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(6)2020 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614885

ABSTRACT

The presence of rhabdomyolysis secondary to multiple infections has been reported, predominantly viral, but also bacterial and fungal. It is well known that COVID-19 can present a wide variety of complications during the course of infection; however, the presence of rhabdomyolysis as an initial condition has not been reported so far. We report a case of rhabdomyolysis as an initial presentation in a patient diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Rhabdomyolysis/etiology , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bicarbonates/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Fluid Therapy , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Rhabdomyolysis/diagnosis , Rhabdomyolysis/therapy , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL