Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(12): 1240-1254, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699219

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles and exomere nanoparticles are under intense investigation as sources of clinically relevant cargo. Here we report the discovery of a distinct extracellular nanoparticle, termed supermere. Supermeres are morphologically distinct from exomeres and display a markedly greater uptake in vivo compared with small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. The protein and RNA composition of supermeres differs from small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Supermeres are highly enriched with cargo involved in multiple cancers (glycolytic enzymes, TGFBI, miR-1246, MET, GPC1 and AGO2), Alzheimer's disease (APP) and cardiovascular disease (ACE2, ACE and PCSK9). The majority of extracellular RNA is associated with supermeres rather than small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Cancer-derived supermeres increase lactate secretion, transfer cetuximab resistance and decrease hepatic lipids and glycogen in vivo. This study identifies a distinct functional nanoparticle replete with potential circulating biomarkers and therapeutic targets for a host of human diseases.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nanoparticles/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biological Transport/physiology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Cell Communication/physiology , Cell Line, Tumor , HeLa Cells , Humans , Lactic Acid/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Nanoparticles/classification , Neoplasms/pathology , Tumor Microenvironment
2.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477930

ABSTRACT

A phenomenon known for over 100 years named "cell-in-cell" (CIC) is now undergoing its renaissance, mostly due to modern cell visualization techniques. It is no longer an esoteric process studied by a few cell biologists, as there is increasing evidence that CICs may have prognostic and diagnostic value for cancer patients. There are many unresolved questions stemming from the difficulties in studying CICs and the limitations of current molecular techniques. CIC formation involves a dynamic interaction between an outer or engulfing cell and an inner or engulfed cell, which can be of the same (homotypic) or different kind (heterotypic). Either one of those cells appears to be able to initiate this process, which involves signaling through cell-cell adhesion, followed by cytoskeleton activation, leading to the deformation of the cellular membrane and movements of both cells that subsequently result in CICs. This review focuses on the distinction of five known forms of CIC (cell cannibalism, phagoptosis, enclysis, entosis, and emperipolesis), their unique features, characteristics, and underlying molecular mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Cell Communication/physiology , Entosis/physiology , Emperipolesis/physiology , Humans
3.
Stem Cell Reports ; 16(9): 2274-2288, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360129

ABSTRACT

Heart injury has been reported in up to 20% of COVID-19 patients, yet the cause of myocardial histopathology remains unknown. Here, using an established in vivo hamster model, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in cardiomyocytes of infected animals. Furthermore, we found damaged cardiomyocytes in hamsters and COVID-19 autopsy samples. To explore the mechanism, we show that both human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-derived CMs) and adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) can be productively infected by SARS-CoV-2, leading to secretion of the monocyte chemoattractant cytokine CCL2 and subsequent monocyte recruitment. Increased CCL2 expression and monocyte infiltration was also observed in the hearts of infected hamsters. Although infected CMs suffer damage, we find that the presence of macrophages significantly reduces SARS-CoV-2-infected CMs. Overall, our study provides direct evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infects CMs in vivo and suggests a mechanism of immune cell infiltration and histopathology in heart tissues of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Heart Injuries/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Animals , Cell Communication/physiology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Vero Cells
4.
Cell Death Dis ; 11(12): 1042, 2020 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969908

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, is an acute and rapidly developing pandemic, which leads to a global health crisis. SARS-CoV-2 primarily attacks human alveoli and causes severe lung infection and damage. To better understand the molecular basis of this disease, we sought to characterize the responses of alveolar epithelium and its adjacent microvascular endothelium to viral infection under a co-culture system. SARS-CoV-2 infection caused massive virus replication and dramatic organelles remodeling in alveolar epithelial cells, alone. While, viral infection affected endothelial cells in an indirect manner, which was mediated by infected alveolar epithelium. Proteomics analysis and TEM examinations showed viral infection caused global proteomic modulations and marked ultrastructural changes in both epithelial cells and endothelial cells under the co-culture system. In particular, viral infection elicited global protein changes and structural reorganizations across many sub-cellular compartments in epithelial cells. Among the affected organelles, mitochondrion seems to be a primary target organelle. Besides, according to EM and proteomic results, we identified Daurisoline, a potent autophagy inhibitor, could inhibit virus replication effectively in host cells. Collectively, our study revealed an unrecognized cross-talk between epithelium and endothelium, which contributed to alveolar-capillary injury during SARS-CoV-2 infection. These new findings will expand our understanding of COVID-19 and may also be helpful for targeted drug development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cell Communication/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Coculture Techniques , Down-Regulation , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Mitochondria/pathology , Mitochondria/virology , Proteome/metabolism , Proteomics/methods , Pulmonary Alveoli/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Up-Regulation
5.
Viruses ; 12(10)2020 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887617

ABSTRACT

Most cells can release extracellular vesicles (EVs), membrane vesicles containing various proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and signaling molecules. The exchange of EVs between cells facilitates intercellular communication, amplification of cellular responses, immune response modulation, and perhaps alterations in viral pathogenicity. EVs serve a dual role in inhibiting or enhancing viral infection and pathogenesis. This review examines the current literature on EVs to explore the complex role of EVs in the enhancement, inhibition, and potential use as a nanotherapeutic against clinically relevant viruses, focusing on neurotropic viruses: Zika virus (ZIKV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Overall, this review's scope will elaborate on EV-based mechanisms, which impact viral pathogenicity, facilitate viral spread, and modulate antiviral immune responses.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Communication/physiology , Coronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Exosomes/metabolism , HIV/metabolism , HIV/pathogenicity , HIV Infections/metabolism , Humans , Retroviridae/metabolism , Simplexvirus/metabolism , Therapeutics/methods , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/virology , Zika Virus/metabolism , Zika Virus/pathogenicity , Zika Virus Infection/metabolism
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL