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1.
Genes (Basel) ; 13(4)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834773

ABSTRACT

Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) account for over one third of the underlying causes of blindness in the paediatric population. Patients with IRDs often experience long delays prior to reaching a definitive diagnosis. Children attending a tertiary care paediatric ophthalmology department with phenotypic (i.e., clinical and/or electrophysiologic) evidence suggestive of IRD were contacted for genetic testing during the SARS-CoV-2-19 pandemic using a "telegenetics" approach. Genetic testing approach was panel-based next generation sequencing (351 genes) via a commercial laboratory (Blueprint Genetics, Helsinki, Finland). Of 70 patient samples from 57 pedigrees undergoing genetic testing, a causative genetic variant(s) was detected for 60 patients (85.7%) from 47 (82.5%) pedigrees. Of the 60 genetically resolved IRD patients, 5% (n = 3) are eligible for approved therapies (RPE65) and 38.3% (n = 23) are eligible for clinical trial-based gene therapies including CEP290 (n = 2), CNGA3 (n = 3), CNGB3 (n = 6), RPGR (n = 5) and RS1 (n = 7). The early introduction of genetic testing in the diagnostic/care pathway for children with IRDs is critical for genetic counselling of these families prior to upcoming gene therapy trials. Herein, we describe the pathway used, the clinical and genetic findings, and the therapeutic implications of the first systematic coordinated round of genetic testing of a paediatric IRD cohort in Ireland.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Retinal Degeneration , Antigens, Neoplasm , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Child , Cytoskeletal Proteins/genetics , Electrophysiology , Eye Proteins/genetics , Genetic Testing , Humans , Retinal Degeneration/diagnosis , Retinal Degeneration/genetics , Retinal Degeneration/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Cell ; 185(5): 916-938.e58, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654147

ABSTRACT

Treatment of severe COVID-19 is currently limited by clinical heterogeneity and incomplete description of specific immune biomarkers. We present here a comprehensive multi-omic blood atlas for patients with varying COVID-19 severity in an integrated comparison with influenza and sepsis patients versus healthy volunteers. We identify immune signatures and correlates of host response. Hallmarks of disease severity involved cells, their inflammatory mediators and networks, including progenitor cells and specific myeloid and lymphocyte subsets, features of the immune repertoire, acute phase response, metabolism, and coagulation. Persisting immune activation involving AP-1/p38MAPK was a specific feature of COVID-19. The plasma proteome enabled sub-phenotyping into patient clusters, predictive of severity and outcome. Systems-based integrative analyses including tensor and matrix decomposition of all modalities revealed feature groupings linked with severity and specificity compared to influenza and sepsis. Our approach and blood atlas will support future drug development, clinical trial design, and personalized medicine approaches for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Proteome/analysis , Adult , Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 14/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 14/metabolism , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Principal Component Analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , Transcription Factor AP-1/genetics , Transcription Factor AP-1/metabolism
3.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4918, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397870

ABSTRACT

Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) are highly unstable and susceptible to rearrangement due to their repetitive nature and active transcriptional status. Sequestration of rDNA in the nucleolus suppresses uncontrolled recombination. However, broken repeats must be first released to the nucleoplasm to allow repair by homologous recombination. Nucleolar release of broken rDNA repeats is conserved from yeast to humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we show that DNA damage induces phosphorylation of the CLIP-cohibin complex, releasing membrane-tethered rDNA from the nucleolus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Downstream of phosphorylation, SUMOylation of CLIP-cohibin is recognized by Ufd1 via its SUMO-interacting motif, which targets the complex for disassembly through the Cdc48/p97 chaperone. Consistent with a conserved mechanism, UFD1L depletion in human cells impairs rDNA release. The dynamic and regulated assembly and disassembly of the rDNA-tethering complex is therefore a key determinant of nucleolar rDNA release and genome integrity.


Subject(s)
Cell Nucleolus/genetics , DNA Repair , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics , Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/genetics , Valosin Containing Protein/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Nucleolus/metabolism , DNA Damage , DNA, Ribosomal/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mutation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Protein Binding , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism , Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/metabolism , Sumoylation , Two-Hybrid System Techniques , Valosin Containing Protein/metabolism
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(17)2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172591

ABSTRACT

In order to understand the transmission and virulence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), it is necessary to understand the functions of each of the gene products encoded in the viral genome. One feature of the SARS-CoV-2 genome that is not present in related, common coronaviruses is ORF10, a putative 38-amino acid protein-coding gene. Proteomic studies found that ORF10 binds to an E3 ubiquitin ligase containing Cullin-2, Rbx1, Elongin B, Elongin C, and ZYG11B (CRL2ZYG11B). Since CRL2ZYG11B mediates protein degradation, one possible role for ORF10 is to "hijack" CRL2ZYG11B in order to target cellular, antiviral proteins for ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Here, we investigated whether ORF10 hijacks CRL2ZYG11B or functions in other ways, for example, as an inhibitor or substrate of CRL2ZYG11B While we confirm the ORF10-ZYG11B interaction and show that the N terminus of ORF10 is critical for it, we find no evidence that ORF10 is functioning to inhibit or hijack CRL2ZYG11B Furthermore, ZYG11B and its paralog ZER1 are dispensable for SARS-CoV-2 infection in cultured cells. We conclude that the interaction between ORF10 and CRL2ZYG11B is not relevant for SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cullin Proteins/metabolism , Multiprotein Complexes/metabolism , Open Reading Frames , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cullin Proteins/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Multiprotein Complexes/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
5.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(29): 17195-17203, 2020 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624792

ABSTRACT

The vast majority of intracellular protein targets are refractory toward small-molecule therapeutic engagement, and additional therapeutic modalities are needed to overcome this deficiency. Here, the identification and characterization of a natural product, WDB002, reveals a therapeutic modality that dramatically expands the currently accepted limits of druggability. WDB002, in complex with the FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), potently and selectively binds the human centrosomal protein 250 (CEP250), resulting in disruption of CEP250 function in cells. The recognition mode is unprecedented in that the targeted domain of CEP250 is a coiled coil and is topologically featureless, embodying both a structural motif and surface topology previously considered on the extreme limits of "undruggability" for an intracellular target. Structural studies reveal extensive protein-WDB002 and protein-protein contacts, with the latter being distinct from those seen in FKBP12 ternary complexes formed by FK506 and rapamycin. Outward-facing structural changes in a bound small molecule can thus reprogram FKBP12 to engage diverse, otherwise "undruggable" targets. The flat-targeting modality demonstrated here has the potential to expand the druggable target range of small-molecule therapeutics. As CEP250 was recently found to be an interaction partner with the Nsp13 protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 disease, it is possible that WDB002 or an analog may exert useful antiviral activity through its ability to form high-affinity ternary complexes containing CEP250 and FKBP12.


Subject(s)
Actinobacteria/genetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Genome, Bacterial , Macrolides/pharmacology , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/drug effects , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Tacrolimus Binding Protein 1A/chemistry , Tacrolimus Binding Protein 1A/metabolism , Actinobacteria/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Autoantigens/genetics , Autoantigens/metabolism , Calcineurin/genetics , Calcineurin/metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Evolution, Molecular , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Macrolides/chemistry , Macrolides/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Conformation , Sequence Homology , Sirolimus/chemistry , Sirolimus/metabolism , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Small Molecule Libraries/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
6.
Mol Cell Endocrinol ; 515: 110917, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661768

ABSTRACT

Obesity patients are more susceptible to develop COVID-19 severe outcome due to the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the viral infection. ACE2 is regulated in the human cells by different genes associated with increased (TLR3, HAT1, HDAC2, KDM5B, SIRT1, RAB1A, FURIN and ADAM10) or decreased (TRIB3) virus replication. RNA-seq data revealed 14857 genes expressed in human subcutaneous adipocytes, including genes mentioned above. Irisin treatment increased by 3-fold the levels of TRIB3 transcript and decreased the levels of other genes. The decrease in FURIN and ADAM10 expression enriched diverse biological processes, including extracellular structure organization. Our results, in human subcutaneous adipocytes cell culture, indicate a positive effect of irisin on the expression of multiple genes related to viral infection by SARS-CoV-2; furthermore, translatable for other tissues and organs targeted by the novel coronavirus and present, thus, promising approaches for the treatment of COVID-19 infection as therapeutic strategy to decrease ACE2 regulatory genes.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes/drug effects , Fibronectins/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , ADAM10 Protein/genetics , ADAM10 Protein/metabolism , Adipocytes/cytology , Adipocytes/metabolism , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/genetics , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Fibronectins/genetics , Fibronectins/metabolism , Furin/genetics , Furin/metabolism , Gene Ontology , Histone Acetyltransferases/genetics , Histone Acetyltransferases/metabolism , Histone Deacetylase 2/genetics , Histone Deacetylase 2/metabolism , Humans , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Models, Biological , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Obesity/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , /genetics , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sirtuin 1/genetics , Sirtuin 1/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 3/metabolism , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
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